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Daily Archive : Thursday June 27, 2013

News

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    Move to stiff Elgin’s sister city is defeated

    An effort by two Elgin councilman to prevent the city from spending any money to host a delegation from its sister city in Chile didn’t get any traction after a testy discussion Wednesday night. “We’re made to feel like if we don’t do this, we’re horrible people,” said John Prigge, who suggested the cutback.

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    The Hometown Fest carnival promises to turn you (temporarily) upside down.

    Palatine’s Hometown Fest sticks with tried and true formula

    The Palatine Jaycees are back on Wednesday, July 3, with Hometown Fest, featuring a carnival, parade, Family Day activities, a variety of food and music, the Arts and Crafts Fair/Business and Charity Expo and fireworks.

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    Oakton gets nanotechnology grant

    Oakton Community College has received a $250,000 grant from the Searle Funds at The Chicago Community Trus to educate industrial employees about the college’s nanotechnology program.

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    N. Aurora bicyclist fatally struck by car near Batavia

    A 50-year-old North Aurora man was killed Thursday afternoon after his bicycle was hit by a car near Batavia, officials said.

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    Hoffman Estates relocating Fourth of July parade

    Hoffman Estates will relocate its Fourth of July parade this year because of the ongoing reconstruction of Hassell Road, village officials said Thursday.

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    O'Hare worker charged with smuggling cocaine

    A manager at a cargo and ground-service company at O'Hare International Airport was arrested this week after a federal investigation involving a government informant caught him trying to smuggle a shipment of cocaine off a flight from Mexico.

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    Dehumidifier failure blamed in fire at Deer Park house

    No injuries were reported from a fire that sparked in a dehumidifier in the basement of a Deer Park house early Thursday, authorities said.

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    Twin Lakes Triathlon canceled due to flooding

    The annual Twin Lakes Triathlon in Palatine scheduled for Sunday has been canceled due to flooding, officials said on Thursday night.

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    Thousands still without power, more storms possible

    A day after major flooding hit the Northwest suburbs, another storm front moved through the area around rush hour bringing strong winds, hail and traffic backups.

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    Two men found dead in Lake Villa home

    Lake Villa police are investigating the possible drug-related deaths of two family members found dead in their home on Thursday morning.

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    Acting IRS Commissioner Danny Werfel prepares to testify on Capitol Hill in Washington Thursday before the House Ways and Means Committee hearing to report on the internal investigation into the extra scrutiny the IRS gave Tea Party and other conservative groups that applied for tax-exempt status.

    Investigator: IRS screened few progressive groups

    A Treasury Department inspector general says the Internal Revenue Service screened only a few progressive groups seeking tax-exempt status for possible political activity, as a clash escalated between that investigator and congressional Democrats who called his probe of the agency misleading.

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    Brief power outage at Great America

    A brief power outage at Six Flags Great America in Gurnee left some people stuck on Thursday night, but everyone was able to get off the rides safely, officials said.

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    Witness Rachel Jeantel, right, continues her testimony to defense attorney Don West in George Zimmerman’s trial in Seminole circuit court in Sanford, Fla. Thursday, June 27, 2013. Zimmerman has been charged with second-degree murder for the 2012 shooting death of Trayvon Martin.

    Friend: Trayvon Martin encounter racially charged

    George Zimmerman’s defense attorney insisted during several testy exchanges with an important prosecution witness Thursday that Trayvon Martin injected race into a confrontation with the neighborhood watch volunteer and insinuated the young woman was not believable because of inconsistencies in her story.

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    Prosecutors: Convicted sex offender failed to register

    A 36-year-old convicted sex offender, who police say was loitering in a children’s play area in an Elk Grove Village fast-food restaurant, pleaded guilty to failing to notify police of his address as the law requires. In exchange for Joseph O'Brien's guilty plea to the class 3 felony, Cook County Judge Ellen Mandletort sentenced him to three years in prison, with credit for the 189 days he has...

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    Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., left, confers with Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., as the Senate Judiciary Committee meets on immigration reform on Capitol Hill in Washington.

    Immigration overhaul: Senate passes historic bill

    With a solemnity reserved for momentous occasions, the Senate passed historic legislation Thursday offering the priceless hope of citizenship to millions of immigrants living illegally in America’s shadows. The bill also promises a military-style effort to secure the long-porous border with Mexico.

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    A student purchases a brown sugar Pop-Tart from a vending machine in the hallway outside the school cafeteria, in Wichita, Kan. High-calorie sports drinks and candy bars will be removed from school vending machines and cafeteria lines as soon as next year, replaced with diet drinks, granola bars and other healthier items the Agriculture Department said Thursday.

    Goodbye M&M’s, hello granola bars as school snacks

    Kids, your days of blowing off those healthier school lunches and filling up on cookies from the vending machine are numbered. The government is onto you. For the first time, the Agriculture Department is telling schools what sorts of snacks they can sell.

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    Guns, FOID cards recovered in Cook County sweep

    Cook County Sheriff’s officials seized an AR-15 assault rifle from an individual whose FOID card had been revoked because of a felony charge as part of a gun sweep in the Northwest suburbs this week, officials said.

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    Community Unit District 300 is searching for a more permanent home for its alternative school. School board members approved a resolution to put the current Oak Ridge property on the market in July.

    Dist. 300’s Oak Ridge students to get new home

    Some students in Community Unit District 300 go to school in trailers. They don’t have a gym or an auto program. Their classrooms don’t have the capacity for full biology or chemistry labs. And their principal often finds a comfortable corner to work from a laptop so group meetings can take place in his office. Oak Ridge School is an alternative program in Carpentersville for students who need...

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    After winning the 2010 Stanley Cup, the Hawks paraded down Washington Street en route to a rally in Chicago.

    Going to the Hawks rally? Here's what to know

    Blackhawks Nation is congregating in downtown Chicago Friday morning to honor our beloved Stanley Cup champions with a parade, which starts at 10:30 followed by a rally in Grant Park. Here's all the tips you need to make your parade-watching a perfect experience.

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    Graue Mill operators hope to grind corn and sell cornmeal to visitors by July 4.

    Graue Mill to be selling cornmeal by next week

    Cornmeal is expected to be on Graue Mill’s shelves again as soon as Wednesday afternoon.The stone-ground cornmeal won’t be ground by the museum’s 161-year-old water wheel gristmill but it will be as close as millers can get for $6,000.

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    Greater Round Lake Fire Protection District’s John Whitten, left, now on paid leave pending a disciplinary hearing, was a captain when he helped at this one-car rollover crash in Round Lake Park in 2005.

