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Daily Archive : Friday March 29, 2013

News

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    John Tyree of South Elgin Parks and Rec Department checks out every piece of equipment at the parks under his care. He makes sure nothing is loose, broken or has graffiti on it.

    Moving Picture: South Elgin handyman stays plenty busy

    John Tyree found his dream job working for the South Elgin Parks and Recreation Department. He gets to work with his hands, spend lots of time outside, and have a positive impact on this community. Whether it's fixing playground equipment or building a trailer for the Easter bunny to ride on, Tyree says his biggest thrill is how kids react to his work.

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    Fred Dresser

    Geneva school board hopefuls discuss money

    Eight people, including two incumbents and a former board member, are seeking seats on the Geneva school board.

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    Inmate found dead in Illinois prison cell identified

    CHESTER, Ill. — An inmate found dead in his cell in a maximum-security prison in southwestern Illinois was serving a 20-year sentence on a sexual assault conviction out of Cook County.

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    Gogebic to test drill at proposed mine site

    MELLEN, Wis. — Gogebic Taconite is expected to begin test drilling at its proposed iron ore mine in northwestern Wisconsin by the end of next month. Gogebic president Bill Williams says the company plans to bore 13 holes at the four-mile site in Ashland and Iron counties. It would be the first work for Gogebic since the state mining law was passed earlier this month.

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    Facebook exec tells students it's OK to be a geek

    Chicago-area students taking part in a spring break robotics camp got a visit and pep talk from Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg.The Facebook chief operating officer and now best-selling author told the high school and middle school students that it's OK to be a geek.

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    Children of convicted killer will inherit estate

    LA CROSSE, Wis. — The children of a western Wisconsin man convicted of killing his parents will inherit part of their grandparents' estate. Probate records filed in La Crosse County Circuit Court show Eric Koula's two children will split $740,000 when they're older.

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    CDW-Government to pay $5.7 in fraud case

    EAST ST. LOUIS, Ill. — The U.S. government says a federal contractor has agreed to pay roughly $5.7 million to resolve allegations the company profited by submitting bogus claims.The deal announced Friday doesn't include any admission of wrongdoing by Vernon Hills-based CDW-Government LLC.

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    Body recovered from river in downtown Milwaukee

    MILWAUKEE — An autopsy is expected to determine the identity of a body pulled from the river in downtown Milwaukee not far from where a college student went missing on New Year's Day.

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    3 Milwaukee officers won't be charged in 2011 death

    A special prosecutor on Friday declined to charge three Milwaukee police officers in connection with the death of a robbery suspect who pleaded for help while gasping for air in the back of a squad car in 2011, saying there wasn't enough evidence to prove a case beyond a reasonable doubt.

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    $100 million loan in sight for Chicago river walk

    Chicago appears close to landing a $100 million federal loan to complete a major river walk project downtown. Mayor Rahm Emanuel and U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood discussed details on Thursday.

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    The ongoing effort to make Waukegan Harbor deeper is receiving $1 million in additional federal funding, U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin and Congressman Brad Schneider announced Friday. The funding will help pay for the dredging of thousands of cubic feet of sand dumped into the harbor as a result of Hurricane Sandy.

    Low levels in Great Lakes bad news for shippers

    Water levels on the Great Lakes are so low that shippers are being forced to leave as much as 15 percent of their cargo behind, said industry experts who are working to find ways to alleviate the problem. Lake Michigan and Lake Huron are about 26 inches below their long-term monthly averages, and Lake Superior is about 13 inches lower, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has said.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    A 19-year-old Lake in the Hills man was charged with criminal damage to property. Schaumburg police reports said a home security video indicated he had keyed a car at the home after the resident declined to contribute to a charity he said he was collecting for.

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    Three injured in Palatine collision

    Three people were injured, one critically, in a two-vehicle crash Friday evening in Palatine. The accident occurred about 5 p.m. on Euclid Avenue east of Quentin Road.

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    Victims cut from vehicles after Palatine crash

    Two people had to be cut from their vehicles following an accident Friday evening on Euclid Avenue east of Quentin Road in Palatine. Robert Brown Jr., 75, of Palatine, was driving a 2012 Chevrolet SUV, and Tracie Steben, 19, of Lombard, was driving a 2003 Nissan Altima, Palatine Police Sgt. Kyle Ingebrigtsen said. Brown suffered serious injuries and was taken to Advocate Lutheran General Hospital...

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    James Sauter

    Plans for services for Vernon Hills trooper announced

    Officials Saturday announced corrected information on plans for services for a state trooper who lost his life Friday when a semitrailer truck slammed into his car on the Tri-State Tollway. On duty at the time, James Sauter, 28, of Vernon Hills had just helped a driver on I-94. "We lost a wonderful person, a wonderful human being and certainly a wonderful human police officer," said Illinois...

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    An angel portrayed by Mayela Correa, of Mundelein, speaks to Jesus played by her father, Miguel Angel Correa, during Way of the Cross at Santa Maria del Popolo Catholic Church in Mundelein on Friday.

    Emotion shows at Way of the Cross throughout suburbs

    Mundelein's Santa Maria del Popolo Catholic Church observed Good Friday with a Latino tradition meant to create a more personal experience for worshippers. Via Crucis, or Way of the Cross, drew a standing-room-only crowd to the church for the Spanish-language drama.

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    Jesus, played by Omar Palma, is whipped as he carries his cross during the Mision San Juan Diego Passion walk from St. Thomas of Villanova Church in Palatine on Good Friday.

    Stations of the Cross throughout the suburbs

    Local Christians celebrated Good Friday by taking part in processions and remembering Jesus Christ's crucifixion.

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    Alexis Huerta

    Elgin police continue to investigate murder

    While Elgin police continues to investigate the killing of a 19-year-old man in an apparent gang-related shooting earlier this week, a community meeting will be held Wednesday to address residents' concerns. Services for 19-year-old Alexis Huerta will be held Sunday in Elgin. "Investigators are still working it around the clock," police Lt. Dan O'Shea said. "They are doing their darndest to get...

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    Des Plaines council to consider water rate hike

    The Des Plaines city council Monday night will consider giving final approval to a 6.9 percent increase to the city's overall water and sewer rate to pass on a 15 percent increase in the cost of purchasing water from Chicago in 2013.

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    Patti Hanson

    Bartlett fire board candidates discuss district’s needs, improvements

    None of the candidates running for a Bartlett Fire Protection District trustee seat have major concerns with how the board is operating, but they don't all agree on how and where improvements can be made. Incumbent Jim McCarthy and challengers Patti Hanson and Jay Langfelder are vying for two 6-year terms. Both seats up in the April 9 election represent DuPage County, though the entire fire...

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    University students punch the air Friday as they march through Kim Il Sung Square in downtown Pyongyang, North Korea. Tens of thousands of North Koreans turned out for the mass rally at the main square in Pyongyang in support of their leader Kim Jong Un’s call to arms. Placards read: “Let’s crush the puppet traitor group” and “Let’s rip the puppet traitors to death!”

    North Korea declares ‘state of war’ with South

    North Korea declared Saturday it has entered "a state of war" with South Korea in the latest of a string of threats that have raised tensions on the Korean Peninsula.North Korea's government, parties and organizations said in a joint statement that all matters between the two countries will now be dealt with in a manner befitting war.

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    Johnny Borizov

    Hearsay statements allowed in Darien triple-murder trial

    Several statements a Darien couple made weeks before being gunned down in their home will be heard by jurors when the case against the man charged with being the mastermind of the shooting goes to trial. Prosecutors say Johnny Borizov, 31, of Willow Springs, was involved in a bitter child-custody dispute with Jeffrey and Lori Kramer's daughter, Angela Kramer, when he enlisted co-defendant Jacob...

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    A car is silhouetted against the setting sun as it travels along Interstate 70 Wednesday in Kansas City, Kansas.

    Socially isolated people die younger

    The most socially isolated subjects had a 26 percent greater risk of dying, even when sex, age and other factors linked to survival were accounted for, the researchers reported online Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. They then tweaked their model to determine whether the connection to death was due to the fact that isolated people are often lonely. It wasn't.

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    Airports sue FAA over control tower cuts

    Airport operators are mounting a legal challenge to the Federal Aviation Administration's decision to cut funding for 149 air traffic control towers, accusing the agency of violating federal law meant to ensure major changes at airports do not erode safety.

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    Ex-Tamms inmates not causing extra problems at Pontiac prison

    The warden at one of the state's toughest prisons said Friday his staff has absorbed highly volatile former Tamms Correctional Center inmates without violence or other trouble by explaining expectations and "giving them what they have coming — nothing more and nothing less."

