2014 readers choice results

Daily Archive : Wednesday June 5, 2013

News

  •  
    Consultants working on the Elgin Chicago Street Station Area Plan considered moving the Chicago Street Metra station to the north, but decided against it because of its cost and logistics. Instead, the current station should be improved with landscape and parking, Land Vision Principal Chuck Hanlon said.

    Elgin transit plan focuses on larger redevelopment

    A preliminary draft plan for the so-called Chicago Street Station Area Plan in Elgin runs the gamut of redevelopment proposals, from street beautification to multistory housing along Route 31. Chuck Hanlon, principal of Land Vision, Inc., based in St. Charles, presented the plan at a meeting attended by about 20 residents, business owners and stakeholders Wednesday night at The Centre of Elgin.

  •  
    From left, Ron Boire, executive vice president of Sears Holdings Corp., Sears employee Vitaly Demin and Philip Robertson, adjudicator with Guinness World Records, show off the certificate.

    Sears employees dress up like Superman, set world record

    Sears Holdings Corp. employees set a world record Wednesday when 566 showed up dressed as Superman. The Hoffman Estates-based company broke the Canadian record for most employees dressed like the Man of Steel. “This is definitely one off the bucket list,” said Sears employee Nancy Beyer.

  •  
    Aaron Lawlor

    Lake County officials oppose election legislation

    Lake County Board members on both sides of the political aisle are opposing state legislation that will strip oversight of elections from the county clerk's office. Taking a stand during a county committee meeting Wednesday morning in Waukegan, Democrats and Republicans alike blasted the measure and said they'll lobby Gov. Pat Quinn to veto that section of the larger elections bill.

  •  

    Illinois-run health insurance marketplace stalls again

    Federal officials could end up overseeing the new Illinois health insurance marketplace for years to come after lawmakers in Springfield balked again at a full embrace of President Barack Obama's health care law. The Legislature adjourned Friday without sending Gov. Pat Quinn's a bill on a state-run marketplace — a consumer-friendly online shopping site for insurance. Quinn has pushed such...

  •  

    Bail bondsmen would be allowed in 5 Wisconsin counties

    The Legislature's budget committee has approved creating a private, commercial bail bond system in five counties in Wisconsin before it would expand statewide after five years.The provision was one of the last items added to the state budget by the Republican-controlled Joint Finance Committee on Wednesday morning following an all-night session.

  •  
    Proposed plan for Orchard Evangelical Free Church's expanded parking lot. The expansion is shaded in a darker color.

    Arlington Heights church faces angry neighbors over tear down plan

    During their first meeting with residents on Wednesday night, leaders from the Arlington Heights Orchard Evangelical Free Church were faced with complaints and questions about the church's plan to tear down eight homes and expand its parking lot. Nearly 100 residents filled village hall on Wednesday for what turned out to be an emotional meeting, but after two hours ended mostly at an impasse as...

  •  
    Wauconda Police Chief Douglas Larsson talks with a supporter before Tuesday night’s meeting at Wauconda High School.

    Wauconda mayor plans to stick with new police chief choice

    Despite community outrage, Wauconda Mayor Frank Bart is moving forward with plans to name Sgt. Patrick Yost the town's next police chief. Yost would replace Douglas Larsson. “We’re still going to have to finalize that agreement,” Bart said.

  •  

    District 15 to defer schedule change until arbitrator rules

    The new school year in Palatine Township Elementary District 15 will begin with no scheduling changes, officials said. Superintendent Scott Thompson and Classroom Teachers' Council President Lisa Nuss released a joint statement Wednesday informing parents that the implementation of professional development time for teachers will be deferred until the second semester in January 2014.

  •  
    Rescue personnel search the scene of a building collapse Wednesday in downtown Philadelphia.

    6 killed, 13 hurt in Philadelphia building collapse

    A building that was being torn down collapsed with a thunderous boom Wednesday, raining bricks on a neighboring thrift store, killing six people and injuring at least 13 others in an accident that witnesses said was bound to happen. A somber Mayor Michael Nutter said those who died were one man and five women but authorities still didn’t know how many people had been in the store or on the...

  •  
    The John C. Dunham STEM Partnership School is shown as a separate building attached to the south side of Stephens Hall, a science building on the Aurora University Campus. The university is working to raise $12 million and begin construction of the science, technology, engineering and math-focused school for third- through eighth-graders in August.

    Groundbreaking set for Aurora U. STEM school

    A science and tech school at Aurora University is edging closer to reality, bringing with it plans for a new welcome center, gateway arch and parking that will expand and update the campus. University officials said groundbreaking is scheduled for August on the John C. Dunham STEM Partnership School, which will teach a science, technology, engineering and math-focused curriculum to third- to...

  •  
    Douglas and Fran Mains agreed to sell their property and house in West Chicago to the DuPage County Forest Preserve District in 2007. They have since donated most of the purchase price back to the district.

    DuPage forest preserve unveils cultural center plan

    It’s been six years since a couple devoted to conserving open space offered their own property and house to the DuPage County Forest Preserve District. Now forest preserve officials have signed off on a plan to transform Douglas and Fran Mains’ former home into an adult cultural center.

  •  
    Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, who is charged with slaughtering 16 villagers in one of the worst atrocities of the Afghanistan War, pleaded guilty Wednesday in an attempt to avoid the death penalty.

    U.S. soldier describes killing 16 Afghan civilians

    The American soldier accused of killing 16 Afghan civilians, many of them women and children who were asleep in their villages, pleaded guilty to murder Wednesday and acknowledged to a judge that there was “not a good reason in this world” for his actions.

  •  
    New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie will set an October special election to fill the U.S. Senate seat made vacant by Frank Lautenberg’s death, a decision that gets voters the quickest possible say on who will represents them.

    New Jersey Gov. Christie bashed for election move

    Seven months after he stood shoulder-to-shoulder with President Barack Obama in what was celebrated by many in storm-battered New Jersey as a selfless display of bipartisanship, Republican Gov. Chris Christie finds himself accused of hypocrisy and naked political self-interest.

  •  
    John Pistole, head of the Transportation Security Administration says he’s dropping a proposal that would have let airline passengers carry small knives, souvenir bats, golf clubs and other sports equipment onto planes. The proposal had drawn fierce opposition.

    TSA drops plan to allow small knives on planes

    The Transportation Security Administration is abandoning a plan to allow passengers to carry small knives, souvenir bats, golf clubs and other sports equipment onto planes in the face of fierce congressional and industry opposition, the head of the agency said Wednesday.

  •  

    Arlington Heights police looking for suspicious person

    Arlington Heights police are looking for information about a suspicious person who approached a Northwest Suburban High School District 214 teacher in a parking lot.

  •  

    Children’s health, safety fair set for Saturday

    House District 64 State. Rep. Barbara Wheeler, a Republican from Crystal Lake, hosts a children’s health and safety fair on Saturday, June 8, at Grant High School, 285 E. Grand Ave., in Fox Lake.

  •  

    Schaumburg saves $25 million on convention center

    The village of Schaumburg recently refinanced bonds that were sold to build the Schaumburg Renaissance Hotel and Convention Center, saving nearly $25 million, officials said. In 2012, the village successfully refinanced $69.9 million of the outstanding bonds, saving a total of $6.6 million. This spring, the village refunded the remaining $173.9 million of the bonds, saving $18.2 million more.

  •  

    Grayslake Fire Department to host blood drive

    The Grayslake Fire Department hosts a blood drive on Saturday, June 8, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Fire Station 1, 160 Hawley St., Grayslake.

  •  

    Dist. 117 to swear in new board member

    A new Antioch-Lake Villa Area High School District 117 board member is expected to be sworn in during the next board meeting on June 11.

  •  
    Francis Cardinal George presides over a funeral Mass for the Rev. Andrew Greeley at Christ The King Church Wednesday, June 5, 2013, in Chicago. Greeley, an outspoken priest and best-selling author died in his Chicago home last week he was 85.