    Round Lake area fire captain on unpaid leave pending disciplinary hearing

    Greater Round Lake Fire Protection District Capt. John Whitten remains on an unpaid leave of absence pending a disciplinary hearing before the board of trustees. Fire Chief Paul Maplethorpe said a hearing on the matter had been set for Friday, but it won't occur as scheduled.

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    Schaumburg police step up 4th of July safety

    Schaumburg police will have an expanded safety program for the Fourth holiday, from June 29 to July 6.

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    Aaron Thurmond

    Woman who ignored subpoena in prostitution case picked up in Champaign

    A downstate woman who claimed her boyfriend and his friend sold her as a prostitute has been taken into custody in Champaign for ignoring a Lake County court-issued subpoena, authorities said. The woman, who is not being identified until charges are filed against her, was wanted after she did not show up in court Monday for the trial against her boyfriend, Aaron Thurmond, 23, and Jeffrey Horton,...

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    Wood Dale man sentenced to 10 years for child pornography

    A former Wood Dale man was sentenced on Thursday to more than 10 years in federal prison for possessing child pornography, according to the U.S. Attorney in Chicago. Brian Perron, 41, was arrested in July 2009 after Homeland Security Investigations agents searched his home and found a computer hard drive with 97 images and 21 videos depicting child pornography, according to a release from the...

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    Daily Herald File Photo The tollway is replacing the firm that runs the brains of its I-PASS system.

    Tollway approves $44 million software contract

    Tollway leaders endorsed a $44 million contract with Accenture to operate the software that processes all I-PASS transactions. The move came with opposition from one of the competitors - Xerox.

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    Hawaiian dancers kick off BeachFest:

    Barefoot Hawaiian Dancers will perform at 3 p.m. Friday, June 28 on the main stage outside the Cultural & Civic Center of Round Lake Beach to kick off BeachFest 2013.

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    Free Mundelein picnic, waterski show:

    Mundelein Park District hosts a free community picnic and water ski show at Diamond Lake Beach on Saturday, June 29 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

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    Naperville hospital settles teen suicide case for $1.65 million

    A psychiatric hospital in Naperville has agreed to pay $1.65 million to the family of a 17-year-old boy who committed suicide there in March 2012. The settlement involving Linden Oaks at Edward Hospital was formally approved in Cook County court this week by Judge Gregory O'Brien.

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    North Aurora’s new electrical contract calls for wind energy

    North Aurora has picked a new company to provide eletricity to residents starting this fall. The new company is supposed to provide electricity from a 100 percent renewable source.

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    After the DuPage County Board gave Islamic Center of Western Suburbs permission to convert a house near West Chicago into a prayer center, attorneys are negotiating a deal to settle the center’s lawsuit against the county.

    DuPage seeks settlement with Islamic group

    With DuPage County already owing $445,000 to one Islamic organization as a result of a federal lawsuit, officials are hoping to spend far less taxpayer money settling a separate legal dispute with another religious group that sued over a zoning issue.

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    Arlington Hts. looks to help disabled find employment

    Arlington Heights is launching a new effort to increase awareness and employment opportunities for citizens with disabilities. The village plans to reach out to potential workers in the area and help make them aware of resources available to help them apply for a job that matches their skills and work with potential employers to let them know about federal tax incentives to hiring people with...

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    District 129 settles scalding tea lawsuit

    West Aurora District 129 has settled a lawsuit filed by the parents of a preschool aged, special needs boy who was severely burned in November 2011 when he pulled a cup of hot tea, which was brought in to class by a teacher, onto his face. The settlement for the family and the boy, who is now 5, was ordered sealed and kept confidential by a judge at the request of the school district.

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    Family day at Lambs Farm:

    Lambs Farm, 14245 W. Rockland Road, Green Oaks, hosts a Fun and Fit Family Day from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, June 29.

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    Grayslake police special enforcement:

    Grayslake police have embarked on a special Fourth of July holiday enforcement campaign.

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    Paul Valade/pvalade@dailyherald.com A vehicle is half under water along Bristol Trail Drive in Lake Zurich Wednesday following heavy rains.

    Flooded areas returning to normal in Lake County

    One day after heavy rain from an early-morning storm caused flooding in southern Lake County, officials said those areas are slowly returning to normal. One of the hardest hit communities was Lake Zurich, but Kent McKenzie, the county’s director of emergency management, said floodwaters are receding.

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    Former New England Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez, left, stands with his attorney Michael Fee, right, during arraignment in Attleboro District Court Wednesday, June 26, in Attleboro, Mass. Hernandez was charged with murdering Odin Lloyd, a 27-year-old semipro football player for the Boston Bandits, whose body was found June 17.

    Hernandez denied bail in murder case

    A judge on Thursday denied bail for former New England Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez, who is charged with first-degree murder in the shooting death of a friend. Hernandez's lawyer argued that Hernandez is not a risk to flee and the case against him is circumstantial. But a prosecutor said the evidence is "overwhelming." A search of a Hummer belonging to Hernandez turned up an ammunition clip...

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    Fox Valley police reports
    An unauthorized ATM withdrawal of $300 and six unauthorized charges totaling $110 were reported June 19 from a resident on the 9N800 block of Crawford Road near Elgin, according to a sheriff’s report.

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    Barrington Hills to restore police raises

    The Barrington Hills village board this week voted to comply with an appellate court ruling ordering they reinstate raises for police officers and reimburse tuition costs for their union chapter’s president. Complying will cost the village more than $200,000.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    A 18-speed girls mountain bike and a boys BMX bike, worth a combined $200, were stolen between 11 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m. Sunday from a driveway on the 6N400 block of Geneva Avenue near St. Charles, according to a sheriff’s report.

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    Matthew Thomas (formerly Matthew Hicks)

    Des Plaines cop again charged with domestic battery

    Nearly a year after being acquitted of domestic battery charges by a McHenry County court, Des Plaines Police Sgt. Matthew R. Thomas, formerly Matthew Hicks, has been charged once again with domestic battery, authorities said.

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    Terry Lynch of Orland Park portrays long time Bartlett Depot employee Joe Charneskey during the building’s 140th Birthday Bash Thursday. In 1873, Luther and Sophia Bartlett donated land to the Chicago & Pacific Railroad for a rail line from Chicago to Elgin. The depot was built in June of that year.

    Bartlett train depot turns 140

    The Bartlett Depot Museum threw a 140th Birthday Bash Thursday to celebrate the building of the structure in June 1973 after Luther and Sophia Bartlett donated a portion of their land to the Chicago & Pacific Railroad, which was building a new rail line from Chicago to Elgin.

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    Aseem Jha of Lisle will be a senior at Naperville North High School. Aseem, who aced both his ACT and SAT college entrance exams, is taking a 7:30 a.m. history class this summer “just for fun.”

