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Daily Archive : Thursday August 1, 2013

News

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    Walkers make their way through Mount Prospect on Saturday during the second day of the Chicago Breast Cancer Komen 3-Day Walk.

    Suburbs provide warm welcome on second day of Komen walk

    The Chicago area’s Susan G. Komen 3-Day walk received a warm welcome Saturday in Mount Prospect as it wound its way through several Northwest suburbs before walkers settled in at Maryville in Des Plaines for an overnight stay and the final leg to Soldier Field.

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    LaRue expects her students to be surprised to see trenches at the site of the important World War I battle in Gallipoli in modern day Turkey. Trenches were common on the Western front, but few know they were used in the east as well. The fact will find its way into LaRue’s history classes at Elgin High School this year.

    U-46 teacher travels the globe to enhance her lessons

    When Chris LaRue learned about grants for educational travel for teachers, it opened up a world for her — literally. LaRue, a teacher in Elgin Area School District U-46’s gifted academy, recently spent two weeks in Turkey. She has also visited China and Germany and she hopes to go to Japan next summer.

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    Brad O'Halloran

    O'Halloran resigns; now who will take charge of Metra?

    After weeks of pressure, Metra Board Chairman Brad O'Halloran has resigned. His departure adds to a leadership vacuum, with former Metra CEO Alex Clifford already gone after receiving an up-to-$718,000 severance package. “The first order of business is to gather things together and keep the railroad running,” Vice Chairman Jack Partelow of Naperville said.

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    National Park Service workers clean the Lincoln Memorial in Washington last week.

    Green stain still shows on Lincoln Memorial

    National Mall Superintendent Robert Vogel said the agency remains confident that all of the paint stain can be removed from the memorial.“We're making good progress,” he said, “and we will be there very soon.”

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    Rudolph Figueroa

    Texas man gets 10 years for soliciting Downers Grove teen online

    A Texas man who posed online as a teen boy to solicit sex from a 13-year-old Downers Grove girl told a judge Thursday that methamphetamines made him do it. “It was the evil of the drugs,” Rudolph Figueroa, 46, said as he was sentenced to 10 years in prison.

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    Norma Alfaro of Arlington Heights and her son Alex, 14, walk around Lake Arlington on Thursday. Changes officially implemented Thursday mean one-way lanes that are clearly marked in an effort to increase path safety after a death earlier this summer.

    Lake Arlington increases path patrols, splits path

    Visitors to Lake Arlington will see increased patrols, new signage and pathway markings indicating interim changes in response to the death of a woman struck by a bicyclist on the path earlier this summer. “The district knows that simply upgrading signage and pathway markings will not be enough to successfully promote a mutual respect among all path users,” officials said in a release

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    A child contracted a rare flu after handling pigs at the DuPage County Fair last month.

    Child gets rare flu from pigs at DuPage County Fair

    A child contracted a rare form of flu after handling pigs at the DuPage County Fair last month, the Illinois Department of Public Health said. “The H3N2v virus is relatively new, but the Illinois Department of Public Health, the Illinois Department of Agriculture and our federal partners are monitoring this situation closely,” said IDPH Director Dr. LaMar Hasbrouck.

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    Bloomingdale body identified as man who died of heart disease

    Preliminary autopsy results from the DuPage County coroner’s office indicate that a Bloomingdale man found on the side of a road Wednesday afternoon died of coronary atherosclerosis. Richard W. Kraszewski, 51, was found on the side of Bloomingdale Road north of Lake Street.

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    Elk Grove Village police asked protesters to remain on the sidewalk Thursday during a worker rally outside Grecian Delight. Workers are protesting the company's latest contract offer.

    Workers rally outside Elk Grove Village company

    Workers rallied Thursday outside Grecian Delight in Elk Grove Village to protest the company's latest contract proposal and threatening to strike if it does not change. More than 70 workers and other members of the Chicago Federation of Labor picketed outside the Greek food distributor, located at 1201 Tonne Road. “The message today to Grecian Delight is, 'Shame on you!'” yelled Jorge...

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    Batavia man accused of DUI, child endangerment

    Kendall County sheriff’s deputies arrested a Batavia man Wednesday night for driving under the influence of alcohol and endangering the life or health of a child, according to a police report.

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    A fifth-grader uses her school issued iPad during a reading enrichment period at Richmond Intermediate School in St. Charles.

    Dist. 303 Davis/Richmond lawsuit testimony concludes

    St. Charles Unit District 303's grade level centers may yet revert to elementary schools following intense cross examination of Superintendent Don Schlomann in a pending lawsuit Thursday.

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    Judge: Drug stings show potential race bias

    The chief judge of U.S. District Court in Chicago has questioned whether the federal government in a drug case racially profiled blacks and Latinos — raising a sensitive issue that for years has arisen in various forms nationwide.

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    Joliet prison blaze ruled arson

    The Illinois State Fire Marshal says a fire at a closed Joliet state prison complex featured in the opening scenes of “The Blues Brothers” was a case of arson.

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    New drug charges lodged against Arlington Hts. man

    A Cook County judge set bail at $50,000 for a 20-year-old Arlington Heights man charged with various drug offenses including possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver and possession of cannabis. If convicted of the most serious charge James bushell could face from six to 30 years in prison.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Burglars cut the locks on a trailer around 10:50 p.m. July 20 in a business lot at 975 Criss Circle in Elk Grove Village and stole a tool bag with tools, two sets of golf clubs, power washer, two tool sets, drill set, TV and designer suit. Value was estimated at $7,895.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Thieves stole a men’s red road bike and a men’s blue road bike and a women’s green bike between 9 a.m. July 20 and 9 a.m. July 27 out of a common apartment bike room on the 200 block of North Dunton Avenue in Arlington Heights. Value was estimated at $4,400.

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    Jill Upadhyaya, a parent from Hoffman Estates, shows her opposition to the late start scheduling option supported by the Palatine Township Elementary District 15 teachers union.

    Parents, students rally before Dist. 15 arbitration hearing

    Several parents and students gathered Thursday morning outside the Palatine Township Elementary District 15 administrative offices before an arbitration hearing was set to begin on the controversial late start/early release scheduling plan. They support the board of education’s earlier vote to release students early on Fridays to accommodate weekly professional development time among teachers.

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    Marmion Academy wants lawsuit for science experiment injury thrown out

    Attorneys representing Marmion Academy in a lawsuit filed by a former student who was injured during a science experiment in May 2010 want the matter dismissed. They argue the private high school, like other schools, have tort immunity in negligence lawsuits. Attorneys for the school and Zachary Bennett, who has since graudated, appeared briefly in court Thursday and the motion to dismiss could...

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    Keith Clausen

    Naperville man wanted for failing to show in court

    A 41-year-old man accused of stealing two guns and filing a bogus report to Batavia police in July 2012 missed a court hearing his week in which prosecutors wanted his bond increased or revoked. An arrest warrant has been issued for Keith Clausen, formerly of Batavia and now of Naperville, according to Kane County Court records.

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    U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. nominee Samantha Power testifies last week on Capitol Hill in Washington.

    Senate approves Obama’s nominee for U.N. ambassador

    Samantha Power’s penchant for outspokenness has included her 2002 call for a “mammoth protection force” to prevent Middle East violence, from which she has distanced herself.

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    Palatine man remembered as “compassionate and caring”

    Devastated friends and family say anyone would be hard-pressed to find a person whose heart was bigger than Roger Mirro’s. The 56-year-old Palatine man, who spent most of his career working to improve the lives of others, died Tuesday after falling into a trash compactor. “He was just a very compassionate and caring person,” his mother, Joyce Kolze, said.

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    Andrew Manley

    Lake Zurich man is set $100,000 bail for DUI

    A 29-year-old Lake Zurich man with three previous DUIs has been charged again with aggravated driving under the influence of drugs. Bail for Andrew Manley was set at $100,000.

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    Historical society concert:

    The Grayslake Historical Society hosts the Vintage Brass band for a special free concert at 7 p.m., Wednesday, Aug. 7, in the courtyard of the museum, 134 Hawley St., Grayslake.

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    Bartlett banquet hall receives final approval

    A plan for a new banquet hall that’s drawn the ire of some of its future neighbors in Bartlett has won village approval, but only after owner Nico Scardino assured leaders he will work hard to keep noise inside and outside at a reasonable level.