    Author, priest Greeley laid to rest

    The Rev. Andrew Greeley was known as an author, a scholar and a priest who challenged authority. He was also remembered as a genuine Chicagoan and a dedicated servant of the church.A funeral mass for Greeley was celebrated Wednesday by Chicago Cardinal Francis George at Christ the King Roman Catholic Church on the city’s South Side.

  •  
    More than 2,000 women of varying skill and experience are expected to conquer the Athleta Esprit de She Triathlon Sunday in Naperville.

    Women triathletes taking over Centennial Beach Sunday

    A nice 3.1 mile jog on a Sunday morning may be just the right amount of exercise for some. But for the women headed to Naperville’s Centennial Beach Sunday morning, that’s just a warm up.

  •  
    President Barack Obama listens as U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice, his choice to be his next National Security Adviser, speaks at the White House Wednesday, when the president made the announcement. Samantha Power, his nominee to be the next U.N. ambassador is at left.

    Obama names outspoken Rice as his security adviser

    Defying Republican critics, President Barack Obama named outspoken diplomat Susan Rice as his national security adviser Wednesday, giving her a larger voice in U.S. foreign policy despite accusations that she misled the nation in the aftermath of the deadly attack on Americans in Benghazi, Libya.

  •  
    Republican venture capitalist Bruce Rauner said is he running for Illinois governor in 2014. He will face state Treasurer Dan Rutherford in the GOP primary. Republican Sens. Kirk Dillard and Bill Brady also have expressed interest.

    GOP’s Rauner says he’s running for Illinois governor

    Republican venture capitalist Bruce Rauner says he’s running for Illinois governor in 2014. In a video posted on his website, Rauner says Illinois is in a financial mess. He says the state needs a political outsider to fix things.

  •  

    Anonymous tip leads to drug arrest in Waukegan

    An anonymous tip resulted in an arrest by the Waukegan Police Gang Intelligence Unit on Tuesday, police said.Police searched a home on the 1600 block of Whitney Street with a search warrant for Angel F. Farfan, 18, and located 0.4 grams of cannabis, a scale, plastic baggies, drug paraphernalia and cash, according to a Waukegan Police news release.

  •  
    Shoppers purchase Mirai sweet corn at the Batavia Farmers Market. The market, which starts Saturday, is moving to North River Street.

    New locale for Batavia Farmers Market

    The Batavia Farmers Market resumes Saturday. But don't look for it to be in the same location.

  •  

    U-46 lunch supervisor policy causes safety concerns

    Elgin Area School District U-46 will implement a new lunch monitor policy next year that has some parents concerned about safety. Layoffs of more than 500 “noon-hour supervisors” in the district’s elementary schools took effect last week after they oversaw the final lunches of the 2012-13 school year. Some of them will be rehired next year but not all of them as the district shifts from providing...

  •  

    Des Plaines council votes to repeal residency clause

    Des Plaines aldermen this week voted to repeal a requirement that certain city employees, specifically department heads, live in town. Mayor Matt Bogusz said Monday the requirement, though well intentioned, has caused problems in recent years.

  •  
    Bradley Stephens

    Rosemont gets help for Stephens center, seeks more

    Rosemont Mayor Bradley Stephens said he’ll keep pushing to get more state financing to renovate the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center. A massive economic development package approved by lawmakers includes a provision that would allow Rosemont to put $5 million it already gets from the state every year for operating the convention center toward the debt from renovation projects.

  •  

    Des Plaines hikes water rates for 2013-2015

    The Des Plaines city council has put in motion a 6.9-percent water and sewer rate hike, in effect passing along Chicago’s 15-percent water rate increase to residents and businesses. The vote was 4-4 with Mayor Matt Bogusz breaking the tie. The increase will raise the average household user’s water bill by $2.25 a month, effectively immediately. The increase is not retroactive. The increase will...

  •  

    Suburban schools push summer reading

    Suburban school districts and libraries are putting a lot of effort into their summer reading programs, saying that it keeps "brain drain" to a minimum and also encourages a lifelong love of reading.

  •  
    Jacquelyn Buchholz

    Woman gets 9 years for breaking into homes while victims attended wakes

    A 25-year-old Johnsburg woman, who was accused with her husband of burglarizing homes while the victims were attending wakes and funerals, pleaded guilty to burglary and was sentenced to nine years in prison. Jacquelyn S. Buchholz will serve the sentence at the same time as sentences from Cook County; her husband, Jason K. Werner, 27, is due in court in Woodstock on Thursday.

  •  
    Tourists enter the Atwood Sphere at the Adler Planetarium in Chicago. Officials at the museum are breaking out the birthday cake to mark the 100th anniversary of the facility’s historic Atwood Sphere. The 15-foot-diameter large-scale mechanical planetarium opened in 1913 and museum officials say it’s the oldest one in the U.S.

    Adler Planetarium marks sphere’s 100th anniversary

    Officials at the Adler Planetarium in Chicago are breaking out the birthday cake to mark the 100th anniversary of the facility’s historic Atwood Sphere. The 15-foot-diameter large-scale mechanical planetarium opened in 1913 and museum officials say it’s the oldest one in the U.S.

  •  
    Plans for a $50 million renovation and expansion at Westfield Hawthorn shopping center in Vernon Hills are proceeding.

    Vernon Hills OKs $13 million for mall expansion

    Vernon Hills officials have agreed on an incentive package that could tally nearly $13 million to spark a major redevelopment at the village's centerpiece Westfield Hawthorn malll. Westfield plans to invest $50 million to include a new entry between Sears and JCPenney to accomodate a 1,200-seat AMC theater. A Dave & Buster's restaurant/arcade is also part of the mix.

  •  
    Sgt. Michael Seyller

    East Dundee sergeant must stay away from alcohol, Wisconsin bar

    Michael Seyller, an East Dundee police sergeant whose career is all but finished in the village, has to stay away from alcohol, the Wisconsin bar and the man he's accused of beating up in the Dairy State.During an initial court appearance Tuesday in Adams County, two hours north of Milwaukee, Seyller was booked and processed, then released on his signature, court records show.

  •  
    Jorge Tejeda

    Elgin man gets 15 years in 2010 cocaine bust

    A 42-year-old Elgin man was sentenced to 15 years in prison after his conviction on cocaine charges. Jorge Tejeda was arrested by Elgin police in March 2010 after setting up a drug deal to buy three kilograms of cocaine from him. Police also seized more than $40,000, along with two guns.

  •  
    The DuPage County Forest Preserve District will work with the state to battle gypsy moths, including caterpillars like these, beginning later this month.

    DuPage prepares to resume battle with gypsy moths

    The battle against gypsy moths, pesky insects that threaten the health of oaks and other trees, will resume in earnest this month in more than 37,000 acres of DuPage County forest preserves and wooded areas of neighboring municipalities.

  •  
    Marcella Somerville

    Cook sheriff seeking information about missing woman

    Cook County Sheriff’s Police are investigating the disappearance of a 68-year-old mentally ill woman who has been missing since May 9, Sheriff Thomas J. Dart said Wednesday.

  •  

    Tri-Cities police reports
    Tri blotter

  •  

    10 hurt in accidental shotgun discharge at St. Charles Sportsmen’s Club

    Ten people were hurt in an accidental discharge of a shotgun at the St. Charles Sportsmen's Club near Elburn on Tuesday night. A 69-year-old man accidentally put a live round in the gun and fired it at the floor. No charges were filed.

  •  
    Lisa Stone

    Lisa Stone pleads guilty to violating protection order

    A former Buffalo Grove village trustee pleaded guilty in Lake County circuit court Tuesday to a single count of violating an order of protection. Lisa Stone, 52, of the 1900 block of Beverly Lane in Buffalo Grove, agreed to one year of supervision, 50 hours of community service and to submit to a psychiatric plan evaluation. Stone also agreed to call Buffalo Grove Village President Jeffrey...

