New DH calendar

Daily Archive : Sunday July 28, 2013

News

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    Dist. 300 school board OKs goals for strategic plan

    Community Unit District 300 school board members discussed a strategic plan Monday as a road map for future teaching and learning in the Carpentersville-based district. Administrators have been working with educational research firm ECRA Group Inc., since the 2011-12 school year to craft the shell of plan. They presented the outline Monday, soliciting a reaction from board members who started out...

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    Zareli Saavedra, 14, of Hanover Park gets a little help from Eugenia Aguilera, 19, of Schaumburg. Zareli, who’s battling brain cancer, had her dream of a quinceañera came true thanks to the Make-A-Wish foundation Sunday in Streamwood.

    Hanover Park teen’s quinceañera wish comes true

    Two years ago, Zareli Saavedra was getting treatment for a cancerous brain tumor, knowing her family wouldn’t have enough money to throw her a lavish quinceañera when she turned 15. The coming of age celebrations routinely cost families upward of $15,000. But Sunday, Zareli did celebrate her 15th birthday in style, thanks to the Make-A-Wish Foundation and its supporters.

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    Shelby Grinnell, left, of Walworth, Wis., receives a plaque and a $300 check from Susie Fisher, of Zion, after winning first place in the Master Showman competition at the Lake County Fair Sunday.

    Master showmen try to impress Lake County Fair judges

    Animals you might normally see at the end of a knife and fork were featured in the fair’s first “Master Showman” competition, where teens demonstrated their ability to “show” animals to judges who would assess the animal’s fitness to provide meat or milk.

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    A bus lies on its side after plunging off a highway near Avellino, southern Italy, early Monday.

    Bus crash in southern Italy kills 38 people

    An Italian tour bus plowed through several cars before it crushed through a sidewall of a highway bridge and plunged into a ravine, killing at least 38 people, authorities said Monday. Rescuers wielding electric saws cut through the twisted wreckage of the bus looking for survivors overnight, and state radio quoted a local police chief as saying the bus driver was among the dead. The bus lost...

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    Purple and black bunting hang from the facade at the Wheeling Police Department on Monday to honor Officer Shamekia Goodwin-Badger, who died Saturday after collapsing during a training exercise Thursday.

    Wheeling cop collapses during training, dies at hospital

    Wheeling Police confirmed that a village police officer collapsed during a training exercise on Thursday and died at the hospital Saturday night.

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    Scott Soldwisch with Medinah Shriners hands out small toy to children while riding a mini motorcycle in Streamwood Summer Celebration parade on Saturday.

    Images: Weekend festivals in the suburbs
    Images from this weekends festivals that include the Puerto Rican Heritage Fest, Arlington Heights Irish Fest, Rockin' the Blocks, Midsummer Downtown Block Party, International Dragon Boat Festival, Streamwood Summer Celebration, DuPage County Fair, Algonquin Founders' Day and the Winfield Criterium

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    Man sentenced to 12 years for DUI that killed 2 Rolling Meadows women

    A Mokena man who pleaded guilty earlier this month to a 2011 DUI crash that killed two women from Rolling Meadows, was sentenced on Friday to 12 years in prison, officials said.

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    Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, center, attends the weekly cabinet meeting in Jerusalem, Sunday. Netanyahu coaxed his skeptical coalition partners Sunday to agree to free Palestinian prisoners as part of U.S efforts to resume peace talks, calling the deal a “tough decision” that he took for the good of the country.

    Israel OKs prisoner release, step to peace talks

    A divided Israeli Cabinet agreed Sunday to release 104 long-term Palestinian prisoners convicted of deadly attacks, clearing a hurdle toward resuming Mideast peace talks and giving U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry his first concrete achievement after months of shuttle diplomacy.

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    Addison man charged in wife’s murder

    An Addison man has been charged with the murder of his wife in what police say was a domestic incident. Kurtis Worley, of the 900 block of Craig Place, has been charged with one count of first-degree murder in the death of Martha Worley, 39, according to a release from the DuPage County state’s attorney on Sunday night.

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    A walking tree trunk caught my attention as I drove west along Chicago Ave. towards downtown Naperville. I was looking for an area with a clean and simple background, making these heavy lifters dominate the image. Left to right: Colbert Riel, Goddard Ariel, Kate Sanderson, Sarah Henry, and AJ Wiessel get a workout carrying a Styrofoam tree to Pfeiffer Hall at North Central College, for a Peter Pan play. The photo was published in the weekly Perspective column.