    Perfection comes with hard work for Lisle teen
    Aseem Jha may have earned perfect scores on both his ACT and SAT college entrance exam - a feat accomplished by just a miniscule portion of test takers each year - but there's a lot more to the 17-year-old from Lisle than just academics.

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    Dist. 300 administrators see bigger raises than some teachers

    Administrators in Community Unit District 300 will get a bigger raise than some teachers next year, based on the intricacies of teacher salary schedules. School board members unanimously approved 2 percent raises for the district's administrative staff at Monday night's school board meeting. Allison Strupeck, director of communication services, said the increase was set to match the raise...

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    No injuries in North Barrington fire

    The Wauconda Fire District continues to investigate the cause of a fire Tuesday night that caused an estimated $150,000 in damage to a home on Kensington Drive in North Barrington. The occupants, who reported the fire, made it out safely.

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    Lake Villa man pleads not guilty in Zion murder

    Jamal Johnson pleaded not guilty in Lake County court to charges that he fired the gun that killed Mutassem Abdelaziz, 23, of Waukegan, in an Aldi parking lot in the 2800 block of Sheridan Road in Zion in May.

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    Elgin councilmen fail to stop spending for sister city visit

    An effort by two Elgin councilmen to prevent the city from spending any money to host a delegation from its sister city in Chile didn’t get any traction after a testy discussion Wednesday night. “We’re made to feel like if we don’t do this, we’re horrible people,” said John Prigge, who suggested the cutback.

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    Johnny Borizov

    Sentencing in Darien triple-murder set for July 15

    A DuPage County judge on Thursday set a July 15 sentencing date for a man convicted of orchestrating the murders of three members of his ex-girlfriend's family. Johnny Borizov, 31, of Willow Springs, faces a mandatory life term for the slayings of Darien residents Jeffrey and Lori Kramer and their 20-year-old son Mike.

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    Toni Preckwinkle

    Cook County projects $152 million deficit in 2014

    Despite staring at a $152.1 million projected deficit in the upcoming budget for fiscal year 2014, Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle pledged no sales or property tax increases Thursday. “It is increasingly difficult to reduce expenses and become more efficient,” Preckwinkle said. “However, I am confident we will be able to make the tough decisions necessary to balance...

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    Palatine Mayor Jim Schwantz.

    Palatine mayor’s office drying out after the storm

    Add Palatine Mayor Jim Schwantz’s office to the long list of places needing a wet vac after Wednesday’s deluge of rain. Staff including Deputy Village Manager Mike Jacobs got into work and noticed water streaming down the walls of his office at village hall. They quickly sprang into action. “They said it was basically raining in my office, so they took down pictures of my kids at different events...

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Thieves stole a men’s wallet between 5 a.m. June 24 and 10:30 a.m. June 25 out of a bedroom in a home on the 700 block of East Greenview Avenue in Des Plaines. The wallet contained cash, credit cards, social security card, driver’s license, and Medicare card. Value was estimated at $1,085.

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    Elgin looks at financial plan for ESO

    The city of Elgin and the Elgin Symphony Orchestra are discussing a financial plan that includes the symphony repaying a $303,000 debt to the city and the city resuming yearly subsidies to the symphony. City Manager Sean Stegall presented the plan at a city council strategic planning meeting on Wednesday afternoon. The council made no decisions and is expected to take up the subject again...

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    College of Lake County instructors receive awards

    College of Lake County instructors Rory Klick (horticulture) and Jeff Varblow (accounting) recently received the 2012-13 Teaching Excellence Award from the National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development in Austin, Texas.

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    @$ID/[No paragraph style]: Nelson Mandela

    Nelson mandela’s condition has improved, President Zuma says

    The health of Nelson Mandela, South Africa’s first black president, has improved since last night, the nation’s presidency said.“He remains critical but is now stable,” President Jacob Zuma’s office said in a statement on its website, after Zuma visited the former leader at a Pretoria hospital. We are “disturbed by the rumors that are being spread about former President Mandela’s health,” it said.

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    Sen. Kel Seliger, R-Amarillo, sits at his desk as the session where Democrats tried to filibuster an abortion bill draws to a close, Tuesday, June 25, 2013, in Austin, Texas. Republican Gov. Rick Perry has called a second special legislative session beginning July 1, allowing the GOP-controlled Texas statehouse another crack at passing the restrictions that opponents say could shutter nearly all abortion clinics in the country’s second-largest state.

    Perry, Texas GOP revive abortion limits fight

    Texas Gov. Rick Perry is set to address a national convention of anti-abortion activists Thursday little more than a day after a special legislative session failed to approve sweeping restrictions to make abortion all but impossible for many women in the state.

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    The U.S. Chemical Safety Board will tell a Senate committee Thursday June 27, 2013 that regulation of the dangerous chemicals used in the industry fall under a “patchwork” of standards that are decades old and are far weaker than rules used by other countries. The findings will be presented to the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works.

    Federal agency finds lax regulation of chemicals at Texas plant

    A federal agency investigating a deadly explosion at a Texas fertilizer plant will tell a Senate committee Thursday that regulation of the dangerous chemicals used in the industry fall under a “patchwork” of standards that are decades old and are far weaker than rules used by other countries.

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    Donna Aldred, left, and her daughter, Leslie Lambert, right, listen during a news conference after the execution of Kimberly McCarthy at the Texas Department of Criminal Justice Huntsville Unit. Aldred’s mother, Dorothy Booth, was killed by Kimberly McCarthy in 1997. McCarthy is the 500th person executed in Texas since 1982.

    Family: Texas’ 500th execution simply justice

    Family and friends of Dorothy Booth waited 16 years — enduring two trials and countless appeals — for the measure of closure that came Wednesday evening when the woman who brutally beat and fatally stabbed their loved one was executed for her crime. Because Kimberly McCarthy’s execution marked the 500th in Texas since 1982, it drew increased attention from protesters and the media. But for...

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    Prince Michael Jackson at the Michael Forever the Tribute Concert. The singer’s eldest son testified in the negligent hiring case against AEG Live LLC on Wednesday, June 26, 2013. Prince, 16, is a plaintiff in the case against concert promoter AEG Live.

    Jackson’s teenage son describes upbringing, father’s death

    Michael Jackson’s oldest son described the frantic efforts to revive his father to a jury, a scene of tears and agony that ended a dozen idyllic years being raised by one of pop music’s superstars.

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    Supporters of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that overturns the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) carry a large rainbow flag during a parade around the Wisconsin State Capitol in Madison, Wis. Wednesday, June 26, 2013. The decision grants federal benefits to married couples in states that recognize same-sex marriage, although Wisconsin is not one of them.