  •  
    Comedienne Sally Edwards, of Wauconda, auditions in front of the judges during last year's Suburban Chicago's Got Talent at the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre in Arlington Heights. Auditions for this year's competition begin Thursday.

    Last day to register for 'Suburban Chicago's Got Talent'

    If you're a talented performer, here's your chance to show us what you've got. Today is the last day to register for the Daily Herald's Suburban Chicago's Got Talent competition. Auditions begin Thursday in Arlington Heights. Walk-ins are allowed at the auditions, but they will have to wait for an open spot in the audition schedule.

  •  

    Fox Valley police reports
    Fox bloter

  •  

    Officials OK Palatine bar’s request for parking lot party

    The Palatine village council has approved a request by the Mac’s on Slade bar and restaurant to host a “Party in the Parking Lot” event to attract business during construction this summer on Slade Street.

  •  

    Kane County poised to hire Facebook, outreach consultants

    Growing the number of Kane County volunteers and increasing the number of “Likes” on the county’s Facebook page is the aim of county board Chairman Chris Lauzen in proposing two temporary contract/consultant jobs. The move would cost $64,000. “The benefit is we need to retain and attract our tax base," Lauzen said. "We need to provide excitement. Our responsibility is to make this as wonderful a...

  •  
    Carpentersville has proposed a resolution that would restrict where medical marijuana is grown and sold in the village and forces would-be sellers and growers to first seek a permit. The board will vote on the resolution at its June 18 meeting.

    Carpentersville moves to regulate medical marijuana

    If Gov. Pat Quinn ever signs the law that allows the use of medical marijuana in Illinois, Carpentersville leaders will be ready.Tuesday night, the board agreed to restrictions that would regulate where medical marijuana could be bought and force growers and sellers to first secure a special permit.

  •  

    Mount Prospect approves new contracts for firefighters, police sergeants

    Mount Prospect trustees Tuesday approved new multiyear contracts awarding small twice annual raises to its firefighters and police sergeants. Under the agreements, firefighters and police sergeants will receive 1 percent pay hikes twice per year, but also pay a larger share of their health insurance premiums.

  •  

    $590 million Powerball jackpot claimed in Florida

    The Florida Lottery says the winner of the $590 million Powerball jackpot has claimed the prize. Lottery officials say they’ll hold an afternoon press conference on Wednesday, though the winner will not attend.

  •  
    This image made from video broadcast Wednesday on Al-Mayadeen Television shows Syrian army troops in Qusair, Syria. The Syrian army triumphantly announced Wednesday the capture of a strategic town near the Lebanese border, telling the nation it has “cleansed” the rebel-held Qusair of “terrorists” fighting President Bashar Assad’s troops. The capture of the town, which lies close to the Lebanese border, solidifies some of the regime’s recent gains on the ground that have shifted the balance of power in Assad’s favor in the Syrian civil war.

    Syrian army announces capture of key town to nation

    The Syrian army triumphantly announced Wednesday the capture of a strategic border town after a three week grueling battle, telling the nation it has “cleansed” Qusair of rebels and calling it “a message” to Syria’s enemies everywhere.

  •  
    West Chicago is seeking permission from the city's historical preservation commission to demolish the Joel Wiant House, which is located at 151 W. Washington St.

    West Chicago debates fate of historic home

    There's “no clear reason architecturally or structurally” to demolish the historic Joel Wiant House in downtown West Chicago, according to an architectural firm hired by city's historical preservation commission. But the city has its own experts who say it would be highly costly to rehabilitate the 144-year-old brick building at 151 W. Washington St. Both findings are at the heart of...

  •  
    The Chicago Futabakai Japanese School performs a Soran Dance during the 30th anniversary Japan Festival in 2012.

    Japan Fest returns to new location in Elk Grove Village June 8-9

    The world of Japan opens to the suburbs this weekend, as Japan Fest 2013 returns June 8-9, at Elk Grove High School, 500 W. Elk Grove Blvd. Admission is free.

  •  
    first lady Michelle Obama was speaking Tuesday evening at a Democratic National Committee fundraiser in Washington. According to a pool report from a reporter who attended the event, an audience member started shouting in support of an executive order on gay rights halfway through Mrs. Obama’s remarks. Mrs. Obama moved toward the protester and said the person would either, quote, “listen to me or you can take the mic, but I’m leaving.”

    Protester interrupts Michelle Obama at fundraiser

    First lady Michelle Obama threatened to leave a nighttime fundraiser unless a protester quit interrupting her speech. Mrs. Obama moved toward the protester and said the person would either, quote, “listen to me or you can take the mic, but I’m leaving." The crowd started shouting for Mrs. Obama to stay. The protester was then escorted out of the event.

  •  

    Boy pleads no contest to killing great-grandmother

    SHEBOYGAN, Wis. (AP) — Prosecutors in Sheboygan County will recommend a 14-year-old boy be eligible for parole in 35 years for killing his great-grandmother with a hammer and hatchet. Antonio Barbeau (bar-BOH’) changed his plea to no contest in court Tuesday as part of a deal with the state. Barbeau had earlier pleaded not guilty by reason of mental disease or defect.

  •  

    Illinois National Guard gets new assistant adjutant

    SPRINGFIELD — The Illinois National Guard says Gov. Pat Quinn has named Brig. Gen. Richard J. Hayes as its assistant adjutant general.The guard says Hayes will serve as the primary assistant to Adjutant General Daniel M. Krumrei in supervising the guard’s 13,000 soldiers and airmen.

  •  

    Peoria faces budget deficit for 2014 and 2015

    PEORIA — City leaders in Peoria say the central Illinois community will likely face a multimillion budget deficit during the next two years and they hope to spend the next several months working to address the problem.City Manager Patrick Urich says the 2014 deficit is expected to be $3.1 million, a figure that will likely grow to $3.6 million in 2015.

  •  

    Chicago expanding residential recycling program
    Chicago expanding residential recycling programCHICAGO (AP) — Chicago is expanding its residential recycling program to 61,000 more households. Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s office announced on Tuesday that blue cart recycling services will begin on June 24 or July 1 for the added households. It’s part of a second phase of a 2013 expansion.

  •  

    Roseland hospital official says Illinois doesn’t owe funds

    An official of Chicago’s Roseland Community Hospital says Illinois does not owe the facility $6 million as originally asserted. The hospital is threatening to close because of its debt.

  •  

    Civil War bust rededication set at Indiana Statehouse

    INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana leaders are planning a commemoration of a Civil War Army officer revered by Union and Confederate soldiers alike.

  •  

    Mom sentenced over baby’s remains at Indiana bridge

    WINCHESTER, Ind. — A woman has pleaded guilty to not reporting the death of her newborn daughter whose remains were found underneath a rural eastern Indiana bridge.A Randolph County judge accepted 29-year-old Ana Monjes’ guilty plea to the misdemeanor charges on Tuesday and gave her a one-year suspended sentence.

  •  

    Carmi man gets 6 years for online drug sales

    A southern Illinois man has been sentenced to six years in prison for selling prescription drugs over the Internet.The U.S. Justice Department says 40-year-old Michael P. Jackson was sentenced Tuesday in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida. After prison time, the Carmi man must serve three years of supervised release.

  •  

    Durbin: Poland should be in U.S. visa waiver program

    Sen. Dick Durbin says Polish citizens should be able to visit the U.S. for up to 90 days without a visa.Durbin met Tuesday with fellow senators and Polish Foreign Minister Radoslaw Sikorski (rah-DOH’-swahv sih-KOHR’-skee). They discussed including Poland in the U.S. Visa Waiver Program.

  •  

    Man gunned down outside Illinois strip club named

    BROOKLYN, Ill. — Investigators say they’ve identified the man gunned down outside a southwestern Illinois strip club as a 27-year-old St. Louis resident.Illinois State Police tell the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that Michael Brooks was shot several times early Sunday outside Roxy’s Strip Club in Brooklyn. He died later at a hospital.

