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Daily Archive : Saturday August 10, 2013

News

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    The start of the first Active Care Color Blast 5k run in Arlington Heights on Saturday. All proceeds go to Clearbrook.

    Active Care Color Blast garners fun and $30,000

    The first Active Care Color Blast 5K run in downtown Arlington Heights pelted about 1,300 runners and walkers with blue, green and other colored cornstarch that drifted into clouds among dozens of spectators lining the streets. The fundraiser garnered about $30,000 from entry fees and sponsors.

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    Gabriela Francesca holds her trophy after being announced the winner of Suburban Chicago's Got Talent in Arlington Heights Saturday.

    Palatine vocalist wins Suburban Chicago's Got Talent contest

    Vocalist Gabriela Francesca of Palatine was named the winner of the 2013 edition of Suburban Chicago's Got Talent, while vocalist Andrew Johnston of Bourbonnais was voted the online “Fan Favorite” on Saturday at the Taste of Arlington Heights. “I didn't know that you had those extra two octaves in you,” said judge Micky York.

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    San Diego County Sheriff's officials say the man suspected of abducting 16-year-old Hannah Anderson has been killed in Idaho and the teen has been found safe. San Diego Sheriff William D. Gore said Hannah's father was "elated" his daughter was found alive. Federal and local law enforcement spent Saturday combing through Idaho's rugged Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness in search of Hannah and her suspected kidnapper, 40-year-old James Lee DiMaggio.

    Teen found safe in Idaho; accused abductor killed

    San Diego County Sheriff's officials say the man suspected of abducting 16-year-old Hannah Anderson has been killed in Idaho and the teen has been found safe. San Diego Sheriff William D. Gore said Hannah's father was "elated" his daughter was found alive.

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    Steve Lawrence,left, Edyie Gorme, center, and Jerry Lewis during the MDA Telethon at the Sahara Hotel.

    Popular singer Eydie Gorme dies at 84

    Eydie Gorme, who had a huge solo hit in 1963 with “Blame it on the Bossa Nova,” died Saturday at Sunrise Hospital in Las Vegas following a brief, undisclosed illness, said her publicist, Howard Bragman.

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    Prospect Heights woman hurt by gun pellet

    A 56-year-old Prospect Heights woman suffered a gun pellet wound to her forearm Friday evening while gardening outside her home on the 200 block of Wolf Road. Prospect Heights Police Chief Jamie Dunne said the woman is believed to have been the victim of an errant shot from a pellet gun just before 7 p.m.

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    CEO of Deutsche Telekom Rene Obermann holds a press conference in Berlin Friday to discuss securing e-mail in Germany. Deutsche Telekom AG and United Internet AG, Germany’s biggest Internet service providers, say they will encrypt customers’ emails by default following reports that the U.S. National Security Agency monitors international electronic communications.

    Lawmakers say obstacles limit oversight of NSA surveillance

    Congress’s 2011 reauthorization vote approved, at Obama’s urging, a four-year extension to the Patriot Act provisions, until June 2015. The reauthorization passed with overwhelming bipartisan majorities, despite objections from civil liberties groups and a handful of lawmakers, including some who were fully aware of the telephone data collection and issued carefully worded yet vague warnings in...

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    Elgin man was victim of South Elgin crash

    The 44-year-old man who died after a car struck a tree Friday in South Elgin has been identified as Orlando Scott Beville of Elgin.

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    Fundraiser to help Roselle teen fighting cancer

    A fundraiser in Roselle Sunday afternoon aims to help a high school senior and his family in his battle with a rare form of cancer as well as raise awareness of the disease. Kevin Boeckenhauer, a student at Lake Park High School, has been fighting Ewing’s Sarcoma for the past year.

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    Gabriela Francesca holds her trophy after being announced the winner of Suburban Chicago’s Got Talent in Arlington Heights on Saturday, August 10.

    Images: Suburban Chicago’s Got Talent Winner Chosen
    10 finalists competed for the title of Suburban Chicago's Got Talent at the Taste of Arlington Heights on Saturday, with Gabriela Francesca of Palatine being named the winner. Andrew Johnston of Bourbonnais was named the online "Fan Favorite."

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    A computer generated likeness of the first attacker’s face.

    Schaumburg police seek to identify woman’s attackers

    Schaumburg police are requesting the public’s help in identifying two suspects in the beating of a 30-year-old woman early Friday morning. Investigators have released computer generated likenesses of the first attacker's face and a tattoo on the second attacker's neck.

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    Jack Nicholson, right, and co-star Karen Black appear together at New York’s Philharmonic Hall to attend the premiere of their new film “Five Easy Pieces.”

    Notable deaths last week

    A roundup of people on national and international note who have died in the past week.

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    From left, Dan McCormack, Chris Lambrite Jr., and Chris Lambrite work Saturday to remove three sides of a cottage after the entire building was ripped off its foundation by a flash flood.

    Body recovered from mudslide in Colorado

    Friday’s torrential rains swept mud, boulders and other debris from the burn scar down U.S. 24, washing away vehicles and damaging several homes and businesses in the area.

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    Brendon Mackey’s father Bryan Mackey hugs his cousin, Heather Melton, after students of Primrose School of Swift Creek released balloons during a memorial for Brendon in Midlothian, Va.

    Youth’s death puts focus on celebratory gunshots

    MIDLOTHIAN, Va. — When a stray bullet pierced the top of Brendon Mackey’s head, the 7-year-old was on his way to a July Fourth fireworks celebration with his dad and other family members. He died the next day in a Richmond hospital, a bullet lodged at the base of his skull, sparking a methodical, door-to-door search for a most elusive killer: celebratory gunfire.