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    Bike rodeo in Lake Zurich:

    The Lake Zurich police department and the village’s park and recreation department host a bike rodeo from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 3, at The Barn in Paulus Park, 200 S. Rand Road, Lake Zurich.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Ryan C. Dobbins, 21, of St. Charles, was charged with driving under the influence, no insurance and driving too fast for conditions after a crash at 1:15 a.m. Tuesday at Route 31 and Silver Glen Road near St. Charles, according to a sheriff’s report.

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    Kids 1st Health Fair:

    The Kids 1st Health Fair is set for Wednesday, Aug. 7, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. at Miguel Juarez Middle School, 201 N. Butrick St., Waukegan. The event provides a variety of free services, from immunizations to dental screenings at considerable savings to families who meet specific income guidelines.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Paul M. Armstead, 28, of Carpentersville, Tuesday was charged with criminal damage of government property, according to a police report. He is accused of damaging the plexiglass protective coverings of three light bulbs in two cells at the Carpentersville Police Department.

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    Michael Senders

    Cops: Man exposed self at McDonald’s window in DuPage

    A Homer Glen man was charged with public indecency after he exposed himself at a McDonald’s drive-up window, DuPage County authorities said Thursday. Michael Senders, 33, of the 13000 block of Buttercup Court, could face up to a year in jail if convicted.

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    This is Babe, a 17-year-old, 45-pound pet African spur thigh tortoise, that has been missing since he escaped from his Wildwood home July 17.

    Wildwood man searches for his missing exotic pet tortoise

    Babe is on the loose and Wayne Viehweg would like to get him back. Babe is a 17-year-old, 45-pound pet African spur thigh tortoise that made a daring escape July 17 from his enclosure behind Viehweg’s Wildwood home on Big Oaks Road.

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    The Rev. John Hurley

    Longtime St. Edna’s pastor remembered for love of parish

    The Rev. John. J. Hurley, the longtime pastor of St. Edna’s Catholic Church in Arlington Heights, has died at 82. “He loved the people of this parish and in this community,” said the Rev. Jerome Jacob, who succeeded Hurley as pastor.

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    The U.S. Senate’s Appropriations Committee approved funding in July to reactivate Thomson prison.

    Durbin, Bustos have meeting on Thomson prison

    Progress is being made toward opening the prison in Thomson, which the federal government bought for $165 million last fall.

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    Restoration work on the telescope in the University of Illinois observatory has been completed.

    117-year-old telescope returns to U of I

    URBANA — The University of Illinois’ 117-year-old observatory telescope is being reinstalled this week after a summer of restoration and a close call on its cross-country journey back home.

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    Killer sentenced to 57 years for car wash murder

    A Cook County judge has sentenced a Chicago man to 57 years in prison for the 2010 murder of a car wash attendant. Jurors convicted Marcus Gordon, 42, in April of first-degree murder in the death of 43-year-old Cesar Rosales.

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    Truck falls on Kankakee mechanic

    A Kankakee auto mechanic has died after the truck he was working on fell on him. The Kankakee County sheriff’s office says 51-year-old Enrique Serrano died Wednesday afternoon.

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    All students in grades six through 12 are now required to show proof of receiving one Tdap vaccine.

    Tdap vaccine required for Illinois preteens, teens

    It’s time for parents to think about back-to-school shots for their children, and that includes high school students. The Illinois Department of Public Health says there’s a new requirement this year. All students in grades six through 12 are now required to show proof of receiving one Tdap vaccine.

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    Contractor Bryon Tobin works on installing the Happy Hollow entrance sign at the Illinois State Fairgrounds Thursday in Springfield. The fair begins Aug. 8.

    Illinois State Fair celebrates farmers’ resiliency

    The annual celebration of Illinois agriculture comes a year after a historic drought that scorched corn and soybean crops throughout the Midwest, dried cattle pastures and diminished hay supplies. “Illinois farmers are veterans of resilience,” Illinois Department of Agriculture Director Bob Flider said, noting the fair will be a chance for them to celebrate the crops they continue to proudly...

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    Midwest Generation’s Waukegan Generating Station, built in 1923, sits on the shore of Lake Michigan.

    IEPA asked to toughen Waukegan coal plant permit

    Environmentalists are asking the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency to toughen a proposed water-discharge permit for a coal-fired power plant in Waukegan, claiming it fails to adequately assess potential harm to Lake Michigan water quality and aquatic life.

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    Des Plaines students win Target shopping spree

    Twelve lucky Des Plaines students will get all their back-to-school needs fulfilled thanks to a cooperative effort by Target and The Salvation Army.Next Wednesday, the students will visit the Target store in Niles to purchase school supplies, clothing and other necessities.

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    Workers unload bags full of quarters from a Brinks Security truck to a trailer in Marion, Ill.

    Man repays insurance money with 4 tons of coins

    “I’ve had 10 years to think about this a little bit, and I’m very, very bitter at this ruling,” Roger Herrin said. “It’s wrong, and everybody knows it’s wrong.”

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    The gurney in the death chamber is shown in this May 27, 2008 file photo from Huntsville, Texas.

    Texas prison system running out of execution drug

    The Texas Department of Criminal Justice said Thursday that its remaining supply of pentobarbital expires in September and that no alternatives have been found. It wasn’t immediately clear whether two executions scheduled for next month would be delayed.

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    Fire damages Aurora grocery store

    Aurora firefighters were working Thursday to determine what sparked a Wednesday night fire that caused an estimated $150,000 damage to a grocery store, authorities said.

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    Baby boy born on subway platform in D.C.

    Taylor gave birth Thursday morning on the platform of the busy L’Enfant Plaza station. Metro officials say she went into labor aboard a green line train bound for Greenbelt, Md. An off-duty emergency medical technician helped her off the train and delivered the baby.

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    Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada speaks Tuesday with reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington.

    Reid to senators: ‘Sit down and shut up’

    WASHINGTON — Tempers and frustrations are flaring in Congress on the eve of its August recess.“Have senators sit down and shut up, OK,” Majority Leader Harry Reid said Thursday, addressing freshman Wisconsin Sen. Tammy Baldwin, who was presiding over the Senate, but in an uncharacteristic loud voice aimed at chatting colleagues.

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    Benjamin Davidson

    Ex-Lake Forest High School employee pleads not guilty to sex assault charges

    A former Lake Forest High School employee pleaded not guilty Thursday to multiple sex-related charges stemming from a relationship with two underage female students. Benjamin Davidson, 30, of the 400 block of Exeter Place in Lake Forest, faces 18 total charges dating from December 2010 to January 2013, authorities said in Lake County court.

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    The metal artwork of Mount Prospect artist Jozef Andrzejczuk will again be featured at the Art & Soul on the Fox in downtown Elgin. The festival features artists working with a variety of mediums including ceramics, glass, metal, photography, watercolors, wood and more.

    New theater performances highlight annual art show

    In its fifth year, the Art & Soul on the Fox juried art show will expand to other art forms, expanding its music and theatrical performances. Running Saturday and Sunday, a kids stage, plays, musical performances, dance instruction and roaming entertainment will keep locals intrigued with art in its many forms in Elgin's downtown area.

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    Kane County police departments look at data sharing

    The city of Elgin greceived a grant to collaborate with Kane County on the implementation of a data-sharing system among law enforcement agencies across the county. The $311,000 in federal funds awarded through the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority will allow the Kane County Sheriff’s Department, plus departments in Carpentersville, East Dundee, West Dundee, Sleepy Hollow,...

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    Capitol Hill police officers arrest immigration reform protesters as they blocked a street on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013.

    Protesters to Congress: Get moving on immigration

    Forty-one pro-immigrant activists were arrested outside the Capitol Thursday after blocking traffic while pushing for passage of comprehensive immigration legislation. “When you want policymakers to see the light, sometimes you’ve got to raise the heat, and that’s what we’re doing today,” said Frank Sharry, executive director of America’s Voice, who was among those arrested.

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    Lombard is looking to honor senior citizens

    The village of Lombard is seeking applications for its annual “Senior of the Year” award. Now in its eighth year, the award aims to celebrate the ccomplishments of seniors in the community. Awards will be presented at the village’s Senior Fair on Oct 2.

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    Morton Arboretum gearing for 10th annual Fall Color 5K

    The Fall Color Festival at the Morton Arboretum in Lisle will get a running start as this year’s 10th annual Fall Color 5K Run & Walk and Kid’s Dash takes place on Sunday, Oct. 6.