  •  

    Wisconsin approves private school tuition tax deduction

    MADISON, Wis. — Private school tuition would be tax deductible under a provision added to the state budget.The Joint Finance Committee on Wednesday approved creating the new tax deduction for tuition expenses of up to $4,000 per year for elementary school students and $10,000 for each high school student. The deduction would begin in 2014.

  •  

    76-year-old central Indiana woman found dead in pool

    NOBLESVILLE, Ind. — Authorities say a 76-year-old woman’s grandson found her dead in the backyard pool of her suburban Indianapolis home.

  •  

    Indiana school returning Indian chief statue to gym

    GOSHEN, Ind. — A northern Indiana high school is putting back up a wooden statue of an American Indian chief representing its “Redskins” mascot ahead of this weekend’s graduation ceremony.Officials removed the statue from Goshen High School’s gym last week, saying they wanted to avoid offending anyone attending Sunday’s ceremony.

  •  

    Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism could be moved

    MADISON, Wis. — The Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism could no longer be housed at the University of Wisconsin under a provision added to the state budget.The Republican-controlled Joint Finance Committee voted Wednesday on the prohibition. No UW employees would be allowed to work at the center, either.

  •  

    Wisconsin committee passes budget that cuts taxes

    MADISON, Wis. — The state budget is on its way to the state Assembly for debate.The plan passed by the Legislature’s Joint Finance Committee on Wednesday morning after an all-night session includes a $650 million income tax cut, expands private school vouchers statewide and rejects a federal Medicaid expansion.Republicans passed the budget on a 12-4 party line vote.

  •  

    Sugar Grove asking residents’ opinions of life in the village

    Sugar Grove is getting set to find out what its residents are thinking, with a professional survey. It would be the first since 1007.

  •  
    Los Angeles Kings right wing Justin Williams fights with Chicago Blackhawks center Andrew Shaw during the second period of Game 3 of the Western Conference finals Tuesday in Los Angeles.

    Dawn Patrol: Concealed carry extension; Hawks lose 3-1

    Gov. Pat Quinn has more time to think about concealed carry. Supporters of Wauconda Police Chief Doug Larsson pack the village board meeting. An Antioch mom is accused of leaving her 4-month-old twins unattended in a car. Cameras are coming to Kane County courtrooms. Dist. 211 widens the search for its next leader. Naperville approves the Freedom Plaza development. Students who don't do their...

  •  
    This house in Inverness was sought by producers of the upcoming reality TV show “The Capones,” whose cast is at top right, but the village board worried about safety on nearby roads and rejected the request.

    Inverness mansion won't house 'The Capones' show

    An Inverness estate featuring seven bedrooms, five fireplaces and one indoor wave pool won't serve as a backdrop to an upcoming reality TV series about the supposed descendants of Chicago's most infamous gangster. The village board recently turned down a request by Los Angeles-based Asylum Entertainment to spend more than two months filming “The Capones” at the 13,000-square-foot...

  •  

    Union teacher conference costs some taxpayers twice

    Taxpayers in 57 suburban school districts spent more than $200,000 on the salaries of 276 teachers and other employees for days spent attending a union conference in April. In some of those school districts, taxpayers picked up the cost of substitutes, as well, while in others the union covered those costs.

  •  

    Dist. 211 agrees to widen search for superintendent

    The first steps in the lengthy and detailed search for a new superintendent in Palatine-Schaumburg High School District 211 will occur by the end of this week.The board agreed Tuesday during a special meeting to open the search to both internal and external candidates. Current Superintendent Nancy Rob plans to retire after the next school year.

Sports

  •  
    A person familiar with the case tells The Associated Press Tuesday that Anthony Bosch has agreed to talk to Major League Baseball about players linked to performance-enhancing drugs. Alex Rodriguez, Ryan Braun, Nelson Cruz and Melky Cabrera are among the players whose names have been tied to the clinic.

    MLB interviewing players as part of drug clinic probe

    Major League Baseball is interviewing players linked to a Miami anti-aging clinic that allegedly sold performance-enhancing drugs and has become the focus of the sport’s investigation. Clinic founder Anthony Bosch has agreed to talk with MLB, according to numerous reports, and union head Michael Weiner said Wednesday the commissioner’s office has assured the union that “no decisions regarding discipline have been made or will be made until those interviews are completed.”

  •  
    How explosive Bulls point guard Derrick Rose will be when he complete returns from his knee injury is difficult to know, but medical advances suggest he’ll be close to his old self. His outside shooting, however, should be improved since he’s had so much time to work on those skills.

    Why his fans will return once Rose returns

    Derrick Rose skipping all of last season and losing some of his fan support is a moot point now. The relevant question is how good a player will Rose be in October when he presumably return to the court, 17 months after ACL surgery? Mike McGraw offers more as part of his season wrapup series on the Bulls.

  •  
    Blackhawks defenseman Duncan Keith will miss Thursday's Game 4 against the Kings after being suspended one game by the NHL for his slash to the face of Los Angeles forward Jeff Carter in Game 3.

    Hawks' Keith suspended for tonight's game

    Blackhawks defenseman Duncan Keith drew a one-game suspension from the NHL on Wednesday for his one-hand slash to the face of Kings forward Jeff Carter in Game 3 on Tuesday. In suspending for tonight's Game 4, the league pointed out how he was a repeat offender and that Carter was hurt on the play, suffering a 20-stitch cut and losing several teeth.

  •  
    Chicago Cubs Julio Borbon, left, and Luis Valbuena, two of three runners who scored on a an Anthony Rizzo double, celebrate in the tenth inning against the Los Angeles Angels in a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Wednesday, June 5, 2013. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

    Rizzo hits 3-run double in 10th, Cubs beat Angels

    Anthony Rizzo had a bases-clearing double in the 10th inning and the Cubs overcame a pair of homers by Mark Trumbo to beat the Los Angeles Angels 8-6 on Wednesday night. "I want to be in that situation," Rizzo said. "They made good pitches on me today, but I was able to get the big hit at the end."

  •  

    Bottom line: Hawks win tonight would be huge

    Troy Murray thinks the Blackhawks were surprised by the way the L.A. Kings played between the two games in Chicago and the game in L.A on Tuesday.The good news, though, is as ineffective as the Hawks were in that loss, they were still in the game until the end.

  •  
    White Sox starting pitcher Jake Peavy will be out 4-6 weeks with a rib injury.

    White Sox likely to go after a pitcher

    The White Sox' starting rotation has been dealing with injuries all season, and Jake Peavy (fractured rib) is the latest casualty. In Thursday's draft, beat writer Soct Gregor says the Sox would be wise to select a college starter with their No. 17 overall pick.

  •  

    Williamson’s Bandits debut a winner

    Pitcher Andi Williamson made her Chicago Bandits debut a winning one, throwing a complete-game 7-1 victory over the Akron Racers on Wedneday night in Rosemont on Opening Night of the 2013 National Pro Fastpitch season.

  •  

    Cubs sure to get top prospect at No. 2

    All the Cubs have to do is sit back and wait for the Houston Astros to make the first selection in baseball's amateur draft Thursday evening. After that, the Cubs will have their pick of several solid prospects with the second selection.

  •  

    Vogelbach, Cougars sting Bees

    Dan Vogelbach’s first-inning home run put the Kane County Cougars on top, and they never looked back en route to an 8-6 victory over the Burlington Bees on Wednesday at Community Field.

  •  

    Masoncup named new St. Charles North coach

    A familiar name to area basketball fans will take over the St. Charles North girls program next year. Sean Masoncup, a 1997 graduate of Geneva High School who played basketball and tennis for the Vikings, will replace Colleen Backer as the North Stars varsity coach.

  •  

    Hockey’s 312 team meets the 90210

    As Blackhawks Team Historian Bob Verdi explains, so much has changed since the National Hockey Leagues expanded to Los Angeles and Oakland in 1967. Back then, Rodeo Drive was a rumor to the Blackhawks. That wasn't the case Wednesday as the bearded boys from Chicago checked out the famous shopping strip at 90210 to take a break from their brusiing battle in the NHL playoffs.