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    A large crowd sings as the cross moves along Division Street in Elgin during a Good Friday procession that began at St. Joseph Church.

    Good Friday in Elgin
    Stations of the Cross in Elgin on Good Friday

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    Paul Lucido of Bolingbrook portrays Jesus during the seventh annual Cross Walk at Alleluia! Lutheran Church in Naperville. The event was one of many Good Friday observances across the region.

    Cross Walk
    A Cross Walk dramztizing the last days of Jesus' life is held at noon, 1:30 and 3 p.m. at Alleluia! Lutheran Church in Naperville.

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    Former Elgin cop’s federal lawsuit dismissed

    A judge has dismissed a federal lawsuit filed by a former Elgin police lieutenant arguing he was denied due process before retiring a few years ago in the wake of his cop wife having an affair with a deputy chief. The city also has been removed as a defendant in an evesdropping lawsuit filed by Greg Welter, arguing that his then-wife and former Deputy Chief Bob Beeter hacked into Greg Welter's...

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    Alexis Wright, 30, leaves the Cumberland County Courthouse in Portland, Maine.

    Maine Zumba teacher pleads guilty to prostitution

    Alexis Wright quietly answered "guilty" 20 times when the judge read the counts, which include engaging in prostitution, promotion of prostitution, conspiracy, tax evasion and theft by deception.

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    Earthmovers remove rocks and mud on the scene where a landslide hit a mining area in Maizhokunggar County of Lhasa, southwest China.

    China: Landslide buries 83 in Tibet

    About 2.6 million cubic yards of mud, rock and debris swept through the area as the workers were resting and covered an area measuring around 1.5 square miles, China Central Television said.

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    Associated Press/Feb. 20, 2009 Then-Atlanta superintendent of public schools Beverly Hall

    Three dozen indicted in Atlanta cheating scandal

    The former superintendent of Atlanta Public Schools and nearly three dozen other administrators, teachers, principals and other educators were indicted Friday in one of the nation's largest test cheating scandals.

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    Rescued sea lion pups in Laguna Beach, Calif. Scientists say nearly half of all the sea lion pups born in island rookeries off Southern California this season have died.

    Starving sea lion pups fill California rescue centers

    Between Jan. 1 and March 24, 948 pups were rescued. The bulk of those were in Los Angeles County, which had 395, followed by San Diego, Orange, Santa Barbara and Ventura counties, he said. Last year, only about 100 pups needed saving during the same period.

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    Woman leaves prison after Quinn grants clemency

    A woman who served 27 years of a life sentence for her husband's murder — despite not being present when he was killed — was among 87 people granted clemency by Gov. Pat Quinn on Friday. Peggy Jo Jackson left the Logan Correctional Center on Friday and headed to South Carolina, where she'll live with her sister and mother and complete her parole.

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    Graham Elliot Stevens

    Wheaton College mourns freshman

    Family and friends this week are remembering Graham Stevens' "hilarious" sense of humor and counseling spirit. Stevens, a 19-year-old Wheaton College freshman died Tuesday, four days after collapsing during a game of Capture the Flag with other members of the college's Men's Glee Club.

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    Learn the early signs of Alzheimer’s

    A program on learning the early detection signs of Alzheimer's will be held 10-11 a.m. Thursday, April 4 during the Lake County Council for Seniors meeting at State Bank of the Lakes, 50 Commerce Drive, Grayslake.

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    T.J. Foley, 18, portrays Jesus as Nick Wielgos, 19, looks on as a Roman soldier during a living Stations of the Cross Friday afternoon at St. Gall Catholic Church in Elburn. Both are from Elburn. The youth group at the church put the program together.

    Stations of the Cross in Elburn
    Wild art from Elburn

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    Kevin Rehberg

    Carpenterville candidates talk cost savings

    When it comes to finding ways to save money in Carpentersville, the five people running for three, 4-year-terms on the village board, have different ideas on what needs to be done. The ideas range from consolidating certain services to sharing vendors with other towns and stopping the village from mailing out reminders that the water will be shut down if the bill isn't paid.

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    New director for Lake County health department

    Antonio "Tony" Beltran has been hired as the new executive director of the Lake County Health Department, replacing Irene T. Pierce, who retired this month after five years.

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    Associated Press/Oct. 20, 2011 Rep. Don Young, a Republican from Alaska, speaks in Anchorage.

    Alaska lawmaker criticized for racial slur

    The 79-year-old Don Young, the second-most senior Republican in the House, issued a statement late Thursday seeking to explain his remark after using the derogatory term "wetback'" to describe the workers on his father's farm in central California, where he grew up.

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    Charles Amrich, left, and Debbie Herrmann

    Controversial Island Lake political website edited

    A controversial website targeting Island Lake mayoral candidate Charles Amrich and trustee hopeful Tony Sciarrone has been edited to remove content about their supporters.

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    An 8-month old female harbor seal, known as Pup 49, swims Wednesday in a pool at Mystic Aquarium in Mystic, Conn.

    Seal pup learning to swim again after amputation

    "She has a really inquisitive and interested personality, and she is very interactive with the environment around her," said Mystic Aquarium veterinarian Allison Tuttle, who supervises the pup's treatment and care.

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    Schaumburg offers 20th annual community scholarship

    Schaumburg Mayor Al Larson has announced the availability of the village's 20th Annual Community Scholarship in cooperation with Business and Career Services Inc. A President's Committee will select the scholarship winner.

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    Christopher Knafelc rescued a man who had fallen off the platform in a north Philadelphia subway station.

    Philadelphia man jumps on tracks to help fallen victim

    A recovering drug addict with a long rap sheet was hailed as a hero for jumping onto subway tracks to rescue a man who walked off a platform.

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    Michael Kainz

    Driver gets three years for fatal Addison crash

    A Hillside man was sentenced Friday to three years in prison for causing a traffic collision that left a motorcyclist dead in Addison. Michael A. Kainz, 22, of the 300 block of Buckthorn Lane, several months ago pleaded guilty to driving under the influence of marijuana in the Nov. 30, 2010, crash that killed 46-year-old Robert Lash of Itasca.

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    Douglas Knerr

    Roosevelt U. Schaumburg provost named executive director

    Douglas Knerr, provost of Roosevelt University's Schaumburg Campus since January 2011, has been appointed executive director and university provost of Roosevelt University, effective May 4. He succeeds James Gandre, who was appointed president of the Manhattan School of Music in New York City.

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    Kenneth A. Bouche

    Schaumburg interim police chief to start Monday

    Schaumburg officials have named retired Illinois State Police Col. Kenneth A. Bouche as the village's interim police chief to immediately succeed the retiring Brian Howerton. Bouche, who was recommended by law enforcement consultant firm Hillard Heintze, is expected to be sworn in Monday morning and will serve alongside Howerton through Howerton's retirement on Friday, April 5.

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    Charges pending against driver involved in Elk Grove school crash

    Charges were pending Friday afternoon against a driver suspected in a hit-and-run near Hanover Park and Roselle, who shortly afterward was involved in a crash at a Hanover Park business, followed by a chase with Roselle police ending in the vehicle crashing into an Elk Grove Village school late Wednesday, authorities said.

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    Aden Khan

    Wisconsin man charged in North Central College threat

    A 20-year-old Wisconsin man was charged Friday with felony disorderly conduct for posting threatening statements on a Facebook page aimed at Naperville's North Central College. Aden Khan, of Madison, was arrested Friday afternoon after Naperville and Wisconsin police searched his home. He is awaiting extradition to Illinois.

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    Judge blocks 2 key provisions of Indiana immigration law

    A federal judge on Friday permanently blocked Indiana from enforcing two key provisions of the state's immigration law approved by lawmakers two years ago, including one that she said could lead to "serious abuses" by police. The American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana and the National Immigration Law Center had sued the state over the 2011 law.

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    Imprisoned ex-clown can’t sue over birthday cards

    A court in Chicago has tossed a lawsuit by an ex-clown imprisoned for sexual assault. He accuses prison officials of violating his rights because they seized birthday cards to his young daughters.

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    Peter Dinklage portrays Tyrion Lannister, who saved King’s Landing from invasion, but received only scorn from his vainglorious father in “Game of Thrones.”

