New DH calendar

Daily Archive : Monday December 3, 2012

News

Sports

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    Fabbri fills it up as St. Viator rolls

    Junior guard Erin Fabbri scored 18 points to lead St. Viator to a 62-35 victory over host St. Edward in a nonconference girls basketball game on Tuesday night. Seniors Hannah Scheller added 9 points and Jennie Horstmann 8 for the Lions, who improved to 5-2.

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    Monday’s girls bowling scoreboard
    Here are the varsity girls bowling results from Monday's events, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls basketball scoreboard
    Here are the results from Monday's varsity girls basketball results as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Victoria Trowbridge of Naperville Central and Shannon Ryan are all smiles after their big win ocer Neuqua Valley. This took place after the Girls basketball regional at East Auorora Friday.

    As big as it gets this early

    Andy Nussbaum needed to go back almost 20 years to remember this significant of a game, this soon in the season. With his elephant-like memory, that's saying something. Nussbaum's unbeaten fifth-ranked Naperville Central Redhawks host No. 4 Wheaton Warrenville South tonight in a matchup of last year's DuPage Valley Conference co-champs. To the winner, an early leg up in the DVC race.

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    Carmel’s Kathleen Felicelli splits Lakes defenders Samantha Ney, left, and Shelby Trkla on Monday night at Lakes High School.

    Considerate Carmel earns win over Lakes

    Sesame Street's Elmo has taken a PR hit in recent weeks, but most toddlers who love the red, furry monster seem unfazed. Three-year-old Owen Perz, for instance, is still a big Elmo fan, so he had to be loving the giant Elmo balloon that his mom Kelly brought home with her on Monday night. Perz is the head girls basketball coach at Carmel, and the Elmo balloon was tied to a chair on her team's bench during its nonconference game at Lakes. Elmo, along with a cookie cake, was a birthday gift from her players, who knew that the perfect gift for Perz was a gift for her young son. "Well, my son is obsessed with Elmo and the girls are kind of obsessed with my son," Perz said with a laugh. "They got me an Elmo balloon for my birthday, but it's really for him. That was really nice." The Corsairs also gave Perz a gift that was more just for her, a 52-44 win over Lakes that bumps their record to 6-2.

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    Redskins edge Giants in big Monday Night matchup
    $PHOTOCREDIT_ON$Associated Press$PHOTOCREDIT_OFF$LANDOVER, Md. — Robert Griffin III threw for one touchdown and had a fumble turn into another score, and the Washington Redskins pulled within one game of the NFC East lead with a 17-16 win over the New York Giants on Monday night.The Redskins improved to 6-6 with their third straight victory, tied with the Dallas Cowboys and on the heels of the Giants, who have lost three of four to fall to 7-5.Griffin completed 13 of 21 passes for 163 yards and ran five times for 72 yards, breaking Cam Newton’s NFL record for yards rushing by a rookie quarterback. Griffin lost the ball on one of his runs, but it flew into the arms of teammate Joshua Morgan, who ran it in for an early touchdown.

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    Memorable effort powers Wheeling’s Peterson

    Maryssa Peterson got a big boost from a little cheerleader Monday night at Arlington Lanes. The Wheeling bowler's 6-day-old nephew, Kayden, was in attendance — and although the odds are good the little guy won't remember much of what transpired, Peterson, her teammates and fans sure will. The junior fired the high game of the Mid-Suburban League meet — a 242 — which was 29 pins higher than her previous best-ever mark.

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    Sam Hiller of Naperville North gets ready to jump from the block during the 200-yard freestyle relay at the boys state swimming finals at Evanston High School Saturday.

    Scouting DuPage County boys swimming

    Here's a look at what to expect from the boys swimming teams of DuPage County this winter.

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    Should the District 300 teachers strike linger, the 30th annual Charger Classic girls basketball holiday tournament could switch venues.

    Teachers strike puts District 300 sports on hold

    When the District 300 teachers hit the picket line Tuesday morning, it also means athletic competition and practices will be shutdown district wide. The list of postponed events will include the girls basketball game scheduled to be played Tuesday night at Dundee-Crown, where the Chargers were to host rival Jacobs as each team would have been seeking its first win of the season. Beyond the daily events that will be postponed or canceled until the strike is over, the greater concern if the strike lingers will be two longstanding varsity holiday basketball tournaments — the 30th annual Charger Classic girls tournament at Dundee-Crown and the Golden Eagles Classic boys tournament at Jacobs.

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    Laura Stoecker/lstoecker@dailyherald.com ¬ Hampshire head coach Bob Barnett with Shane Hernandez on Saturday, January 8.