  •  
    The Blackhawks' Patrick Kane is unable to score on Kings goalie Jonathan Quick in Game 1. Kane has on 2 goals in 15 playoff games this year.

    Blackhawks' Kane looks to step up his game

    Patrick Kane has only 2 goals in 15 playoff games for the Blackhawks and was mostly invisible in Tuesday's 3-1 loss to the Kings at Staples Center in Game 3 of the Western Conference finals. Hawks coach Joel Quenneville admitted he was looking for a little more from his star winger. “It's tight for the top guys,” Quenneville said.

  •  
    Los Angeles Kings defenseman Slava Voynov, left, celebrates with center Jeff Carter (77) after scoring a goal against the Chicago Blackhawks during the second period in Game 3 of the NHL hockey Stanley Cup playoffs Western Conference finals, Tuesday, June 4, 2013, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

    Kings’ Voynov making his presence felt

    Los Angeles Kings defenseman Slava Voynov has become a difference-maker. At least he was in Game 3. Voynov had a goal and assist in the 3-1 win for Los Angeles, giving him the Kings’ team record for most playoff goals by a defenseman with 5.

  •  

    No way latest baseball scandal hits Cubs, White Sox

    Wouldn't it be great if certain Cubs and White Sox players were suspended for 100 games in baseball's latest drug scandal? You know, just so Chicago baseball fans didn't have to watch them flop around anymore this season?

  •  
    Cubs prospect Albert Almora of the Kane County Cougars has had a terrific start in Geneva with the Class A club, batting .455 through his first 11 games.

    Cubs hitting prospects connecting with Cougars

    While the Cubs are struggling in the NL Central, the future looks bright in Geneva with three talented prospects pounding the ball for their Class A affiliate, the Kane County Cougars. Here's an update on prospects Rock Shoulders, Dan Vogelbach and Albert Almora, who are leading the way for the franchise.

  •  
    Chicago White Sox's Alejandro De Aza drives in a run against the Seattle Mariners in the 16th inning of a baseball game on Wednesday, June 5, 2013, in Seattle. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

    Sox snap skid, beat Seattle 7-5 in 16

    Alejandro De Aza and Alex Rios each had an RBI single in the 16th inning, and the White Sox snapped an eight-game losing streak with a 7-5 victory over the Seattle Mariners on Wednesday.

  •  
    Defenseman Duncan Keith will miss Game 4 of the Western Conference finals Thursday under a one-game suspension for high-sticking Los Angeles' Jeff Carter. The NHL announced the suspension Wednesday.

    Keith suspended for Game 4

    Defenseman Duncan Keith will miss Game 4 of the Western Conference finals Thursday under a one-game suspension for high-sticking Los Angeles' Jeff Carter. The NHL announced the suspension Wednesday.

  •  
    Serbia's Novak Djokovic celebrates defeating Germany's Tommy Haas in three sets 6-3, 7-6, 7-5, in their quarterfinal match at the French Open tennis tournament, at Roland Garros stadium in Paris, Wednesday June 5, 2013. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)

    Nadal, Djokovic to meet in French Open semifinals

    Here comes the showdown everyone’s been anticipating since the field was set nearly two weeks ago: A Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic semifinal Friday that will have the feel of a final, and not only because they met for the championship at Roland Garros a year ago.

  •  
    Chicago White Sox starter Jake Peavy delivers a pitch during the first inning of an interleague baseball game against the Miami Marlins in Chicago, Saturday, May 25, 2013. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)

    Jake Peavy out 4-6 weeks

    Jake Peavy will miss at least the next four to six weeks after an MRI revealed the White Sox starter has a non-displaced rib fracture on the left side of his chest.

  •  

    Hawks' Keith: Carter high-stick was accident

    Chicago Blackhawks defenseman Duncan Keith said he accidentally high-sticked Los Angeles Kings forward Jeff Carter in the face in Game 3 of the Western Conference finals. “Yeah, it was accidental,” Keith said. “Obviously, I wanted to give him a tap, but not where I got him."

  •  
    Los Angeles Kings goalie Jonathan Quick blocks a shot by Brandon Saad of the Blackhawks in Game 1 of the Western Conference finals.

    Former Hawk Gilbert saw good things in Saad

    Greg Gilbert’s time with Brandon Saad was brief, but the impression Saad left on the 15-year NHL veteran was lasting. “I only had him for about four months, but you could see that he was brought up the right way,” said Gilbert, who took over as coach of the OHL’s Saginaw Spirit in December of 2011. “All his actions were pointed toward being the best player he could be — his work ethic on and off the ice, the way he carried himself.

  •  

    Two crazy stories involving deer crashes

    Mike Jackson's outdoors notes offer some local fishing updates, plus a pair of stories involving deer striking a motorcyclist and another deer crashing a Beach Boys concert and giving a fan a concussion.

  •  

    Unwinding, with a simpler life in the Northwoods

    Mike Jackson knows close to a dozen guys who dream of being someplace else, like the Northwoods. Schaumburg angler John Plaza, for instance. He retired, sold his suburban home and built a beautiful lakefront home designed by his wife. There are others whose stories are very similar. And then there is Ben, who opted for a simpler life and doesn’t look back with any regret at his new job as a fishing guide.

  •  

    Baseball returns to the basics

    Mike North thinks LeBron James is setting up scapegoats if the Miami Heat happen to lose tonight. By using Cleveland comparisons, it looks like he is throwing his teammates under the bus.

  •  
    Chicago Fire forward Sherjill MacDonald reacts after missing a pass against the Houston Dynamo in a playoff match last October. MacDonald, the club’s highest-paid player, has only started in seven matches this season.

    Roster change impacts Fire’s MacDonald

    With the addition of forward Mike Magee two weeks ago, Sherjill MacDonald dropped even further out of coach Frank Klopas’ lineup. Orrin Schwarz has more in his Chicago Fire notebook.

  •  

    Dodgers beat Padres 2-1 to end 2-game skid

    Yasiel Puig lived up to the hype in his major league debut, and then some. Puig had two singles and made a strong throw from right field to first to complete a game-ending double play, helping the Los Angeles Dodgers beat the San Diego Padres 2-1 on Monday night.

  •  

    Lincecum ends three-start skid, Giants beat Jays

    Tim Lincecum ended a three-start losing streak, Andres Torres hit a two-run homer and the San Francisco Giants beat Melky Cabrera and the Toronto Blue Jays 2-1 on Tuesday night.

  •  

    Brewers rally in 10th for 4-3 victory over A’s

    Carlos Gomez scored from first on Yuniesky Betancourt’s line drive in the gap between center and right in the bottom of the 10th inning, lifting the Milwaukee Brewers to a 4-3 victory over the Oakland Athletics on Tuesday night.

Business

  •  
    Sherman Sykes cooks hamburgers for a lunchtime crowd at his rebuilt restaurant in Henryville, Ind. U.S. service firms grew at a faster pace in May, driven by a jump in new orders, according to data released Wednesday by the Institute for Supply Management. But a measure of hiring showed companies added fewer jobs.

    Weak signals on the economy send stocks plunging

    A series of weak economic reports sent the stock market plunging to its lowest level in a month on Wednesday. Companies like miners, banks and chemical makers, whose fortunes are most closely tied to the prospects for growth, led the market lower. That’s a sign investors are becoming less confident in the U.S. economy.

  •  
    Walgreen said sales grew even though generic drug over the past year and a shifting calendar hurt its performance.

    Key May revenue figure climbs 2.8 pct for Walgreen

    Deerfield-based Walgreen’s revenue from established stores topped analyst expectations for May, even though a rise in generic drugs continues to dent the top line of the nation’s largest drugstore chain.

  •  
    Adi Mor said the Party Fantasy he plans for Wheeling will be similar to the one operating in Mundelein.