    Images: The Week in Pictures
    This edition of The Week in Pictures features Irish dancers in an empty store, 900 ears of shucked corn, and WWII airplanes.

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    Police stand guard as wreckage of a crashed train is seen ready to be deposited in Santiago de Compostela, Spain, Sunday.

    Spanish train crash driver charged provisionally

    The driver of a Spanish train that derailed at high speed killing 79 people was provisionally charged Sunday with multiple cases of negligent homicide. A court statement said investigative magistrate Luis Alaez released Francisco Jose Garzon Amo without bail.

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    Pope Francis waves from his popemobile along the Copacabana beachfront on his way to celebrate the World Youth Day’s closing Mass in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Sunday. Hundreds of thousands of young people slept under chilly skies in the white sand awaiting Francis’ final Mass for WYD.

    Pope draws 3 million to Mass as Brazil trip closes

    Pope Francis’ historic trip to his home continent ended Sunday after a marathon weeklong visit to Brazil that drew millions of people onto the sands of Rio de Janeiro’s iconic Copacabana beach and appeared to reinvigorate the clergy and faithful alike in the world’s largest Catholic country.

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    Oliver Dickens

    Police: Carpentersville man threw bleach on taxi driver to avoid fare

    An 18-year-old Carpentersville man faces an aggravated battery charges alleging he threw a can of bleach in a cabdriver’s face instead of paying his fare Thursday night, according to police. Oliver D. Dickens, 18, of the 1200 block of Silverstone Drive, is being held in the Cook County jail in lieu of $125,000 bond, records show. He was easily arrested after leaving his ID in the cab.

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    This is the Carlton hotel in Cannes, southern France, where $53 million worth of jewels and diamonds were stolen in one of Europe’s biggest jewelry heists recent years.

    Police: $53 million in jewels stolen in Cannes

    A staggering $53 million worth of diamonds and other jewels was stolen Sunday from the Carlton Intercontinental Hotel in Cannes, in one of Europe’s biggest jewelry heists in recent years, police said. One expert noted the crime follows recent jail escapes by members of the notorious “Pink Panther” jewel thief gang.

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    Danielle Krebs of St. Charles, 12, cheers on the BMX riders Sunday at the 2013 Winfield Criterium at Oakwood Park in Winfield.

    Hundreds of riders enjoy Winfield Criterium

    The annual Winfield Criterium rode through town Saturday and Sunday, sending cyclists from all over the region through neighborhood streets on the village’s north side. Organizers estimated that between 300 and 400 riders participated in the criterium, a bicycle-racing event that included courses of .9 miles and 1.25 miles.

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    Supporters of Egypt’s ousted President Mohammed Morsi chant slogans supporting the former leader during a protest near Cairo University in Giza, Egypt, Sunday.

    Morsi backers defiant in face of Egypt govt threat

    Escalating the confrontation after clashes that left 83 supporters of Egypt’s ousted Islamist president dead, the interim government moved Sunday toward dismantling two pro-Mohammed Morsi sit-in camps, accusing protesters of “terrorism” and vowing to deal with them decisively.

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    Bob Ellison, of Fox Lake, rides the Fireball with daughter Amanda at the Lake County Fair Sunday, July 28.

    Images: Sunday’s Lake County Fair
    Photos of the 85th Annual Lake County Fair in Grayslake from Sunday, July 28.

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    Improve Playhouse performance

    Libertyville’s Improv Playhouse presents a Chicago-based cabaret for audiences on Aug. 10 at 7:30 and 9 p.m.

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    Law committee meets Tuesday

    The Lake County Board’s law and judicial committee will meet at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, July 30, at the county government building in Waukegan.

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    Evaluation ordered in elderly landlord ax chase

    A judge has ordered a fitness evaluation for a Carpentersville man accused of chasing his 73-year-old landlord with an ax. Christopher A. Pederson, 60, is charged with felony aggravated battery to a victim over 60 and aggravated assault with a deadly weapon after police said he chased the Elgin man through a parking lot. The man was not injured.

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    Dillard to address Arlington Hts. Tea Party

    A black, lifelong Chicago Democrat who converted to the Republican Party will be the first speaker at the Arlington Heights Tea Party meeting 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 1, in the 3rd floor board room of Arlington Heights village hall, 33 S. Arlington Heights Road.