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    A San Clemente Island loggerhead shrike chirpsin its enclosure at a facility on San Clemente Island. The rare bird has gone from near extinction because of military training to proliferation, even during an era of numerous conflicts with extensive military training.

    Endangered species thrive on military ranges

    Defense spending on threatened and endangered species jumped nearly 45 percent over the past decade from about $50 million a year in 2003 to about $73 million in 2012. The military protects roughly 420 federally listed species on more than 28 million acres, according to the Pentagon.

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    Religious family abandons U.S., gets lost at sea

    The months-long journey has been “pretty exciting” and “little scary at certain points,” Hannah Gastonguay said.

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    The Outpost General Store is slated to open in September at the location of the old Wayne Country Store on Army Trail Road.

    It’ll have a new name, but Wayne’s getting its store back

    The Outpost General Store should open sometime next month in Wayne, columnist Dave Heun has found out.

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    Two MV-22 “Osprey” aircraft approach an airfield Saturday in Edgartown, Mass. on the island of Martha’s Vineyard while flying in support of the Marine One helicopter carrying President Obama to the island.

    Obamas return for summer stay on Martha’s Vineyard

    President Obama will play golf, hit the beach, dine out, relax with his family and read something other than a White House briefing book. He engaged in all those activities and more during his earlier presidential vacations on the island.

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    Yemeni soldiers inspect a car at a checkpoint Saturday on a street leading to the U.S. and British embassies in Sanaa, Yemen.

    Suspected drone strike kills two more in Yemen

    An accelerated use of drone strikes in Yemen under President Barack Obama and a U.S.-backed offensive last year drove militants from territory they had seized a year earlier, during Yemen’s political turmoil amid the Arab Spring.Washington recently flew diplomatic staff out of Yemen’s capital over fears of a terrorist attack.

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    Black smoke from a car bomb attack marks the site Saturday in Baghdad. A wave of car bombings targeted cafes and markets around the Iraqi capital of Baghdad as people celebrate the end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, killing and wounding scores of people, officials said.

    Wave of bombings in Iraq kills 69

    The death toll in Saturday’s attacks is the highest single-day total since July 20, when brazen assaults on two prisons near Baghdad plus other attacks left 71 dead.More than 1,000 people were killed in Iraq in July, the highest monthly death toll in five years.

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    Supporter of Egypt’s ousted President Mohammed Morsi attend a protest Saturday outside Rabaah al-Adawiya mosque, where protesters have installed a camp and held daily rallies at Nasr City, Cairo, Egypt.

    Egyptian militants join funeral for drone victims

    The attack a day earlier by the Israeli drone was a rare operation that could indicate increased cooperation between Egypt and Israel against militants in northern Sinai after a coup ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi last month. It also is likely to increase tensions in a border region that has seen other rocket attacks in the past.

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    In this photo made with slow shutter speed, an Indonesian youth jumps through flaming rope, during a traditional celebration Thursday marking the end of the holy fasting month of Ramadan.

    Six killed by hot lava as Indonesia volcano erupts

    ushing hot lava from an erupting volcano killed six people sleeping in a beach village on an eastern Indonesian island on Saturday, after ash and smoke shot up to 1.2 miles into the air, officials said.

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    A street vendor sells umbrellas Tuesday in Rome. Hot weather this week had temperatures rising up to 104 degrees.

    Rome scooters a memory as mayor leads bicycle push

    Italians bought 1.61 million bikes last year compared to 1.4 million cars. At the same time, the number of cars circulating on Italian roads fell by 35,026 in 2012 and the number of people taking the country’s driving exam plunged to the lowest in more than 20 years, according to data from the Anfia auto industry group and the Ministry of Transport.

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    The Illinois Youth Center in Warrenville saw four suicide attempts in late 2012.

    Youth center installs suicide-resistant furniture

    The state is spending $750,000 to install suicide-resistent fixtures and furniture at Illinois Youth Center Warrenville after four suicide attempts by residents in the final months of 2012, the agency that runs the center says.

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    Patric Abedin, who also goes by the name, “Nick Beef,” poses for a photo among the grave markers at Calvary Cemetery in the Queens borough of New York. In 1975 Abedin bought the grave plot next to where presidential assassin Lee Harvey Oswald is buried, and then placed the granite marker inscribed with Nick Beef there in 1997.

    Mystery of Texas grave next to Oswald’s solved

    When he was 18, Nick Beef read that the burial plot next to Lee Harvey Oswald’s was available. He bought it for $17.50 down and 16 monthly payments of $10.Beef said he has often asked himself why he wanted it.

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    Spring Grove man critical after motorcycle accident

    A Spring Grove man is in serious but stable condition after a motorcycle accident in Round Lake Park on Friday afternoon. Police plan to interview the man, who is now in intensive care in Advocate Condell Medical Center in Libertyville.

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    Deerfield man found in Des Plaines River

    The body of Ronald Kite of Deerfield, who had been missing since the end of July, was found in the Des Plaines River in Riverwoods this week.

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    Addison Police Officer Maria Reyes and heart attack victim Ed Sullivan meet for the first time Tuesday during an emotional reunion at Adventist GlenOaks Hospital in Glendale Heights. Sullivan survived after Reyes used an automated external defibrillator to resuscitate him.