    New Party Fantasy coming to Wheeling

    The owner of the Party Fantasy children's play center in Mundelein got permission this week to open another one in Wheeling. Adi Mor, who also owns Garden Fresh Market stores, said the Wheeling Party Fantasy will resemble the Mundelein one, with gokarts, a climbing wall, dance floor, inflatable bounce houses, toddler area and party rooms.

  •  
    Cheerios is standing by the fictitious biracial family featured in their latest Heart Healthy campaign, which reflects a black-white racial mix uncommon in commercials today.

    Cheerios stands by TV ad showing mixed-race family

    The message in Cheerios' latest TV commercial is in line with the company’s Heart Healthy campaign, except this 30-second ad features a black dad, white mom and biracial child and produced enough vitriol on YouTube last week that Cheerios requested the comments section be turned off.

  •  
    Beginning this week, Spirit Airlines will start serving wine in cans, saying the cans are easier to store, and they weigh less than bottles.

    Spirit Airlines starts serving wine in cans

    Spirit Airlines is thinking outside of the bottle. The low-cost carrier known for extra fees and cheeky ads, starting this week, is pouring wine out of aluminum cans.

  •  
    The U.S. government is taking advantage of the recent run-up in General Motors stock to sell off another 30 million shares in the auto giant that it acquired in a bailout, according to the Treasury Department, Wednesday.

    Treasury to sell 30 million shares of GM stock

    The U.S. government is taking advantage of the recent run-up in General Motors stock to sell off another 30 million shares in the auto giant that it acquired in a bailout.

  •  
    Kathie Maiello of Any-Time Home Care, left, talks with Jashod Chaney, of Albany, at the Dr. King Career Fair at the Empire State Plaza Convention Center, in Albany, N.Y. Payroll processor ADP said Wednesday, June 5, 2013, that companies added 135,000 jobs in May.

    Survey: U.S. private employers add 135K jobs in May

    A private survey shows U.S. businesses added just 135,000 jobs in May, the second straight month of weak gains. Payroll provider ADP said Wednesday that May’s gain was above April’s revised total of 113,000. But it’s much lower than the gains ADP reported over the winter, which averaged more than 200,000 a month from November through February.

  •  
    The European Union’s executive arm has given tiny Latvia the go-ahead to become the 18th country to join the troubled euro currency union next year.

    Latvia gets go-ahead to become 18th euro member

    The tiny Baltic state of Latvia has won approval to become the 18th member of the troubled euro currency union — despite doubts among many of its people and international concerns about its banking system.

  •  
    Peeps move through the manufacturing process, at the Just Born factory in Bethlehem, Pa. Orders to U.S. factories rose modestly in April as manufacturers rebounded from a weak March performance, the Commerce Department said Wednesday.

    U.S. factory orders up 1 percent in April

    Orders to U.S. factories rose modestly in April as manufacturers rebounded from a weak March performance. Factory orders rose 1 percent in April compared with March when orders had dropped a sharp 4.7 percent, the Commerce Department said Wednesday. The big swing reflected volatility in commercial aircraft orders, which were down sharply in March but surged 53.3 percent in April.

  •  

    Natural gas futures fluctuate

    Natural gas futures fluctuated in New York before a weekly report that may show a larger-than-average stockpile increase.

  •  

    Dell: Icahn-Southeastern offer short by $3.9B

    Dell says a buyout offer from Southeastern and billionaire investor Carl Icahn is approximately $3.9 billion short of the amount needed to pay shareholders as promised and operate the business. A special Dell board committee still favors a buyout offer from the struggling PC maker’s CEO and founder, Michael Dell, and investment firm Silver Lake Partners.

  •  
    Former News International chief executive Rebekah Brooks, accompanied by her husband Charlie, right, leaves a court after entering a not guilty plea to charges related to phone hacking, in London, Wednesday, June 5, 2013. Brooks on Wednesday denied charges of phone hacking, bribing public officials and trying to thwart a police investigation into tabloid wrongdoing.

    News International ex-CEO pleads not guilty to hacking charges

    The former chief executive of Rupert Murdoch’s News International on Wednesday denied charges of phone hacking, bribing public officials and trying to thwart a police investigation into tabloid wrongdoing. Rebekah Brooks answered “not guilty” in a firm voice to five charges at a court hearing at London’s Southwark Crown Court.

  •  
    Toyota says it is hiring slightly more new workers than first expected as it increases production at its southwestern Indiana factory.

    Toyota’s Indiana plant adding more jobs

    Toyota says it is hiring slightly more new workers than first expected as it increases production at its southwestern Indiana factory.

  •  

    SEC to consider tougher rules for money funds

    The Securities and Exchange Commission is expected on Wednesday to propose stricter regulations for money-market mutual funds, hoping to shore up an industry that posed risks to investors at the height of the 2008 financial crisis. SEC officials have yet to make public any proposed changes to its oversight of the $2.7 trillion industry.

  •  
    A man walks by an electronic stock board of a securities firm Wednesday in Tokyo. Asian stock markets fell Wednesday as signs the U.S. Federal Reserve might scale back its super-loose monetary policy caused investors to trim equity investments.

    Nikkei weighs on markets ahead of more U.S. figures

    Disappointment at Japan’s latest package of measures designed to boost its economy coupled with concerns over the course of U.S. monetary policy to weigh on markets Wednesday. Japan’s benchmark Nikkei 225 index had another day to forget as investors appeared disappointed at the lack of detail in a keynote speech on the economy from Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

  •  
    Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe gestures Wednesday during a speech at a seminar in Tokyo. Abe outlined a sweeping blueprint for rejuvenating Japan’s ailing economy with reforms meant to bring more women into the workforce, promote industrial innovation and coax cash-hoarding corporations into investing more.

    Japan’s Abe outlines reform strategy for economy

    Prime Minister Shinzo Abe outlined Wednesday a sweeping blueprint for rejuvenating Japan’s ailing economy, calling for reforms to bring more women into the workforce, promote industrial innovation and coax cash-hoarding corporations into investing more. “Now is the time for Japan to be an engine for world economic recovery,” Abe said.

  •  
    A U.S. trade agency on Tuesday issued a ban on imports of Apple’s iPhone 4 and a variant of the iPad 2 after finding the devices violate a patent held by South Korean rival Samsung Electronics. On Tuesday, the White House issued a recommendation to Congress that it limit the ITC’s ability to impose import bans in these cases.

    ITC rules for Samsung, bans iPhone 4 imports

    A U.S. trade agency on Tuesday issued a ban on imports of Apple’s iPhone 4 and a variant of the iPad 2 after finding the devices violate a patent held by South Korean rival Samsung Electronics. Because the devices are assembled in China, the import ban would end Apple’s ability to sell them in the U.S.

  •  
    Toyota Motor Corp. said Wednesday it is recalling about 242,000 of its Prius and Lexus hybrid vehicles due to problems with their braking systems.

    Toyota recalls 242,000 Prius, Lexus hybrid cars

    Toyota Motor Corp. said Wednesday it is recalling about 242,000 of its Prius and Lexus hybrid vehicles due to problems with their braking systems. The recall applies to about 233,000 Prius vehicles made between March and October 2009 and about 9,000 Lexus HS250h models made between June and October 2009.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Envelope pillows are a great project for a meaningful sentiment. Not only will they be a unique gesture, but the recipient can also keep the pillow as a gift.

    Create meaningful messages in a pillow

    I love finding special ways of giving someone a message besides the usual letter, email or phone call. To me, a little time and thought put into the presentation of even the simplest greeting makes a huge impact. That’s why these envelope pillows are a great project for a meaningful sentiment. Not only will they be a special gesture, but the recipient can also keep the pillow as a gift.

  •  

    Proscuitto a tasty update to spinach salad

    In this updated version of bacon-dressed spinach salad the bacon has been replaced with a leaner, lighter and sweeter cured-pork product: prosciutto from Parma, Italy. Toasted walnuts add crunch, and the combination picks up zing from a vinegary mix of sauteed onions and apples softened by a little maple syrup.