    Vows wait, but gay couples cheer high court moves

    Backed by rainbow flags and confetti, thousands celebrated in California’s streets after U.S. Supreme Court rulings brought major advances for gay marriage proponents in the state and across the country. Though wedding bells may be weeks away, same-sex couples and their supporters savored the long-awaited decisions. “Today the words emblazoned across the Supreme Court ring true: equal justice...

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    U.S. President Barack Obama, left, shakes hands with Senegalese President Macky Sall after a joint press conference at the presidential palace in Dakar, Senegal, Thursday, June 27, 2013. Senegal’s national slogan, printed on the wall behind them, reads ‘One People, One Goal, One Faith.’

    Obama clashes with African host over gay rights

    President Barack Obama on Thursday praised the Supreme Court’s ruling on same-sex marriage as a “victory for American democracy” but clashed with his African host over gay rights in a sign of how far the movement has to go internationally.

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    Obama: No wheeling or dealing to extradite Snowden

    The United States won’t be scrambling military jets or engaging in high-level diplomatic bartering to get National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden extradited to the U.S., President Barack Obama said Thursday. Dismissing him as “a 29-year-old hacker,” Obama sought to downplay the international chase for Snowden, lowering the temperature of an issue that has already raised tensions between...

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    Larry Pascua carries a rainbow flag at a celebration for the U. S. Supreme Court’s rulings on Prop. 8 and the Defense of Marriage Act in the Castro District in San Francisco, on Wednesday, June 26, 2013.

    Ruling showcases Obama evolution on gay marriage

    For Barack Obama, the Supreme Court’s decisions on gay rights punctuate an evolution as president on the subject of same-sex marriage — a personal journey that has taken him from opposition to ambivalence to enthusiastic support. In many ways, Obama’s trajectory parallels that of the nation. But no one’s vacillation on the subject has been more closely watched than his

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    Mount Prospect native Ross Rosenberg is the author of the book “The Human Magnet Syndrome: Why We Love People Who Hurt Us.” He also owns Clinical Care Consultants in Arlington Heights.

    Mount Prospect author explains why opposites attract

    Ross Rosenberg of Mount Prospect owns Clinical Care Consultants in Arlington Heights and travels the country giving seminars on healthy relationships. His book, "The Human Magnet Syndrome: Why We Love People Who Hurt Us," was published in April, explaining his theories on why selfless and codependent people fall in love with emotional manipulators.

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    West Chicago officials are seeking permission from the city’s historic preservation commission to demolish the 144-year-old Joel Wiant House. It appears unlikely that will happen. But the city council gets the final say on whether the house at 151 W. Washington St. will be razed.

    Panel working to save 144-year-old West Chicago house

    If West Chicago chooses to demolish a 144-year-old house it owns in the downtown area, it probably won’t have the support of the city’s historical preservation commission. The advisory panel next week is expected to reject — for the second time — a request by the city to raze the Joel Wiant House.

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    Lisle Park District event coordinator Wendy Nadeau is the driving force behind a public art project this year that features decorated wooden wheelbarrows.

    Decorated wheelbarrows raising money for Lisle’s Partners For Parks

    Lisle Park District is sponsoring a public art display this summer that features decorated wooden wheelbarrows. Wendy Nadeau, an administrative assistant and event coordinator for the district, is the mastermind behind the idea and has decorated three of the wheelbarrows herself.

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    Lincoln copy of Gettysburg Address on display

    One of the most famous Abraham Lincoln artifacts is going on public display in Springfield. A copy of his Gettysburg Address written in Lincoln’s own hand will be available for public viewing starting Thursday and running through November at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum.

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    Metra offers deal on Friday for Stanley Cup event

    Metra is offering a deal for Chicago Blackhawks fans who want to watch the Stanley Cup celebration on Friday.The Chicago Sun-Times reports that the commuter train line will charge only $5 for unlimited rides Friday. The offer is good for all riders on Friday, whether they’re attending the festivities or not.

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    20-minute I-70 closures begin Thursday night

    TERRE HAUTE, Ind. — Eastbound motorists on Interstate 70 in western Indiana should expect 20-minute closures late Thursday and early Friday.The Indiana Department of Transportation says 20-minute closures in the eastbound lanes in Vigo County along the Illinois state line will begin at 11 p.m. Thursday and continue until 6 a.m. Friday, weather permitting.

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    Rescuers look for a man and a dog who were reported swept away by a fast-moving creek in the Grassy Lake Forest Preserve near Lake Barrington.

    Dawn Patrol: Rescuers halt search; Qdoba closing 13 area restaurants

    Rescuers can't find man, dog in rain-swollen creek. No answers yet in Wheeling plane crash. Qdoba to close 13 suburban restaurants. Elgin OKs money, personnel for Northwest Fourth Fest. St. Charles-area man dies in crash. Security will be tight along Hawks parade route. Kane brings Stanley Cup to Letterman show.

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    Standing on artificial legs beneath a “Boston Strong” banner, Boston Marathon bombing victim Jeff Bauman waves to the crowd during an uplifting and emotional ceremony before Game 6 of the Stanley Cup Finals in Boston.

    'Boston Strong' still rules, but don't feel guilty about winning

    Chicago sports teams have a history of crushing the nation's emotional favorites. Boston wanted the Stanley Cup as part of the healing process in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombing. “I think that's what hurts the most is, in the back of our minds, we wanted to do it for those kind of reasons: the city of Boston, what Newtown has been through, that kind of stuff,” Bruins head...

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    Longtime fan Fred Olderr of Melrose Park chats with Weird Al Yankovic on Wednesday during a book signing for his new book “My New Teacher and Me” at Anderson’s Bookshop in Naperville.

    Weird Al charms fans at Naperville book signing

    “Weird Al” Yankovic swears the young boy featured in his second children’s book isn’t him. The book is not autobiographical, but Yankovic’s latest written work certainly features elements of the creative, quirky and plain weird that have made the 53-year-old accordion player and pop satirist famous for his musical parodies.“People of all ages can enjoy my music,” he said Wednesday “And I think...

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    The historic Graue Mill in Oak Brook could be producing authentic stone-ground cornmeal again by as early as next week. Rus Strahan, a miller who serves as vice president of the museum board, said Wednesday he has located and is ready to purchase a $6,000 corn grinder that can do the job.

    Graue Mill could resume grinding next week

    Graue Mill could be up and grinding authentic stone-ground cornmeal again by next week. But it may cost officials at the historic museum double the $3,000 they originally planned for.