    'She's our angel,' Addison family says of officer

    Addison resident Ed Sullivan feels lucky to be alive after having a heart attack while behind the wheel of his truck. His wife believed he was dead until a police officer armed with an automated external defibrillator arrived. “There's times where you know someone is gone — and he was gone,” Nancy Sullivan said.

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    This U.S. silver dollar sold Thursday night for $3,877,500.

    Rare silver dollar sells for $3.88 million in Rosemont

    An 1804-dated U.S. silver dollar specially made on behalf of President Andrew Jackson sold for $3,877,500 in a public auction Thursday night in Rosemont. The pre-sale estimate was $3 million.

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    This arrest photo made available Friday, Aug. 9, 2013 by the Miami-Dade Police Department shows Derek Medina of South Miami, Fla. Medina allegedly admitted to killing his wife Thursday, Aug. 8, 2013, and posted a photo of his 26-year-old wife's body slumped on the floor of their apartment on his Facebook page. Medina turned himself in to police. He has been charged with first-degree murder.

    Fla. murder suspect posted photo of wife's body

    Derek Medina appeared to live much of his life online. The 6-foot-2, 200-pound South Miami resident posted photos and videos of himself kick boxing, sailing, meeting celebrities and wearing a Miami Heat championship ring. In one Facebook photo, he mugged for the camera, holding a knife and a gun and wearing a green camouflage vest.

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    A Bahraini police officer sits in a police car at a new checkpoint near the U.S. Embassy in Manama, Bahrain. Eighteen of the 19 U.S. embassies and consulates that were closed in the Middle East and Africa because of a terrorist threat will reopen on Sunday or Monday, the State Department said Friday, Aug. 9, 2013.

    US to reopen 18 diplomatic missions after threat

    Eighteen of the 19 U.S. embassies and consulates that were closed in the Middle East and Africa because of a terrorist threat will reopen Sunday, the State Department says. The U.S. Embassy in Sanaa, Yemen, will remain closed. The U.S. Consulate in Lahore, Pakistan, which was closed Thursday because of what officials say was a separate credible threat, also was not scheduled to reopen.

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    Record international class at Illinois Wesleyan

    A record number of international students will enter Illinois Wesleyan University this year.

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    Treasurer: Use free state site to claim property

    State Treasurer Dan Rutherford (ROOTH'-ur-furd) is reminding Illinois residents to use the state's official website to search for unclaimed property.

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    City announces first locations for speed cameras

    The city of Chicago is announcing where a dozen new speed enforcement cameras will be installed as part of its Children's Safety Zone Program.

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    The Schwandt brothers, all 12 of them, pose for a photo in their Rockford, Mich. Tuesday, August 6, 2013. Clockwise from bottom left, Tyler, 21, holding Tucker, 2 days, Vinny, 10, Drew, 16, Zach, 17, Charlie, 3, Calvin, 8, Brandon, 14, Luke, 19 months., Gabe, 6, Wesley, 5 and Tommy, 11. As Jay and Kateri Schwandt brought their 12th newborn baby boy home Tuesday, they made a couple of things clear. They have not been trying for a girl these past two decades, as they gave birth to boy after boy (after boy).

    Odd news this week: Maggots in sandwich, bear in kitchen

    Welcome to our inaugural odd news column. Each Saturday, we will bring you a digest of strange and curious news from around the world. Plus find some of the best, can’t-miss videos on the Internet. We hope you enjoy.

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    Michael Geheren, left, his father, Bill, and Travis Wittmeyer run a Huntley Community Radio show called “2 Dudes and a Dog” that streams online. Michael Geheren is its executive producer, while his father and Wittmeyer are the hosts.

    Huntley radio applying for FCC license

    Huntley Community Radio organizers are in the midst of applying for a license with the Federal Communications Commission. If successful, HCR would operate a low-powered station on FM radio.

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    Joe McMahon

    Status of unreported DUI probe in Kane County unclear

    It’s been nearly 50 days since Kane County Board members called for a criminal investigation into the circumstances surrounding more than 1,000 DUIs that went unreported to the state during former Kane County Circuit Court Clerk Deb Seyller’s tenure. And Chairman Chris Lauzen has called for a status report on that request. Both Lauzen and board members are unlikely to get a response.

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    The Cook County Board last month approved additional engineering work related to the Quentin Road expansion project between Dundee and Lake-Cook roads near Palatine.

    Quentin Road expansion near Palatine moving forward

    It's been a few years since anything happened, but there's some movement once again related to the controversial Quentin Road expansion project through the Deer Grove Forest Preserve near Palatine. “We’re very excited about being able to move the project forward,” said John Yonan, superintendent of Cook County’s Department of Transportation and Highways.

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    A sculpture of Naperville founder Joseph Naper is lowered by crane Friday at the Naper Homestead site at Mill Street and Jefferson Avenue. The 1,500-pound sculpture took more than three hours to install and will be covered with burlap until it officially is unveiled at 4 p.m. Friday, Aug. 23.

    Sculpture of Naperville founder placed at homestead

    Naperville founder Joseph Naper returned to his homestead Friday — at least symbolically — as city public works crews installed a 1,500-pound sculpture of the pioneering settler at Mill Street and Jefferson Avenue. The sculpture officially will be unveiled and dedicated during a ceremony scheduled for 4 p.m. Friday, Aug. 23, at the site near what’s now downtown Naperville.

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    This undated photo posted on the official Instagram account of the Syrian Presidency purports to show Bashar Assad visiting with soldiers in Baba Armr, Homs province, Syria, in 2012. Amid the carnage from the Syrian civil war, President Bashar Assad has embraced every tool at his disposal including social media to project confidence and transmit his message to dedicated fans, most recently on the popular photo-sharing service Instagram posting pictures of himself and his glamorous wife surrounded by idolizing crowds.

