Daily Archive : Sunday November 4, 2012

News

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    Sen. Mark Kirk smiles and accepts his medal as he comes out of the stairwell on the 103rd floor of the Willis Tower Sunday during Skyrise Chicago, a benefit climb for the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. While he was in inpatient therapy Kirk worked with RIC Physical Therapist Michael Klonowski, right.

    Sen. Kirk climbs 37 flights of stairs in Willis Tower Sunday

    A smiling U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk crossed the threshold of the Willis Tower Skydeck Sunday making an impressive stair climb less than a year after suffering a serious stroke. With a brace on his left leg and little use of his left arm, the Highland Park Republican climbed 37 flights from the 66th floor to the 103rd during the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago's fourth annual urban climb.

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    Firefighters from West Chicago and neighboring departments were on the scene of an extra-alarm blaze that swept through a three-story apartment building Sunday morning. The fire left many residents temporarily homeless, but all escaped unharmed.

    West Chicago apartment fire leaves residents homeless

    Fire swept through a 24-unit West Chicago apartment building Sunday, leaving its residents temporarily homeless and without their belongings, but injuring none. West Chicago firefighters were called to the Timber Lake Apartments at 1212 King Circle about 10:06 a.m. in response to the fire, which broke out in one of several buildings that make up the complex. the fire was most extinguished by...

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    Derek M. Habbley

    Suspect arrested in Huntley High School bomb threat

    A 25-year-old Union man is facing a felony disorderly conduct charge alleging he made a bomb threat Saturday against Huntley High School. Derek M. Habbley, of he 10000 block of Ridge Lane, was arrested in the school’s parking lot by police responding to the threat, which forced the evacuation of the building and several nearby homes.

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    Older than the political volunteers who work the phones with her, 79-year-old Ruth Farnham of Hanover Park can use her husband Willis “Bill” Farham for inspiration. He is a 91-year-old precinct captain known for bringing out the votes in Schaumburg Township.

    A lesson that you're never too old to get out the vote

    Working the phones for her political convictions, 79-year-old Ruth Farnham of Hanover Park is older than most volunteers. But her husband, Willis "Bill" Farnham, is a 91-year-old precinct captain who boasts the highest voter turnout in his township.

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    In these last few days of the campaign, there's a real opportunity for parents to help educate the next generation of voters.

    Talking to kids about elections — without bias

    Election Day is tomorrow, and if you're like me and millions of other Americans, there are two words that describe your feelings: Thank God. Imagine turning on the television without hearing about the 47 percent, moving forward, Question 7, Tim Kaine and George Allen. It's enough to make me giddy. But, in these last few days of the campaign, there's a real opportunity for parents to help educate...

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    President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney are locked in a tight race for the White House.

    Obama and Romney: Where they stand on the issues

    As President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney bring their campaigns down the homestretch, here's a detailed summary of where they stand, and where they differ, on the major issues, from the economy, the debt, foreign policy and a variety of social issues.

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    Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney smiles as he campaigns at the International Exposition Center in Cleveland on Sunday.

    Rivals stress differences and bipartisanship hopes

    Two days from judgment by the voters, President Barack Obama raced through four far-flung battleground states on Sunday while Mitt Romney ventured into traditionally Democratic Pennsylvania, seeking a breakthrough in a close race he mused aloud he might lose.

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    Supporters hold up a sign as they wait for first lady Michelle Obama to speak during a campaign rally for her husband, President Barack Obama, at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio, Saturday. In nearly elction-night scenarios, Ohio plays a pivotal role.

    A look at the most competitive states in the race

    A look at the race between President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney for the 270 electoral votes needed to win the White House. With two days left in the campaign, Obama appears closer to the goal, but Republican Mitt Romney has closed on the Democrat and pulled narrowly ahead in some battleground state polling.

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    Floridians stand in line Sunday, the last day of early voting, in Miami. A judge extended early voting hours in one Florida county Sunday after Democrats sued to allow more time.

    Judge orders Florida county to extend early voting

    A judge extended early voting hours in one Florida county Sunday after Democrats sued to allow more time in a presidential battleground state where more than 4 million ballots have already been cast.

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    Mary Wittenberg, president of the New York Road Runners, reacts after speaking with a family whose house was heavily damaged during Superstorm Sandy in the Staten Island borough New York ON Sunday.

    NY marathon canceled? Tell that to the runners

    Their race was called off, but marathoners were still on the move in New York on Sunday. Hundreds of runners wearing marathon shirts and backpacks full of supplies took the ferry to hard-hit Staten Island and ran to stricken neighborhoods to help.