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    Robert Quig, founder of Quig's Orchard in Mundelein, rides a float in 1997 with his grandson Nathan in commemoration of the business' 50th anniversary. Quig, who died June 1, was known for his love of conversing with visitors.

    Longtime Mundelein orchard founder to be remembered by friends and family

    Founded in 1947, Quig's Orchard on Route 83 in Mundelein became an attraction for generations of families. Despite closing eight years ago, many vividly recall the orchard and its associated attractions. A celebration of the life of founder Robert Quiq is planned for July 21 in Grayslake.

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    Hal Honeyman of St. Charles, an adaptive bike specialist for the Wounded Warrior Project, fits James Dahan of Lisle into the recumbent trike on which he will be participating in the Soldier Ride this week. Dahan, a Marine who served in Iraq in 2004, is with his wife, Erin, and children Josie, 10, Maureen, 7, and Kalel, 5.

    Wounded vets ride kicks off Thursday in Rosemont

    About 50 wounded veterans from across the country will join the annual Wounded Warriors Project Soldier Ride, which starts Thursday in Rosemont. The five-day event includes a 15-mile course through the village, and a trip from Wrigley Frield to U.S. Cellular Field. “Over three days we're doing over 50 miles,” said Shana Gibbs, logistics coordinator for the Wounded Warrior Project and...

Sports

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    Blockbuster trade looms between Celtics, Nets

    After the draft ended Thursday, Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau shared his thoughts on the breakup of the Boston Celtics. Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce are reportedly headed to Brooklyn.

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    New Mexico's Tony Snell averaged just 12.5 points per game last season, but he hit 22 of 39 3-pointers in the Lobos' last five games of the regular season.

    Bulls grab player who can shoot, defend

    Heading into the NBA draft, it was tough to distinguish or separate any of the half-dozen or so tall shooting guards that figured to be available with the No. 20 pick. The Bulls gave it a shot, selecting 6-foot-7 Tony Snell, a junior from New Mexico. “Snell was a guy we had targeted for quite a while,” Bulls general manager Gar Forman said. “When he was there, we were really happy to pick him with that 20th spot.

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    NBA Commissioner David Stern shakes hands with UNLV's Anthony Bennett, who was selected first overall by the Cleveland Cavaliers in the NBA draft Thursday in New York.

    In Bennett pick, Cavs lead off draft with surprise

    Anthony Bennett was stunned at the start. David Stern had a big surprise at the finish. In between, Nerlens Noel and a number of others experienced wild rides to start their careers in an unsettled first round of the NBA draft. Bennett became the first Canadian No. 1 overall pick, and Noel tumbled out of the top five and right into a trade, the first of many moves that took a back seat to one in the works for the team that calls Barclays Center home. The Brooklyn Nets will acquire Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett from Boston in a blockbuster deal.

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    Captain Jonathan Toews was the first player to hoist the Stanley Cup on Monday after the Hawks beat the Bruins 3-2 in Game 6 of the Final. But what he did next drew admiration from his teammates.

    Hawks veterans awed by Toews’ leadership

    Jamal Mayers has played with many great leaders in his long NHL career, but he thinks none of them compare to Jonathan Toews. Mayers was still on cloud nine Thursday, three days after Toews made sure he was one of the first Blackhawks to get the Stanley Cup. Mayers called Toews and "unbelievable leader” and even compared Toews to Mark Messier, who has the NHL leadership trophy named after him.

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    New Mexico's Tony Snell goes for a layup against Boise State in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Saturday, Feb. 16, 2013, at the Pit in Albuquerque, N.M. New Mexico won 60-50. (AP Photo/Jake Schoellkopf)

    In draft, Bulls go for pair of shooters over size

    The Bulls selected New Mexico’s Tony Snell with the 20th pick in the NBA draft on Thursday, adding help on the perimeter. The Bulls decided to go with a wing player rather than a big man and grabbed a 6-foot-7 guard who is considered a top-notch shooter. With the 49th pick, they selected power forward Erik Murphy of Florida, adding another shooter in the second round.

  •  

    Cougars rally twice to win in 10 innings

    Trailing 6-0 and 7-1, the Kane County Cougars appeared on their way to a seventh consecutive loss to begin the second half, but they rallied to beat the Beloit Snappers 8-7 in 10 innings Thursday at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark in Geneva

  •  

    Boomers win 1-0 in 11 innings

    Bobby Martin hit a chopper against reliever Chris Squires in the top of the 11th inning, and Sean Mahley scored all the way from second base as the Schaumburg Boomers held on to beat host Traverse City 1-0.

  •  
    There is speculation that the Yankees have inquired about Paul Konerko.

    Sox refuse to stop believin'

    As the White Sox linger in last place in the AL Central, trade rumors are ramping up. General manager Rick Hahn is likely listening to offers for every player on the 25-man roster, but he reportedly is not interested in moving Sox captain Paul Konerko.

  •  
    Cubs pitcher Matt Garza put on another good show for the scouts Thursday in a 7-2 victory at Milwaukee. Garza improved to 3-1 with a 3.83 ERA, and his trade value goes up with each good start

    Another stellar performance by Garza

    Cubs pitcher Matt Garza put on another good show for the scouts Thursday in a 7-2 victory at Milwaukee. Garza improved to 3-1 with a 3.83 ERA, and his trade value goes up with each good start. Garza keeps saying he just focuses on his next start. But he's been traded before, so he knows the drill. “My job is to get ready for every five days, go out there and perform and do what I got to do,” he said.

  •  
    The Cubs celebrate their 7-2 win over Milwaukee Brewers in a baseball game Thursday, June 27, 2013, in Milwaukee.

    Soler situation ‘unfortunate’

    Cubs outfield phenom Jorge Soler will be in a walking boot for 4-6 weeks as the result of a stress fracture in his left tibia. Soler could mess the rest of the season at Class A Daytona.

  •  
    Chicago Blackhawks NHL hockey president and CEO John McDonough, center facing, hoists the Stanley Cup Trophy outside a Chicago steakhouse, Tuesday, June 25, 2013. McDonough was joined by Blackhawks owner Rocky Wirtz at the restaurant. (AP Photo/Scott Eisen)

    One more title and Hawks can be called a dynasty

    Few franchises have reached dynasty status, but if Hawks win another title soon, they will join that elite group. Hawks winger Patrick Sharp admitted that was a topic for discussion on the plane ride home from Boston. “It’s kind of crazy,” Sharp said. “We grew up watching teams like the New Jersey Devils, who always seemed to be in the finals, the Colorado Avalanche, Detroit; now you can say the Hawks have won twice, too.”

  •  
    Despite facing possible back surgery, the Blackhawks’ Marian Hossa said winning the Stanley Cup is what matters.