    Hampshire’s Barnett thrilled about IBCA honor

    Hampshire boys basketball coach Bob Barnett plans on having a heck of a car ride down to Bloomington in April. Barnett will make the trek south with his father, Keith, to the Illinois Basketball Coaches Association Hall of Fame ceremony. The association recently revealed Barnett will be inducted with the Class of 2013. "It's the Hall of Fame. Are you kidding me?" said an appreciative Barnett when asked his thoughts on joining the state's elite high school basketball coaches in the Hall. "It's years of work and toiling and sweat and laughter. It also tells me a lot of kids were willing to give up personal gains for team goals. It's an incredible honor and accomplishment."

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    Fans cheer as A.J. Pierzynski leaves the field.

    Despite Hahn’s words, it’ll be tough for Sox to sign Pierzynski

    On the first day of baseball's winter meetings Monday, general manager Rick Hahn again said there is still a chance veteran catcher A.J. Pierzynski could return to the White Sox.

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    Batavia’s Bethany Orman battles for a loose ball.

    Freshmen making instant impact

    It seems everywhere you look there's another freshman making an impact in her first year of high school.

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    Trying to explain Geneva’s ACL woes

    You can't blame Geneva High School varsity girls basketball coach Sarah Meadows for being a little apprehensive these days when she hears these three letters spoken — A, C, and L.

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    Girls basketball/Top 20
    Montini, Rolling Meadows and Neuqua Valley are the top 3 teams in this week's Daily Herald girls basketball Top 20.

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    Johnny Manziel

    Heisman finalists: Manziel, Te’o, Klein

    Johnny Manziel and Manti Te'o are in position to make Heisman Trophy history. Manziel, the redshirt freshman quarterback from Texas A&M, and Te'o, Notre Dame's star linebacker, along with Kansas State quarterback Collin Klein, were invited Monday to attend the Heisman presentation ceremony. Manziel is the favorite to win college football's most famous player of the year award Saturday night in Manhattan. He would be the first freshman to win the Heisman and the first Texas A&M player since halfback John David Crow won the school's only Heisman in 1957.

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    It’s worth the wait for Brugioni, Grant

    Grant senior Dom Brugioni couldn't wait for the start of the boys bowling season. His high school, after all, had never had a team. Now, things are rolling for Brugioni and his new teammates.

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    Former Houston Astros pitcher and broadcaster Jim Deshaies was named to the Chicago Cubs television team on December 3, 2012.

    Cubs fans ought to like what Deshaies brings to the table

    WGN-TV confirmed reports out of the winter meetings in Nashville that former major-league pitcher Jim Deshaies will be the new TV analyst on Cubs broadcast. Deshaies had been an analyst on Houston Astros broadcasts. He replaces the popular Bob Brenly, who left to take a similar job with the Arizona Diamondbacks.

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    Images from the Carmel at Lakes girls basketball game on Monday, Dec. 3.

    Images: Carmel vs. Lakes, girls basketball
    The Lakes Eagles hosted the Carmel Corsairs for girls basketball action on Monday, Dec. 3 in Lake Villa.

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    Moriarty’s complete effort lifts Christian Liberty past IMSA

    Jess Moriarty was the Class 1A 3-point shooting queen last March. She is a sophomore guard who hustles up and down the floor looking to make passes, shoot from the outside or drive to the basket. But after scoring 13 points to help lead Christian Liberty Academy to a 34-22 victory over Illinois Math and Science on Monday, guess what the 5-foot-5 native of Hoffman Estates was most excited about?

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    Cary-Grove’s Michael Hamann is a three-time state qualifier.

    D155 co-op team hs plenty of experience

    The District 155 co-op boys' swimming team is looking for an encore performance this year. District 155, which features swimmers from Cary-Grove, Crystal Lake South, Crystal Lake Central and Cary-Grove, won the Fox Valley Conference invitational title last year and returns nearly all its key swimmers from last year's powerhouse. Senior Michael Hamann (IM, backstroke) is a three-time state qualifier, while senior Tyler King was a member of the state 400 relay team. He'll swim the fly and 50 this year. Senior Adam Gaynor (200, 100) earned the most improved sectional performance honor and also was a member of the state 400 relay team. Senior Andrew Brierton (50 and 100) was a member of that relay as well.

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    Lake Zurich’s Raffelson, Lynn make their mark on campus

    A couple of former Lake Zurich football teammates, J.J. Raffelson and Jack Lynn, made their mark at the collegiate level this fall.

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    Boys bowling: Scouting Lake County

    Here's a look at the girls bowling team of Lake County for the 2012-13 season.

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    Chicago Bears head coach Lovie Smith said Monday that he couldn't find anything good to talk about with his team's defensive performance against Seattle.

    Smith offers no defense for Bears defense

    Bears coach Lovie Smith couldn't find much positive to say about his defense's performance in Sunday's overtime loss to the Seahawks, and the team travels to Minnesota for next week's game against the Vikings with an injury-depleted roster. Bob LeGere has more on what was on the mind of the Bears head coach in his meeting with the media Monday.

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    Brandon Marshall fumbles but was able to recover for a 34-yard gain in the first quarter Sunday at Soldier Field. Marshall finished with 10 catches for 165 yards.