    A triumphant return of HBO’s ‘Game of Thrones’

    To do real justice to "Game of Thrones," I'd have to quit my job and tackle those 4,000 or so unread pages of George R.R. Martin's series of five fantasy novels on which the finely crafted HBO series is based. There just isn't that sort of time in my sort of world. "Game of Thrones," which begins its third season Sunday night, is like no other TV show around right now — brilliant,...

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    Garbage service changes likely coming to Batavia, Geneva Prices, recycling toters, days of service being reviewed

    Changes are likely coming to the way Batavia and Geneva residents dispose of trash and recyclable items, as the towns weigh options for new garbage service contracts.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Samuel F. Baylor, 20, of Elgin, was charged with possession of less than 2.5 grams of marijuana after a traffic stop at 12:15 a.m. Monday at Royal and McLean boulevards, Elgin, according to a sheriff's report. Police said they had stopped Baylor because he was speeding and he disobeyed a red light while making a U-turn.

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    Stephen R. Henley

    Traffic, roads top safety concern for Volo candidates

    Three of four candidates running for village trustee in Volo say traffic is the public's number one safety concern. Incumbents Stephen Henley, Carol Porter and Bruce Buschick and newcomer Cathy Wimer are seeking three trustees seats at stake in the April 9 election.

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    Mundelein HS show to benefit Make-A-Wish Foundation

    Mundelein High School students will sing, dance, juggle, read poetry and more to benefit the Make-A-Wish Foundation at their annual variety show, Friday, April 5 at 7 p.m. in the MHS Auditorium. The school is at 1350 W. Hawley St., Mundelein.

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    Grant High puts on “Charlie Brown” musical

    The play "You're a Good Man Charlie Brown" will be brought to life at the Grant High School auditorium, 285 E. Grand Avenue in Fox Lake, at 7 p.m. on Friday April 17, Saturday April 18, Friday, April 26 and Saturday April 27. Charlie Brown and the Peanut gang sing and dance their way through the trials and tribulations of youth in the musical based on the beloved cartoon strip by Charles M.

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    The ongoing effort to make Waukegan Harbor deeper is receiving $1 million in additional federal funding, U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin and Congressman Brad Schneider announced Friday. The funding will help pay for the dredging of thousands of cubic feet of sand dumped into the harbor as a result of Hurricane Sandy.

    Waukegan Harbor to get funding because of Hurricane Sandy

    The ongoing project to make Waukegan Harbor deeper for ships will get an additional $990,000 from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, a pair of Illinois lawmakers announced Friday. The funding will help repair damage caused by Hurricane Sandy. The funding was awarded as part of the $821 million package approved for the Army Corps of Engineers to aid victims of Hurricane Sandy and to rebuild the...

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    Black Weapons Armory store owner Tommy Rompel, left, shows former mayoral candidate Shaun McClusky, a shotgun Thursday at the Tucson, Ariz., store. The weapon is similar to those to be given away as part of a privately funded program he is launching to provide residents in crime-prone areas with free shotguns.

    Arizona group to give away shotguns

    The nonprofit Armed Citizen Project is part of a national campaign to give shotguns to single women and homeowners in neighborhoods with high-crime rates. The effort comes amid a national debate on gun control after mass shootings in Arizona, Colorado and Connecticut.

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    B.R. Ryall YMCA launches annual fundraising campaign

    R.R. Ryall YMCA of Northwestern DuPage County, based in Glen Ellyn, is launching its annual community support campaign on April 1.

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    Tazewell County man convicted in methadone deaths

    PEKIN, Ill. — A 19-year-old Tazewell County man has been convicted in the methadone deaths of two other men.The Pekin Daily Times reports that Circuit Judge Kevin Galley on Thursday convicted Daughlton Calvin of two homicide counts for providing the prescription painkiller to the men, who died within a day of each other last May.

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    Sheriff: Smoke killed 5 in Illinois mobile home fire

    SHERRARD, Ill. — Authorities say the five people killed in a western Illinois mobile home fire died of smoke inhalation.The Mercer County Sheriff’s Department said Friday that autopsies confirmed the cause of death.

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    Participants take part in activities at a McHenry County PADS SleepOut for Shelter event. This year, PADS Lake County is partnering up with McHenry County PADS and holding its first SleepOut at Carmel High School May 11, the same day as this year’s McHenry event.

    PADS Lake County to host SleepOut for Shelter at Carmel

    SleepOut for Shelter, an awareness event and fundraiser that is s part of an ongoing effort by PADS Lake County to end homelessness in the area, is being held Saturday, May 11, at Carmel Catholic High School's Baker Football Stadium in Mundelein.

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    Susan Rogers, executive director of the Oklahoma Board of Dentistry, speaks Thursday during a news conference regarding the practices of Tulsa oral surgeon Wayne Harrington, at the Tulsa Health Department’s James O. Goodwin Health Center in Tulsa, Okla. Health officials said that thousands of Harrington’s patients should undergo testing for HIV and hepatitis after officials looking into the source of a patient’s viruses discovered the dentist’s instruments weren’t being cleaned properly.

    Oklahoma dental clinic, a ‘menace’ to public health

    State and local health officials planned to mail notices Friday urging 7,000 patients of Dr. W. Scott Harrington to seek medical screenings for hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV. Inspectors allege workers at his two clinics used dirty equipment and risked cross-contamination to the point that the state Dentistry Board branded Harrington a "menace to the public health."

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    North Koreans punch the air Friday during a rally at Kim Il Sung Square in downtown Pyongyang, North Korea. Tens of thousands of North Koreans turned out for the mass rally at the main square in Pyongyang in support of their leader Kim Jong Un’s call to arms. The placard reads: “U.S. forces, get out!”

    Analysis: North Korea threat may be more bark than bite

    Across North Korea, soldiers are gearing up for battle and shrouding their jeeps and vans with camouflage netting. Newly painted signboards and posters call for "death to the U.S. imperialists" and urge the people to fight with "arms, not words." Despite the hastening drumbeat of warfare, none of the key players in the region wants or expects another Korean War — not even the North Koreans.

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    Southwestern Illinois man wins suit over hole in one

    EDWARDSVILLE, Ill. — A southwestern Illinois meat cutter who sued after a prize for his hole in one during a charity golf tournament wasn’t paid out as promised has carded a legal victory.

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    Trial stalls for man accused of burning girlfriend

    BENTON, Ill. — The southern Illinois trial for a man accused of dousing his girlfriend with chemicals and setting her on fire has been delayed over a switch in defense attorneys.

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    Illinois officials open Pontiac prison to news media

    PONTIAC — The Illinois Department of Corrections is opening the maximum-security prison in Pontiac to news media Friday. Reporters will see the inside of one of the state’s tougher prisons — and one of the oldest. Part of the Livingston County facility opened in 1871.

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    Illinois fire marshal suggests child safety strategies

    SPRINGFIELD — The Illinois State Fire Marshal is suggesting ways for families to keep children safe this spring. The fire marshal issued a set of tips Thursday that officials hope will prevent serious incidents as families prepare to spend more time outdoors.

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    Officials: Car bombs kill 19, wound 72 in Baghdad

    Iraqi officials say four car bombs have struck Shiite mosques in Baghdad, killing at least 19 people and wounding 72. A police officer says the deadliest bombing was in western Jihad neighborhood when a parked car bomb exploded as worshippers were leaving a mosque after Friday prayers. Seven people died there and 25 were wounded.

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    Pakistani Christians pray Friday during a Mass on Good Friday in a church in Islamabad, Pakistan. Christians around the world are marking the Easter holy week.

    Christians mark Jesus’ crucifixion on Good Friday

    Hundreds of Christians streamed through the cobblestone alleyways of Jerusalem's Old City on Friday, hoisting wooden crosses and chanting prayers to mark the crucifixion of Jesus. Throngs of pilgrims walked a traditional Good Friday procession that retraces Jesus' steps along the Via Dolorosa, Latin for the "Way of Suffering."

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    NBC News prepares to go live Friday outside the home of former South African President Nelson Mandela, in Johannesburg. A lung infection that has plagued Nelson Mandela has struck again, prompting doctors to admit the 94-year-old former president to a hospital. The presidency said Friday that Mandela was making “steady progress” during hospital care.

    South Africa: Mandela making progress in hospital

    South Africa's presidency says Nelson Mandela is in good spirits and is making steady progress during hospital treatment for a recurring lung infection. The office of President Jacob Zuma also says in a statement that the 94-year-old former president enjoyed a full breakfast on Friday morning.

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    In this photo released by the Syrian official news agency SANA, Mohammed Zaal al-Ali, left, is sworn in Thursday as governor of Hasaka province by Syrian President Bashar Assad, right, in Damascus, Syria.