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    Howard Richmond

    Aurora minister guilty in $1.6 million church expansion scheme

    On paper, Howard Richmond was a successful pastor, flush with millions of dollars to grow his Aurora church. In reality, he was behind $130,000 in rent. On Thursday, the Naperville man pleaded guilty to a bribery and forgery scheme that bilked supporters out of more than $1.6 million.

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    USPS eyes alcohol deliveries

    Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe has a wish list for raising cash for his financially ailing agency. High on it is delivery of beer, wine and spirits. Donahoe says delivering alcohol has the potential to raise as much as $50 million a year. The Postal Service says mailing alcoholic beverages is currently restricted by law.

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    Ariel Castro sits in the courtroom during the sentencing phase Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013, in Cleveland. Three months after an Ohio woman kicked out part of a door to end nearly a decade of captivity, Castro got the life term for the most serious count and was getting additional time for the hundreds of other counts.

    Ohio man gets life term in kidnapping of 3 women

    The Ohio man convicted of holding three women captive in his Cleveland house over a decade and raping them repeatedly has been sentenced to life without parole. Ariel Castro pleaded guilty last week to 937 counts including aggravated murder, kidnapping, rape and assault in a deal that could bring a life sentence plus 1,000 years.

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    Secretary of State John Kerry meets with Pakistan’s opposition leader Imran Khan in Islamabad, Pakistan, Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013. Kerry said the resumption of security talks will cover “all of the key issues between us, from border management to counterterrorism to promoting U.S. private investment and to Pakistan’s own journey to economic revitalization.”

    US, Pakistan ease ties; Kerry hints drones could end

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and his Pakistani counterpart, Sartaj Aziz, said Thursday that the two countries will resume high-level negotiations over security issues and Kerry suggested — then seemed to reverse himself — that the disputed drone strikes could end soon. “I believe that we’re on a good track. I think the program will end as we have eliminated most of the threat and continue...

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    In this image taken from Associated Press Television shows, Russian lawyer Anatoly Kucherena showing a temporary document to allow National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden to cross the border into Russia at Sheremetyevo airport outside Moscow, Russia, on Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013. National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden has received asylum in Russia for one year and left the transit zone of Moscow’s airport, his lawyer said Thursday.

    Snowden leaves airport after Russia grants asylum

    National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden left the transit zone of a Moscow airport and officially entered Russia after authorities granted him asylum for a year, his lawyer said Thursday, a move that suggests the Kremlin isn’t shying away from further conflict with the United States. “Over the past eight weeks we have seen the Obama administration show no respect for international or...

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    Jeremy A. Betancourt

    Arraignment delayed for Antioch teen in fatal street racing crash

    The arraignment hearing for an Antioch Township teen accused of killing a teenage girl in a June street racing crash has been delayed until Sept. 25, authorities said Thursday. Jeremy Betancourt, 17, of the 41000 block of North Circle Drive in unincorporated Lake County near Antioch, was not in court after checking himself into a Streamwood behavioral health center nearly two weeks ago for...

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    In this image taken from video posted by Ugarit News, which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, purports to show a fireball from an explosion at a weapons depot set off by rocket attacks that struck government-held districts in the central Syrian city of Homs on Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013. The blasts sent a massive ball of fire into the sky, killing scores and causing widespread damage and panic among residents, many of whom are supporters of President Bashar Assad.

    At least 40 killed in Syrian weapons depot blast

    Rocket attacks struck government-held districts in the central Syrian city of Homs on Thursday, setting off successive explosions in a weapons depot that killed at least 40 people and wounded dozens, an opposition group and residents said. The explosions in Homs reflected the see-saw nature of the conflict. It showed that despite significant advances by Assad’s military, rebels could still strike...

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    Hoffman Estates supporting two National Night Out events

    Hoffman Estates is supporting two National Night Out events on Tuesday, Aug. 6. National Night Out is an opportunity for neighbors to get together to promote safer streets. It is used to strengthen police and community partnerships and heighten awareness of crime and drug prevention.

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    In this July 10, 2012, file photo, then Indiana school Superintendent Dr. Tony Bennett speaks in Indianapolis. Bennett built his national star by promising to hold “failing” schools accountable. But when it appeared an Indianapolis charter school run by a prominent Republican donor might receive a poor grade, Bennett’s education team frantically overhauled his signature “A-F” school grading system to improve the school’s marks from a “C” to an “A”.

    Fla. education chief resigns amid grading scandal

    Florida’s education commissioner resigned Thursday amid allegations that he changed the grade of a charter school run by a major Republican donor during his previous job as Indiana’s school chief. Tony Bennett called that interpretation “malicious and unfounded” and said he would call for Indiana’s inspector general to look into the allegations because he is certain he will be cleared of...

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    A man cools off in a fountain at a park in Shanghai, China, Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013. Hot weather has set in with temperatures rising up to 104 degrees Fahrenheit in Shanghai.

    Bacon fries on pavement as heat wave grips China

    It’s been so hot in China that folks are grilling shrimp on manhole covers, eggs are hatching without incubators and a highway billboard has mysteriously caught fire by itself. The heat wave — the worst in at least 140 years in some parts — has left dozens of people dead and pushed thermometers above 104 degrees F in at least 40 cities and counties. “It is just hot! Like in a food steamer!”...

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    Lightning at Colo. base leaves 12 soldiers hurt

    Twelve soldiers were injured, one critically, after lightning struck near them during a training exercise at Fort Carson, a base spokesman said Thursday. Maj. Earl Brown, deputy public affairs officer at the Army base near Colorado Springs, said six of the soldiers were still hospitalized and five were treated and released after Wednesday’s strike. An engineering soldier was in critical condition.

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    Voters look at posted results outside a polling station in Harare Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013 President Robert Mugabe’s ZANU PF party said Thursday, that it has withdrawn an unauthorized message on its Twitter feed claiming a resounding victory in the country’s national elections.

    Zimbabwe challenger says poll is not credible

    The main challenger to Zimbabwe’s longtime president, Robert Mugabe, said Thursday the election is “null and void” due to alleged violations in the voting process, but Mugabe has denied vote rigging. “The shoddy manner in which it has been conducted and the consequent illegitimacy of the result will plunge this country into a serious crisis,” Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai warned.

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    For each generation, changing the world is tougher than it looks

    Our Ken Potts remembers back when Baby Boomers were going to change the world. That, it turns out, was a little more difficult than it looked.

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    Armed robber in Schaumburg takes family’s vehicle

    A Schaumburg man playing with his children in a neighborhood park was robbed of his car at gunpoint Tuesday night, police said. The 36-year-old was with his children at the west end of Atcher Park when the robber approached, displayed a handgun and took the man's car keys.

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    Schaumburg neighborhood garage sale Friday, Saturday

    The 13th annual Lexington Green II Subdivision Garage Sale will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, Aug. 2 and Saturday, Aug. 3 in the Schaumburg neighborhood off Meacham Road just south of Schaumburg Road. Many neighborhood families are participating, selling TVs and computers, antiques and furniture.

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    Like they did last year, kids can try on some mini fireman boots and check out the emergency vehicles on display 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at Pentair Water and Oberweis Dairy near I-88 and Randall Road during North Aurora Days, a weekend-long festival starting Friday.

    Remembering a friend: North Aurora Days honors Max Herwig

    With the death of Max Herwig, longtime coordinator and volunteer for North Aurora Days, the village is feeling the loss of the well-known, committed community member. So this year, the village is coming together to bring back this community event Friday through Sunday.

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    A gay rights activist chant slogans during a demonstration in front of the Russian consulate in New York, Wednesday, July 31, 2013. Russian vodka and the Winter Olympics in Sochi are the prime targets as gays in the United States and elsewhere propose boycotts and other tactics to convey their outrage over Russia’s intensifying campaign against gay-rights activism.

    Russia will enforce anti-gay law during Olympics

    Russia will enforce a new law cracking down on gay rights activism when it hosts international athletes and fans during the 2014 Olympics in Sochi, the country’s sports minister said Thursday. “An athlete of nontraditional sexual orientation isn’t banned from coming to Sochi,” Vitaly Mutko said in an interview with R-Sport. “But if he goes out into the streets and starts to propagandize, then of...

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    Subsidies for the village’s two golf courses is one reason Buffalo Grove officials say they might face deficits over the next five years. However, officials note, the size of the subsidy will decline from $150,000 to $25,000 between 2014 and 2018.