  •  
    Comedian Brian Regan performs Friday at the Improv Comedy Showcase in Schaumburg.

    Weekend picks: Comedian Brian Regan comes clean at Improv

    Comedian Brian Regan is famed for largely eschewing blue content, so he can reach out to more audiences. He continues his Improv Comedy Showcase engagement Friday in Schaumburg. Veteran rock star Sting performs his hits during two shows at Ravinia Friday and Saturday. Best-selling author Judy Blume will attend a Saturday screening of the film adaptation of her 1981 young adult novel “Tiger Eyes” at the Tivoli Theatre in Downers Grove.

  •  
    PAUL VALADE/pvalade@dailyherald.com ¬ The Grayslake Farmers Market is Lake County's oldest and largest evening market. Geneva Lakes Produce Farm & Greenhouse from Burlington, Wis. offerered a nice selection of vegetables Wednesday which included red and green peppers.

    Tips for a successful trip to the market

    With all the recent interest in locally grown, farm-fresh and organic foods, it’s no wonder the number of U.S. farmers markets has more than tripled in the past 15 years. There are now more than 7,175 across the country, according to the Agriculture Department. Buying local means products are picked at peak ripeness, providing the top freshness, flavor and nutrients. Now is the time to get exploring, to discover new produce and fresh or potted herbs that your supermarket might not feature.

  •  
    Fruits and berries are harvested and make their way to local farmers markets within a few days. Vendors will share information on where their food is grown.

    Fruits, vegatables taste better when fresh off the farm

    Marg Duer doesn't care if the egg came before the chicken. But she is particular about how it tastes. Duer, who founded the Palatine Farmers Market more than 20 years ago and still manages it today, believes farmers markets offer shoppers a unique experience that can place healthier items on their plates — as well as save them money on certain items.

  •  
    The burgers are still a fave at Brandt's in Palatine.

    Menu, renovations give Palatine's Brandt's a new lease on life

    Brandt's is a long-time Palatine favorite that faced an uncertain future earlier this year. A couple of hometown pals purchased the 130-year-old building and reopened it as Brandt's of Palatine. They've put a lot of money into updating and the kitchen and bathrooms, but even more importantly, they've updated the menu to make it more family- and wallet-friendly.

  •  
    Peyton List will appear as part of "Tween Stars Live Tour 2013" at the Rosemont Theatre.

    Tween tour to stop in Rosemont

    “Tween Stars Live Tour 2013” ­— featuring eight actors from Disney Channel and Nickelodeon television shows ­—­ will come to the Rosemont Theatre from noon to 2 p.m. Sunday, July 28. Tickets will be available at 10 a.m. Friday at tweenstarslivetour.com.

  •  
    The Eagles will perform in Rosemont on Oct. 19.

    The Eagles headed for Rosemont

    Legendary rock band The Eagles will swoop into Rosemont’s Allstate Arena to perform on Saturday, Oct. 19. Tickets for the concert, priced $49 to $189, go on sale at 10 a.m. Saturday, June 8, at ticketmaster.com.

  •  
    "Bobby Flay's Barbecue Addiction"

    New books help novices, enthusiasts stoke their interest in smoking

    To say that smoking is hot is an understatement. In 2012, nearly 14.4 million smoker and barbecue units were shipped in the U.S., according to the Hearth, Patio and Barbecue Association. With that many smokers on peoples' patios, came the cookbooks filled with suggestions for what to cook on those smokers. Since early spring I've been deluged with cookbooks about grilling, barbecue and smoking. Being a novice smoker myself I turned to Michael Pennisi, a seasoned smoker and winner of the 2012 Daily Herald Cook of the Week Challenge, for help.

  •  
    Chicken Leg and Wing Rack

    Grilling gadgets for fun and function

    Grilling gadgets galore. Deborah Pankey tells you which ones are worth adding to your summer arsenal. She also gives you the 411 on entertaining diva Heather Christo's recipe demonstration in Glen Ellyn.

  •  
    Experienced smokers might want to try their hand at Myron Mixon’s Smoked Turkey Drumsticks.

    Smoked Turkey Drumsticks
    Smoked Turkey Drumsticks

  •  

    2013 Farmers Markets
    A number of communities throughout the Chicago suburbs will host farmers markets in 2013. Here's a list of the days and times of each market in area towns.

  •  

    Farmers Market Salad With Herbed Vinaigrette
    Farmers Market Salad with Herbed Vinaigrette

  •  
    Singer Lenny Kravitz will join co-host Jason Aldean, while rapper Nelly will team with Florida Georgia Line on their crossover hit “Cruise” during Wednesday night’s CMT Music Awards show.

    Expect the unexpected at CMT Music Awards

    Country music has been good to the rapper Nelly, and he’s back in Music City because of it. Nelly will perform the crossover hit “Cruise” with country duo Florida Georgia Line during the CMT Music Awards. The imaginary, but once impenetrable, lines between American music genres are blurring more each day, and Nelly’s happy to serve as an eraser.

  •  
    Writer-director Joss Whedon’s latest film is an independent adaptation of Shakespeare’s “Much Ado About Nothing.”

    Bard inspires Josh Whedon’s superheroes

    Some might find it strange that Joss Whedon’s first movie since “The Avengers” — his 2012 megahit about a team of Marvel Comics superheroes — is an independent adaptation of Shakespeare’s “Much Ado About Nothing.” But it makes perfect sense to him. The man who created TV hits like “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” and its spinoff “Angel” says his dramas all have a bit of the Bard in them.

  •  
    British actress Kate Winslet with her husband Ned Rocknroll are expecting a child, according to reports.

    Kate Winslet expecting a baby with new husband

    Kate Winslet is going to be a mom again. A representative for the 37-year-old Oscar winner confirms Winslet and husband Ned Rocknroll are expecting a child. People.com first reported the pregnancy Tuesday.

  •  

    Jon Stewart taking break from ‘Daily Show’

    Jon Stewart is starting a summer-long break from anchoring “The Daily Show,” but it will be no holiday. He’ll be in the Middle East making his first movie. While he’s away, Stewart says he’ll miss hosting the Comedy Central fake newscast. As he explains, “People clap for me! That doesn’t happen just anywhere.”

  •  

    Frugal living: cleaning cabinets and making bread

    Frugal Village founder Sara Noel shares tips for cleaning gunky buildup on kitchen cabinets.

  •  
    “The Kill Room” by Jeffrey Deaver

    Deaver’s latest is filled with twists and turns

    Part of the joy in watching an ace baseball pitcher throw a perfect game is that every toss is different and the batter can’t figure out what’s coming next. Jeffery Deaver has written an ace thriller to keep readers guessing and gasping with his latest Lincoln Rhyme thriller, “The Kill Room.” A master magician with words, Deaver misdirects with one tale while what’s really going on is just off the reader’s radar.

  •  

    Younger vintners breathe new life into Languedoc

    A rogue sense of adventure has a positive side when it comes to France's Languedoc region. Languedoc is unbound by the traditions that have grown around Bordeaux and Burgundy over the centuries, traditions that dictate which grapes should be planted where. And that shows in the region's adventurous wines.

  •  
    Patience pays tasty dividends with a tender slab of Smoked Prime Rib with Red Wine Steak Sauce.

    Smoked Prime Rib with Red Wine Steak Sauce
    Smoked Prime Rib with Red Wine Steak Sauce

  •  

    A buyer’s guide to choosing a smoker

    Smoking enthusiast Jim Shahin provides a buyer's gudie to smoking rigs.

  •  

    Rigs for grilling and smoking

    If you’re in the market for a rig that can handle both grilling and smoking, Jim Shahin says there are things to keep in mind.

  •  
    Isn't homemade pulled pork why you wanted a smoker in the first place? This Peach Pulled Pork is a good recipe to start with.