    Hossa’s aching back may require surgery

    Marian Hossa might need back surgery for the injury he suffered in Game 2 of the Stanley Cup Final.“I may need surgery or another shot,” Hossa said Thursday. “I’ll talk to Dr. (Michael) Terry and try to make the best decision. It’s one of those two options.”Hossa called it a disk problem that made his right foot numb when he skated.

  •  
    Matt Garza struck out 10 in seven solid innings and Dioner Navarro hit a three-run homer, sending the Cubs to a 7-2 victory over the Milwaukee Brewers on Thursday. Garza (3-1) had his third consecutive strong outing. The right-hander allowed one run on eight hits and a walk while throwing 101 pitches.

    Garza strikes out 10 in Cubs' 7-2 win over Brewers

    Matt Garza struck out 10 in seven solid innings and Dioner Navarro hit a three-run homer, sending the Cubs to a 7-2 victory over the Milwaukee Brewers on Thursday. Garza (3-1) had his third consecutive strong outing. The right-hander allowed one run on eight hits and a walk while throwing 101 pitches.

  •  

    Waubonsie Valley’s Singhsumalee advances to title match

    A 16-year-old has a chance to become one of the youngest Illinois Women's Amateur champion ever.

  •  
    Cyclist Alberto Contador answers questions of reporters during a news conference Thursday. The Tour de France starts in Porto Vecchio on Saturday.

    Contador motivated for Tour clash against Froome

    Two-time champion Alberto Contador predicts an action-packed Tour de France in his comeback year, insisting he's motivated to defeat Chris Froome even while playing down talk of a two-man race.

  •  

    10 things to know about doping

    For almost as long as they have cycled the length and breadth of the country, Tour de France riders have doped — with everything from brandy to ghoulish blood transfusions.

  •  
    Bears quarterback Jay Cutler and his teammates will return to training camp at Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbannais on July 26.

    Bears release training camp schedule

    The Bears' first training camp under new coach Marc Trestman features 11 practices at 9 a.m. of the 13 that are open to the public. The Bears' 12th camp at Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais begins on July 26.

  •  
    Olympian Matt Tegenkamp will race in the 2013 Chicago Marathon, race officials announced Thursday.

    Olympian Tegenkamp joins Chicago Marathon field

    U.S. Olympian Matt Tegenkamp has committed to run in the 2013 Chicago Marathon. Tegenkamp, along with U.S. teammate Dathan Ritzenhein, will improve the United States' presence at the race. The last American to win the men's division was Khalid Khannouchi in 2002.

  •  
    Purdue forward Sandi Marcius, right, scrambles for the ball with Michigan forward Glenn Robinson III in a game last March. Marcius has transferred to DePaul.

    Former Boilermaker Marcius transfers to DePaul

    DePaul men's basketball coach Oliver Purnell announced Thursday that Sandi Marcius has transferred to the Blue Demons for the 2013-14 season. Marcius, a 6-foot-10 forward, graduated from Purdue and will be eligible for one season with DePaul as a graduate student.

  •  
    Illini golf coach Mike Small has qualified again for the PGA Championship.

    Illini coach Small qualifies for PGA Championship

    University of Illinois men's golf coach Mike Small tied for fourth at the PGA Professional National Championship on Wednesday to earn a berth in the 2013 PGA Championship. This will be Small's ninth appearance in a PGA Championship field and his 12th major championship, which includes three U.S. Opens.

  •  
    Fire goalkeeper Sean Johnson will be joining the U.S. National Team as it prepares for the Gold Cup. Paolo Tornaghi will start in goal for the Fire while Johnson is away.

    Fire’s Johnson called for national duty

    It’s a common conundrum for pro soccer club coaches: You want players good enough to be called into their national teams, but you don’t want them to be called in the middle of your season. Now the Chicago Fire must deal with that situation after goalkeeper Sean Johnson was called up to train with the U.S. National Team.

  •  

    Mike North video: An Amazing Feat

    Mike North can't get over Nik Wallenda's crossing the Grand Canyon without any harness or net on a tight rope. He says you've got to see it to believe it.

Business

  •  
    Fernando Alvarado, Ecuador’s communications minister, announces Ecuador is renouncing trade preferences that are up for U.S. congressional renewal during a news conference in Quito, Ecuador, Thursday. It comes as Ecuador considers the asylum request of NSA leaker Edward Snowden, which has prompted critics in the U.S. to suggest retaliation against the South American country.

    Ecuador heats rhetoric as Obama downplays Snowden

    Ecuador said Thursday it is renouncing tariff benefits on hundreds of millions of dollars in trade that are up for renewal by the U.S. Congress. The announcement by Communications Minister Fernando Alvarez comes at a moment when Ecuador faces U.S. pressure to avoid granting asylum to National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden.

  •  
    U.S. stocks rose, sending the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index to its biggest three-day rally since January, on better-than-estimated economic data and assurances on stimulus efforts from Federal Reserve officials.

    Stocks gain on encouraging news about the economy

    Good news on jobs and consumer spending pushed stocks higher again Thursday. The Dow Jones industrial average and the Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose for a third straight day. Yields on Treasury securities fell for a second day, easing worries that a sudden spike in interest rates could hurt the economy.

  •  
    Gov. Pat Quinn called lawmakers back to Springfield this month for a special legislative session on pensions. But both chambers remained divided on how fix the problem.

    Bipartisan committee holds first pension hearing

    Members of a bipartisan panel tasked with coming up with a plan to address Illinois’ pension crisis don’t all agree with Gov. Pat Quinn’s July 9 deadline to report back with a solution. Democratic Sen. Kwame Raoul says it could take longer than that. He spoke to reporters Thursday before the panel’s first public hearing. He says another hearing will take place next week.

  •  
    Buckingham Palace accounts showed Thursday that Queen Elizabeth II will receive a 5 per cent income boost following record portfolio profits.

    UK queen set for income boost after record profits

    Buckingham Palace accounts showed Thursday that Queen Elizabeth II had a good year financially — the monarch will receive a 5 percent income boost following record portfolio profits. The Crown Estate, a vast property portfolio, made $380 million in the last financial year, a 5.2 percent annual increase.

  •  

    Buffalo Grove board meets with Cambridge Commons developer

    Buffalo Grove trustees at a special meeting Wednesday night again discussed plans for a Fresh Farms grocery store at the Cambridge Commons shopping center, but took no action. Village Manager Dane Bragg said the meeting was to make sure there were no surprises and that he expected based on the discussion that the developer will present revised signage requests at the board’s next meeting July 15 that are likely to meet with approval.