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    Officials investigating Palatine garage fire

    Palatine fire officials are investigating the cause of a garage fire Saturday morning in the 600 block of South Warren Avenue. No civilians or firefighters were injured. The garage sustained heavy damage, but investigators have yet to determine a cost estimate.

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    The Lutherbrook campus in Addison includes a school and residential treatment center for children ages 6 to 18 who have suffered trauma.

    Police reports reveal ‘troubling’ cases at Lutherbrook
    A sexual encounter, a knife in a classrom and an attack on a teen are among troubling occurrences at Lutherbrook that have caught the attention of the Cook County public guardian. But leaders of the Addison treatment center for traumatized youth say the facility is all about healing and helping children.

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    'Deacon' White

    One-time Aurora resident Deacon White entering baseball's Hall of Fame

    Deacon White died near St. Charles 25 days after the first National Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony in 1939. Now 74 years later, the one-time Aurora resident regarded by historians as the one of the greatest catchers of baseball's inaugural days is getting his due.

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    New York City Mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner takes reporters questions Tuesday during a news conference at the Gay Men’s Health Crisis headquarters in New York. The former congressman says he’s not dropping out of the New York City mayoral race in light of newly revealed explicit online correspondence with a young woman.

    Why does Anthony Weiner keep doing it?

    The lewd behavior that New York mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner engaged in suggests he is struggling with more than bad behavior and could be dealing with a variety of issues driving his problematic sexual behavior, experts said. “It’s driven behavior,” said Berlin, a psychiatrist who has been treating patients for more than 30 years. “People are feeling they are pushed to act a certain way even...

Sports

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    Bears linebacker Lance Briggs smiles as he talks with teammates during NFL football training camp Saturday, July 27, 2013, at Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais.

    As Bears don pads, Cutler under constant pressure

    The anticipated improvement of the Bears' offensive line wasn't evident in Sunday's first training camp practice in pads. The approximatly 9,000 fans saw the defensive get the best of the rebuilt offensive line more often than not. I thought the defense had the jump start on us, and there were defensive players who had edges,” said head coach Marc Trestman, whose area of expertise is on offense.

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    New York Yankees' Alfonso Soriano takes his helmet off after being tagged out at first base by Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher Chris Archer during the seventh inning of a baseball game Saturday, July 27, 2013, in New York.

    Soriano a living emblem of Cubs' failed possibilities

    Alfonso Soriano is finally gone, and it doesn't feel like I thought it would. For years I dreamed of finding him a new home, and now he's off to revisit an old one. But Soriano's trade back to the place of his MLB birth doesn't fill me with the joy it once may have. I, like many of you, had grown to respect him.

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    Arlington Heights wins twice, forces one more game

    With 59 years directing the Arlington Heights American Legion team and eight state championships, manager Lloyd Meyer has certainly seen his team enjoy some stellar days of baseball. Sunday was another one.On the brink of elimination from the Division I tourney at Recreation Park in Arlington Heights, Meyer’s club scored 3 runs with two outs in the bottom of the ninth inning to edge Northbrook 7-6. Post 208 then held on for a 5-3 victory over the tourney’s only previously undefeated team, Elk Grove, to give itself a chance for the title today at 1 p.m. on the Lloyd W. Meyer Field.

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    Bullpen rescues Cougars against Chiefs

    Juan Paniagua started for the Kane County Cougars on Sunday at Dozer Park, but he managed to record only six outs. However, the bullpen came to the rescue with 7 scoreless innings as the Cougars earned a 6-3 victory over the Peoria Chiefs.

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    Bears rookie offensive guard Kyle Long is “a gifted kid,” according to teammate Jermon Bushrod. “He has it physically. Just mentally and getting into this playbook, that’s going to come with time. It’s not easy. This is not an easy offense to learn.”

    Bears’ Bushrod likes what he sees in draft pick

    Two-time Pro Bowl offensive left tackle Jermon Bushrod is impressed by what he's seen so far from first-round pick Kyle Long, who is competing for the starting job at right guard.

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    Adam Dunn watches his solo home run against the Royals during the sixth inning of the Sox’ loss Sunday at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Low trade activity doesn’t surprise Konerko

    As usual, White Sox captain Paul Konerko had some interesting insight as Wednesday's nonwaiver trade deadline approaches. Konerko doesn't blame the Sox' poor play on all the trade rumors flying around, and he doesn't think there will be as many deals as anticipated.

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    Despite a 0-for-17 slump, Gordon Beckham is still hitting .300 for the season.