    Bears’ offense needs other WRs to step up

    Sunday was just the latest example of Bears wide receiver Brandon Marshall putting up huge numbers in the passing game but not getting much help from his teammates. Coach Lovie Smith admits the offense needs additional players to step up as complements to Marshall, but the Bears are banged up at wide receiver.

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    NIU’s Carey has a track record of success

    Northern Illinois athletic director Jeff Compher has good reason to have a lot of confidence in his new head football coach, Rod Carey. "Every opportunity Rod has had to step up and make a difference in our program, he has done it," Comphere said "Whether developing a young, untested offensive line or stepping in as the offensive coordinator and playcaller in the second game of the season, he has responded with poise and professionalism."

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    Toews will be in NHL meetings today

    Blackhawks captain Jonathan Toews is among the small group of players invited to be part of negotiations today in New York with six owners as the NHL and Players' Association try something different in an attempt to end the 80-day lockout.

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    Jimmy Butler said he’s comfortable coming off the bench and giving the Bulls a spark with teammate Taj Gibson.

    Bulls, Hamilton caught a break

    In some ways, having a torn plantar fascia is considered a lucky break. The Bulls have had plenty of players suffer through months of soreness with plantar fasciitis, which is inflammation of the tendon that connects the arch to the heel. Joakim Noah, Andres Nocioni and Toni Kukoc come to mind.

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    The Bulls’ Richard Hamilton will miss an undetermined amount of time with torn plantar fascia in his left foot. Jimmy Butler and Marco Belinelli will take his place but coach Tom Thibodeau has not indicated who will start.

    Butler or Belinelli will start for injured Hamilton
    There was no definitive word on when Richard Hamilton might return from a torn plantar fascia in his left foot. Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau also declined to name a replacement at shooting guard, but recent lineup trends have leaned heavily in one direction.

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    Libertyville’s Filippo authors winning cross country finale

    Katherine Filippo is an English major at Illinois Wesleyan with an emphasis in writing. The former Libertyville standout sure wrote a great script for her final cross country season in Bloomington. She helped the Titans reach the NCAA finals for the first time in school history. Clocked in a time of 23:22.3 for 188th place, Filippo helped the Titans finish 24th in the NCAA Division III cross country championships at the LaVern Gibson Course in Terre Haute, Ind. "Qualifying for nationals was a goal that we had been working toward for the past four years," said Filippo, who also worked as an intern in the sports information department at IWU.

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    Gunnar Kay

    Another Kay to play collegiate baseball

    When Gunnar Kay was a freshman, St. Viator baseball coach Mike Manno believed the young pitcher might end up at the Division I level of college baseball. "Because of his great mechanics we thought he had a chance," Manno said. "And he comes from a family of D-1 players." Sure enough, Gunnar will become the third sibling from the Kay house to play at the top collegiate level. He has accepted a scholarship to Dallas Baptist University in Texas. He becomes the seventh Lion to commit to a D-I school in seven years and eight other players from the school's baseball program have gone on to D-II, III or junior college.

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    MLB pitchers might try safety hat liners next year

    Big league pitchers could experiment with protective hat liners next season, hoping they can absorb the shock of batted balls such as the ones that struck Brandon McCarthy and Doug Fister in the head. Major League Baseball medical director Dr. Gary Green presented ideas to executives, physicians and trainers at the winter meetings this week. Among the prototypes being studied is headgear made of Kevlar, the high-impact material used by the military and law enforcement and NFL players for body armor.

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    New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez has a torn labrum, bone impingement and a cyst, the Yankees said Monday. The third baseman will need to follow a pre-surgery program over the next four-to-six weeks, and the team anticipates he will be sidelined four-to-six months after the operation.

    Alex Rodriguez needs hip surgery, will miss season’s start

    Alex Rodriguez will have surgery on his left hip and will miss the start of the season and possibly the entire first half. Rodriguez has a torn labrum, bone impingement and a cyst, the Yankees said Monday. The third baseman will need to follow a pre-surgery program over the next four-to-six weeks, and the team anticipates he will be sidelined four-to-six months after the operation. That timetable projects to a return between the start of May and mid-July.

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    Pittsburgh Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin, center, joins the rest of the bench Sunday in celebrating the winning field goal dagainst the Baltimore Ravens in Baltimore.

    Steelers hanging around behind resurgent Batch

    Larry Foote has no illusions about the Pittsburgh Steelers catching the Baltimore Ravens to win the AFC North even after Sunday's emotionally charged 23-20 victory over their bitter rivals. He doesn't exactly care either. Sure, homefield in the playoffs — if the Steelers manage to make it — would be nice. But the 32-year-old doesn't believe it's necessary for Pittsburgh to get where it wants to go.

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    Illinois’ Joseph Bertrand (2) collides with Georgia Tech Marcus Georges-Hunt (3) as Georgia Tech Daniel Miller (5) tries to block the shot Wednesday during the second half in Champaign.