    Buffalo Grove financial forecast shows potetial deficits

    Like the weather picture you see on your local news, Buffalo Grove’s five-year financial forecast shows conditions could be worse in some areas than others. Finance Director Scott Anderson delivered the forecast to the village board this week, emphasizing that the presentation is not necessarily a guarantee of what the future holds and that officials will be working to balance the budget over the...

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    Norway mass killer wants to go back to school

    The convicted Norway mass killer has applied for admission to the University of Oslo, testing the limits of Norway’s commitment to rehabilitate criminals rather than punish them. “In Norway, and I’m proud of this, we have a system where inmates, in general, can apply to study at universities, most of them from their own cell, so it will be distance learning,” said Ole Petter Ottersen, the rector...

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    Jan Schakowsky

    Schakowsky: 23 privately funded trips since 2007

    U.S. Rep. Jan Schakowsky, an Evanston Democrat, has taken 23 privately funded trips worth about $198,000 since 2007, more than any others in the suburban congressional delegation during that time, records compiled by the website Legistorm.com show. “These trips encourage bipartisanship and are filled with rigorous policy discussions," her spokesman said.

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    Lawmakers debate a bill that would legalize marijuana and regulate production and distribution in Montevideo, Uruguay, Wednesday, July 31, 2013. Uruguay’s unprecedented plan to put the government at the center of a legal marijuana industry has made it halfway through congress.

    Uruguay takes step toward full pot legalization

    Uruguay’s unprecedented plan to put the government at the center of a legal marijuana industry has made it halfway through congress. “Sometimes small countries do great things,” said Ethan Nadelmann, executive director of the U.S. Drug Policy Alliance. “Uruguay’s bold move does more than follow in the footsteps of Colorado and Washington. It provides a model for legally regulating marijuana that...

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    Candie

    Best way to protect felines, other animals is to keep them indoors

    Since I feed birds, squirrels and rabbits in my yard, I would like to suggest that I am providing an all-day adventure for my felines when they are not busy napping. I provide them all the fascination of a moving picture show without them going outdoors. In fact, my felines are never allowed access to the outdoors except to go the veterinarian in an escape-proof carrier.

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    Qurbah, six months old, with Arabic that reads, “Morsi,” painted on her face, attends a demonstration with her mother outside Rabaah al-Adawiya mosque, where they have installed a camp and hold daily rallies at Nasr City, in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, July 31, 2013. Egypt’s military-backed government has ordered the police to break up the sit-in protests by supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi, saying they pose an “unacceptable threat” to national security. Egyptian authorities on Thursday offered “safe passage and protection” for thousands of supporters of the country’s ousted president if they end their marathon sit-ins in Cairo.

    Egypt offers ‘safe passage’ for Morsi’s supporters

    Egyptian authorities on Thursday offered “safe passage and protection” for thousands of supporters of the country’s ousted president if they end their marathon sit-ins in Cairo. “The Interior Ministry ... calls on those in the squares of Rabaa el-Adawiya and Nahda to listen to the sound of reason, side with the national interest and quickly leave,” Interior Ministry spokesman Hany Abdel-Latif...

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    Margaret Miles, right, celebrates with wife Cathy ten Broeke, left, after they were married at the Minneapolis Freedom to Marry Celebration, Thursday at the Minneapolis City Hall.

    Gay couples get hitched in Minnesota, Rhode Island
    Gay couples began tying the knot in Minnesota and Rhode Island on Thursday, pushing the growing roster of places where same-sex couples can wed to more than a quarter of U.S. states. Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak began presiding over his state’s first sanctioned gay marriages just after midnight Wednesday, as 42 same-sex couples who didn’t want to wait any longer filed into City Hall to make it...

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    The patio area at the Mill Race Inn in Geneva reflects the restaurant’s current state: closed and looking for a buyer. City officials envision, however, that the property could be redeveloped with housing and stores, especially if combined with a neighboring property.

    Geneva hopes to strengthen ties to Fox River

    Riverside redevelopment? Geneva's been doing that for decades, evidenced, for example, by Island Park, which was sold to the city 100 years ago. But it could be doing more to strengthen the ties between the Fox River and the rest of the downtown, according to a city plan.

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    Critics: Consumers should know more about outbreak
    Food safety advocates say they are alarmed by a lack of information being disseminated about the spread of a nasty intestinal illness that has sickened nearly 400 people nationwide, including four in Illinois, one of those in Lake County. The outbreak of the rare parasite cyclospora has been reported in at least 15 states, and federal officials warned Wednesday it was too early to say that the...

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    Jim Aronson spins the Wheel of Meat at the Ham and Bacon Stand during the 2009 Lake Villa Days in Lehmann Park.

    Lake Villa Days ready to celebrate its 80th year

    The Lake Villa Days community festival will celebrate its 80th anniversary this year with the usual traditions, including local firefighters battling with water, food, live music and a friendly atmosphere. The festival will be in Lehmann Park Thursday through Sunday.

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    Palatine Police Department Sgt. Larry Canada, right, and officer Mark Dockendorf stand at attention outside the entrance during the wake for Wheeling police officer Shamekia Goodwin-Badger at Kosssak Funeral Home in Wheeling last night.

    Dawn Patrol: Wheeling officer mourned; trash compactor kills man

    Wheeling police officer remembered. Palatine man’s body found in trash compactor. Wauconda village administrator Torres out. Man’s body found on Bloomingdale Road. New Schaumburg plant to bring 400 jobs. Kane computer upgrade cost falls to $9 million. HR in 10th lifts Indians over Sox 6-5.

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    Brad O'Halloran

    Enough votes to oust Metra chairman?

    If Metra directors vote on booting out beleaguered Chairman Brad O'Halloran is a stalemate possible? With two directors from Kane and DuPage counties jumping ship, the eight votes needed to nix O'Halloran might not be there, even with a director from Naperville saying, "The time is right for some corrective action regarding the chairman.”

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    Paul Darley

    Cronin not rushing to fill Metra vacancy

    DuPage County Board Chairman Dan Cronin says he’s in no hurry to appoint a new county representative to the Metra board of directors. He said he would prefer to delay the appointment until after Metra deals with the fallout over its former CEO Alex Clifford’s resignation.

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    Pat Quinn

    Quinn defends Lake County election board decision

    Online voter registration was a bigger priority to Gov. Pat Quinn than not expanding the size of government in a state that leads the nation in units of government. That's why Quinn didn't use his amendatory veto power to pull the plug on creation of a Lake County election commission in a sweeping election bill he signed Saturday.

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    Two groups are being formed to study the future of the DuPage County Fair and whether it should be moved from the fairgrounds in Wheaton.

    DuPage County Fair looking for ways to improve

    The question of whether the DuPage County Fair is relocated sometime in the future won’t be answered until county officials decide what to do with the existing fairgrounds in Wheaton. To help them make that decision, county officials plan to enlist a group of real estate experts to explore whether there could be a more productive use of the 42-acre site, which the county owns next to its...

Sports

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    The Cubs’ Junior Lake smiles in the dugout after hitting a solo home run in the first inning against the Dodgers on Thursday night.

    Offense continues to be issue for Cubs

    The good news for the Cubs Thursday was they hit 4 home runs. The bad news was they had 5 hits total in a 6-4 loss to the Dodgers. The Cubs' hitting woes, particularly with men in scoring position, was a hot topic of the day.

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    Ex-Cub Marmol returns but feels unappreciated

    Former Cubs closer Carlos Marmol returned to Wrigley Field Thursday as a member of the Los Angeles Dodgers. Marmol said he did not feel appreciated by the fans for the good things he did before his career fell on hard times.

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    Chicago Cubs' Anthony Rizzo runs the bases after hitting a solo home run in the first inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers in a baseball game in Chicago on Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013. (AP Photo/Charles Cherney)

    Cubs bats can't top Dodgers' Puig

    Yasiel Puig hit a long home run and scored two runs to lead the Los Angeles Dodgers to a 6-4 win over the Cubs on Thursday. Hanley Ramirez and Jerry Hairston each drove in two runs for the Dodgers, who got a win a night after having a four-game winning streak snapped and improved their record to 11-2 since the All-Star break.

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    Chicago Bears defensive end Julius Peppers (90) recovers a loose ball and is stopped by Detroit Lions quarterback Matthew Stafford (9) during the second quarter of an NFL football game at Ford Field in Detroit, Sunday, Dec. 30, 2012. (AP Photo/Rick Osentoski)

    Trestman in awe of how Peppers carries himself

    Even at age 33 and after 11 years in the NFL, defensive end Julius Peppers says he feels like a much younger man, and he still plays as if he's in his prime. That's good news for the Bears and bad news for anyone trying to prevent him from adding to his career toal of 111.5 sacks, the second most in the NFL since he entered the league in 2002.