  •  
    Recent surveys polling the attitudes of downtown Arlington Heights business and those who shop in the community revealed some discrepancies between what the two groups think is important to attracting consumers.

    Survey reveals differences between Arlington Hts. shoppers, businesses

    Arlington Heights is taking the concerns of businesses into account as part of a communitywide study about how to improve the local business climate. The Arlington Economic Alliance discussed the first draft of the business survey results Thursday, including differences in perceptions between business owners and consumers that could effect the market.

  •  

    EPA, SunCoke reach agreement over air violations in Illinois, Ohio

    Lisley-based SunCoke Energy and two subsidiaries will pay a $2 million fine to resolve alleged air pollution violations at plants in Illinois and Ohio. The agreement between SunCoke Energy and the U.S. Justice Department was announced Wednesday. It requires the companies to spend $100 million to upgrade pollution control equipment. The alleged violations occurred at Gateway Energy and Coke plant in Granite City, Ill., and the Haverhill Coke plant in Franklin Furnace, Ohio.

  •  
    Caterpillar Inc. Chairman and CEO Douglas R. Oberhelman delivers the keynote address to the Illinois Chamber of Commerce annual meeting & business leaders luncheon in Chicago, Wednesday.

    Caterpillar CEO: Call lawmakers on pension mess

    Caterpillar CEO Doug Oberhelman wants Illinois' business leaders to pressure lawmakers to address the state's $97 billion pension crisis. Oberhelman told business leaders Wednesday at the Illinois Chamber of Commerce's annual meeting that the pension system is in deep trouble. According to a copy of his speech he said lawmakers frequently hear labor unions' views on pensions but seldom hear directly from owners and executives.

  •  
    Chicago billionaire business executive Penny Pritzker, President Obama’s pick for Commerce Secretary, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington.

    Pritzker sworn in as Obama’s commerce secretary

    Billionaire Chicago business executive Penny Pritzker is now officially commerce secretary. The White House says that Pritzker was sworn in on Wednesday. The Senate confirmed her nomination on Tuesday, filling a vacancy that has stood since John Bryson resigned last summer. The vote was 97-1.

  •  
    “BUBBA’S Buffalo Blue Cheese Chicken Dip”

    Blue cheese chicken dip sold in Illinois recalled
    South Florida-based ECRS, LLC is recalling 12,560 pounds of chicken dip products because of misbranding and an undeclared allergen The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service announced Wednesday that the products contain anchovies, a known allergen which is not declared on the label.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Actor Armie Hammer takes on his first major leading-man role opposite Johnny Depp in “The Lone Ranger,” out in theaters July 3.

    Armie Hammer becomes leading man in 'Lone Ranger'

    If it weren't for the movie “Home Alone,” Armie Hammer might not be starring in “The Lone Ranger.” Seeing the 1990 Macaulay Culkin hit inspired Hammer to become an actor. “I had a dream that night that I was the kid in the house with the blowtorch and all that stuff and thinking, 'This is awesome! I love acting!'" said Hammer, recalling the thoughts of his 11-year-old self. “I knew this was for me. It was the only thing I wanted to do.”

  •  

    OWN to air ‘Children,’ ‘One Life’

    “All My Children” and “One Life to Live” are returning to TV. Oprah Winfrey’s OWN network says it’s acquired the first 40 episodes of the daytime dramas’ revival on The Online Network. They’ll air Monday through Thursday for a 10-week period beginning July 15.

  •  
    A 911 operator (Halle Berry) plays cat and mouse with a serial killer in the thriller "The Call."

    Halle Berry gets ‘The Call,’ now on DVD
    Jeff Tuckman review home video selections for the Daily Herald

  •  
    Chef Dan Temesy offers a daily fish special at The Green Room in Libertyville.

    Libertyville eatery recycles global favorites into an ecclectic menu

    The Green Room of Libertyville is a spot where the staff warmly welcomes diners to nosh global favorites and a place that proudly recycles elements from its former restaurant inhabitant. Some of the tables, seating, bowls and silverware and even some of the menu items are carry-overs from the location's former life as Henry Yee's Chinese Restaurant. There's not an ounce of pretension in the place.

  •  
    FBI Special Agent Sarah Ashburn (Sandra Bullock), right, teams up with bossy Boston Detective Shannon Mullins (Melissa McCarthy) in “The Heat.”

    McCarthy, Bullock a perfect pairing of comical cops in 'The Heat'

    Paul Feig's comedy “The Heat” begins with strained sight gags, cartoonishly overwritten dialogue and an eye-rolling overreliance on cop buddy comedy clichés. Yet, when Melissa McCarthy and her partner in crime-fighting, Sandra Bullock, find their comic groove, the hits begin to outnumber the misses and “The Heat” brings on some riotously funny moments and several surprises along the way.

  •  
    U.S. President Sawyer (Jamie Foxx) gets help from a buff cop (Channing Tatum) when terrorists hit the Capitol in the inadvertently comical “White House Down.”

    'White House' a downer action thriller

    In Roland Emmerich's action thriller “White House Down,” we have a cop with marital problems (and a dirty, sleeveless undershirt) fighting to save a girl from apparent terrorists who've taken control of a massive building while Beethoven plays. If this sounds familiar, you've probably seen the original “Die Hard” as screenwriter James Vanderbilt apparently did before writing this script.

  •  
    The Plain White T’s perform in January 2011 during halftime of a Bears game in Chicago.

    Plain White T’s coming to Lisle for festival

    The Plain White T’s will headline Benedictine University’s BenFest 2013 festivities on Aug. 24 at the Village of Lisle-Benedictine University Sports Complex, officials said Thursday. Recording artist and first season finalist on NBC’s “The Voice,” Vicci Martinez, will open the concert. Her latest self-titled album includes the single, “Come Along,” featuring Grammy winner Cee Lo Green.

  •  
    In this publicity image released by NBC, celebrity chef Paula Deen appears on NBC News’ “Today” show, Wednesday. Deen dissolved into tears during the interview Wednesday about her admission that she used a racial slur in the past.

    Target cuts ties with Paula Deen

    Paula Deen’s merchandise and media empire is fast unraveling. Retailers Target Corp. and Home Depot Inc. and diabetes drug maker Novo Nordisk became the latest companies to sever ties or distance themselves from celebrity cook Paula Deen as fallout builds from revelations that the Southern celebrity chef used racial slurs in the past.

  •  
    Michael Gandolfini, left, son of James Gandolfini, arrives for the funeral service of his father, star of “The Sopranos,” in New York's the Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine, Thursday, June 27, 2013. The 51-year-old actor died of a heart attack last week while vacationing in Italy with his son.