    Syrian rebels capture key town near Jordan border

    Syrian rebels on Friday captured a strategic town near the border with Jordan after a day of fierce clashes that killed at least 38 people, activists said, as opposition fighters expand their presence in the south, considered a gateway to Damascus. The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said 16 rebels were among the dead in the fighting in and around Dael.

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    Worker accused of stealing electronics from EPA

    The Cook County Sheriff’s Office says a temporary worker has been charged with stealing electronic devices from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Chicago office.Authorities say 35-year-old Alan Baker of Chicago is charged with stealing a laptop computer and two smartphones while he was performing janitorial work in December at the EPA’s downtown offices.

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    Judge: Indiana man convicted of killing 4 can appeal

    SOUTH BEND, Ind. — A northeastern Indiana man who has been on Indiana’s death row for 14 years for fatally shooting his brother and three other men has been cleared to ask the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago to set aside his death sentence.

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    Indiana wraps up deal for Ohio River toll bridge

    INDIANAPOLIS — Officials in Indiana have completed a contract to build a new bridges over the Ohio River to Kentucky.The Courier-Journal reported Friday the final contracts with WVB East End Partners, a consortium Indiana picked to design, finance, build, operate and maintain the bridge, have been finalized.

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    Indiana court upholds 253-year sentence for molester

    ANDERSON, Ind. — An Indiana man sentenced to 253 years in prison after he pleaded guilty to 19 counts of child molesting has lost his bid to have his sentence shortened.The Indiana Court of Appeals this week upheld the sentence issued to 39-year-old William Everage Jr. in July 2012 by a Madison County judge.

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    University of Illinois fixture Follett’s closing in May

    A landmark on the University of Illinois campus will soon close. Follett's has been selling school supplies, Illini gear and a range of other things for almost 75 years. But the store will close in May.

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    West Chicago firefighters battled a house fire yesterday on Alamance Drive in West Chicago. Four people were hurt in the end.

    Dawn Patrol: Body found in Addison; State trooper killed in crash

    A body is recovered from Salt Creek in Addison. Buffalo Grove police warn of burglaries. Four hurt in West Chicago fire. Tollway misdeeds revealed. Rene Douglas back at Arlington. $500,000 drug bust in Bloomingdale.

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    Pam Fender

    Grafton Township supervisor candidates talk finances

    Grafton Township supervisor candidates Pam Fender and James Kearns agree that the township's finances are in dire straits but they have different ideas on how to handle the mess. The township has spent an estimated $600,000 on lawsuits among elected officials and outgoing Supervisor Linda Moore, who says the office might have to shut down briefly next month because of a lack of funds.

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    Hoppe's Tavern owner Jill Hoppe, left, has been teaming up with breast cancer walker Nancy Belanger to help raise money by hosting fundraisers for the last seven years at the bar on Elgin's east side.

    Elgin bar helps breast cancer fundraising

    An Elgin resident and her daughter are planning to participate in the Avon Walk for Breast Cancer in June in Chicago and, for the last seven years and counting, Hoppe's Tavern in Elgin will help with the fundraising. Neither Nancy Belanger nor her daughter, Jess Bell, have had to deal with the disease, but feel it's important to contribute to the cause. “I thought I was lucky, and I wanted...

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    Roselle Trustee Kory Atkinson has held office-seekers to exacting standards for filing their paperwork. He's mounted legal challenges against at least 10 candidates, including eight who weren't running against him.

    Roselle trustee makes ballot challenges an art

    Kory Atkinson has developed something of a reputation for himself since entering public office: He's the guy who tries to get other candidates kicked off the ballot. "There's a tendency to think it's just a lawyer doing some slick tricks, but the rules that apply to elections are not ones I've created," he said.

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    Martyl Langsdorf sits in the Robert Paul Schweikher-designed home in Schaumburg in 2006.

    Martyl Langsdorf, Doomsday Clock artist, dies at 96

    Martyl Langsdorf, longtime resident of Schaumburg's historic Schweikher House and the professional artist who first depicted the nuclear Doomsday Clock, died Tuesday at the age of 96. Her late husband, Alexander Langsdorf Jr., was a physicist who worked on the Manhattan Project that developed the first atomic bomb, but later he came to regret its use.

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    Bruce Rauner

    Potential governor hopeful Rauner claimed extra exemptions

    A likely Republican gubenatorial bidder improperly claimed three homeowner exemptions for a number of years, a Daily Herald investigation has found. After being notified of the error Wednesday afternoon, Bruce Rauner Thursday paid Cook County $1,616 to cover the extra tax savings he received, spokesman Chip Englander said.

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    The Cubs’ Anthony Rizzo hits a double during a spring training game against Cleveland on Sunday in Goodyear, Ariz.

    Poll Vault: Who will win more games — Cubs or Sox?

    The Cubs' 2013 season will begin Monday afternoon in Pittsburgh. The Sox will open at home later that day against Kansas City. What are your predictions for the year? Which team will win more games? Can the Cubs finish better than fifth?

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    A man looks for a helping hand in Chicago during the summer of 2012.

    Images: Photo Contest Finalists
    Each week you submit your favorite photo. We pick the best of the bunch and select 12 finlaists. Here are the finalists for the week of March 25th.

Sports

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    Wolves drop out of playoff spot

    The Chicago Wolves and Milwaukee exchanged goals for much of their intense Amtrak Rivalry game on Saturday night, but the Admirals netted back-to-back scores in the third period to claim a 4-3 win at Allstate Arena. Wolves captain Darren Haydar and defensemen Kevin Connauton and Mark Matheson scored goals for the Wolves (32-24-5-4), who dropped from a seventh-place tie with the Admirals into ninth in the Western Conference standings. The top eight qualify for the playoffs.

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    Mark Welsh/mwelsh@dailyherald.com Blackhawks Michael Frolik with a shot on goal against Anaheim's goalie Jonas Hiller that could have tied the game in the third period falls short at the United Center in Chicago on Friday.

    Bad bounce proves costly for Hawks

    Anaheim's 2-1 victory over the Blackhawks Friday at the United Center was the Ducks' third in a row over the Hawks and moved them back within 3 points of the Western Conference lead. “If you look at the last two games we played with them it’s the exact same scenario,” Quenneville said. “You look like you might get something out of the game and come up empty.

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    Mark Welsh/mwelsh@dailyherald.com Blackhawks Brent Seabrook gets tripped up in the second period as he tries for a loose puck at the United Center in Chicago on Friday.

    Hawks not worried about wheeling-and-dealing Penguins

    Having grown up in Pittsburgh, Brandon Saad used to be a big Penguins fan.That’s changed now that Saad plays for the Blackhawks, but the rookie left winger still noticed what his former favorite team has done in the last week to load up for another Stanley Cup run by acquiring Jarome Iginla, Brenden Morrow and Douglas Murray in three separate deals.“I don’t pay too much attention to it, but when you have the NHL channel on it’s always on there,” Saad said. “It’s cool what they’ve done, but it’s a business and I’m in Chicago now. Growing up I think most guys are fans of the hometown teams. They’re doing well, but at the same time it’s all about here.”The Penguins have won 14 games in a row, making them the NHL’s new media darlings.“We had our streak there, but it’s nice now to be under the radar,” Saad said. “There are other great teams out there with their streaks and the media is always going to hype them.”Hawks captain Jonathan Toews said he will worry about the Penguins at the appropriate time.“Even though we haven’t seen them, no one is going to have to play those teams until the Stanley Cup Finals so it’s not like you’re as concerned about it,” Toews said. “All the trades that happen, you’re very aware of what’s going on.”The Penguins have actually helped the Hawks by taking Iginla, Morrow and Murray out of the Western Conference.“As long as they get knocked out of the playoffs in the first round, they can take all the players they want,” Toews said.Memories of Selanne:When Teemu Selanne broke into the NHL with Winnipeg 21 years ago, Jonathan Toews was a kid and a Jets fan.Now he is playing against the great Finn, but Friday’s game at the United Center was possibly the last time they’ll skate on the same ice.“I have all the respect in the world for him,” Toews said of the 42-year-old Selanne. “It’s crazy to think a guy like that is still playing. I compare him to Jaromir Jagr as one of those guys when I first started playing hockey at 6, 7, 8 years old, they were coming into their NHL careers. Here I am; I get the chance to play against all-time greats like that.“To see what (Selanne) is doing at his age is unheard of. He’s a guy you have a lot of respect for and years down the road you can look back at and be proud to say you had the chance to play against him.”Toews was asked if he could see himself playing as long as Selanne.“I’d like to think I could, but you never know what it’s like until you get there, I guess, so who knows?” Toews said.Sharp update:Injured winger Patrick Sharp would like to play either Sunday against Detroit or Monday against Nashville.“I’m close,” said Sharp, who has been sidelined since March 6 with a sprained left shoulder. “We have (two games coming up) and I’d like to play in one of (them), but it’s really day to day.”Slow starters:In the last four games, all losses, the Ducks had allowed 9 goals in the first period prior to facing the Hawks on Friday.“When you have a team that has played a lot of games and you get behind consistently 2-0 in the first period, you’re not going to come back all the time,” Ducks coach Bruce Boudreau said.Ÿ Follow Tim’s hockey reports on Twitter @TimSassone and check out his Between the Circles blog at dailyherald.com.