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    It sure does seem like this season might be it for Paul Konerko, but whenever it is that he decides to walk away from the game he should go out with all the praise and accolades he has earned as a star for the White Sox.

    Not his style, but Konerko really deserves fitting send-off

    If Paul Konerko decides to hang him up after the season, here's hoping he gives the fans fair warning so they can show their appreciation for a player who has meant so much to his team and his city. That and more White Sox talk in this week's Spellman's Scorecard.

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    Chicago White Sox pitcher Chris Sale delivers against the Cleveland Indians in the second inning of a baseball game, Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013, in Cleveland. (AP Photo/David Richard)

    White Sox future not as dark as it might seem

    It's been a miserable season for the White Sox, who are on pace to lose 101 games. But general manager Rick Hahn said the barren minor-league system is better than critics think, and plenty of prospects are well on their way to the South Side.

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    Chicago Bears rookie guard Kyle Long talks to the media.

    Bears' Long shows he's a quick study

    Safety Brandon Hardin stripped the football from running back Armando Allen in Thursday morning's practice, scooped it up and sprinted 90 yards to the opposite end zone. And he was almost caught from behind — by 313-pound guard Kyle Long. The speed is just one of the rare combination of physical attributes that led the Bears to use the 20th overall pick on Long in April. Bob LeGere says the son of Hall of Fame defensive end Howie Long still has a lot to learn about offensive line play in the NFL, but he's already shown he's a quick study.

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    Tourney host Trenton ousts Elk Grove

    Elk Grove's run in the American Legion baseball state tournament came to a close Thursday in a 6-3 loss to tournament host Trenton on Thursday.

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    Bostic eager to learn more every day

    Rookie middle linebacker Jonathan Bostic. already starting in place of injured veteran D.J. Williams, got the added responsibility of calling defensive signals in Thursday's practice.

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    Webb Simpson chips to the ninth green during the first round of the Bridgestone Invitational golf tournament Thursday at Firestone Country Club in Akron, Ohio. Simpson finished his round at 6-under par.

    64 gives Simpson lead at Bridgestone

    Webb Simpson, playing his first competitive round at Firestone Country Club, shot a 6-under 64 on Thursday to take a one-stroke lead in the Bridgestone Invitational.

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    New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez throws the ball during a rehabilitation workout at Steinbrenner Field Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013, in Tampa, Fla. Major League Baseball is threatening to kick A-Rod out of the game for life unless the New York star agrees not to fight a lengthy suspension for his role in the sport's latest drug scandal, according to a person familiar with the discussions. The person spoke to The Associated Press on Wednesday, July 31, 2013 on condition of anonymity because no statements were authorized. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

    Monday MLB drug deal deadline as playoffs loom

    Looming playoffs could force an end to negotiations in baseball’s latest drug scandal as pressure builds to impose penalties so stars can still make the postseason.Monday appears to be the deadline for Alex Rodriguez and 13 others to accept suspensions for their ties to the Biogenesis of America anti-aging clinic.

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    Jeray bidding for third Illinois Women’s Open

    Nicole Jeray, the LPGA Tour veteran from Berwyn, is poised to join amateur Kerry Postillion as the only three-time champions of the Illinois Women’s Open. Jeray, though, one stroke out of the lead entering the last 18, trailing Postillion’s daughter Samantha, a 21-year-old amateur who plays for the University of Illinois.

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    (No heading)

    Sky scout for Friday...please post on web

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    South Korea's Inbee Park watches her shot on the first fairway during the first round of the Women's British Open golf championship on the Old Course at St Andrews, Scotland, Thursday Aug. 1, 2013. (AP Photo/Scott Heppell)

    Park, seeking 4th straight major, opens with 69

    Wearing a black rain suit and a soft smile, Inbee Park looked calm as ever standing before the imposing Royal & Ancient clubhouse just moments before she teed off Thursday in the Women’s British Open.Only after her unsteady round of 3-under 69 did Park reveal perhaps the biggest surprise at St. Andrews.She was nervous.

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    Gold medalist Taylor McKeown, of Australia, smiles during an awards ceremony for the women's 200-meter breaststroke final at the U.S. Open Swimming Championships, Wednesday, July 31, 2013, in Irvine, Calif. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

    Big night for Lochte, Magnussen, US golden girls

    Ryan Lochte feels like himself again. Looks more like himself, too, with that gold medal around his neck.Missy Franklin and Katie Ledecky have felt this way all along. They’re piling up so much gold they might need bigger suitcases to get home.

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    Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver Riley Cooper meets with the media at NFL football training camp on Wednesday, July 31, 2013, in Philadelphia. Cooper has been fined by the team for making a racial slur at a Kenny Chesney concert that was caught on video, leading him to say he's "ashamed and disgusted" with himself. (AP Photo/Philadelphia Daily News, Yong Kim) THE EVENING BULLETIN OUT, TV OUT; MAGS OUT; NO SALES

    Sensitivity training set for Eagles WR Cooper

    The Philadelphia Eagles are setting up Riley Cooper with sensitivity training after the wide receiver was caught on video making a racial slur.“In meeting with Riley yesterday, we decided together that his next step will be to seek outside assistance to help him fully understand the impact of his words and actions,” the team said in a statement Thursday.

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    New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez leaves the team's minor league complex after a rehabilitation workout Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013, in Tampa, Fla. Major League Baseball is threatening to kick A-Rod out of the game for life unless the New York star agrees not to fight a lengthy suspension for his role in the sport's latest drug scandal, according to a person familiar with the discussions. The person spoke to The Associated Press on Wednesday, July 31, 2013 on condition of anonymity because no statements were authorized. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

    A-Rod in simulated game, could be Trenton bound

    Alex Rodriguez played in a simulated game Thursday, probably the last step before the New York Yankees send him on a second minor league injury rehabilitation assignment — if he’s not suspended first.

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    Rick West/rwest@dailyherald.com ¬ Injured Chicago Bulls point guard Derrick Rose (1) warms up before game 3 of the NBA Eastern Conference semifinals at the United Center in Chicago Friday.

    Rose’s return could come Oct. 5 in Indiana

    If all goes according to plan, Derrick Rose’s return to NBA action will not start in Chicago. The Bulls released their preseason schedule on Thursday and it features games in Indianapolis, St. Louis and Rio de Janeiro before the first contest at the United Center on Oct. 16 against Detroit.

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    Northwestern sets football ticket record

    With 30 days still remaining before its 2013 football season-opener, Northwestern has surpassed the school’s modern-era record for its largest season ticket sales base.

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    West's Candace Parker, of the Los Angeles Sparks, drives to the basket while guarded by East's Cappie Pondexter, of the New York Liberty, during the first half of the WNBA All-Star basketball game in Uncasville, Conn., Saturday, July 27, 2013. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)

    WNBA monthly honors to Fowles, Parker

    NEW YORK — Sylvia Fowles of the Chicago Sky and Candace Parker of the Los Angeles Sparks were named the WNBA’s Eastern and Western Conference Players of the Month, respectively, for games played in July.

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    Austin Jones of St. Charles spins through the air in a tuck at the St. Charles Gymnastics Academy. He took the gold medal in the vault and placed 5th in the parallel bars in his age and level at the 2013 Junior Olympic Championships in Portland, Ore.

    Young St. Charles gymnast loves what he can do

    Twelve-year-old Austin Jones says there's something really cool about being able to do things that most people can't even fathom. That's why he's loved gymnastics from the first time he tried it, when he was just 4. “I wanted to keep with that because it's really fun in the air, and not a lot of people could do it," said the St. Charles boy. In the eight years since, Austin's hard work has propelled him to become one of the top young gymnasts in the country.

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    White Sox pitcher Chris Sale allowed 5 runs on 10 hits in 5 innings of work Thursday, falling to 6-11 on the season.

    White Sox swept by Cleveland, fall 6-1

    Ryan Raburn homered twice and drove in four runs and the Cleveland Indians won their eighth consecutive game, a 6-1 victory over the White Sox on Thursday. White Sox pitcher Chris Sale allowed 5 runs on 10 hits in 5 innings of work Thursday, falling to 6-11 on the season.