    Instagram is Syria President Assad’s latest platform

    Syria’s embattled president already has a Facebook page, Twitter account and a YouTube channel. Now Bashar Assad is turning to the popular photo-sharing service Instagram in the latest attempt at improving his image as his country burns, posting pictures of himself and his glamorous wife surrounded by idolizing crowds. The sophisticated PR campaign is striking for an isolated leader who has...

Sports

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    The Cubs’ Dioner Navarro watches his RBI double against the St. Louis Cardinals during the eighth inning Saturday night at Busch Stadium in St. Louis.

    Navarro lifts Cubs to 6-5 win over Cardinals

    Dioner Navarro made it look simple Saturday night. The Cubs catcher, picking up a bat for the first time in three days, lashed a run-scoring double in the eighth inning to break a tie and cap a three-run rally that helped the Cubs beat the St. Louis Cardinals 6-5. The win gave the Cubs, who won the opener 3-0 on Friday, a series win in St. Louis for the first time in nearly three years.

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    Boomers split doubleheader against Evansville

    Playing a doubleheader for the second time on the road trip, the Schaumburg Boomers split with the Evansville Otters, winning the opener 2-1 before a 5-1 defeat in the nightcap.

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    Fire holds on for 2-1 win over Montreal Impact
    Joel Lindpere and Dilly Duka scored first-half goals and the Chicago Fire held on for a 2-1 victory over the Montreal Impact on Saturday night. The win was the Fire’s second straight and improved them to .500 this season (9-9-4), stretching an unbeaten streak to four games (3-0-1) in MLS competition. Coupled with New England’s loss, Chicago climbed to sixth in the MLS’ Eastern Conference.

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    Cougars shut out by Cedar Rapids Kernels

    Jose Berrios carried a no-hitter into the sixth inning and the Kane County Cougars finished with only 2 singles in a 6-0 loss to the Cedar Rapids Kernels on Saturday night before a season-high 11,979 at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark.

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    White Sox left fielder Alejandro De Aza, middle, celebrates with teammates Conor Gillaspie, left, and Gordon Beckham after Saturday’s 5-4 victory over the Minnesota Twins at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Beckham leads off with 4 walks for White Sox

    Gordon Beckham opened some eyes out of the leadoff spot Saturday by drawing 4 walks. Dont expect Beckham to stay at the top of the order - he was just filing in for Alejandro De Aza, who was held out of the starting lineup.

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    Andre Rienzo, who made his third start with the White Sox on Saturday, has not been happy with his walks total.

    White Sox getting big glimpse of future

    The White Sox beat the Twins 5-4 Saturday, snapping a 12-game losing streak to ALCentral opponents. But the bigger news for the Sox was starting pitcher Andre Rienzo and outfielder Avisail Garcia, who were both on the field and are big parts of the future.

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    Bears quarterback Jay Cutler (6) is sacked by Carolina Panthers’ Charles Johnson, left, during the first half of a preseason NFL football game in Charlotte, N.C., Friday, Aug. 9, 2013. (AP Photo/Bob Leverone)

    Trestman says Bears have ‘something to build on’

    The outcome of the Bears' preseason-opening loss to the Panthers isn't nearly as important as the performance of individuals hoping to make the final 53-man roster and for establishing a starting point for first-year coach Marc Trestman and his staff.

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    It hasn’t been the best of seasons for the Kane County Cougars, but Cubs prospect Albert Almora and his teammates understand it’s more about player development than wins and losses.

    For Cougars, it’s about much more than wins and losses

    The Kane County Cougars are completing their first year as the Midwest League affiliate of the Cubs. The Cougars have lost more than they've won, but the long-term goal of the Cubs is to develop players for higher levels of baseball, culminating with the major leagues.

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    White Sox general manager Rick Hahn has a plan, and he’s sticking to it.

    Sox GM Hahn: No quick fix

    The White Sox are rebuilding. No, it’s not a rip-it-to-shreds rebuild along the lines of the Cubs, but it’s a reconstruction nonetheless. The pitching staff is solid, with the third-best rotation in the American League, but the offense is the worst in the American League and that’s not something solved with a Winter Meetings makeover.

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    Oak Hill finally had enough elements for a strong test Saturday in the PGA Championship, and Jim Furyk was up for the fight. Grinding to the end in swirling wind that cast doubt on so many shots, Furyk closed with two big putts — one for birdie to regain the lead, one for par to keep it — that gave him a 2-under 68 and a one-shot lead over Jason Dufner going into the final round.

    Furyk has lead heading to final round of PGA

    Oak Hill finally had enough elements for a strong test Saturday in the PGA Championship, and Jim Furyk was up for the fight. Grinding to the end in swirling wind that cast doubt on so many shots, Furyk closed with two big putts — one for birdie to regain the lead, one for par to keep it — that gave him a 2-under 68 and a one-shot lead over Jason Dufner going into the final round.

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    White Sox closer Addison Reed, right, celebrates with catcher Tyler Flowers after defeating the Minnesota Twins 5-4 Saturday at U.S. Cellular Field.

    White Sox rally to beat Twins 5-4

    Conor Gillaspie lined a go-ahead single in the sixth inning and the Chicago White Sox rallied to beat the Minnesota Twins 5-4 on Saturday. Jordan Danks homered and rookie Andre Rienzo pitched 5 1-3 innings in his home debut as the White Sox snapped a five-game losing streak against the Twins.