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    Chicago Blackhawks goalie Ray Emery makes a save against the Anaheim Ducks during the first period of an NHL hockey game in Chicago, Friday, March, 29, 2013. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)

    Ducks get late goal and 2-1 win over Blackhawks

    Sheldon Souray scored the go-ahead goal with 2:08 left, Jonas Hiller made 25 saves and the Anaheim Ducks defeated the Blackhawks 2-1 on Friday to end a four-game losing streak.

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    Michigan's Glenn Robinson III (1), Tim Hardaway Jr. (10), Jordan Morgan (52), Caris LeVert (23) celebrate after beating Kansas 87-85 in overtime of a regional semifinal game in the NCAA college basketball tournament, Friday, March 29, 2013, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

    Burke leads improbable UM rally over Kansas, 87-85

    Trey Burke scored all 23 of his points after halftime, including a long, tying 3-pointer in the final seconds of regulation, and Michigan rallied to beat Kansas 87-85 in the South Regional semifinals Friday night.

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    Louisville center Gorgui Dieng (10) shoots over Oregon forward Arsalan Kazemi (14) during the second half of a regional semifinal in the NCAA college basketball tournament, Friday, March 29, 2013, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

    Smith leads Louisville to 77-69 victory over Ducks

    Russ Smith matched his career high with 31 points to lead three Cardinals in double figures, and top-seeded Louisville overcame its toughest test yet in a 77-69 victory over Oregon on Friday night.

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    Judson softball runs win streak to 12

    The Judson University softball rolled to another doubleheader sweep and ran its winning streak to 12 in a row Friday, defeating St. Francis 3-1 and 6-2. Brittany Di Giola (2B, 2 RBI), Allison Catlett (2B, RBI) and Maddie Smith (2B) led the Judson offense while Sarah Boyer ran her pitching record to 7-1 on the season, throwing a 4-hitter with 11 strikeouts and 1 walk.

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    Streamwood falls twice

    The Streamwood softball team opened its season Friday, losing a doubleheader to DeKalb 5-3 and 10-1.Kylee Jambor (RBI) and Melissa Malcolm had triples for the Sabres in Game 1. Jessica Daley was the losing pitcher.In Game 2, Holly Foret had a double and a triple for Streamwood and Brittany Delao drove in the Sabres’ only run. Kaitlyn Hedger took the loss.

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    Willowbrook sweeps R-B

    Darian Pelsor took a no-hitter into the seventh inning, striking out five, and Erin Sporer slugged a 3-run homer in a 5-run fifth as Willowbrook (3-0) beat Riverside-Brookfield 5-0 in the first game of a doubleheader Friday.Sam Schmidt drove in 2 runs and Darian Pelsor and Delaney Pelsor combined on a 6-hitter in a 3-1 Warriors' win in Game 2.

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    Big first inning paces Willowbrook

    The Warriors (1-1) stormed to a 5-0 first-inning lead against the Mustangs (1-1). Brian Johnson, Gabe Gage and Jake Cady each had 2 hits. Kevin Johnson won on the mound, pitching the first three innings of a 2-hitter. Tamal Kumar drove in Metea Valley's lone run in the seventh inning.

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    Taugner, Lake Park leap past Glenbard North

    Christian Taugner's first step this season looks like it'll lead to a giant leap. The Lake Park senior pitcher said he felt great in his first outing on Friday, and it definitely showed on the mound. Taugner struck out nine over 5 scoreless innings and scattered 3 hits while leading the Lancers to an 8-4 victory over Glenbard North at Boomers Stadium in Schaumburg.

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    Crystal Lake South’s Hall throws no-hitter

    Crystal Lake South's Tyler Hall fired a five-inning no-hitter Friday as the Gators' baseball team defeated Machesney Park Harlem 15-0 in its season opener. Hall struck out 5 and walked none.

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    Minnesota’s Andrei Kirilenko shoots as Luol Deng (9) and Jimmy Butler (21) defend during their game on March 24. The Bulls are 3-0 this season when when Deng and Butler both start.

    Butler, Deng an explosive combination for Bulls
    As the Bulls try to forget about Miami and look forward to Dallas on Saturday afternoon, a certain lineup merits further discussion. Jimmy Butler and Luol Deng have started together just three times his season, but the results have been solid.

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    Against Florida State on Tuesday, Griner threw down three dunks in the post that any guy her age would be proud of.

    Griner would be slam dunk for Sky

    Come on, Chicago. We need to find a way before WNBA draft day to cross up the Phoenix Mercury, which edged out the Chicago Sky last fall and received the No. 1 pick in the WNBA’s draft lottery. That way we can draft Baylor 6-foot-8 superstar center Brittney Griner

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    Minnesota Timberwolves’ Nikola Pekovic, left, of Montenegro, drives against the Bulls’ Nazr Mohammed in the first quarter of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, March 24, 2013, in Minneapolis.

    Mohammed gives his take on James’ complaints

    Bulls veteran Nazr Mohammed had a mature take on the Bulls' physical play against Miami on Wednesday and LeBron James' post-game complaints. "I've been around long enough to know, when the guys on your team keep getting hit, it always looks harder and worse than when he's on the other team," he said.

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    Mundelein's hot spring continues

    Mundelein's baseball team maintained its hot start to the season Friday. Southern Illinois-bound Will Farmer hit a 2-run homer, and Michael Metz earned the win, as the Mustangs improved to 6-0 with an 11-1 win over host Webber Township

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    San Francisco Giants' Buster Posey removes his cap during batting practice before an exhibition spring training baseball game against the Oakland Athletics, Thursday, March 28, 2013, in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

    Buster Posey gets $167M, 9-year deal from Giants

    Buster Posey is the San Francisco Giants' new franchise man.The Giants rewarded NL MVP and batting champion with a $167 million, nine-year contract Friday,

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    Jamaican Olympic gold medalist Usain Bolt, center, and sprinter Daniel Bailey, from Antigua and Barbuda, center left, run with young athletes during their visit to the Projeto Futuro Olimpico or Olympic Future Project in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday, March 28, 2013. The Olympic Future Project promotes the practice of sports and healthy living, targeting the low-income populations of the inner city. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

    Bolt to run 150-meter race at Copacabana beach

    Usain Bolt will have Copacabana beach in the background when he tries to break his 150-meter world best in a street race this weekend in Rio de Janeiro.

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    Detroit Tigers pitcher Justin Verlander, right, looks at team president, CEO and general manager Dave Dombrowski during a news conference after a spring baseball exhibition game on Friday, March 29, 2013, in Lakeland, Fla., where Verlander talked about his new seven-year, $180-million contract. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

    Verlander signs richest pitching deal in baseball

    Detroit Tigers ace Justin Verlander agreed Friday to a $180 million, seven-year contract, topping Felix Hernandez for the richest deal for a pitcher in baseball history.

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    Last season, New York Jets offensive guard Matt Slauson didn't give up a single sack. He signed with the Bears on Friday.

    Ex-Jets starting guard Slauson signs with Bears

    Two days after losing starting guard Lance Louis to the Dolphins in free agency, the Bears signed former Jets guard Matt Slauson to bolster an offensive line that had become thin in talent at that position. Slauson has been a full-time starter for the past three seasons and did not allow a sack last season.

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    Mount Prospect offers property owners seminar on Emerald Ash Borer

    11.46-page 2- can holdFrom 7 to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, April 10, arborists from Mount Prospect's Public Works Department Forestry/Grounds division will host a seminar for property owners at the Public Works Emergency Operations Center, 1720 W. Central Road, Mount Prospect. Staff will discuss some of the many options now available for those who want to treat ash trees with insecticides in an attempt to prevent infestation by the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB). Additionally, they will provide information on hiring tree care contractors, as well as planting replacement trees for removed ashes.