    Illinois moves up to No. 13 in AP Top 25 poll

    Indiana, Duke and Michigan remained the top three teams in The Associated Press' college basketball poll. Look all the way to the bottom and you won't see Kentucky's name for the first time since John Calipari became coach of the Wildcats. The Illini jumped nine spots in this week's poll, moving from No. 22 to No. 13.

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    New Orleans Saints football linebacker Jonathan Vilma is pursued by reporters Friday as he arrives at an attorney’s office in Washington for a session of the pay-for-pain bounty system with the New Orleans Saints.

    Tagliabue, Saints continue bounty hearings

    Hearings in the NFL bounty probe of the Saints have resumed with witness appearances by former Minnesota Vikings head coach Brad Childress, Saints assistant head coach Joe Vitt and linebacker Jonathan Vilma. Former NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue has been appointed to oversee the hearings, which he has scheduled to conclude in New Orleans by Tuesday. There were also several days of witness appearances in Washington, D.C., last week.

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    This image provided by Sports Illustrated shows the cover of the Dec. 10 issue, on sale now, featuring LeBron James who has been named the Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year 2012. James is the first NBA player to win the award since Heat teammate Dwyane Wade in 2006.

    LeBron James chosen as SI’s Sportsman of the Year

    When LeBron James learned he was Sports Illustrated's Sportsman of the Year, the Miami Heat star was surprised. Not because he thought his achievements in 2012 weren't worthy, but because he figured what happened in 2010 was still holding him back. "I remember just like yesterday when I signed here and basically, like the roof caved in," James told The Associated Press, referring to the fallout from his infamous "Decision" to leave Cleveland for Miami in 2010.

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    Mike North video: Little excitement about Cubs’ pitching.

    Mike North says the Chicago Cubs have their pitching staff set for next season but he's not at all excited about it.

Business

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    Ford Motor Co. President and CEO Alan Mulally stands beside a Lincoln MKZ during a press conference Monday in New York. The MKZ, the first of seven new or revamped Lincolns that will go on sale by 2015, will arrive at dealerships this month.

    Lincoln brand changes name as new MKZ goes on sale

    After years of dismal sales, Ford's Lincoln luxury brand is reintroducing itself with a new name and a new midsize sedan. The brand is returning to the name Lincoln Motor Co. as it launches its new MKZ sedan.

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    An Amazon.com employee processes orders at its Fernley, Nev., warehouse. A storm is brewing in Europe over how little Internet powerhouses like Google and Amazon are paying in tax.

    Europe takes on tech giants and their tax havens

    Governments, hungry for money to prop up their struggling economies, are accusing the technology giants of incorporating themselves up in low-tax countries so they can avoid paying hundreds of millions of dollars to countries such as Germany, Britain and France — where most of their European income is derived.

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    General Motors said November industrywide U.S. light-vehicle sales were the highest in almost five years, exceeding analysts’ estimates while Honda Motor Co. led gains as buyers returned to showrooms after Hurricane Sandy.

    Storm delays lift already strong US auto sales

    Superstorm Sandy gave an extra boost to already strong U.S. auto sales last month, although carmakers warned that uncertainty over the "fiscal cliff" could undo some of those gains.

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    River traffic passes through a section of water containing an electric fish barrier in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal in Romeoville.

    Great Lakes states’ suit over Asian carp rejected
    A federal court dismissed a lawsuit brought by five states seeking to force the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to erect barriers between the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River basin to prevent Asian carp from migrating from the river into the lakes.

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    U.S. stocks fell, following a two-week advance for the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index, as an unexpected contraction in manufacturing spurred concern about the potential economic toll from the so-called fiscal cliff.

    Stocks edge lower after weak manufacturing report

    Stocks edged lower on Wall Street Monday after a surprisingly weak manufacturing report heightened concern that fiscal deadlock in Washington is already hurting the economy.

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    A worker for a Chinese-owned solar panel manufacturer examines a solar panel at a company facility in Goodyear, Ariz. The factory makes solar panels for one of the world’s biggest solar manufacturers.

    Chinese units of 5 big US audit firms charged

    Federal regulators have charged the Chinese affiliates of five of the biggest U.S. accounting firms with impeding the government's investigation of Chinese companies by refusing to turn over documents.

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    News Corp's headquarters is shown in New York. News Corp. said Monday that its new publishing company will keep the News Corp. name, while its separate media and entertainment company will be renamed Fox Group.

    News Corp.'s new media co. to be named Fox Group

    News Corp. said Monday that its new publishing company will keep the News Corp. name, while its separate media and entertainment company will be renamed Fox Group. The conglomerate announced plans this summer to split into two public companies, one for its newspaper and book publishing business and the other for its fast-growing movie and TV operations. Rupert Murdoch will serve as chairman of the new News Corp. and chairman and CEO of Fox Group.