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    Chargers rookie linebacker Manti Te'o will sit out this week with a sprained right foot and miss San Diego's game against the Bears on Thursday. Te'o wore a walking boot while watching Saturday morning's practice. “Manti has a foot sprain and he will be out this week and I will give you any further updates as the week goes on, or next week,” coach Mike McCoy said. “But he will be out for the week.”

    Te'o has foot sprain, won't play against Bears

    Chargers rookie linebacker Manti Te'o will sit out this week with a sprained right foot and miss San Diego's game against the Bears on Thursday. Te'o wore a walking boot while watching Saturday morning's practice.“Manti has a foot sprain and he will be out this week and I will give you any further updates as the week goes on, or next week,” coach Mike McCoy said. “But he will be out for the week.”

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    New York Yankees' Alex Rodriguez strikes out during his first at bat during the first inning of a baseball game against the Detroit Tigers on Friday, Aug. 9, 2013, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

    A-Rod sits a night after striking out 3 times

    Alex Rodriguez has a day off to think about the “overwhelming” reception he received in his season debut at Yankee Stadium.A-Rod was not in the New York Yankees’ starting lineup Saturday, about 13 hours after striking out three times in four at-bats during a 4-3, 10-inning victory over the Detroit Tigers.

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    Cubs starting pitcher Chris Rusin throws against the St. Louis Cardinals in the first inning Friday at Busch Stadium.

    Cubs get 1st shutout in St. Louis in 16 years

    With a small sample size from which to choose, Chris Rusin can easily pick his best performances. His latest ranks toward the top. Rusin pitched around seven hits in six innings, Anthony Rizzo had a two-run single and the Chicago Cubs recorded their first shutout in St. Louis in 16 years with a 3-0 victory over the Cardinals on Friday night.

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    Avisail Garcia reacts after striking out in his first at-bat with the White Sox during the seventh inning of the second game Friday night against the Twins at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Garcia arrives on the Sox scene

    Avisail Garcia didn't arrive at U.S. Cellular Field in time to start Game 2 of a day/night doubleheader against the Twins Friday, but the White Sox' new outfielder did get in the game and was busy. At the plate, Garcia struck out and was hit by a pitch and he also played center and right field.

Business

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    The Empire State Building towers over the skyline of a blackout-darkened New York City just before dawn.

    Ten years after blackout, grid faces new threats

    The industry has mostly addressed the failures blamed on a tree branch in Ohio that touched a power line and set off outages that cascaded across eight states and parts of Canada the afternoon of Aug. 14, 2003, darkening computer screens, halting commuter trains, and cutting lights and air conditioners for 50 million people.

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    Los Pajaritos petrochemical complex that belongs to Mexico’s state-owned oil company Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex) in Coatzacoalcos in the state of Veracruz, Mexico.

    Fight brews over private stake in a Mexican icon

    The most controversial part of Pena Nieto’s plan will likely seek to encourage private investment and technology, possibly including risk-sharing, production-sharing or concessionary agreements, which are banned by Mexico’s Constitution.Pena Nieto repeatedly has assured Mexicans that his plan will not privatize the industry.

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    Pedestrians pass by a Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina trailer at the downtown farmer’s market in Raleigh, N.C.

    Blue Cross reaches out over insurance law changes

    MORRISVILLE, N.C. — Just down from the Target and Gander Mountain big-box stores and between a nail salon and dental office, North Carolina’s largest health insurer opened its first retail store. It has some exercise offerings — step aerobics classes and stationary bike workouts — but for now, its main product is providing in-person information about changes coming in October with the health insurance overhaul law. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina is opening half a dozen of these offices in strip malls statewide to first educate and then, starting in October, enroll consumers shopping for coverage because of the federal Affordable Care Act, also known as “Obamacare.” Blue Cross affiliates in Florida and Pennsylvania have had similar stores open for years. The North Carolina company also hauls an air-conditioned showroom trailer to fairs and farmers markets to reach out to the estimated 600,000 people who will be newly shopping for individual policies — some of them subsidized by the government for consumers who might have trouble affording a policy. Many of the individual policies will be sold on a statewide Internet marketplace designed to make buying coverage comparable to finding a hotel room or rental car.As people who have been uninsured or had their coverage provided by employers start shopping around, BCBSNC is reaching out like never before to expand on its 375,000 insurance policies for individuals, marketing director Bruce Allen said. The goal is explaining the federal law, which requires everyone to have coverage or pay a fine and subsidizes many middle-class consumers who might otherwise not be able to afford policies on their own. The law also prohibits insurers from rejecting customers who have pre-existing health conditions. “There’s a big segment of the population that really wants to talk to someone face to face about it,” Allen said. “It’s a new market that’s entering that doesn’t have health insurance, never had it, and really needs kind of that step-by-step walk-through to understand a really critical decision for them to make.”Across the country, Blue Cross companies are among the health insurers most aggressive in reaching out to build consumer trust and capture their spending on policies. Spots for a broad new print, television and online advertising campaign are multiplying. Meetings with civic organizations community groups, and religious institutions are taking place from Vermont to Texas. The North Carolina company has rented movie theaters and invited guests to watch first-run films, with the addition of a 15-minute ad explaining the Affordable Care Act and laptop-ready staffers in the lobby offering individual guidance on the law.The Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, the umbrella organization for the country’s 38 Blue Cross companies, launched a campaign last month with the Walgreen Co. drugstore chain, with signs and brochures in about 8,000 stores.WellPoint, the largest operator of Blue Cross Blue Shield health plans, is teaming up with Spanish-language TV and radio network Univision in California, New York, Colorado and Georgia for meetings, broadcast advertisements, and newscast segments describing what coverage means and how to buy insurance on an online exchange.Blue Cross Blue Shield companies already are some of the country’s biggest sellers of health insurance policies for individuals. Seven Blue Cross companies, including North Carolina’s, were among the top 10 at the end of 2011, according to Atlantic Information Services Inc., which specializes in health industry data and news.