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    Linebacker Brian Urlacher might want to think about retiring so he can close his career the way he started it — as a Chicago Bear.

    Spellman's Scorecard: Time for Urlacher to end it right

    Brian Urlacher ought to admit it's time to hang it up ... and do it as a Bear. That and much, much more in this week's Spellman's Scorecard.

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    Duke associate head coach Chris Collins directs the team during practice for a regional semifinal game in the NCAA basketball tournament Thursday in Indianapolis. Duke plays Michigan State on Friday. On Tuesday, Collins was hired as the new head coach at Northwestern.

    Northwestern landed a winner in hiring Collins

    Mike North thinks Chris Collins just might be the right man for the job at Northwestern. There isn't a college team in the state right now who has a hold on the city, and he believes NU could fill that void with this hire.

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    La Salle guard Sam Mills, left, defends Wichita State guard Malcolm Armstead during the second half of a West Regional semifinal in the NCAA men's college basketball tournament, Thursday, March 28, 2013, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

    Shockers roll to 72-58 NCAA win over La Salle

    Wichita State went from sweet to elite, beating La Salle 72-58 on Thursday night to reach the final eight of the NCAA tournament for the first time in 32 years. Malcolm Armstead scored 18 points, Carl Hall added 16 points and freshman Ron Baker 13 for the ninth-seeded Shockers, who proved their upset of No. 1 seed Gonzaga in the third round was no fluke.

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    Round Lake rolls to victory

    Kristin Pierce struck out 8 batters in 3 hitless innings, and the junior aided a 15-hit attack, as Round Lake’s softball team opened its season with a 19-2 win over host Northtown Academy on Thursday.Pierce also hit a booming double off the center-field fence. Sophomore Hayley Steinberg and senior Alexis Fernandez (double) combined for 6 hits, 6 runs scored and 6 RBI.

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    Members of 1971-72 Lakers weigh in on end of Heat streak

    Members of the 1971-72 Los Angeles Lakers didn't throw a party when the Bulls beat Miami on Wednesday, assuring the Lakers' iconic 33-game streak will live on. But they didn't shed any tears, either, even with Heat president Pat Riley a former teammate.

Business

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    24 E. coli illnesses linked to frozen foods

    Health officials say at least 24 people have become sick from an outbreak of E. coli infections linked to frozen snack foods marketed to children. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported illnesses in Illinois and 14 other states. The Buffalo, N.Y.-based Rich Products Corp. has recalled quesadillas, mozzarella bites and other frozen products made in November.

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    Supporters of both sides of the gun debate gather outside the National Shooting Sports Foundation headquarters Thursday in Newtown, Conn.

    State officials court gun makers unhappy with new laws

    Firearms manufacturers upset over newly restrictive gun laws and proposals in their home states are getting a message from other places: Move here, where the climate is favorable to your products and so are the tax codes.

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    Police Department Detective Chris Couch empties a vial of prescription drugs, mostly painkillers, at the Columbus, Ind., station. Police acknowledge that the fight against drug abuse, especially the illicit use of prescription drugs, might never be fully won, but they insist that educational efforts and greater cooperation taking place among police agencies, doctors, hospitals and other medical professionals can save lives and lead to more arrests of dealers peddling painkillers.

    UPS pays $40 million to end online pharmacies probe

    Shipping company UPS agreed Friday to pay $40 million to end a federal criminal probe connected to deliveries it made for illicit online pharmacies.

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    John Amidon holds up a model of an Air Force drone while protesting Wednesday outside Creech Air Force Base in Indian Springs, Nevada.

    Risks at the dawn of the age of drones

    Drones — some as tiny as a hummingbird — promise everyday benefits as broad as the sky is wide. But the drone industry and those eager to tap its potential are running headlong into fears the peeping-eye, go-anywhere technology will be misused.

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    People walk outside of the Apple Inc. Computer store last Saturday on the Third Street Promenade in Santa Monica, Calif.

    Apple patents iPhone with wraparound display

    pple is seeking a patent for an iPhone that has a display that wraps around the edges of the device, expanding the viewable area and eliminating all physical buttons.

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    Suzanne Meredith of Walpole, Mass., gases up her car at a Gulf station in Brookline, Mass. Reducing sulfur in gasoline and tightening emissions standards on cars beginning in 2017, as the Obama administration is proposing, would come with costs as well as rewards.

    EPA taking aim at auto emissions, sulfur in gas

    Reducing sulfur in gasoline and tightening emissions standards on cars beginning in 2017, as the Obama administration is proposing, would come with costs as well as rewards. The cost at the pump for cleaner air across the country could be less than a penny or as high as 9 cents a gallon, depending on who is providing the estimate.

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    PSI, Capacity collaborate on natural gas engine
    Power Solutions International Inc. and Capacity of Texas Inc. announced a collaboration to bring natural gas engines to the medium-duty truck market.

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    Fifth Third joins Kane County Cougars for food drive

    CHICAGO — Fifth Third Bank (Chicago) will celebrate its namesake birthday — May 3 — by joining forces with the Kane County Cougars to conduct an area wide food drive.The campaign named “Strike Out Hunger” will include:Ÿ Between April 18 and May 2, attendees of Kane County Cougar home games will be asked to collect food and bring it to Fifth Third Bank Ballpark, 34W002 Cherry Lane, Geneva, home of the Kane County Cougars, Class A Affiliate of the Chicago Cubs. Anyone who donates food will receive special discounted admission of $5.30 to the year’s first baseball game with fireworks being held on Friday, May 3. Visit www.kccougars.com for team schedule and more information.Ÿ During the same time period, bank employees throughout the Chicago area and Northwest Indiana will raise money to benefit Vital Bridges Grocery Centers of Heartland Health Outreach program and the Northwest Indiana Food Bank.“Everyone at Fifth Third Bank takes great personal pride in this company and all the wonderful things it represents,” said Fifth Third Bank (Chicago) president & CEO Robert A. Sullivan. “Our company’s culture and our core values are all singularly focused on serving the needs of our customers in the communities in which we serve and do business, and as such our interest in helping local food banks is perfectly aligned.”The “Strike Out Hunger” campaign will culminate in a special evening on May 3 at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark, home of the Kane County Cougars, when 53,000 meals will be donated to the Northern Illinois Food Bank. The day was chosen as May 3 is the bank’s so-called birthday, the date of 5/3 representing the bank’s name, branding and logo.“In working together with Fifth Third Bank, we are calling on all fans to help reach our goal of donating 53,000 meals for the Northern Illinois Food Bank,” said Curtis Haug, Kane County Cougars general manager. “We’re thrilled to welcome fans to Fifth Third Bank Ballpark for a special night on 5/3 Day as we lend a hand to help less fortunate people in our communities.”The public is invited to participate by bringing donated can goods and nonperishable foods to Fifth Third Bank Ballpark on April 18, April 23, May 1 and May 2.

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    Sears Hometown and Outlet names new board member
    Sears Hometown and Outlet Stores elected James F. Gooch to its board of directors and as chair of the board's audit committee. Gooch had served as president and chief executive officer of RadioShack Corp. and prior to that as its chief financial officer.

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    General Employment Enterprises names new CFO, treasurer
    General Employment Enterprises announced it has appointed Andrew J. Norstrud as chief financial officer. Norstrud joins General Employment Enterprises from Norco Accounting and Consulting, where he concentrated his services on assisting companies with mergers and acquisitions and SEC filing requirements.