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    Volunteers carry donated goods into the Belmar recreation center Sunday in Belmar, N.J. After being battered by Monday’s storm surge by Superstorm Sandy much of the region is still without power and many homes have been damaged.

    Cold weather and new storm add to victims’ misery

    Shivering victims of Superstorm Sandy went to church Sunday to pray for deliverance as cold weather settling in across the New York metropolitan region — and another powerful storm forecast for the middle of the week — added to their misfortunes and deepened the gloom.

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    Two men stabbed in Batavia

    Batavia police are speaking to a person of interest connected with a stabbing that happened early Sunday morning, but no charges had been filed as of Sunday night, police said.

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    Arlington Heights Library book drive through Dec. 1

    The Arlington Heights Memorial Library is having a holiday book drive through Dec. 1. The library is collecting new books for children from infancy to age 16 for Wheeling Township’s holiday Adopt-a-Family program.

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    Bahraini anti-government protesters hold pictures of top Shiite cleric Sheik Issa Qassim during a march in Duraz, Bahrain, Friday that demonstrators said was held out of concern Qassim would be arrested. Demonstrations were held in several villages nationwide Friday, challenging a new government ban on protests.

    Gulf squeeze on dissent raises alarm with allies

    The Gulf has been the slow burn of the Arab uprisings.The fraternity of rulers in the oil-rich region has remained intact with tactics ranging from withering force in Bahrain to arrests of perceived dissenters in the United Arab Emirates. And it’s been done without too much serious blowback from their Western allies.

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    Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas has publicly suggesting his people would have to relinquish claims to ancestral homes in Israel.

    Palestinian leader violates taboo on refugees

    The Palestinian president has set off a strident debate by shattering a once-inviolable taboo, publicly suggesting his people would have to relinquish claims to ancestral homes in Israel.

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    Syrian regime opponent Abdel Baset Seda, center, speaks with other participants during the meeting of the General Assembly of the Syrian National Council in Doha, Qatar, Sunday.

    Divisions emerge at Syria opposition conference

    Sharp disagreements arose Sunday on the first day of a Syrian opposition conference meant to forge a more cohesive leadership that the international community says is necessary before it will boost its support for those trying to overthrow President Bashar Assad.

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    Jeremiah Wrath, 17 of Hanover Park

    3 charged with armed robbery in Hanover Park

    Three Hanover Park men, including two brothers, were charged on Saturday with felony counts of armed robbery and residential burglary for a holdup and home break-in that occurred in late October, police said.

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    Spectators watch as a pumpkin flies through the air during the annual Pumpkin Drop hosted Sunday by the Mundelein Park & Recreation District at Keith Mione Community Park. Families and children brought their Halloween pumpkins and rolled them, smashed them and launched them using the Big Red trebuchet designed by Mundelein High School students.

    Smashing (and launching) pumpkins in Mundelein

    Mundelein’s annual pumpkin drop combines physics with environmentalism. It also offers children the pure pleasure of beating a pumpkin to a pulp with a baseball bat and the thrill of seeing pumpkins catapulted down a sled hill.

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    ASSOCIATED PRESS Penn State’s Matthew McGloin celebrates with fans after Penn State defeated Purdue, 34-9, Saturday in West Lafayette, Ind. The football team has faced unprecedented penalties in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky scandal.

    Penn State looks ahead but scandal fallout lingers

    A year after retired Penn State assistant coach Jerry Sandusky’s arrest on child sex abuse charges, the fallout from one of the worst scandals ever in higher education promises to linger still for months, if not years, to come.

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    Daniel Chang, 22 of Naperville, was arrested on weapons charges by Champaign police early Sunday morning.

    Naperville man arrested for firing gun in Champaign

    A Naperville man was arrested in Champaign early Sunday morning on allegations he fired a gun during an intoxicated fight with his roommate, leading to their apartment building being evacuated and a SWAT team response. Daniel J. Chang, 22, of 1416 Stonegate Road in Naperville, faces charges of unlawful use of a weapon and aggravated discharge of a firearm, police said.

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    One thing nearly every campaign isn’t short on is promises. Just keeping track of them becomes a logistical nightmare — let alone the candidate ever following through on them all.

    Hours to go, so many promises to keep

    Mitt Romney has a ton of promises to keep if he becomes president, and that’s on his first day alone, never mind the other 1,460 days. Barack Obama was similarly brimming with will-do’s in his first presidential campaign, racking them up by the hundreds, big and small.