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    The Motorola Mobility Moto X phone is displayed during a launch event in New York, U.S., on Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013. Google Inc.’s Motorola Mobility unit today announced a flagship Moto X smartphone with customizable colors, in an effort to revive the business after falling behind Apple Inc. and Samsung Electronics Co.

    Google’s Moto X phone hugs middle of the road

    The Moto X, the first flagship phone from Motorola since Google bought the company, still manages to stand out from the flood of Android devices. It’s smart, sensible and accessible in a way that many more tricked-out competitors aren’t.

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    Review: Google photo tools won’t replace humans

    I was intrigued when Google promised to automate photo editing as part of enhancements to its Google Plus social network. You simply upload a batch of photos and Google will try to highlight the best ones and make them look their best. Google did a decent job for a virtual photo editor, but I’m not ready to cede creative control quite yet.

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    In this March 23, 2010 file photo, the Google logo is seen at the Google headquarters in Brussels.

    Why Apple, Google are the best of enemies

    In the past, these companies maintained largely separate businesses. Apple sold hardware. Google did search. Facebook was a social network. And Amazon was an online store. But now they’re all vying to become not just the most successful firms in tech but the most consequential companies in any industry, anywhere. I think we often pay outsized attention to the rivalry, and we don’t look enough at the friendly cooperation among these companies.

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    The Android app Papyrus is a good replacement for your pocket pad, serving as a digital pen and paper.

    App reviews: Papyrus, Grid

    The Android app Papyrus is a good replacement for your pocket pad, serving as a digital pen and paper. Grid aims to help you organize your life, whether you’re planning an event or making a grocery list.

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    Why you should be using the wallet app Venmo

    The app is called Venmo, and it allows you to exchange payments with people in your social circles via your smartphone. Since the app works directly with U.S. banks, Venmo payments can be “cashed out” into your bank account overnight on business days. If you opt not to cash out, the money accumulates in your Venmo balance. Which is all to say that Venmo is the quintessential app for the urban professional twentysomething.

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    Twitter buzz helps boost TV-show ratings, Nielsen finds

    Twitter Inc. users, sending status updates in 140-character bursts on the social-networking site, can increase television ratings by sharing their thoughts while a show is on air, researcher Nielsen found. The study marks the first time Nielsen has established a direct link between Twitter activity and TV use, potentially helping the social-networking site attract more marketing dollars.

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    Associated Press reporter Michael Liedtke models Google glass at a Google base camp in San Francisco. Google Inc. is touting Glass as a liberating breakthrough that will make technology more convenient and less obnoxious in social situations than checking a smartphone to see what’s happening in your digital realm. Critics deride Glass as another disturbing example of a how enslaved people are to their devices and a sign that technology is obliterating personal privacy.

    Review: First peek through Google Glass impresses

    Google Inc. is touting Glass as a liberating breakthrough that will make technology more convenient and less obnoxious in social situations than checking a smartphone to see what’s happening in your digital realm. Critics deride Glass as another disturbing example of a how enslaved people are to their devices and a sign that technology is obliterating personal privacy.

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    Google Glass team members wear Google Glasses at a booth at Google I/O 2013 in San Francisco.

    With wearable technology, a new independence for people with disabilities

    It’s been 18 years since Tammie Lou Van Sant held a camera. But nearly two decades after a car accident left her paralyzed from the chest down, Van Sant is shooting again — thanks to a device that could be part of technology’s next big trend. For some people with disabilities, the rise of Google Glass and wearable technology has given them a new measure of independence. “I just go out into the world now,” she said. “I can take pictures or do anything I want.”

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    Caroline Criado-Perez, right, poses with a concept design for a 10-pound note adorned with an image of author Jane Austen. From left: Mary Macleod, conservative member of Parliament; Bank of England Governor Mark Carney; Stella Creasy, Labor member of Parliament.

    Twitter abuse stirs unease in Britain

    Hours after successfully campaigning to have a woman — Jane Austen — featured on a new British banknote, Caroline Criado-Perez was bombarded with rape and death threats. The vast majority came via Twitter. The uproar is the latest in Britain’s uneasy relationship with Twitter, a site that has become a tool for democracy in many countries but that has come under heavy fire here from government officials, sports stars and celebrities, among others.

Life & Entertainment

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    Navy always makes beautiful waves. It gracefully sets off every finish in your decor, like leather, silver, brass and pottery, and any garden furniture.

    Use navy to anchor your home decor

    Navy has it all. It’s a no-fail neutral that looks perfect paired with practically everything, from white and cream to coral and citron. It gracefully sets off every finish in your decor.

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    This bedroom suite is not antique, but has a value of $2,000 or slightly more.

    Valuing an attractive bedroom set

    Q. We would like to sell this bedroom set, but have no idea of the value. We have had it for 41 years. We refinished it because the surface had turned black. It is solid mahogany and I am thinking it is from the 1930s. The bed is full-sized, and the highboy has some damage on the upper side. Any information would be appreciated.

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    Tourists gather around the Thomas Jefferson Statue next to MusČe d’Orsay during a guided tour around the main spots of the Revolutonary-era American presence on Paris’ left bank.