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    Qatar’s Deputy Prime Minister and president of the 18th United Nations Convention on Climate Change, Abdullah bin Hamad al-Attiyah, speaks Monday during a news conference being held after six days of intense negotiations in Doha, Qatar. Highlighting a rift between the rich countries and emerging economies like China, New Zealand’s climate minister staunchly defended his government’s decision to drop out of the emissions pact for developed nations, saying it’s an outdated and insufficient response to global warming.

    Fossil fuel subsidies in focus at climate talks

    assan al-Kubaisi considers it a gift from above that drivers in oil- and gas-rich Qatar only have to pay $1 per gallon at the pump. "Thank God that our country is an oil producer and the price of gasoline is one of the lowest," al-Kubaisi said, filling up his Toyota Land Cruiser at a gas station in Doha. "God has given us a blessing." To those looking for a global response to climate change, it's more like a curse.

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    US manufacturing shrinks in November to 3-year low

    A survey shows U.S. manufacturing shrank in November to its weakest level since July 2009, the first month after the Great Recession ended. Worries about automatic tax increases in the New Year cut demand for factory orders and manufacturing jobs. The Institute for Supply Management said Monday that its index of manufacturing conditions fell to a reading of 49.5. That's down from 51.7 in October.

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    Archer Daniels Midland raises offer for GrainCorp

    Agribusiness conglomerate Archer Daniels Midland Co. is increasing its buyout offer for GrainCorp by almost 4 percent and disclosed it has already added to its stake in the Australian grain handler. Under the revised deal, it will cost ADM about $2.33 billion to buy the rest of the company.

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    U.S. builders spent more on home construction in October.

    US builders boost spending 1.4 percent in October

    U.S. builders increased their spending on construction projects in October by the largest amount in five months, led by a surge in housing. The Commerce Department said Monday that construction spending rose 1.4 percent in October. It was the largest gain since a 1.7 percent increase in May.

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    Oil hovers near $89 as China production improves

    The price of oil hovered around $89 a barrel Monday as investors focused on signs that China's economy may be picking up after a prolonged slowdown. Benchmark crude for January delivery was up 2 cents to $88.93 a barrel at late afternoon Bangkok time in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract rose 84 cents to close at $88.91 in New York on Friday.

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    Chinese industrial upswing cheers markets

    News that manufacturing activity in China, the world's second largest economy, grew for the first time in 13 months helped push global stocks higher on Monday. HSBC's Purchasing Managers' Index rose to 50.5 in November from October's 49.5 on a 100-point scale on which numbers above 50 indicate activity is expanding.

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    President Barack Obama waves Friday after speaking at the Rodon Group, which manufactures over 95% of the parts for K’NEX Brands toys, in Hatfield, Pa. The visit comes as the White House continues a week of public outreach efforts, while also attempting to negotiate a deal with congressional leaders.

    House and Senate sit on tax bills the other passed

    It may not sound like it from the rhetoric, but both the House and Senate already have passed separate bills to delay big tax increases awaiting nearly every taxpayer next year if Congress and the White House can't agree on a plan to avert the "fiscal cliff."

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    Participants listen Monday to the speech of Hamdoun Toure, Secretary General of International Telecommunication Union, ITU, seen on screens, at the 11th day of the World Conference on International Telecommunication in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The head of the U.N.’s telecommunication overseers sought Monday to quell worries about possible moves toward greater Internet controls during global talks in Dubai, but any attempts for increased Web regulations are likely to face stiff opposition from groups led by a major U.S. delegation.

    Clashes over Internet rules to mark Dubai meeting

    The U.N.'s top telecommunications overseer sought Monday to quell worries about greater Internet controls emerging from global talks in Dubai, but any attempts for major Web regulations will likely face stiff opposition from groups led by a high-powered U.S. delegation. The 11-day conference, seeking to update codes last reviewed when the Web was virtually unknown, highlights the fundamental shift from tightly managed telecommunications networks to the borderless sweep of the Internet.

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    Greece launches heavily-discounted bond buyback

    Greece said Monday it will spend up to (euro) 10 billion ($13 billion) in a heavily-discounted bond buyback program that it hopes will help stabilize its debts. Private holders of Greek bonds, such as banks and pension funds, have until Friday to register their interest in participating in the buyback program. It will be conducted by what is known as a Dutch auction, a type of auction whereby prices start high and then decline.

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    A man walks out of a Starbucks coffee cafe Monday holding a drink in west London. A committee of British lawmakers says the government should “get a grip” and clamp down on multinational corporations that exploit tax laws to move profits generated in Britain to offshore domains. The committee says major multinationals including Starbucks, Google and Amazon are guilty of immoral tax avoidance. Starbucks announced it is reviewing its British tax practices in a bid to restore public trust.