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    Simpson takes over Glenbard East softball program

    Nikki Simpson is about to get her first crack at running a softball program.Running and softball, Simpson does quite well.The former All-Area outfielder at Glenbard South — and granddaughter of Chicago Cubs great Billy Williams — was hired this week as the new varsity coach at Glenbard East.

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    Northwestern head coach Pat Fitzgerald celebrates a first down in the closing seconds of the Gator Bowl against Mississippi State in Jacksonville, Fla. Northwestern will start the season No. 22 in the coaches’ poll.

    Alabama No. 1 in coaches’ poll; Northwestern No. 22

    Alabama is No. 1 in the USA Today preseason coaches’ poll. Five Big Ten teams cracked the Top 25, including Northwestern at No. 22. Notre Dame is rated No. 11.

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    Mike North video: Alex Rodriguez considers his options
    Initially Alex Rodriguez said he would not accept a suspension. Now it appears he has changed his mind most likely cause of the evidence Major League Baseball has in their possession.

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    The Cubs’ David DeJesus watches his two-run single against the Milwaukee Brewers during Wednesday night’s game at Wrigley Field. The Cubs won 6-1.

    Jackson helps Cubs beat Brewers 6-1

    Edwin Jackson pitched eight solid innings, David DeJesus drove in three runs and the Chicago Cubs beat the Milwaukee Brewers 6-1 on Wednesday night to salvage the finale of the four-game series. Anthony Rizzo hit a two-run homer and Starlin Castro belted a solo shot as Chicago closed out a 14-13 July, its first winning calendar month since it went 15-10 last July. Jackson allowed one run and eight hits in his longest outing of the season, staying in the game after a 66-minute rain delay in the sixth inning.

Business

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    John Koskinen stands outside the White House in Washington. President Barack Obama has nominated Koskinen as Internal Revenue Service commissioner.

    Obama picks restructuring expert to take over IRS

    “With decades of experience, in both the private and public sectors, John (Koskinen) knows how to lead in difficult times, whether that means ensuring new management or implementing new checks and balances,” Obama said in a statement. “Every part of our government must operate with absolute integrity and that is especially true for the IRS. I am confident that John will do whatever it takes to restore the public’s trust in the agency.”

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    Former Goldman Sachs vice president Fabrice Tourre, right, walks to Manhattan federal court Thursday with his attorneys, in New York.

    Ex-trader ‘Fabulous Fab’ found liable in SEC case

    A former Goldman Sachs trader who earned the nickname “Fabulous Fab” was found liable Thursday in a fraud case brought by federal regulators in response to the 2007 mortgage crisis that helped push the country into recession. A jury reached the verdict at the civil trial in Manhattan federal court of Fabrice Tourre — a French-born Stanford graduate described by Securities and Exchange Commission lawyers as the face of “Wall Street greed.” Tourre’s attorneys portrayed him as a scapegoat in a downturn caused by larger economic forces.

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    A sidewalk gets shaped Thursday in front of new construction in Omaha, Neb. Conductors of a monthly survey of business leaders in nine Midwest and Plains states say the region’s economy will grow in the coming months.

    Factories, jobs, markets show resurgence

    Stronger growth at U.S. factories could aid a sluggish economy that has registered tepid growth over the past three quarters. And it could provide crucial support to a job market that has begun to accelerate but has added mostly lower-paying service jobs.

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    About 75 shoppers who were lined up in front of The Nike Store enter with high-fives by store employees for its grand opening at the Fashion Outlets of Chicago on Thursday.

    Rosemont outlet mall opens to throngs of bargain shoppers

    Opening day for the Fashion Outlets of Chicago outlet mall in Rosemont was marked by huge crowds, long lines, and minor glitches such as failing registers, a packed parking garage and traffic snarls. Yet, overall shoppers left with wide grins on their faces from having accomplished their bargain-hunting mission. “There are a lot of great stores here,” said Brian Perille, 17, from Barrington.

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    The Motorola Moto X smartphone, using Google’s Android software, shown off Thursday at a press preview in New York.

    U.S. factory means buyers can customize Google phone

    With its first smartphone designed completely in-house, Google is demonstrating one of the benefits of moving production from Asia to the U.S.: It’s letting buyers customize phones to give them their own style.

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    Workers use buckets to remove crude oil Tuesday during a clean-up operation on the beach of Prao Bay on Samet Island in Rayong province eastern Thailand. About 13,200 gallons of crude oil that leaked from a pipeline operated by PTT Global Chemical Plc, has reached the popular tourist island in Thailand’s eastern sea despite continuous attempts to clean it up.

    Despite boom, higher costs push Big Oil into slump

    New troves of oil have been found all over the globe, and oil companies are taking in around $100 for every barrel they produce. But these seemingly prosperous conditions aren’t doing much for Big Oil: Profit and production at the world’s largest oil companies are slumping badly.

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    Specialists Peter Kennedy, Bernard Wheeler, and Philip Finale, confer on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

    S&P 500 closes above 1,700 for first time

    Overnight, a positive read on China’s manufacturing helped shore up Asian markets. Then, an hour before U.S. trading started, the government reported that unemployment claims fell last week. At mid-morning a trade group said U.S. factories revved up production last month. And while corporate earnings news brought both winners and losers, investors were able to find enough that they liked in companies including CBS, MetLife and Yelp.

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    Google-funded sea research vessel sets sail

    The Falkor is funded by the Schmidt Ocean Science Institute, which was co-founded by Google executive Eric Schmidt and his wife, Wendy.

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    Gov. Pat Quinn signs a bill for medical marijuana Thursday at the University of Chicago Center for Care and Discovery. Patients will be allowed up to 2.5 ounces at a time.

    Medical marijuana will be legal Jan. 1

    Illinois became the 20th state in the nation to allow the medical use of marijuana Thursday, with Gov. Pat Quinn signing some of the nation’s toughest standards into law. The measure, which takes effect Jan. 1, sets up a four-year pilot program for state-regulated dispensaries and 22 so-called cultivation centers, where the plants will be grown.

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    Allstate profit advances on investments, reduced disaster costs

    Northbrook-based Allstate Corp., the largest publicly traded U.S. auto and home insurer, said second-quarter profit climbed on investment gains and reduced costs tied to natural disasters. Net income climbed 2.6 percent to $434 million, or 92 cents a share, from $423 million, or 86 cents, a year earlier, the Northbrook, Illinois-based company said yesterday in a statement.

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    Walgreen investors sue CEO over $80 million DEA painkiller fine
    Deerfield-based Walgreen Co. Chairman James A. Skinner and Chief Executive Officer Gregory D. Wasson were sued by investors accusing them of failing to protect the company from an $80 million federal fine for lax oversight of prescription painkiller distribution. The shareholders’ complaint in federal court in Chicago also names 11 board members as defendants and was filed on behalf of the company, the biggest U.S. pharmacy chain.

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    ECB rates unchanged amid hopes for recession’s end

    The European Central Bank has left its benchmark interest rate unchanged at a record low of 0.5 percent. The bank held off on further efforts to stimulate Europe’s lagging economy after recent indicators suggested the recession might soon be coming to an end in the 17 European Union countries that use the euro.

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    Obama orders review of chemical plant rules

    President Barack Obama is ordering federal agencies to review safety rules at chemical facilities in response to the deadly April explosion at a Texas fertilizer plant. Obama, in an executive order to be announced Thursday, specifically tasks agencies with examining new ways to safely store and secure ammonium nitrate, the explosive chemical investigators say caused the Texas blast.

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    Career Education Corp., headquartered in Schaumburg, is using adaptive learning technology with online courses.

    Career Education expands use of new online platform for students

    Schaumburg-based Career Education Corp., a provider of for-profit schools and online education, is diving into adaptive learning technology at two of its schools and rolling it out to others later this year. Adaptive learning technology customizes programs to the user, in this case, the student taking an online course. It tracks what the student is learning, what still needs to be learned, and whether the course should offer more challenges.

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    Qdoba Mexican Grill opening second Schaumburg location

    Qdoba Mexican Grill will open its second Schaumburg location Friday, Aug. 2 at 2602 W. Schaumburg Road in Schaumburg. To celebrate the grand opening, Qdoba will open its doors at 10:30 a.m. and the first 50 customers to visit will receive prize bags with giveaways ranging from free chips and queso to Free Burritos for a Year.

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    Creditors overwhelmingly approved the bankruptcy reorganization plan for American Airlines parent AMR Corp., which includes a merger with US Airways that would create the world’s biggest airline.