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    Prosecutors ready to investigate claims, if necessary

    If you plan to go to the polls Tuesday, the Kane County State’s Attorney’s Office will be staffing a hotline for people to report voter fraud and other violations of electioneering. The complaint hotline at (630) 208-5328 will be staffed from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. and it is for voters who might see or experience voting problems or irregularities at any of the county’s 228 precincts.

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    Get crafty in Island Lake

    The Island Lake Parks and Recreation Department will host its 25th Annual Holiday Arts and Craft Faire on Nov. 17-18 at village hall, 3720 Greenleaf Ave.

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    Waukegan Turkey Trot this Saturday

    Join the Waukegan Park District on Saturday, Nov. 10 at Belvidere Park for the annual Turkey Trot.

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    Town meeting on Vernon Hills YMCA

    The Vernon Hills Park District will host a town-hall meeting from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 6 at the Central Lake YMCA, 700 Lakeview Parkway, Vernon Hills.

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    Lake County dietitian honored

    The University of Illinois Extension Lake County Unit has awarded Toby Smithson, the Lake County Health Department’s community dietitian, with the Hall of Fame award for community partnership in food and nutrition education.

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    D50 student play starts Thursday

    Woodland Elementary District 50’s Intermediate School will present its fall production of “Keeper of the Tales: Stories from 1,001 Arabian Nights” at 7 p.m., Nov. 8 and 9 at the school, 1115 N. Hunt Club Road, Gurnee.

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    Roxanne Boothe stands outside the Sam Burt Houses, where she is president of the tenants association, and shouts that “we have hot food” to alert residents of a donation of food on Saturday in Coney Island, N.Y. The complex, which has been without power since Monday, flooded during superstorm Sandy. “We have no heat, no water, no electricity, it’s dark in the whole building,” said Boothe.

    Falling temps add urgency to superstorm recovery

    Falling temperatures on Sunday put more people at risk in a region already battling gasoline shortages, stubborn power outages and spasms of lawlessness in the wake of Superstorm Sandy. With temperatures in the 30s and more than 700,000 people still without power in the area, some who were planning to run in the canceled New York City Marathon instead headed to Staten Island on Sunday morning to...

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    Storm-weary gamblers reappear as Atlantic City casinos reopen

    Todd Parker sat at one of only two roulette tables open in the almost-empty Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa in Atlantic City, putting Hurricane Sandy out of his mind as he tried to add to his three stacks of dollar chips. “I want to get enough to build a big wall and a moat I can hide behind,” said Parker. Since the storm hit, he had been stuck at home with intermittent electricity. When he heard that...

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    Thomas Buell, 55, still wears the fisherman’s waders that he and four other men wore when they ferried women, children and older people to safety in kayaks as a fire threatened their homes at the height of Superstorm Sandy. The Belle Harbor, Queens, residents took it upon themselves to evacuate as the fire that destroyed 14 homes on their street moved their way, sending burning embers and smoke toward their houses.

    Tragedies can’t break heroic NY community’s spirit

    Tragedy has too often visited one Queens community, but residents drew a line in the sand with Superstorm Sandy, rallying with a surfboard and kayaks at the storm’s peak to rescue themselves as a fire engulfed 14 homes and flaming embers came at them like a torch.

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    Eileen James wears layered clothing and stays close to the windows in the daytime to try and stay warm in Farmingdale, N.Y. The 78-year-old retired secretary is one of thousands of elderly people coping with no electricity or heat in the wake of Superstorm Sandy.

    Elderly face challenges coping with Sandy’s impact

    Eileen James sits by the window when the sun is out, wears gloves to bed and hasn’t had a hot meal in a week. Like many elderly people in the New York area coping with no electricity or heat in their homes in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy, the 78-year-old retired secretary confesses she’s “starting to get less and less patient."

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    NY marathoners run to help in storm-ravaged Staten Island

    Jordan Metzl thought he’d be running in his 30th marathon today. Instead, the sports medicine doctor will jog through the streets of storm-ravaged Staten Island to deliver relief goods from his backpack. “Our first reaction was it’s a shame and then we wondered what can we start to do to help,” said Metzl, a physician at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York. “Let’s run into Staten Island.”

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    Incumbent Republican Chris Kachiroubas, left, opposes Democrat challenger Ralph Scalise in the DuPage County Circuit Court Clerk race Tuesday.

    Circuit Clerk candidates differ over management styles

    Two candidates for DuPage County Circuit Clerk have different philosophies about how the office should be managed. Two-time incumbent Chris Kachiroubas says he has reduced costs and increased efficiency. Challenger Ralph Scalise says the office is "top-heavy" and relies on outsourcing for savings.