    David Chase memorializes James Gandolfini

    The creator of “The Sopranos” said at James Gandolfini's funeral that the actor brought the traits of a sad boy, “amazed and confused,” to the role of Tony Soprano. “You were a good boy,” David Chase said Thursday at the ceremony at New York's Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine.

  •  
    Celebrity chef Paula Deen on NBC News’ “Today” show, Wednesday, June 26, 2013 in New York. Paula Deen has been dropped by the Food Network and Wal-Mart, but book-buyers are standing by her.

    Deen book sales soar, new release No. 1 on Amazon

    Paula Deen has been dropped by the Food Network and Wal-Mart, but book-buyers are standing by her. As of Thursday morning, “Paula Deen’s New Testament: 250 Recipes, All Lightened Up,” ranked No. 1 on Amazon.com.

  •  
    “Sisterland” by Curtis Sittenfeld

    'Sisterland' is perfect summer read

    To characterize Curtis Sittenfeld's new novel, “Sisterland,” as an ideal beach read isn't meant as an insult. The author of “American Wife,” her new novel isn't as sappy as the jacket description implies. It's the story of identical twins — Kate and Violet — who are raised by an emotionally absent father and a depressed mother and share the gift (or curse) of “senses” or an ability to see people's secrets and events before they happen.

  •  
    CDW in Vernon Hills.

    CDW raises about $396 million from IPO

    Vernon-Hills based CDW has raised about $396 million from an initial public offering of its common stock. The information technology company said that the offering of about 23.3 million shares was priced at $17 per share, which was at the low end of its projected $17 to $18 projected price range. The underwriters have a 30-day option to buy up to an additional 3.5 million shares.

  •  
    The band Devo (in 1978) — Mark Mothersbaugh, left, Bob Mothersbaugh, kneeling, Jerry Casale, Bob Casale and Alan Myers. Drummer Alan Myers died Monday after a battle with brain cancer. He was 58.

    Devo drummer Alan Myers dies of brain cancer

    Alan Myers, the former longtime drummer for the band Devo, best known for “Whip It,” has died after a battle with brain cancer. He was 58. Myers died Monday in Los Angeles, where he lived, Devo spokesman Michael Pilmer said Wednesday. Myers was the band’s drummer from 1976 to 1985 during Devo’s heyday.

  •  
    Justin Bieber has been sued by a paparazzo who claims the singer kicked and punched him last year at a Southern California shopping center.

    Paparazzo sues Justin Bieber for alleged assault

    Justin Bieber has been sued by a paparazzo who claims the singer kicked and punched him last year at a Southern California shopping center. A lawsuit filed Wednesday alleges the “Baby” crooner attacked Jose Osmin Hernandez Duran after Bieber and his then-girlfriend went to the movies at The Commons in Calabasas.

  •  

    Music notes: Underground Q87.7 hosts all-day music fest

    Underground Q87.7 dives in to the summer music festival pool with a surprising list of entertainers. O.A.R. brings some musical hits to the Charter One Pavilion. Fans can still catch Naked Raygun this weekend because of their added show at the Metro.

  •  
    Enjoy the final days of June drink specials at Gibsons.

    Night life events: Fun on the patio at Gibsons

    Phil Seed plays some R&B, funk and jazz from 8 to 11 p.m. Saturday on Gibsons’ patio. Saturday specials include $10 French martinis, $8 Jack Honey and lemonade and more. Catch the band According to Sarah at 9 p.m. Saturday, June 29, at Thirsty Whale in Algonquin. If you’re itching to keep toasting the Blackhawks, there are specials every day of the week at Bannerman’s in Bartlett.

  •  
    Clara (Gemma Arterton) survives 200 years as a vampire by plying the skills of a prostitute in Neil Jordan’s stylish but needlessly complicated tale “Byzantium.”

    Gemma Arterton shows her versatility in two new films

    British actress Gemma Arterton bulleted to fame as one of James Bond’s cool women in “Quantum of Solace.” Two movies opening Friday pay homage to her versatility. Dann Gire reviews “Unfinished Song,” a romance, and “Byzantium,” a stylish vampire mother/daughter drama from Neil Jordan. Dann also reviews “Redemption,” which gives Jason Statham his most dramatically complex, challenging movie character so far.

Discuss

  •  

    The Metra board’s outrageous generosity

    A Daily Herald editorial decries the Metra board's outrageous $440,000 severance package for an executive director it asked to resign.

  •  
    U.S. Rep. Peter Roskam

    Federal pricing model would help students better plan college payments

    Guest columnist U.S. Rep. Peter Roskam: Too many students take years longer to pay off their debt and it postpones their ability to buy homes and cars, start businesses and families and save for retirement. This can’t be the new normal.

  •  
    State Rep. Tom Cross

    Proposed state tax credit could help make college more affordable

    Guest columnist state Rep. Tom Cross: A House proposal aims to help families avoid burying themselves in debt just to help put their kids through college.

  •  

    A way to rein in college tuition costs
    A Mount Prospect letter to the editor: I suggest we create a disincentive for universities to continue increasing costs by employing more adjunct (part-time) professors and eliminating the provision that prohibits student loan default. Nothing like a little insecurity to encourage economic austerity.

  •  

    Inflated pensions are not what was intended
    A letter to the editor: Clearly this “gaming of the system” over many years significantly inflated the pensions’ actuarial “unfunded liability.” To limit the damage caused by these past abuses the pensioners should minimally forgo the automatic 3 percent COLA especially if the taxpayers are then to be required to pay the actuarial “required amount.”

  •  

    Those who break law are criminals
    A letter to the editor: Democratic Rep. Luis Gutierrez criticized an immigration bill crafted by house Republicans by saying “You would think there are 11 million criminals in the United States.”

  •  

    Reminders of what is important in life
    A letter to the editor: Celebration of life! I am reflecting on the past few days.

  •  

    Hillary Clinton still likes us
    A Lombard letter to the editor: Apparently Fritz Alexander did not get his information about what Hillary Clinton said from the news conference to the Congressmen who were badgering her about the event that took place in Benghazi. They wanted to know whether or not it was a terrorist act or a random act.

  •  

    No salaries for pols until state solvent
    An Elgin letter to the editor: While you were sleeping, retired teacher Beverly Lopatka walked away with a retirement of almost $400,000 and is now spending Illinois taxpayers’ money in another state. Some politicians were surprised at the loophole, which was implemented around 1947.

  •  

    Declared deceased by Social Security
    A Glen Ellyn letter to the editor: Your June 25 editorial relates to an unfortunate situation happening to me. Due to a medical condition requiring doctor intervention, I learned that Social Security declared me “deceased” on May 25.

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