    American Airlines creditors approve reorganization plan
    Creditors overwhelmingly approved the bankruptcy reorganization plan for American Airlines parent AMR Corp., which includes a merger with US Airways that would create the world’s biggest airline. AMR said Thursday that preliminary results show that at least 88 percent of the ballots cast by creditors favored the turnaround plan. AMR s

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    Acquisition helps Lisle’s Catamaran 2Q profit soar

    Lisle-based Catamaran Corp. said Thursday that its second-quarter earnings more than doubled after the pharmacy benefits manager completed a major acquisition last year.The company also said it had raised its earnings forecast for 2013 and completed another acquisition. Its shares rose more than 3 percent in morning trading.

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    As a slew of big-name Japanese companies report improved quarterly earnings, one theme is taking the sheen off their rosy numbers: mainstay businesses are still struggling despite the perk from a weaker yen.

    Sony returns to quarterly profit on cheap yen

    As a slew of big-name Japanese companies report improved quarterly earnings, one theme is taking the sheen off their rosy numbers: mainstay businesses are still struggling despite the perk from a weaker yen. The latest example came Thursday from Sony Corp.

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    Wis.-based Skyward announces expansion plans
    A Stevens Point company plans to expand after deciding to stay in Wisconsin. Leaders of Skyward Inc. celebrated Wednesday with community members and elected officials. Officials of the information system company say they were able to stay in Wisconsin thanks to a bill supported by both Republican and Democratic lawmakers.

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    Procter & Gamble adjusted 4Q results beat Street

    Procter & Gamble Co. said Thursday that its fiscal fourth-quarter net income dropped 48 percent due to a write-down related to its Braun Appliance business and other one-time costs. But its adjusted results beat Wall Street expectations, and its shares edged up in premarket trading.

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    Rep. Virginia Foxx, R-N.C., front right, with Reps. Luke Messer, R-Ind., from left, Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash., and John Kline, R-Minn., talk about student loans on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday.

    Bill to lower student loan rates heads to Obama
    A bipartisan bill that would lower the costs of borrowing for millions of students is awaiting President Barack Obama’s signature. The House on Wednesday gave final congressional approval to legislation that links student loan interest rates to the financial markets. The bill would offer lower rates for most students now but higher rates down the line if the economy improves as expected.

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    The wreckage of the Asiana Flight 214 airplane after it crashed at the San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco.

    NTSB gets complaints about air crash attorneys

    Officials are looking into whether some attorneys may have violated a U.S. law barring uninvited solicitation of air disaster victims in the first 45 days after an accident in connection with the crash landing of Asiana Flight 214 in San Francisco.

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    Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel pauses during a news conference at the Pentagon, Wednesday.

    Hagel: Budget cuts could harm nation’s defense
    Pentagon officials insist they are not crying wolf when they say proposed budget cuts could severely harm the military. In a detailed and stark warning, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said about $500 billion in automatic budget cuts scheduled to take effect over the next decade could leave the nation with an ill-prepared, underequipped military doomed to face more technologically advanced enemies.

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    Martha Stewart products in the Macy’s store at the Kenwood Towne Centre.

    Judge to hear final arguments on Martha Stewart
    Attorneys for J.C. Penney and Macy’s are set to be back in court Thursday after a three-month break to present closing arguments in a contract dispute over a partnership with the Martha Stewart brand.New York State Supreme Court Judge Jeffrey Oing could decide the case as early as Friday, experts say

Life & Entertainment

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    ‘Spectacular Now’ a surprising, heartfelt teen romance

    “The Spectacular Now” is a pure gem of a teen romance graced with sparkling acting by its young leads, Miles Teller and Shailene Woodley, as high-school seniors falling awkwardly in love. Directed with a sure and sensitive touch by James Ponsoldt, the film breaks refreshingly with teen-romance formula and offers up lots of pleasant, quiet surprises.

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    Singer Lana Del Rey will close out the first day of Lollapalooza festivities with a Friday night set.

    Women in the spotlight at Lollapalooza in Chicago

    Women are preparing to rock this year's Lollapalooza music festival. The more than two-decades-old festival opens Friday in Chicago's lakefront Grant Park with a strong female lineup, building on headlining appearances in recent years by Lady Gaga, Florence and the Machine and Neko Case. Lana Del Rey and Cat Power will each close one of Lollapalooza's eight stages over the three-day event this year.

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    The restored space shuttle Galileo from the 1960’s television show “Star Trek” is unveiled at Space Center Houston in Houston.

    Restored Star Trek ship Galileo arrives in Houston

    HOUSTON — When the smoke cleared and the music died down, Candy Torres could no longer contain herself. Looking at the shiny, restored Star Trek Galileo shuttlecraft sitting in Houston in all its TV glory, she broke down.“All of a sudden I was just crying. I was in tears. I couldn’t believe it,” Torres said, donning a brown tourist engineer hat and a NASA mission operations shirt. “It meant something.”And Torres wasn’t alone. Trekkies of all stripes arrived in Houston for the momentous unveiling of the shuttlecraft that crash-landed on a hostile planet in the 1967 “Star Trek” episode called “The Galileo Seven.” Some wore Scotty’s Repair Shop T-shirts, others full-blown spandex outfits worn by Mr. Spock and his peers in the famous TV show and movies that have garnered a following so large and so devoted it is almost cultlike.Adam Schneider paid $61,000 for the battered shuttlecraft in an auction and spent about a year restoring the fiberglass ship and making it look nearly as it did on that episode. He flew in from New York to mark the unveiling at the Space Center Houston, where it will be permanently displayed not far from NASA’s Mission Control.“Unbelievably proud,” he said, beaming alongside the white shuttle. “Like sending your kid to college and having them get a job to build a successful life, because this was under our care for a year and we grew very attached.Jeff Langston, 45, drove more than 160 miles from Austin with his two sons to see the moment. He and his 12-year-old son, Pearce, wore matching red Scotty’s Repair Shop T-shirts. His 10-year-old son, Neo, couldn’t find his shirt, but that didn’t put a damper on the moment.“It was very exciting,” Neo said, bouncing on his feet. “When they filmed Star Trek the Galileo was cool and now that they remade it, it’s cool to see a new version of the Galileo. And it’s beautiful.”Richard Allen, the space center’s 63-year-old CEO and president, hopes that just as the Star Trek movies and others like it inspired Torres to pursue a career in science and engineering, that today’s generation will be similarly inspired when they see the Galileo.“It’s fantastic,” he said of the shuttlecraft. “We’re all about exciting and educating ... and I’m convinced that space is one of the best, if not the best, way of creating inquiry in young minds.”

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    ‘G.I. Joe: Retaliation’ gathers an epic cast

    Video answer man Jeff Tuckman reviews several home video releases this week, incluging the action movie “G.I. Joe: Retaliation.” He writes it’s worth renting or buying this movie just for the exciting ninja scene set in the mountain peaks of Japan. The special effects really kick in when Cobra blows up London in an amazing fashion. This story pits American democracy against super villains.

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    ‘Shrek’ to make local stage debut in Schaumburg

    Locally produced stage musicals usually feature classics that have stood the test of time, ready to be reinterpreted by and introduced to a new generation. And then, every so often, comes something new to everyone. Schaumburg On Stage will be the first theater group in the Northwest suburbs to perform the recent Broadway hit “Shrek the Musical."

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    Representatives from more than 30 breweries will be serving up tastes of more than 100 craft beers Saturday at Wheaton's Memorial Park.

    Wheaton Brew Fest to feature more than 100 beers

    Whether you're a craft beer snob or just starting to learn about the hop-filled world that lies outside the king of beer's castle, there's likely to be a brew just for you at the third annual Wheaton Brew Fest. “Our brewery list is a good marriage of brews this year,” said Arrowhead Golf Club beverage manager and Wheaton Brew Fest committee member Brian Whitkanack.

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    Saturday’s car show at the Summer Daze celebration in Warrenville will be one of the highlights of the two-day event.

    Summer Daze in Warrenville features rock ‘n’ roll, cars

    Two of America’s favorite things will be converging on Warrenville this weekend: rock ‘n’ roll and cars. The corner of Butterfield and Batavia roads will be rocking once again for Warrenville’s 36th annual Summer Daze festival and about 100 cars are expected to be displayed at Saturday’s car show.

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    Trench (Denzel Washington) and Stig (Mark Wahlberg) don't know each is working as an undercover agent for another agency in the R-rated, action-packed comedy "2 Guns."