    Sox’ Beckham having a seriously good season

    You have to look pretty hard to find a bright spot on the White Sox this season, but Gordon Beckham fits the profile. Even though two left wrist injuries have sapped much of his power, Beckham is the only Sox hitter with an average over .300.

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    Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville, right, and general manager Stan Bowman appear at a news conference during the sixth annual Blackhawks Convention.

    Quenneville: Hawks ready to deal with ‘Stanley Cup hangover’

    Hawks coach Joel Quenneville is already preparing for the "Stanley Cup hangover question" that is sure to come at some point next season.

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    United States defender DaMarcus Beasley (7), center, holds the trophy as he celebrates with teammates after defeating Panama 1-0 during the CONCACAF Gold Cup final soccer match at Soldier Field on Sunday.

    U.S. wins soccer’s Gold Cup at Soldier Field

    A Brek Shea goal in the 68th minute of the Gold Cup final gave the United States a 1-0 victory against Panama in front of 57,920 mostly pro-American fans at Soldier Field. It also was the Americans’ 11th straight win, leaving the team brimming with confidence heading into the final stretch of qualifying this fall for June’s World Cup in Brazil.

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    Cubs pitcher Travis Wood, right, is greeted by teammate David DeJesus, left, after hitting a home run off San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Tim Lincecum during Sunday’s fifth inning.

    Wood’s arm, bat get it done for Cubs

    Travis Wood pitched a four-hitter over seven innings and had a home run among his two hits in helping the Cubs complete a three-game sweep in San Francisco for the first time in 20 years, beating the Giants 2-1 Sunday.

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    Jay Cutler looks to a pass during NFL football training camp Saturday, July 27, 2013, at Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais.

    Bears won’t be forced into Cutler decision

    Stop me if you’ve heard this before, but 2013 is a very big year for Jay Cutler. Still, if GM Phil Emery and coach Marc Trestman don’t get from Cutler what they expect, don’t believe for a moment that Emery will be forced into paying Cutler.

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    Tensions high in Sox clubhouse as trade deadline approaches

    Well, this is pretty much it. Whatever changes the White Sox are going to make will happen in the coming hours and days. Yes, the Sox could still make trades after this week’s deadline, but the bulk of anything they do will happen now. In fact, something may have already gone down by the time you finish reading this.

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    Cubs scouting report
    Cubs scouting report

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    White Sox slugger Adam Dunn watches his solo home run against the Kansas City Royals during Sunday’s sixth inning at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Royals outlast White Sox in extra innings

    Alex Gordon hit a two-run homer in the 12th inning and the Kansas City Royals beat the White Sox 4-2 on Sunday for their sixth consecutive victory. With no outs and Jarrod Dyson on third, the White Sox brought their infield in, but it didn’t matter one bit. Gordon drove a 2-2 pitch from Donnie Veal (1-1) over the wall in center for his first homer since July 7 and No. 10 on the year.

Business

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    A worker walks past artwork by Austyn Weiner at the Fashion Outlets of Chicago in Rosemont, which opens Thursday, Aug. 1.

    Rosemont’s upscale outlet mall opens Thursday

    Rosemont's new upscale outlet mall opens Thursday, Aug. 1. We'll talk to a retail expert about how this mall fits in with the overall region and Rosemont's grand vision, and have all the details/logistics of opening day.

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    In this Aug. 22, 2006, file photo, then-Shell Oil Co. president John Hofmeister addresses a conference to discuss the protection of and potential threats to national and global critical infrastructures in Washington. In a recent interview with AP, Hofmeister says oil and gas companies often do a terrible job at communicating.

    Some say industry arrogance fueled fracking anger

    The boom in oil and gas fracking has led to jobs, billions in royalties and profits, and even some environmental gains. But some experts say arrogance, a lack of transparency and poor communication on the part of the drilling industry have helped fuel public anger over the process of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking.

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    Students at Georgetown University, seen here, and on campuses around the country hope Congress restores a lower interest rate on student loans.

    Differences small between student loan bills

    The House is set to go along with a bipartisan Senate compromise that would link college students’ interest rates to the financial markets and offer borrowers lower rates this fall.

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    Renee Adams, left, poses with her mother Irene Salyers and son Joseph, 4, at their produce stand in Council, Va. Four out of five U.S. adults struggle with joblessness, near poverty or reliance on welfare for at least parts of their lives, a sign of deteriorating economic security and a vanishing American Dream.