    UK lawmakers seek end to corporate tax avoidance

    British lawmakers on Monday accused major multinational companies including Starbucks, Google and Amazon of immoral tax avoidance, while Starbucks announced it is reviewing its British tax practices in a bid to restore public trust. Parliament's public accounts committee said the government should "get a grip" and clamp down on multinationals that exploit tax laws to move profits generated in Britain to offshore domains.

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    tacey Rassas, a quality control manager at Suntech Power Holdings Co., a Chinese-owned solar panel manufacturer, examines a solar panel at a company facility in Goodyear, Ariz. The factory makes solar panels for one of the world’s biggest solar manufacturers.

    China overtaking US as global trader

    Shin Cheol-soo no longer sees his future in the United States. The South Korean businessman supplied components to American automakers for a decade. But this year, he uprooted his family from Detroit and moved home to focus on selling to the new economic superpower: China. In just five years, China has surpassed the United States as a trading partner for much of the world, including U.S. allies such as South Korea and Australia, according to an Associated Press analysis of trade data.

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    Treasury secretary Timothy Geithner said Republicans have to stop using fuzzy ‘political math’ and say how much they are willing to raise tax rates on the wealthiest 2 percent of Americans and then specify the spending cuts they want.

    White House to GOP: It’s your move

    The White House says Republicans should come clean about how much they're willing to raise tax rates on the rich. Republicans counter that President Barack Obama's latest plan is a joke that avoids tough decisions on the nation's biggest entitlement programs, including Medicare.

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    New Alzheimer’s drug studies offer patients hope

    For Alzheimer's patients and their families, desperate for an effective treatment for the epidemic disease, there's hope from new studies starting up and insights from recent ones that didn't quite pan out. If the new studies succeed, a medicine that slows or even stops progression of the brain-destroying disease might be ready in three to five years, said Dr. William H. Thies, chief medical officer of the Alzheimer's Association.

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    Developing a stage presence can help you sell an idea

    Jeanie Carter teaches stage presence — a potentially important difference-maker as you walk confidently to the podium, shake the hand of the individual who introduced you and begin your presentation to an audience of peers and potential customers. Small Business Columnist Jim Kendall covers the important topics with Carter.

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    Tom, left, Rob and Kevin Ryan of Central Plumbing Company Inc. in Arlington Heights say plumbers in their family date back to the 1920s.

    Family plumbing company thrives in Arlington Heights

    Tom, Kevin and Rob Ryan of Central Plumbing Company Inc. in Arlington Heights say plumbers in their family date back to the 1920s. The growing family business operates in Arlington Heights.

Life & Entertainment

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    Termite evidence found 12 years after sale

    Q. When I bought my home, 12 years ago, the seller disclosed that she had no knowledge of any termites. Last week, I discovered evidence of termites, so I called a pest inspector and he found plugged holes in the slab floor where termicide was injected.

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    To construct a snow globe illusion that conjures up some holiday magic, use stencils and etching cream to adorn a glass cloche with snowflakes. Arrange a miniature house, bottle-brush trees and a blanket of imitation snow atop a cake plate, and cover the scene with your newly etched cloche. As an alternative to building a village, pile pinecones, greenery, berries or clove-studded oranges on the plate before adding the cloche.

    The 12 ideas of Christmas

    Time is passing quickly, and the big day is just around the corner. If your home needs a little more Christmas spirit, you've come to the right place! Get your yuletide decorating off to a fast start with a dozen jolly holiday decorations and cleverly crafted displays that you can easily reproduce or readily adapt to suit your style.

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    She’s tired of hosting big holiday dinners with no reciprocation

    Five years ago, her sister-in-law announced she was neither attending nor hosting Thanksgiving. This woman hosts every Christmas for 20-plus people and she's having trouble with why her sister-in-law can't have them over for Thanksgiving.

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    In true “American Idol” fashion, where winners need to strike while the iron’s hot, winner Phillip Phillips Jr. didn’t have a lot of time to record his debut album, “The World From the Side of the Moon,” which is now in stores.

    'Idol' winner Phillips finds 'Home' with debut

    With the success of his debut single, "Home," Phillip Phillips isn't just the dude who won "American Idol." He's the dude with that folk-rock hit, according to the fans he's met. "There was a lot of people who didn't even know I was on 'Idol,'" he continued. "I think that's cool."

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    A touch of thyme adds unexpected richness to Annie Overboe's holiday cookies.

    Baking secrets: Crafting your culinary legacy

    Create a signature cookie for holiday cookie swaps and gatherings. Baking Secret columnist Annie Overboe gives tips for how to bake a cookie that's uniquely yours and shares her unique thyme-tinged butter cookie recipe.

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    A touch of thyme adds unexpected richness to Annie Overboe's holiday cookies.

    Holiday Thyme Cookies
    Holiday Thyme Cookies

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    BBC adapting Rowling’s ‘Casual Vacancy’ for TV

    The BBC says it is turning J.K. Rowling's first novel for adults into a television drama. "The Casual Vacancy" is a darkly humorous saga of modern British life in which a local council election unleashes rivalries and resentments in a small town.