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    SAC Capital portfolio manager arrested in New York City

    NEW YORK — A senior portfolio manager for one of the nation’s largest hedge funds was arrested Friday, accused of making $1.4 million illegally in a widening insider trading probe involving an investment company founded by billionaire businessman Steven A. Cohen.Michael Steinberg, 41, was arrested at 6 a.m. at his Manhattan home on insider trading charges lodged in an indictment unsealed in U.S. District Court in New York City. A senior portfolio manager at SAC Capital Advisors, he was scheduled to appear in court Friday.His attorney, Barry Berke, said in a statement that Steinberg “did absolutely nothing wrong.” He said Steinberg’s trading decisions were based on detailed analysis along with other information he properly obtained.“Caught in the crossfire of aggressive investigations of others, there is no basis for even the slightest blemish on his spotless reputation,” he said.In a statement, SAC Capital said Steinberg “has conducted himself professionally and ethically during his long tenure at the firm. We believe him to be a man of integrity.”U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said in a statement that Steinberg “was another Wall Street insider who fed off a corrupt grapevine of proprietary and confidential information cultivated by other professionals who made their own rules to make money. With lightning speed in at least one case, Mr. Steinberg seized on the opportunity to cash in and tried to keep his crime quiet, as charged in the indictment.”George Venizelos, head of the FBI’s New York office, said the arrest was the latest in an FBI probe that has resulted in more than 70 arrests.“Mr. Steinberg was at the center of an elite criminal club, where cheating and corruption were rewarded,” he said. “Research was nothing more than well-timed tips from an extensive network of well-sourced analysts.”At least four other people associated with the Stamford, Conn.-based firm have been arrested over a period of about four years.The arrest of Steinberg and the January arrest of a former hedge fund portfolio manager for an affiliate of Cohen’s firm has increased speculation that the government is taking a hard look at the practices of the billionaire hedge fund owner. In the January case, Cohen is repeatedly referenced as a “Hedge Fund Owner” in a criminal complaint. He has not been charged in the case and SAC spokesman Jonathan Gasthalter has said the company and Cohen are cooperating with the inquiry and “are confident that they have acted appropriately.”In the latest case, Steinberg is charged with conspiracy to commit securities fraud and four counts of securities fraud, accused of using inside information as he made trades involving Dell Inc. and Nvidia Corp. securities. If convicted, he could face up to 85 years in prison.Civil charges against Steinberg also were filed by the Securities and Exchange Commission.On March 15, the SEC said that two affiliates of SAC Capital Advisors would pay more than $614 million in what federal regulators called the largest insider trading settlement ever. The settlement is subject to court approval.

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    Unemployment fell in February in 22 U.S. states

    Unemployment rates fell in 22 U.S. states in February from January, a sign that hiring gains are benefiting many parts of the country. The Labor Department says unemployment rates rose in 12 states and were unchanged in 16.

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    A customer counts her change after a purchase at Lodge’s store in Albany N.Y. U.S. consumers earned more and spent more in February, helped by a stronger job market that offset some of the drag from higher taxes, according to the Commerce Department.

    U.S. consumer spending, income jump in February

    Consumers earned more and spent more in February, helped by a stronger job market that is offsetting some of the drag from higher taxes. The Commerce Department said Friday that consumer spending rose 0.7 percent in February from January. It was the biggest gain in five months and followed a revised 0.4 percent rise in January, which was double the initial estimate.

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    In his quick trip Friday to South Florida, President Obama will try to show the public that the economy remains his top priority in the midst of high-profile campaigns on immigration reform and gun control.

    Obama to pitch more jobs in public works in Miami

    President Barack Obama will promote a plan to create jobs by attracting private investment in highways and other public works during a visit Friday to a Miami port, a senior administration official said. The president will flesh out details of his proposals in a speech at the port, which is undergoing $2 billion in upgrades paid for with government and private money.

  •  
    A Stanford University student walks in front of Hoover Tower on the Stanford University campus in Palo Alto, Calif. Congressional inaction could end up costing college students an extra $5,000 on their new loans. The rate for subsidized Stafford loans is set to increase from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent on July 1, just as millions of new college students start signing up for fall courses. The difference between the two rates adds up to $6 billion.

    Congressional inaction could cost college students

    Congressional inaction could end up costing college students an extra $5,000 on their new loans. The rate for subsidized Stafford loans is set to increase from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent on July 1, just as millions of new college students start signing up for fall courses. The difference between the two rates adds up to $6 billion.

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    Passers-by stand in front of an electronic stock price board Friday showing global stock index including Japan’s Nikkei 225, top center, that closed for the week at 12,397.91 after gaining 61.95 points. Asian stock markets were mostly higher Friday as momentum carried over from yet another record high on Wall Street.

    Asia stocks modestly higher after S&P hits record

    Asian stock markets were mostly higher Friday as momentum carried over from yet another record high on Wall Street. Trading remained thin, however, as stock, bond and commodities markets were closed for Good Friday in the U.S. and Europe, along with large parts of Asia. The Standard and Poor's 500 index closed Thursday at its highest level, driven by more encouraging data on the U.S. economic recovery.

  •  
    An Insitu ScanEagle unmanned aircraft is launched Tuesday at the airport in Arlington, Ore. It’s a good bet that in the not-so-distant future aerial drones will be part of Americansí everyday lives, performing countless useful functions. A far cry from the killing machines whose missiles incinerate terrorists, these generally small unmanned aircraft will help farmers more precisely apply water and pesticides to crops, saving money and reducing environmental impacts. They’ll help police departments to find missing people, reconstruct traffic accidents and act as lookouts for SWAT teams. They’ll alert authorities to people stranded on rooftops by hurricanes, and monitor evacuation flows.

    Drone industry worries about privacy backlash

    With military budgets shrinking, drone makers have been counting on the civilian market to spur the industry's growth. But there's an ironic threat to that hope: Success on the battlefield may contain the seeds of trouble for the more benign uses of drones at home. The civilian unmanned aircraft industry worries that it will be grounded before it can really take off because of fear among the public that the technology will be misused.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Broadway star Liz Callaway is set to perform in concert at the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre in Arlington Heights on Friday, Nov. 1.

    Metropolis adds new comedy revues, concerts
    Upcoming concerts and comedy shows have been recently announced for the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre in Arlington Heights.

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    Super handyman: Keep your brick home in great shape

    A brick house is a strong house. Just ask the Three Little Pigs! But if you want those bricks to look good and stay in good shape, you'll want to try some or all of these tips.

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    Home inspector: Buyers worry about radon in home

    Q. We are in the process of buying a house and were informed that the sellers installed a radon mediation system last year. Radon levels before the system was installed were about 7 picocuries per liter. What should we do about this situation, and what are the effects of radon exposure to occupants?

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    Blue Mercury glass from Pottery Barn brings in one of the iconic pastel hues of the Easter season in a fresh new way.

    Modern takes on Easter décor

    Fuzzy chicks and cute bunnies are part of the pastel pantheon of Easter decor, and their charm helps define the look of the season. But for those who prefer celebrating with a modern aesthetic, there are many attractive decor options that are a tad less cute and a tad more contemporary.

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    About real estate: Seller must refund excess sales proceeds

    "Finders, keepers" works in the schoolyard, but not in the real estate world.

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    The Inverness Hills neighborhood was largely built in the 1980s when large homes were going up fast in Inverness.

    Large homes, good schools draw buyers to Inverness Hills

    Two years ago, Wanda and Frank Tardio moved from Palatine to a larger home in Inverness Hills. "I was familiar with the area and liked it, then I fell in love with the house, and next I met such nice neighbors — that I knew it was where I wanted to be," Wanda Tardio said.

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    Richard Griffiths, the British actor who played the boy wizard’s unsympathetic Uncle Vernon in the “Harry Potter” movies, has died. He was 65.

    ‘Harry Potter’ actor Richard Griffiths dies at 65

    Richard Griffiths, the versatile British actor who played the boy wizard's unsympathetic Uncle Vernon in the "Harry Potter" movies, has died. He was 65. Agent Simon Beresford announced Friday that Griffiths died a day earlier of complications following heart surgery at University Hospital in Coventry, central England.

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    Barbara Walters plans to retire next year, ending a television career that began more than a half century ago and made her a trailblazer in news and daytime TV.

    Barbara Walters to retire next year

    Barbara Walters plans to retire next year, ending a television career that began more than a half century ago and made her a trailblazer in news and daytime TV. Someone who works closely with Walters said the plan is for her to retire in May 2014 after a series of special programs saluting her career. The person was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity Thursday.

  •  
    Alice Smith, “She”

    Smith realizes promise with comeback

    Six years is a long time to build up anticipation. That's how long it's been since Alice Smith released her sultry, soulful 2007 debut, "For Lovers, Dreamers & Me." With that album, the singer-songwriter was tagged with that coveted "next big thing" title. And then ... silence.

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    Clutch, “Earth Rocker”

    Clutch get heavy again on ‘Earth Rocker’

    Clutch, “Earth Rocker” (Weathermaker Music)Hallelujah.Clutch, the hard-touring Maryland band with an endless supply of guitar riffs, is back on the righteous path of heavy rock after an ill-advised foray into bluesy territory. Singer Neil Fallon’s growl is ho-hum when it croons over a Hammond B3. But it sounds just right when he’s howling at the moon, as on the new demented party anthem, “The Wolf Man Kindly Requests ...”“Earth Rocker” is Clutch’s hardest-hitting album in a while, and it’s full of Fallon’s occasionally inscrutable, fantastical sci-fi themes. There are references to Guttenberg, the Large Hadron Collider and the medieval weapon the halberd — and that’s just in one song (“Unto the Breach”).“The Face” imagines a post-apocalyptic pop culture landscape where rock is dead and electric guitars have been cast into the sea. On “Cyborg Bette,” our rock-star narrator falls for a robot, his “latest model.” A welcome return to form.