    Signs of declining economic security

    Four out of 5 U.S. adults struggle with joblessness, near-poverty or reliance on welfare for at least parts of their lives, a sign of deteriorating economic security and an elusive American dream. Survey data exclusive to The Associated Press points to an increasingly globalized U.S. economy, the widening gap between rich and poor, and the loss of good-paying manufacturing jobs as reasons for the trend.

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    Treasury Secretary Jack said Sunday that Congress needs to raise the debt limit and take away the “cloud of uncertainty” about the nation’s ability to pay its bills.

    Treasury’s Lew: Congress needs to pass debt limit

    Congress needs to raise the debt limit and take away the “cloud of uncertainty” about the nation’s ability to pay its bills, Treasury Secretary Jack Lew said in an interview broadcast Sunday.

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    Lisa Stevens, a regional banking executive of Wells Fargo, poses for a photo in her office in Los Angeles. Wells Fargo is one of the country’s biggest lenders to small business.

    Wells Fargo exec: Small businesses need guidance

    When Lisa Stevens speaks about her role as head of small business banking at Wells Fargo & Co., she focuses more on how she can help her customers rather than how she can grow the bank’s loan portfolio. Stevens is aware that her customers also include those who can’t qualify for a loan. “It’s about getting a plan and helping people to set up and establish goals and move forward,” says Stevens, who has led Wells Fargo’s small business banking operations for two years.

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    Work Advice: When a good boss goes bad

    Karla L. Miller writes an advice column on navigating the modern workplace. Each week she will answer one or two questions from readers.

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    The emblem for the Detroit Police Department is seen on the sleeve of an officer Wednesday outside of the Theodore Levin U.S. Courthouse in Detroit. Detroit began its first court hearing after filing the biggest U.S. municipal bankruptcy. The city plans to seek a court order barring lawsuits against Michigan Governor Rick Snyder that are related to the case.

    A blueprint for how to save Detroit

    Detroit is filing for bankruptcy to get out from under crushing debts incurred to bondholders and pensioners during decades of economic decline and financial mismanagement. The political and legal barriers to doing so are enormous, but in principle the decline of Detroit could be slowed by literally making the city smaller and its population larger. “I don’t think Detroit can fund its current operations without shrinking substantially,” David Schleicher said.

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    Patrick McGuire of Atwood, Mich., examines sweet cherries growing in his orchard. McGuire says a labor shortage caused by the immigration controversy is making it difficult for him and other Michigan fruit growers to harvest their crops.

    Farmers, other businesses crucial in House debate over immigration

    Mornings for Bruce Frasier, an onion and cantaloupe grower in southwest Texas, are tinged with anxiety over whether enough day laborers will arrive in vans to harvest his crops. “It’s a heck of a way for a businessman to start his day,” said Frasier, who visited Washington to express his concerns about a dwindling labor force as he sought to persuade members of his Republican Party to revise immigration laws.

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    Career Coach Q&A: Resume tuneup, extracting constructive feedback

    Joyce E.A. Russell, an industrial and organizational psychologist, discussed workplace issues in a recent online forum.

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    Not all emerging-market stocks are down this year

    Iinvestors have been turning to actively managed mutual funds this summer. Such funds generally charge higher fees, but those that are run by talented, or lucky, stock pickers have a chance of beating the index. “Now, you’re seeing greater dispersion in returns from countries,” says Patricia Oey, a senior analyst at Morningstar.

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    Unused appliances such as toasters can make up 10-15% of your bill (left); properly selected and planted shade trees can save up to $80 annually on the average electric bill (right). Sources: EPA and Pepco.

    Make summer the season for saving energy

    Whether replacing light bulbs or unplugging your unused cellphone charger, small changes can make a big impact on your electricity bill this summer and beyond. Kristinn Leonhart, spokeswoman for the Environmental Protection Agency’s Energy Star program, said the average home has about 30 light fixtures, together consuming more electricity than a home’s washer and dryer, refrigerator and dishwasher combined.

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    Tips for handling your health care needs overseas

    An international vacation typically involves months of advance planning, from renewing passports to finding flights and booking hotels. But even the most carefully planned itinerary can be knocked off course by an unexpected health problem. Here are some tips on getting the medical care you need, no matter where your travels take you.

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    Backpacks at different price points, all from L.L. Bean: from left, Deluxe Book Pack for children age 10 and older, $39.95; the Original Back Pack for children age 7 and older, $34.95; and the Sport Pack, for children age 9 and older, $49.95.