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    Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, is expecting a baby, St James’s Palace officially announced Monday.

    Palace says Duchess of Cambridge expecting a baby

    The most widely anticipated pregnancy since Princess Diana's in 1981 is official: Prince William's wife, Kate, is pregnant. St. James's Palace announced the pregnancy Monday, saying that the Duchess of Cambridge — formerly known as Kate Middleton — has a severe form of morning sickness and is currently in a London hospital. William is at his wife's side. News of the pregnancy drew congratulations from across the world, with the hashtag "royalbaby" trending globally on Twitter.

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    1928 Ford closed cab pickup and 1930 Ford Town Sedan Fodor with Briggs body.

    Couple’s Model A’s are two of a kind

    "If you're going to have a classic car, you have to drive it. Otherwise, I recommend you collect stamps!" That is the advice Mike Podgorski of barrington gives on how our beloved rolling icons should be handled. Podgorski and his wife, LaVerne, have racked up plenty of miles through the years on both of their antique Ford Model A's.

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    Researchers have found that lying can affect the body physically and mentally.

    Liars face health consequences, research shows

    Lying lengthened Pinocchio's nose, but research suggests the more falsehoods we tell, the more it shortens our lives. Fibbing releases stress hormones that can increase heart rate and breathing, slow digestion and cause tension and hypersensitivity in muscles and nerve fibers. Researchers at the University of Notre Dame carried out a 10-week honesty experiment with 110 people, half of whom were instructed to stop telling major and minor lies during the test.

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    A nationwide study has found inflatable bounce houses can be dangerous and the number of kids injured in related accidents has soared 15-fold in recent years.

    Bounce houses a party hit, but kids’ injuries soar

    They may be a big hit at kids' birthday parties, but inflatable bounce houses can be dangerous, with the number of injuries soaring in recent years, a nationwide study found. Kids often crowd into bounce houses, and jumping up and down can send other children flying into the air, too. The numbers suggest 30 U.S. children a day are treated in emergency rooms for broken bones, sprains, cuts and concussions from bounce house accidents.

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    Chia seeds are a nutritional powerhouse, offering antioxidants, protein, fiber and omega-3s in a small package.

    Your health: Benefits of chia seed
    Learn all about the chia seed and why it's even better for you than flax seeds. And depression can be common as you age, but there are ways to combat it and live a full and rich life as you move into your senior years.

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    Mild weight loss may not reduce heart risk in diabetics

    Losing a small amount of weight doesn't appear to lower the risk of heart attacks and strokes in people with diabetes who are already getting good medical care, according to a long and expensive clinical experiment. While modest weight loss has benefits in how overweight diabetics feel, sleep and move, whatever benefit it may confer in preventing cardiovascular disease — which is what most diabetics die from — is too small to measure, the study found.

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    Experimental diabetes drug helps most vulnerable patients

    Johnson & Johnson's experimental diabetes drug helped the most vulnerable patients in two studies, including older people who struggle to get their blood sugar under control and those at high risk of heart disease. Two company-funded studies presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes in Berlin showed that potential side effects of canagliflozin included dangerously low blood pressure and blood-sugar levels.

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    New techniques in gene sequencing helped the family of Patrick Butters solve a 36-year medical mystery that also affected his mother, Melissa.

    New DNA techniques end mystery of what ails baby Patrick

    Chris Butters was changing a diaper for his son, Patrick, last November when he felt something in the two-month-old's abdomen. It was about the size of a marble or a peanut M&M candy. "What in the world is that?" he recalled thinking. Butters and his wife, Melissa, suspected the growth in Patrick's abdomen was a new chapter in a 36-year-old medical mystery that began in the 1970s, when Melissa herself was a little girl battling unexplained tumors.

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    Epilepsy drug reduces weight in obese patients, study finds

    An epilepsy drug helped obese people lose weight, according to a study that shows the potential of another antiseizure medication to aid in weight reduction. Obese people who took 400 milligrams of Zonegran a day for a year had a 7.3 pounds greater weight loss than those on a placebo, according to the study published in Archives of Internal Medicine.

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    Dr. Elizabeth Reeve and her son Luke enjoy relaxing in their prairie garden.

    Prairie garden a soothing place for psychiatrist, autistic son

    When psychiatrist Elizabeth Reeve needs to unwind and recharge her mental batteries, she heads to the prairie. Not the wild prairie, but the one she and her husband have painstakingly restored at their weekend home in southeastern Minnesota. "It's therapeutic — an opportunity to get outside and think in a different way," she said.

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    Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler walks off the field after a play against the Houston Texans Nov. 11. Cutler ended up leaving the game because of a concussion.