    Walking in Jefferson’s footsteps in Paris

    The tourist hordes crowding the entrance to Paris’ Musee d’Orsay may be too occupied fighting to keep their place in line to notice, but just steps away is a monument that symbolizes the centuries-long relationship of France with the United States. There, on the Left Bank landing of the Leopold-Sedar-Senghor footbridge, a larger-than-life bronze statue of the third U.S. president Thomas Jefferson keeps watch from the very spot where the real-life Jefferson took in some of Paris’ architectural wonders more than 200 years ago.

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    Since gladioli bloom from the bottom up, cut them for indoor use when the bottom bloom starts to show color.

    Gladiolus a showy flower

    The gladiolus produces a large, showy flower spike that lasts for several days in the garden or in a vase. To get the most bloom for decoration inside, cut the stalk when the lowest blossoms have begun to show color.

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    David Costabile as Simon Boyd in “Low Winter Sun,” premiering Sunday, Aug. 11.

    AMCs ‘Low Winter Sun’ looks deep into Detroit

    DETROIT — “Low Winter Sun” isn’t a reality show about police in Detroit, the city in which it’s set and filmed. Nor is it a “ripped-from-the-headlines” crime-solving drama like others that have come before.Yet it aims to be truer, at least on a human level, to the place that in real life is struggling through some of its darkest times and recently became the largest city in the U.S. to file for bankruptcy after decades of decline.“Everyone is looking for a second chance — and it’s sort of this idea: `What are you willing to do in order to get that in some way?”’ said Chris Mundy, executive producer, showrunner and writer for the drama that debuts Sunday on AMC. “I wanted to set it in a city that reflected that in some way. Detroit made a lot of sense to me.”“Low Winter Sun” revives a two-part U.K. miniseries from 2006 and returns actor Mark Strong to the lead role as homicide detective Frank Agnew. It also marks Hollywood’s return to the Motor City as a place to explore crime, following the short-lived ABC drama, “Detroit 1-8-7,” from the 2010-11 season.The principal actors and creators of “Low Winter Sun” say after the original version, it owes a greater debt to HBO’s “The Wire” and its AMC lead-in, “Breaking Bad,” since “Low Winter Sun” focuses its lens on one unraveling story that takes its detectives into the city’s criminal underworld. The show, which has been confirmed for an initial run of 10 episodes, begins with Strong’s Agnew and James’ Geddes killing a fellow cop in what appears to be an act of retribution. The story unspools from there, peeling back the consequences from that act.“This is not a cop show — the police element is the framework, but what you’re actually dealing with are people trying to cope against all odds,” said Strong, a British actor whose film credits include “Zero Dark Thirty,” “Sherlock Holmes,” “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” and “John Carter.”He spoke recently from the desk of his character on the Detroit set in a secure warehouse near the massive, deteriorating Packard automobile plant built more than a century ago that’s increasingly become the target of thieves, metal scrappers, urban explorers and graffiti artists. One scene shot that day features Strong and Lennie James, another veteran British actor who plays Detective Joe Geddes, interviewing a witness to their crime. The dialogue is peppered with references to jobs being outsourced and Detroit’s distant fur-trading past.Setting and filming the show in Detroit, which at once tries to live up to its promise and live down its problems, makes all the difference, Strong said.“What it has is a fantastic backdrop because you have a cityscape that is as need as repair as all of the characters are in this show ... but we’re not suggesting for a second that everything that goes on in Detroit is dark and down and dirty,” he said. “What we found here is this amazing place to be able to play out all the psychology of all the characters that have been created. ... It wouldn’t work in New York or L.A. or anywhere else, to be honest, other than here.”James said “Low Winter Sun” was “by far the best script that came my way last year.”“It’s the kind of part I like to play. I like people who have got a kind of internal monologue going on and what they’re putting on the outside isn’t necessarily what’s going on in the inside,” said James, who has appeared in AMC’s “The Walking Dead,” HBO’s “Hung” and the film “Colombiana.” “It’s a really brilliant, simple premise that’s easy to tell and can take you in a million different directions.”To ensure authenticity even within the fictional realm of “Low Winter Sun,” the producers hired Ira Todd, a Detroit police detective and consultant who also worked on “Detroit 1-8-7.” Todd said the creators of the earlier show wanted to approach it more like “Low Winter Sun,” but ABC executives “had a different vision.”

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    The boardwalk at Rehoboth Beach, Del., is not open to dogs, but the area surrounding it is a dog-friendly place with a number of businesses that offer accommodations and treats for pets.

    It’s a dog’s life at vacation destination

    When you’re looking to get a dog, experts tell you to find one that fits your lifestyle. And when you take your dogs on vacation, you need to find a vacation that fits the dogs. That’s why, for about a dozen years now, my husband and I have spent a weekend or two each summer in Rehoboth Beach. We go back again and again in large part because our dogs like it.

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    Fruit leather, a veggie and pinwheel sandwiches make a nice lunch for a back-to-school success.

    Bringing excitement back to the brown bag lunch

    My goal this summer has been to create quick and easy homemade versions of (most) of the typical kid lunch foods. We’ve had some big wins this summer (like the fruit leathers), and some major flops. So, here are some fun ideas to spice up the kids' lunches and some favorite products to make packing nutritious lunches a cinch!