    Backpack shopping tips and suggestions

    It’s hard to think about school supplies while you’re still enjoying homework-free days at the pool. But the new academic year will be here in a few weeks, and one thing that almost every student needs is a good backpack. Whether your child is on the hunt for a backpack with a favorite cartoon character or in a preferred color, it’s important to help him choose one that is the right size and shape for his body and what he needs to carry.

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    A worker works on the roof of a zero net energy home at The Preserve at Mountain Vista in New Paltz, N.Y.

    Building homes that make more power than they take

    “Zero-net energy” homes will feature thick walls, solar panels and geothermal heating and cooling systems, meaning families should be able to generate more energy over a year than they consume. These homes under construction 70 miles north of New York City have costly green features. But the builders believe they are in tune with consumers increasingly concerned about the environment and fuel costs.

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    Cheap headlight bulbs can be a hassle

    Q. We have a 2004 Buick Ranier on which I have had to replace the low beam headlamps a total of five times — three on right and two on left — over the past two years. A local repair shop did three, a dealer did one and I did one after researching the “ How To” of removing the front grill without breaking it.

Life & Entertainment

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    Peyton List will appear as part of The Tween Stars Live Tour at the Rosemont Theatre Sunday.

    Sunday picks: Scream for the Tween Stars tour

    The Tween Stars Live Tour features Disney Channel and Nickelodeon singing actors like Peyton List, Calum Worthy and more at the Rosemont Theatre. Take a look at three private North Shore landscapes during The Garden Conservancy's Open Days Program. Watch the famed Tempel Lipizzans perform to classical music and then tour the stables Sunday at Tempel Farms in Old Mill Creek.

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    Carson Daly, left, Adam Levine, Christina Aguilera, and CeeLo Green say finding a star on “The Voice” isn't really the goal.

    'The Voice' mentors aren't looking to find a star

    The mentors on “The Voice” may be superstars, but the consensus is it's not on them that the singing competition show has failed to find big stars such as themselves. Adam Levine, Christina Aguilera, CeeLo Green and the show's host and producer Carson Daly addressed journalists at the Television Critics Association summer press tour." I think that we all know that the lightning in a bottle you have to capture in order to be successful in this business is extraordinarily difficult," Levine said.

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    Boyfriend’s mother harsh on his girlfriend’s attitude

    Q. I have an autoimmune disorder that exhausts me. After a recent party at my boyfriend’s mom’s house, I heard that the mother and an aunt insist I came off “moody” and “mad” the whole day.

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    This publicity image released by 20th Century Fox shows Hugh Jackman in a scene from “The Wolverine.” The superhero film brought in $55 million its first weekend of release.

    'The Wolverine' claws way to top of box office

    "The Wolverine," the Fox film featuring Hugh Jackman's sixth turn as the claw-wielding superhero, opened with $55 million in North America, according to studio estimates Sunday. Last weekend's top movie, Warner Bros.' low-budget horror “The Conjuring,” slipped to second place, adding another $22.1 million to its take. “Despicable Me 2” was in third with $16 million.

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    Jennifer Aniston says it’s not that she and her fiance actor Justin Theroux have postponed their wedding, it’s that they haven’t even set a date yet.

    Aniston says she, Theroux ‘already feel married’

    Jennifer Aniston is dismissing rumors surrounding her upcoming wedding to Justin Theroux and setting the record straight. “We just want to do it when it’s perfect, and we’re not rushed, and no one is rushing from a job or rushing to a job,” the 44-year-old actress told The Associated Press on Saturday while promoting her new film, “We’re the Millers.” “And, you know, we already feel married,” she added.

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    Actress Shirley Jones has released her new autobiography.

    Shirley Jones offers naked truth in new book

    Shirley Jones opens the door to her house and appears every inch the ladylike Marian the librarian or sweet farm girl Laurey or cheerfully steady Mrs. Partridge, offering a warm smile and handshake. Her elegant, modestly high-necked jacket is black, her makeup is discreet and her silver hair tidy. Jones’ living room has the sort of traditional furniture and knickknacks (exception: a prominent Academy Award) that would fit any suburban house. Then there’s “Shirley Jones,” her new autobiography that turns the 79-year-old actress’ image on its head in startling — even shocking — ways.

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    Reuven Gershon performs “Come Together” in the rock musical “Let It Be” at the St. James Theater in New York.