    Doctor urges solutions to reduce concussions in kids

    Concussions are commonly associated with big bodies, big hits and football. With the recent concussions of Bears quarterback Jay Culter and rookie defensive end Shea McClellin, medical experts argue that such injuries aren't limited to professional athletes and more attention should be paid to the risks faced by children athletes. Dr. Robert Cantu, one of the world's leading experts on traumatic brain injuries, said concussions can occur in soccer, baseball, softball and even cheerleading.

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    Brushing, flossing critical for a healthy mouth

    How do you keep your mouth healthy as you age? You know the answer. The pillars of cavity and plaque prevention — brushing and flossing (at least twice a day), and regular cleanings at the dentist's office — remain as important as ever.If you have trouble brushing and flossing by hand because of arthritis or other conditions, switch to an electric toothbrush.

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    The holidays and the many desserts of the season can be a trying time for people struggling with food addictions.

    Beware the trigger foods of the holiday season

    If Santa really does stuff his face with every cookie he encounters after shimmying down those chimneys, that explains the big belly. But health and fitness expert Pam Peeke might say Saint Nick's behavior also could be a sign of something commonly found south of the North Pole: food addiction. Peppermint bark pushers might sound significantly less nefarious than cocaine dealers, but they're offering folks the same surge of dopamine, Peeke explains in her new book, "The Hunger Fix."

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    A less-invasive way to replace heart valves

    For many patients with aortic valve stenosis — a deadly narrowing of the aortic valve that obstructs blood flow from the heart — that amounts to a death sentence. Half die within two years of diagnosis. Then the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in November 2011 approved Edwards Lifescience's Sapien transcatheter heart valve — a way to replace a diseased aortic valve without open-heart surgery.

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    Simple tests parents can do
    There is no surefire test that parents can use to determine whether their child needs to see a medical professional for a possible traumatic brain injury, but parents should be observant and ask their child about how he or she is feeling. Is there a headache? Are the headaches getting worse? Is it hard to concentrate? Does homework cause a headache? A simple test:A. What was the score of the last game? B. What team were you playing? C. What color jerseys was the other team wearing? D. Name four unrelated words and ask your child to repeat them. Wait 2 minutes and ask them to repeat them again. E. Name six digits and ask your child to repeat them. Then ask your child to repeat the digits backward. Suggestions to make sports safer for children: A. No tackle football before age 14. B. No body checking in hockey before age 14. C. Require helmets in field hockey and girls’ lacrosse. D. No heading in soccer until age 14. E. Require chin straps for baseball helmets and eliminate head-first sliding. F. Hold game officials to a higher standard. Keeping players as safe as possible should be the No. 1 priority. Source: “Concussions and Our Kids” by Dr. Robert Cantu

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    At least one aging expert says many baby boomers are not prepared for old age.

    Aging boomers won’t admit they’re getting old

    Hearing problems and the threat of hepatitis C and attendant liver complications are perhaps the largest looming problems for the 76 million baby boomers. But there is some good news for a generation long regarded as hedonistic: Boomers smoke and drink less than their predecessors, and most sexually transmitted diseases they might have incurred in the "free love" era are treatable.

Discuss

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    Editorial: Licensing bill would make roads safer

    A proposal to grant special driver's licenses to undocumented immigrants in Illinois would make roads safer for everyone by requiring driver tests and insurance, a Daily Herald editorial says.

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    Cliff jumping with Obama

    Columnist Charles Krauthammer: Why are Republicans playing the Democrats' game that the "fiscal cliff" is all about taxation?

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    A legacy we dare not leave

    Columnist Eugene Robinson: You might not have noticed that another round of U.N. climate talks is under way. Here in Washington, we're too busy to pay attention to such trifles.Meanwhile, evidence mounts that the legacy we pass along to future generations will be a parboiled planet.

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    Elder lobby should back off on Medicare

    Columnist Froma Harrop: Like the $10,000 handbag that's become a status symbol because it costs so much, America's extravagant medical system has been sold on the notion that the more you pay, the more you get. In health care, that's not necessarily so. In some cases, the opposite is true.

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    In Oval Office, the fly hears all

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: Much speculation has followed the private luncheon between President Obama and Mitt Romney, about which little is known. Alas, where there is a White House, there is always someone willing to whisper a few tidbits in the interest of national curiosity.

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    Pension crisis a threat to state’s future
    A Chicagoland Chamber of Commerce letter to the editor: We know that meaningful change doesn't come easy, but we trust and hope that our leaders in Springfield will be honest and forthright about the current challenge.

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    2 clergy didn’t speak for all Catholics
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: The Nov. 29 headline "Clergy back license law" is, at best, misleading. With all due respect for their admirable vocations, the two clergy who spoke to state lawmakers in favor of granting driver's licenses to illegal immigrants are not "Arlington Heights Catholic leaders."

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    Closing 2 juvenile prisons makes sense
    An Evanston letter to the editor: Like Illinois, states throughout the nation are shifting youth away from incarceration and into community-based treatment with the goal of rehabilitating youth rather than simply punishing them.

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