    '2 Guns' engaging, energetic action comedy capped by charismatic stars

    The biggest surprise in 2 Guns” might be the explosive chemistry between stars Denzel Washington and Mark Wahlberg, who exchange witty jibes and zesty zingers like gunfire between marksmen. These 2 actors are so good at exuding lovable animosity toward each other that “2 Guns” could almost dispense with its frenetic action and just concentrate on the rapport between its 2 main characters.

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    A Los Angeles judge ordered Lohan on Wednesday to undergo 18 months of therapy sessions to continue treatment after a successful three-month stay in rehab facilities as part of her sentence in a misdemeanor case filed after a car accident in June 2012.

    Lohan completes rehab stint; more therapy ordered

    A judge says Lindsay Lohan must undergo frequent therapy sessions now that the actress has successfully completed a court-ordered stint in rehab. Superior Court Judge James R. Dabney ordered Lohan to meet with a therapist in person three times a month until November 2014.

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    ‘Parks and Rec’ loses 2 cast members

    NBC’s “Parks and Recreation” is losing two of its cast members. Rob Lowe and Rashida Jones will leave the series after the 13th episode of the upcoming sixth season.

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    Country music star Randy Travis is out of the hospital three weeks after he was admitted with congestive heart failure and later suffered a stroke.

    Randy Travis out of the hospital

    Country music star Randy Travis is out of the hospital three weeks after he was admitted with congestive heart failure and later suffered a stroke. A statement Wednesday says Travis has been discharged from The Heart Hospital Baylor Plano near Dallas, where he was admitted July 7.

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    A double dose of Nintendo nostalgia

    Nintendo gives us a reason to care about the Wii U on Sunday when “Pikmin 3,” the latest installment in the colorful strategy franchise, hits stores. The game puts you in control of an interstellar explorer who commands his minions — or Pikmins — to solve puzzles and find food in lush environments. The capabilities of the Wii U bring a few new features to the game, including the ability to use your gamepad as an in-game camera. Also, howzabout a new erotic thriller from Brian De Palma?

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    Amelia Langer, an assistant curator of Draft Urbanism, the art exhibition of the 2013 Biennial of the Americas, unzips the opening to a hotel room made of aluminum and inflated vinyl capable of being held aloft by a van-mounted scissor lift during a promotional display in a parking lot in downtown Denver.

    Hotel offers pop-up inflatable room

    For a limited time, a Denver hotel is offering a package with a one-night stay in a pop-up, inflatable room that rises 22 feet in the air, thanks to a scissor lift on top of the van on which it sits. The cost: $50,000. There is a weight limit. No smoking is allowed.

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    A bottle garden frames flower and vegetable beds in a backyard in Langley, Wash. Combined with a basket collection, it brings the gardener’s personality into play.

    Slow gardening a lifestyle rather than a race

    Felder Rushing is not a man to be hurried. This former county extension agent turned folklorist, author and lecturer is an advocate of slow gardening — emphasizing the process over the product. “Life has a lot of pressures,” Rushing says. “Why include them in the garden?” Slow gardening is an offshoot of the international Slow Food Movement, which, in its words, aims “to strengthen the connection between the food on our plates and the health of our planet.” Think of it as mixing ecology with gastronomy, promoting wellness over the high-calorie fare of many fast-food menus.

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    Pork loin gets an herbed maple syrup rub before it hits the grill. Serve with grilled corn and scallions salad.

    Nourish: Summerize roast pork by grilling

    Pork roast gets a hot-weather makeover and heads to the grill, where it’s cooked over indirect heat. The root vegetables are replaced by grilled summer corn and lots of grilled scallions. A judicious dose of maple syrup complements the natural sweetness of both.

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    Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) shares a moment with her rich con-artist husband Hal (Alec Baldwin) shortly before her privileged world implodes in Woody Allen's "Blue Jasmine."

    Bad things happen to characters we love to hate in ‘Blue Jasmine’

    Dann reviews two movies: Woody Allen’s “Blue Jasmine,” starring the splendid Cate Blanchett as a fallen financial goddess who, like Tennessee Williams’ self-deluded Blanche DuBois, seems to be incapable of acknowledging the reality of her existence; plus “The Hunt,” a superb Danish drama about an innocent man accused of sexual misconduct with children. Dann also provides some film notes.

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    Maggie George, left, and Rebecca Voelkel with their 6-year-old daughter Shannon at their Minneapolis home. Maggie and Rebecca have married each other twice, first ceremonially in their Minneapolis church in 2006, then legally while visiting San Francisco five years ago. Now the couple is mulling whether to do it all again — or to simply sleep through it — when gay marriage becomes legal in Minnesota this week.

    Gay couples choosing whether to re-celebrate vows

    Maggie George and Rebecca Voelkel have married each other twice, first ceremonially in their Minneapolis church in 2006, then legally while visiting San Francisco five years ago. Now the couple is mulling whether to do it all again — or to simply sleep through it — when gay marriage becomes legal in Minnesota this week. They’re among the gay couples nationwide who have ignored state lines in pursuit of a marriage license, even if it had no legal standing back home, as voters, courts or legislators slowly created the patchwork of U.S. states where gay marriage is legal.

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    Elmhurst natives The Orwells will play an official Lollapalooza aftershow Saturday, Aug. 3, at Schubas. The band will also perform at 1 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 4, on the Grove Stage at Lollapalooza.

    The Orwells: From suburban garage band to Lollapalooza

    Matt O’Keefe’s first trip to Lollapalooza was as a kid in 2006 tagging along backstage with his dad, a Flaming Lips fan. Sunday, he’ll be back at Lollapalooza — as a performer, not a fan. O’Keefe’s band, punk group The Orwells, takes Lollapalooza’s Grove Stage at 1 p.m. Sunday in Chicago’s Grant Park. So might some fan be screaming his name this time? “Maybe,” said O’Keefe, now 18, with a laugh. “But I doubt any 40-year-old and his kids will be doing it.”

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    Night life events: Try a new brew at Emmett’s beer dinner

    Sample a selection of Emmett’s beers and take a tour of the brewery at a beer dinner at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 8, in West Dundee. Featured beers include Saison, Citra IPA, Emmett’s Red Ale, Bourbon Barrel Aged Scottish Ale. The dinner menu includes ahi tuna two ways; watermelon salad; lemon grass sorbet; Emmett’s red ale BBQ short ribs; and flourless chocolate cake, all for $59.95.

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    The Elgin Cultural Arts Commission's “Walkabout: Theater on Your Feet” premiered in 2010. Kelly Bolton, on ladder, and others presented “Oracle” at a store on Chicago Street.

    'Walkabout' stages spy-themed skits around Elgin

    A man stands on a ledge contemplating suicide.Police officers interrogate a suspect. An art thief discusses a prized painting she may or may not have stolen. Mother and daughter spies realize they have been sent to kill each other. These all make up the Janus Theater Company's production of “Walkabout: Jumpers, Thieves, Cops & Spies.” The James Bond-themed series of small plays will run from Friday to Sunday, Aug. 2-4.

Discuss

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    Aaron Lawlor

    Editorial: Lake County right to fight unwarranted law

    A Daily Herald editorial says Lake County is right to fight a state law that would impose an expense election commission tha few can justify and many do not want.

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    Editorial voice and the question of judgments

    Columnist Jim Slusher: A common refrain from people who disagree with a Daily Herald editorial factors down to something like, “Who died and made the Daily Herald the judge?” There is a simple answer to that question. No one did.

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    Weiner’s Schnitzel

    Columnist Kathleen Parker:

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    Jury bungled Zimmerman case
    A Carpentersville letter to the editor: I’ve been reading with some confusion the letters concerning the George Zimmerman trial. Most of the letter writers’ missives I’ve read in your paper have had a very loose grasp of the facts.

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    Policy errs on side of caution, restraint
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: Although the president chose not to press charges for war crimes against those who irresponsibly took us to war in Iraq — i.e. torture at Abu Ghraib, torture connected to rendition, and the continuing injustices at Guantanamo, he nevertheless has shown extraordinary common sense and forbearance in conducting the foreign policies which he has initiated — drone strikes notwithstanding.

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    There is help for heroin addiction
    A Carol Stream letter to the editor: The heroin epidemic has been well documented. All the information is out there. However, when it comes to the treatment of this addiction, little is offered. For those who are afflicted or know someone who is afflicted with this addiction, there is help.

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