    Beatles tribute band comes together on Broadway

    Reuven Gershon and James Fox have some insanely daunting shoes to fill: Every night, they’re asked to impersonate John and Paul on Broadway. Yes, that John and Paul. Gershon and Fox portray, respectively, John Lennon and Paul McCartney in a Fab Four cover band that has taken its concert show, “Let It Be,” from London’s West End to New York.

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    Jeff Bridges, left, and Ryan Reynolds star “R.I.P.D.,” which opened last weekend to dismal reviews and low tickets sales.

    It’s been a volatile summer for Hollywood

    On and off screen, it’s been a bruising summer for Hollywood. One after another, they have come: Big-budget, globe-trotting blockbusters backed by marketing budgets in the hundreds of millions. Some of these films have succeeded. Some have flopped. But more than most summers, the content of this year’s seasonal crop of spectacles has felt like a pummeling, leaving both moviegoers and some in the industry dazed from the onslaught.

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    The Centre of Elgin’s climbing wall offers 1,165 square feet of routes for all skill levels.

    Rock climbers keep cool climbing indoors in suburbs

    When the unpredictable summer weather means it’s raining or just too hot to play outside, you don’t have to resign yourself to having your energetic kids running around the house. One great option to let your family moving is to try rock climbing at one of these local gym or community center, where kids of all ages and fitness levels can challenge themselves.

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    Fireworks illuminate the Eiffel Tower in Paris during Bastille Day celebrations.

    France learning to put out the welcome mat

    There are no trash cans on the Champs-Élysées. Paris' department stores, as well as shops and restaurants across the country, are closed on Sundays. And pickpockets swarm the Eiffel Tower and the Louvre. France has long had a reputation — particularly in the English-speaking world — for being a bit difficult to visit. We love to hate it, with its surly waiters and superior shopkeepers. But we also love to love it: More people visit France than any other country in the world. But now, after years of casually riding a reputation for stunning monuments and world-class food, the French are starting to talk about tourism as an economic benefit

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    AirVenture 2013 is a weeklong event held in Oshkosh, Wis., featuring wall-to-wall aviation.

    On the road: AirVenture to land in Oshkosh

    AirVenture 2013, a weeklong event held in Oshkosh, Wis., is the world’s largest fly-in and boasts scads of activities to amaze and entertain all ages. Also, Sheboygan, Wis., on the shores of Lake Michigan, will once again host its annual Brat Days festival.

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    Book notes: Meet Anton DiSclafani at Anderson’s
    Meet author Anton DiSclafani as she reads from and signs copies of her book “The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls” at 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 1, at Anderson’s Bookshop in Naperville.

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    French get advice on how to treat tourists

    What does an American expect from Paris? What’s the best way of making an Italian feel welcome? Paris’ Chamber of Commerce and Industry and its Regional Tourism Council have teamed up to produce a guide for hotel owners, restaurateurs and shopkeepers in the hopes that it will help shake off the city’s reputation for snobbishness.

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    Chris Jaffee, Netflix VP of Product Innovation, left, and Bob Heldt, Director of Engineering, look over video displays as they await the debut of “Orange Is The New Black.”

    It takes a ‘war room’ to launch Netflix’s series

    “Orange Is The New Black” is the fourth exclusive Netflix series to be released in five months. The shows have become the foundation of Netflix’s push to build an Internet counterpart to HBO’s premium cable channel. “This is Silicon Valley’s equivalent of a midnight movie premiere in Hollywood,” says Chris Jaffe, Netflix’s vice president of product innovation.

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    Designer Abigail Edwards evokes nature in startling and interesting ways in her wallpaper, “Storm Clouds.” Its available in gray or blue and features metallic lightning bolts.

    Mother Nature meets modern decor

    Artists and artisans have captured flora, fauna and even meteorology in media such as photography, illustration, metal and clay. The designs, translated into wall decor and furnishings, range from startling to serene.

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    SH13G042TREASURES July 8, 2013 -- This is a nifty old device that will still get the job done. (SHNS photo courtesy Joe Rosson and Helaine Fendelman / Treasures In Your Attic) (Newscom TagID: shnsphotos147087.jpg) [Photo via Newscom]

    Is this old eggbeater worth much?