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    Mom’s troubled waters swirl ‘Sea Creatures’

    There’s a charmer at the heart of “Sea Creatures,” and it’s not the novel’s narrator, Georgia, who is plenty likable in her own admittedly stumbling, searching way. It’s her 3-year-old son, Frankie, whose refusal to talk has begun to weigh on Georgia’s marriage to the boy’s father, Graham. It weighs on the reader, too, as Frankie is recognizably bright, playful and inquisitive, but never quite ready to connect verbally.

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    Jim Grant (director Robert Redford) comforts his daughter (Jackie Evancho) before he goes on the lam in “The Company You Keep.”

    DVD previews: ‘The Company You Keep,’ ‘Big Wedding’

    A former radical goes on the lam in "The Company You Keep," a dysfunctional family unites for "The Big Wedding" and Gerard Butler must defend the president in "Olympus Has Fallen." All three are heading to DVD.

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    Sharon Stone plays Dorothy Boreman in “Lovelace.”

    Sharon Stone happily unrecognizable in 'Lovelace' role

    Actors make physical transformations for roles all the time; it's what they do. Still, many have found it truly stunning to see Sharon Stone — who at 55 still looks unnervingly like the sleek, blonde, leg-crossing femme fatale she played two decades ago in “Basic Instinct” — appear dark, severe, ungainly and nearly unrecognizable in “Lovelace.” “NOBODY recognized her,” says Amanda Seyfried, who plays Stone's daughter, the “Deep Throat” star Linda Lovelace, in the film that opens Friday. “Harvey Weinstein, if I remember correctly, did not know that Sharon Stone was in it. She's that good.”

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    Taylor Swift will bring her country pop tunes to Soldier Field on Saturday, Aug. 10.

    Weekend picks Taylor Swift seeing ‘Red’ at Soldier Field
    Sheryl Crow and Cirque du Soleil are just some of the entertainment headliners at the 2013 edition of “Macy’s Glamorama: Fashion in a New Light” Friday at Millennium Park’s Harris Theater for Music and Dance. Also, find out which of the top 10 finalists of Suburban Chicago’s Got Talent will be the grand prize winner on Saturday at the Taste of Arlington Heights at Vail Avenue and Campbell Street in downtown Arlington Heights.

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    This Belgian wooden maquette is a scaled replica of a model used by an architect to study form, structure and proportion. Geometric shapes are strong decor elements for autumn.

    Crisp, contemporary shapes have a cool vibe that appeals to many

    Quadrilaterals, cubes, polyhedrons … sound like 10th grade math class? Perhaps, but they’re also examples of one of this fall’s biggest trends in home decor: geometrics.

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    Insulating attic and loft space must be done properly

    Q. My 30-year-plus home has a third-floor loft. The temperature is always more extreme than the rest of the house. There is an attic space off this room, which has its original insulation only. Not too long ago I had a contractor come in to give me a price on reinsulating. He said he felt it was not necessary to do it

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    HomeStory’s sliding doors with inlaid mirrors are popular for closet installations.

    Door replacement has gone high tech

    Replacing a home’s interior doors has always made a big difference in the look of a house. Until recently, the mess and expense involved served as a deterrent to making that change. That is no longer the case, said Dan Teuscher, owner of HomeStory Chicago, based in Elk Grove Village.

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    There’s no limit to number of proxies an owner can gather

    Q. A great number of units in our condominium association are investor owned and being leased. The board president claims she has the voting proxy for about 30 units.It appears she controls who is elected to the board. Is this legal?

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    Accepting an offer by phone doesn’t actually count

    Q: My wife and I made an offer on a home. Our real estate agent texted my wife about a phone call from the owner’s real estate agent saying the owner accepted our offer, and they would send the paperwork the following day. Two days passed with no paperwork.

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    ‘Man caves,’ handmade items are growing home trends

    When it comes to what is in and what is out, the sky is the limit. Whatever makes you feel happy and comfortable is the best trend for you and your family. With that said, let me give you a few thoughts on what designers see as notable styles these days.

Discuss

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    Photo by Brendan McGee of Batavia Shooting stars will be on display in the heavens this weekend as part of the Perseid Meteor Shower.

    The Soapbox

    Daily Herald editors write about football safety for kids, lake path changes, awesome sky views and a couple of special teens, among other topics.

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    Not so factual after all
    A West Dundee letter to the editor: Who else sees the irony in the fact that on the very same day the Daily Herald Assistant Managing Editor/Opinion tells us they do turn away opinion letters with “blatantly incorrect statements” they publish an individual’s opinion letter in defense of the Affordable Care Act claiming, “Thanks to Obamacare, the premiums on health insurance went down 50 percent in New York”?

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    Budget cutting is destroying nation
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: My favorite recreational past times are in jeopardy because of the Republican Party created budget cuts — commonly referred to as sequestration. I am mad, as you know what, at the Republican regressive, nation-destroying budget cutting.

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    Pete Rose not only gambler in baseball
    A Northbrook letter to the editor: Now, in both the National and American leagues, we have any number of multimillion-dollar-a-year ball players who regularly and methodically take to gambling every season. They knowingly and willfully “gamble” on their odds of being caught taking performance-enhancing drugs.

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    Third airport is a waste of state’s money
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: Gov. Pat Quinn is just amazing — amazingly disconnected from reality that is. I write this after reading the news that he has just approved a plan for the state to acquire the added property needed to build Chicago’s third major airport in Will County.

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    A true pioneer among African-Americans
    An Elgin letter to the editor: I am going to miss my longtime friend Mary Wheeler West. I first met Mary in 1985 when I started to do research into Elgin’s African-American community. We met at the library, and she gave me her help without much coaxing. Hers was the first family I worked with.

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