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    Phosphorescent, “Muchacho”

    Luminous new album from Phosphorescent

    Phosphorescent, “Muchacho” (Dead Oceans)Matthew Houck’s quest for a few moments of simplicity has led to his most complex album yet, a lush take on easygoing country flavored with a light ocean breeze.“Muchacho” crystallized as Phosphorescent’s only permanent member retreated to Mexico on a weeklong spur-of-the-moment trip to check out following a difficult period in his life. He returned to Brooklyn, N.Y., with the beating heart of his most accomplished album yet, full of sprawling arrangements with horns and keys and electronic adornments. Yet Houck never loses his deft touch for the personal moment, like when he narrates a rough patch for the listener before warbling, “I’ll fix myself up, come and be with you” over a dreamy organ line on “Muchacho’s Tune.” He heads in the opposite direction as he patiently layers on the textures in “The Quotidian Beasts” until he’s got something that soars right on past the seven-minute mark.There are little wonders all over “Muchacho,” an album that hopefully will take Houck to a wider audience as popular musical tastes begin to turn his way.

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    Local theater: Metropolis stages musical ‘Goldilocks’

    Here's what's happening on the suburban theater scene. Chicago Kids Company brings its musical version of "Goldilocks and the Three Bears" to the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre as part of its family-friendly, educational series Stories in Action! and Marriott Theatre revives "South Pacific," plus much more.

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    Two-time Tony Award-winner Norbert Leo Butz, middle, stars with Tony Award nominees Kate Baldwin and Bobby Steggert in the world premiere of “Big Fish” at Chicago's Oriental Theatre starting Tuesday, April 2.

    'Big Fish' creators hope to make a splash in Chicago

    Director/choreographer Susan Stroman and composer/lyricist Andrew Lippa both have a "Big Fish" story to tell. Both are major creative forces behind the world-premiere musical "Big Fish," the story of a young man questioning his dying Southern father's tall tales that plays a monthlong tryout at the Oriental Theatre starting Tuesday, April 2, before heading to Broadway. And both have been in this position before — Stroman with "The Producers" and Lippa with "The Addams Family."

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    Jeremy Piven stars as the bold businessman who reinvented shopping in PBS’ “Mr. Selfridge.”

    PBS’ ‘Mr. Selfridge’ showcases an American visionary

    Harry Selfridge made shopping fun. Sure, people always shopped, but it was more of a chore before Selfridge redefined the experience in 1909. Though many Americans may not know his name, the lush eight-part series "Mr. Selfridge," launching on PBS' "Masterpiece Classic" Sunday, March 31, brings viewers into his world. Jeremy Piven ("Entourage") is perfectly cast as the brash American in the title role.

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    Stacked Music — Erin Goldsmith, left, Jenna Steege, Katie Yore and Stacey Smith — performs four-part musical improv during the 16th Annual Chicago Improv Festival.

    Suburban venue, talents gear up for Chicago Improv Festival

    When it comes to improv, Chicago is Mecca. But it wasn't until 1998 that the improv community began showcasing itself during an annual Chicago Improv Festival. Fifteen years later, the festival — running April 1-7 — is a major event with more than 700 performers and 20 city and suburban venues. It's also attracting big-name talent, including Scott Adsit, Kay Cannon and John Lutz of NBC's "30 Rock," as well as Rob Belushi of Spike TV's "The Joe Schmo Show."

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    Amber Freeland serves beer at HB Jones in Elmhurst.

    Elmhurst’s HB Jones features clever decor, design-your-own burgers

    Mascots may usually be the domain of sports teams, fast food restaurants and breakfast cereals, but when Salseria owner Anthony Gambino was working on his new spot, he decided he'd have one too. The menu and décor at HB Jones, which opened in December at 551 S. York St. in Elmhurst, are based around the imagined adventures of a fictional world traveler, mixing American cuisine and drinks with a bit of international flare.

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    Music notes: Hip-hop artist Na Palm stops at Durty Nellie’s
    Chicago rapper Na Palm, who combines hip-hop with electronic dance music, will perform Friday at Durty Nellie's in Palatine, and veteran (but still vital) rock band Local H hits the stage at the Montrose Room in Rosemont Saturday.

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    Mortgage professor: What seniors should know if borrowing costs start to rise

    This is a great time for senior homeowners to take out a home equity conversion mortgage HECM), especially if they don't need the extra money now! Sounds crazy? It isn't, so read on.

Discuss

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    Bob Chwedyk/bchwedyk@dailyherald.com Some school districts are allowing students to bring their own devices for use in classrooms.

    Editorial: School tech decisions vital to future
    Allowing students to bring their own tech devices into classrooms can work, but districts should not rush into the practice, a Daily Herald editorial says.

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    If Hillary Clinton has a time to win, it’s in ’16

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: Clearly, the Hillary Clinton for president proposition poses more questions than answers. But the calculus comes down to this: She has been working toward this moment essentially all her life, diligently clearing away the brush blocking her path. The zeitgeist is ready for a woman president. Most important, she can win — and few think the country would be worse for it.

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    Argiris a strong voice for residents
    Letter to the editor: "Dean Argiris is a strong leader, an outspoken voice of the people and the right man to lead Wheeling to an even brighter future," write Bob and Alice Poulsen of Wheeling.

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    Mt. Prospect, don’t settle for fuzzy math
    Letter to the editor: Carol Tortorello says Mount Prospect is well run and the sitting village board deserves some credit for that. "This group has worked very well together and got us through the last bad years very well, thank you," she writes.

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    Won’t regret a vote for Vandenbergh
    Letter to the editor: Craig Bernacki says he has known Gayle Vandenbergh for more than 15 years, and he promises she won't be a "rubber stamp" board member. "She will be an excellent trustee we all can be proud of," he writes.

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    Pat Kelly’s decisions are based on facts
    Letter to the editor: Karen Carney endorses Patricia Kelly for Bartlett mayor, saying Kelly has been been quietly volunteering and making a difference here for many years.

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    Mulder: Why Hayes is the best choice
    Letter to the editor: Retiring Arlington Heights Village President Arlene Mulder writes that Trustee Tom Hayes is by far the best choice to replace her. "With Tom's help and support, we have accomplished a great deal," she writes. "It is clear Tom Hayes is the most qualified for the job, ready and able to lead Arlington Heights in 2013 and beyond."

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    Tinaglia will bring new energy to board
    Letter to the editor: Don Lyon applauds Jim Tinaglia's decision to endorse Tom Hayes for Arlington Heights mayor, and says Tinaglia has shown he'll make decisions on what is best for the village as a whole.

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    Stand up for right to feel safe from guns
    An Ingleside letter to the editor: We need to implement immediate action to help prevent more gun violence in America.

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    Gurnee mayor deserves re-election
    A Gurnee letter to the editor: The mayor of Gurnee is running for re-election. Mayor Kovarik has been the mayor for the past eight years and has demonstrated strong financial leadership.

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    President has little choice in making cuts
    A Mundelein letter to the editor: In order to make the sequester as devastating and unappealing as possible, there is very little leeway allowed in the across-the-board cuts.

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    Unfair portrayal of drugstores
    A Batavia letter to the editor: I was highly disappointed by the recent WSJ Sunday article "10 things drugstores won't tell you." I have been a pharmacist for 18 years and felt it was sensationalistic, misleading and offensive. The article painted drugstores in a dark light and misrepresented the responsible care we provide.

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    Fighting against Medicare fraud
    A St. Charles letter to the editor: With all the political hyperbole about saving services in Washington, one area that deserves attention is the elimination of Medicare fraud, estimated to cost us $60 billion per year.

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    Important election looms in Lombard
    A Lombard letter to the editor: After having Bill Mueller as the president of the Lombard village board for more than 20 years, sadly we have the ask of choosing a successor. We must be very careful in making this choice because it probably will have a strong effect on the village, its residents and businesses for years to come.

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    Alas, there is a need for self-defense
    A West Chicago letter to the editor: In his recent Fence Post letter (Armed society not a Christian society), Tom Teune makes several clearly illogical and indefensible claims. First, he said the framers of the Constitution intended to form a strong central government. That statement is not supported by history.

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