    Q. Thanks in advance for any information you can give me on this “Silvers No. 3” eggbeater. It measures 12 inches high by 4 inches square. On one side it is graduated for liquid weights — 4 ounces to 1 pound. On another it has such notations as “One Quart Full” and “One Pint 3 Gills.” Another side has embossed text, including “Even Full 8 ‘T’ 4 Coffee Cups.” The bottom is embossed “Silvers, Brooklyn NY” and has a representation of the Brooklyn Bridge.

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    Not only do these electronic toilets flush themselves, some models feature complete audio systems with AM/FM radio and an auxiliary input to play your stored music and podcasts.

    Singin’ in the shower on a whole-new level

    Today, we do have plumbing fixtures complete with internal sound systems. While these toilets and bathtubs can be pricey, the good news is usually you only need one of these musical plumbing fixtures to fill your bathroom with sound.

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    Locating roof leak’s source may take some detective work

    Q. I have a perplexing problem. I have a flat roof on a house built in 1975. The previous owners had a foam roof installed shortly before I purchased the home in 1997. I had the roof coated within a year of moving in.

  •  
    Wall-mounted sinks and gray grout, pictured, are design choices that make it much easier to clean a bathroom.

    Six design choices for an easy-to-clean bathroom

    When designing a bathroom, people rarely take functional aspects like ease of cleaning into consideration, says Sandra Soria, author of “Bathroom Idea Book” (The Taunton Press, 2013). “I think we approach our home aesthetically, and we maybe tend to get caught up in things we love and not think about problems down the line,” Soria says.

Discuss

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    Congressman Peter Roskam

    Editorial: Roskam, ethics and an oddly funded trip to Taiwan

    A Daily Herald editorial says that even if it is determined that Rep. Peter Roskam of Wheaton broke no ethics rules or laws on his 2011 trip to Taiwan, he owes his constituency an explanation for why he and his wife got to travel for free.

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    When sex matters

    Columnist Michael Gerson: While political sex scandals can be disturbing, outrage at sex scandals can also be irritating.

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    Political sex scandals and the public’s judgment

    Columnist Michael Gerson: Mostly, sex is properly private. Combined with recklessness, the abuse of power or cruelty, however, it can take on public implications. While rejecting judgmentalism, it is still appropriate for voters to exercise some judgment.

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    Rep. Steve King’s rotten tomatoes

    Columnist Dana Milbank: Rep. Steve King, an Iowa Republican, has always been a bit of a melon head, but he outdid himself in an interview that came to light last week in which he described “DREAMers” — people brought to this country illegally as children — as misshapen drug mules. “For every one who’s a valedictorian, there’s another 100 out there that — they weigh 130 pounds and they’ve got calves the size of cantaloupes because they’re hauling 75 pounds of marijuana across the desert,” the honorable gentleman said. Cantaloupe calves?

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    Will Obama support new Egypt cabinet?
    A Waukegan letter to the editor: The new Cabinet in Egypt was sworn in on July 16. The European Union foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton is already in Cairo dealing with the interim cabinet as a legitimate government. Note the new cabinet contains women and Christians.

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    New form can ensure end-of-life wishes
    A Mount Prospect letter to the editor: I read with interest the opinion piece by Ellen Goodman about Nelson Mandela and her call for end-of-life conversations before they are needed. Many people around the country and in Illinois also agree with her and have been working to help people identify their power of attorney for health care and make their wishes known for many years.

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    Coverage of trial was lopsided
    A Palatine letter to the editor: Martin was consistently portrayed as an innocent youngster by repeatedly publishing a photo taken when he was 14 years old while in fact he was actually now larger than Zimmerman. Meanwhile Zimmerman was consistently portrayed as a racist vigilante who was looking for trouble.

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    Border still porous; update the numbers
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: For a very long time now, the estimate of 11 million illegal immigrants having crossed our border has been the accepted number. Our border was not and is not closed, and there is no evidence that the illegals have stopped coming.

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    DOMA repeal didn’t ‘follow the nation’
    A Woodstock letter to the editor: “Dumb and Dumber” is a movie of two brainless losers. Is this Generation Y, also known as the Millennial Generation? They cheer for repeal of the Defense of Marriage Act without understanding the unintended consequences. DOMA passed both houses of Congress by large, veto-proof majorities and was signed into law by President Bill Clinton.

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    DuPage flood fees fleece the taxpayer
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: DuPage County is taking advantage of flood-ravaged citizens with exorbitant permit costs. After the most recent flood many homeowners have once again had to replace furnaces, refinish damaged basements or have felt the need to install expensive generators to protect their property.

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