    Peach Pulled Pork
    Peach Pulled Pork

  •  
    Spinach and Prosciutto Salad With Apple-Onion Vinaigrette

    Spinach and Prosciutto Salad With Apple-Onion Vinaigrette
    Spinach and Prosciutto Salad With Apple-Onion Vinaigrette

  •  
    Queens of the Stone Age — Troy Van Leeuwen, left, Jon Theodore, Josh Homme, Michael Shuman and Dean Fertita — released their first album in six years, “... Like Clockwork,” on Tuesday. They're heading to Chicago to play Lollapalooza on Friday, Aug. 2.

    Heavy new Queens of the Stone Age album looks at life after death

    When Josh Homme sat down to write the music that would become Queens of the Stone Age's long-awaited new album, "... Like Clockwork," he found he had nothing to say. Worse, he was vaguely embarrassed by everything he'd done before. The mind has its dark places, and Homme found himself stuck in some if its blacker recesses after dying briefly on the operating table during leg surgery in 2010. “One of the things it did for me was it made music seem almost stupid to me, silly,” Homme said.

  •  
    “Eat Your Colors! A Puzzle Book” by Sarah Albee and Joe Matthieu.

    What will it be in kid books: cupcakes or carrots?

    Some authors and publishers are focused on creating alternatives to c-is-for-cupcake picture books for parents struggling to promote broccoli. Even Cookie Monster sometimes eats smarter, chowing down on celery and demonstrating smaller portions of his namesake treats in “Ding Dong, Elmo’s Here!” and other books from the folks on Sesame Street.

  •  

    Dining events: Get ready for some deep-dish pizza

    Hawthorne's Backyard adds deep-dish pizza to the menu; Ruth's Chris and Mondavi partner for a 100th birthday wine dinner; Spain takes on France as Mon Ami Gabi faces off against Cafe Ba-Ba-Reeba! in a battle of the small plates.

  •  

    In search of a rig that will light my fire

    Contemplating the smoker at rest, gleaming in the sunlight, it's obvious she isn't what she used to be. Her firebox vents are rusted open. Her metal charcoal insert, which should lie flat, is warped. Her chimney keeps falling off.Still writer Jim Shahin and his smoker had 13 good years together but it's time to move on. So, what comes next?

Discuss

  •  

    Editorial: A local mistake the governor can fix

    A Daily Herald editorial calls on Gov. Quinn to use his amendatory veto to remove a legislative edict setting up a separate election commission in Lake County.

  •  

    Where’s your daddy, and why it matters

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: Trends that diminish the importance of fathers from the family unit cannot — or should not — be celebrated.

  •  

    Agonizing over a slippery slope

    Columnist Richard Cohen: We have squandered our leadership — actual and moral — and done nothing to save lives. We might have contained a war that is spreading daily. We could at least have tried. It’s been a shameful performance.

  •  

    Drone strikes should stop
    A Mundelein letter to the editor: Obama’s promises to reduce the extent of the War on Terror have not been less exemplified than the drone strikes in Pakistan.

  •  

    Lawmakers should remember the poor
    A Hawthorn Woods letter to the editor: As our Legislators make their way home via state-subsidized transportation, and looking forward to their summer, I hope they have the time to think about retirees.

  •  

    Proposed DePaul arena not justified
    A Grayslake letter to the editor: If I were a donor to DePaul, I would have to question further donations to a private, Catholic university that has $70 million to throw at a multiuse arena that would also house the school’s men’s and women’s basketball programs.

  •  

    Proud to have an electric ‘Obamamobile’
    A Mount Prospect letter to the editor: I am not saying no more oil or coal just lets be wise in our consumption. We also need to once more believe in America and the American worker not with words but actions.

  •  

    Courts too easy on criminals
    A Rolling Meadows letter to the editor: We the people must stop this revolving door for the criminals and make the judges accountable and follow the law. Throw these criminals in jail where they belong. If the jails get overcrowded, so what? They get what they deserve.

  •  

    All should be part of social security
    An Elgin letter to the editor: Finally there was a common sense plan to fix our pension system. The article by Louis W. Kosiba, May 22, stated that everyone should be in the Social Security system. I have heard this talked about but nothing is ever done about this.

  •  

    Writers need to consider the facts
    A St. Charles letter to the editor: There seems to be a recent trend as I read “Your Views” in the Opinion page of the Daily Herald. This trend is to represent one’s opinion as fact.

  •  

    Police gun sale fundraiser a bad idea
    A St. Charles letter to the editor: The League of Women Voters of Central Kane County is strongly opposed to the St. Charles Police Department raising funds by selling confiscated or turned-in guns.

  •  

    It’s GOP that should be investigated
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: The Inspector General who conducted the audit of the IRS unit, whose job it is to review not-for-profit applications for validity, concluded in his audit report how difficult it is to discern a social welfare organization from a political advocacy group.

  •  

    If the U.S. can’t run the post office ...
    A Naperville letter to the editor: The May 26 letter writer Mary Warren from Wheaton should look a bit closer at Obamacare when she states: “GOP sabotage of health care shameful.” Her claim that both houses of Congress passed Obamacare is true.

  •  

    The other IRS scandal

    Let us stipulate that now might not be the best time — with IRS officials exposed for abusing power, caught in self-serving deceptions, invoking their constitutional right against self-incrimination — to dramatically expand the authority and size of their agency. But this is what Obamacare requires. Thousands of new IRS agents will implement 40-odd provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act — the exact number a matter of dispute since the law itself is so confusing. The largest tax law and social policy change in a generation will be imposed on a skeptical public by a government agency whose credibility is in ruins. But the IRS is not merely implementing Obamacare. It engaged in a regulatory power grab to ensure that it could implement Obamacare. As written, the Affordable Care Act provides tax credits and subsidies for the purchase of health insurance through exchanges that are run by “a governmental agency or nonprofit entity that is established by a state.” Since the federal government is constitutionally forbidden from ordering states to create exchanges, the law provides incentives to ensure their cooperation. This was part of the reform’s political appeal: Federal subsidies would be mediated through state institutions, undermining the criticism that American health care was being nationalized. But 33 states have so far refused to create health exchanges. The law allows the Department of Health and Human Services to set up federal health exchanges in the holdout states. But the statute makes no mention of the IRS providing credits and subsidies through federal exchanges. Without subsidies, employers and some individuals in those states would be exempt from mandates. Obamacare would be unworkable in over half the country. The IRS resolved this conundrum by denying its existence. In a May 2012 regulatory ruling, it asserted its own right to provide credits outside the state exchanges as the reasonable interpretation of an ambiguous law. But the language of the law is not ambiguous. And health scholars Jonathan Adler and Michael Cannon, in an exhaustive recent analysis, find no justification for the IRS’ ruling in the legislative history of Obamacare. “The statute,” they argue, “and the lack of any support for the IRS rule in the legislative record put defenders of the IRS rule in the awkward position of arguing that it was so obviously Congress’ intent to offer tax credits in federal exchanges that despite a year of debate over the PPACA, it never occurred to anyone to express that intent out loud. A better explanation is that the PPACA’s authors miscalculated when they assumed states would establish exchanges.” So: The IRS seized the authority to spend about $800 billion over 10 years on benefits that were not authorized by Congress. And the current IRS scandal puts this decision in a new light. What was the role of politics in shaping this regulatory decision? What pressure was applied? Surely the IRS is above such things. Or maybe not. “It doesn’t look good from the road,” says Cannon, the director of health policy studies at the Cato Institute, “when IRS employees violate the clear language of federal law in a matter that just happens to rescue the top domestic policy achievement of their boss, the president.” The IRS ruling is being challenged in a case brought by the attorney general of Oklahoma. Chief Justice John Roberts’ decision on the first Obamacare case made clear that the federal judiciary is reluctant to intervene on health matters. But lawsuits brought by states are generally taken seriously in federal court, and this one might also make its way to the Supreme Court. Both the statutory language and the legislative history are on Oklahoma’s side. A ruling against the administration could force Congress to revisit Obamacare.

«May

Jun 2013

Jul»
S M T W T F S
26 27 28 29 30 31 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 1 2 3 4 5 6