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    Police seek gunman who wounded 7 at Savannah fair

    Police in Georgia are hunting for at least one gunman who opened fire and wounded seven people overnight at a crowded fair in Savannah. Savannah-Chatham County police spokesman Julian Miller said Sunday that nobody was killed in the shooting at the Coastal Empire Fair late Saturday. But seven people were taken to area hospitals with gunshot wounds.

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    Vicki Williams, 47, of Mechanicsville, Va., poses for a photo. On the cusp of the 2012 elections, The Associated Press interviewed dozens of Americans to try to gauge the economic mood of the nation. People were asked about jobs, housing, gas prices, retirement and other issues. Among them was Vicki Williams, whose view of the economy has brightened, but she worries that the nation has drifted away from a political culture that once seemed more inclined to help the needy.

    Mood of the Nation: Worrying how others are faring

    On the cusp of the 2012 elections, The Associated Press interviewed dozens of Americans to try to gauge the economic mood of the nation. People were asked about jobs, housing, gas prices, retirement and other issues. Among them was Vicki Williams, whose view of the economy has brightened, but she worries that the nation has drifted away from a political culture that once seemed more inclined to...

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    Republican Rep. Bob Dold, of Kenilworth, opposes Deerfield Democrat Brad Schneider in the 10th Congressional District.

    Suburban congressional races play big in national picture

    With a congressional map drawn by Illinois' Democrats, the suburbs have become the battlegrounds between Republicans and Democrats fighting for control of the U.S. House. With just days until the election, here's a rundown of those contests between Peter Roskam and Leslie Coolidge; Joe Walsh and Tammy Duckworth; Jan Schakowsky and Timothy Wolfe; Robert Dold and Brad Schneider; Judy Biggert and...

Sports

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    Bears wide receiver Brandon Marshall catches a 13-yard touchdown pass as he is defended by Tennessee Titans cornerback Coty Sensabaugh (24) and safety Michael Griffin (33) in the first quarter Sunday.

    Bears in complete control in rout

    A central theme this week was starting fast. But not everyone got the memo. Defense and special teams obviously were in the loop, producing 2 of the Bears’ first 3 touchdowns in a 28-point first quarter. In their first seven games, the Bears had scored just 30 points in the first quarter. The offense was a bit late to the party, but it raged late and helped pile it on in a 51-20 blowout victory over the 3-5 Tennessee Titans.

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    A big day for DuPage County runners

    It was if the eight DuPage County teams turned the Class 3A girls cross county meet into an extended block party. Glenbard West junior Madeline Perez made history, only to have Naperville North steal the show with its depth and balance.

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    Bulls guard Marco Belinelli, seen here Friday against Cleveland, scored 13 points in Saturday’s loss to New Orleans.

    Belinelli feeling more at home with Bulls

    After a miserable preseason, Bulls shooting guard Marco Belinelli is starting to contribute. He scored 13 points in Saturday’s loss to New Orleans and is averaging 9 points hrough three regular season games.

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    Chicago Bears defensive end Corey Wootton (98) scores a touchdown after he recovered a blocked punt as Tennessee Titans punter Brett Kern, center, and safety Al Afalava (38) try to bring him down in the first quarter of an NFL football game Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, in Nashville, Tenn.

    Northwestern connection gets ball rolling for Bears

    Northwestern products Sherrick McManis and Corey Wootton combined on the blocked punt that resulted in the Bears’ first touchdown vs. the Titans.

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    Charles Tillman, left, and Chris Conte break up a pass in the end zone intended for Titans wide receiver Kenny Britt in the second quarter Sunday.

    Tillman’s amazing season continues

    It took just one play Sunday for Charles Tillman to demonstrate yet again that he has no equal when it comes to separating opponents from the football. After Matt Hasselbeck’s 18-yard completion Kenny Britt, Tillman punched the ball loose from behind. “It kind of set the tone for our football team right away,” Bears coach Lovie Smith said after the 51-20 rout.

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    Bears quarterback Jay Cutler, left, and linebacker Brian Urlacher had plenty to celebrate during Sunday’s rout of the Titans.

    Bears won’t need to remember these Titans

    The Bears’ formula for winning with defense and turnovers is so strong that the fight isn’t even fair. That was certainly the case again Sunday in Tennessee.

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    Checkers top Wolves 4-1

    The Chicago Wolves saw a 1-1 tie turn into a 4-1 loss after surrendering 3 goals in a 7:26 span to the Charlotte Checkers on Sunday at Time Warner Cable Arena. Left wing Brett Sterling scored the only goal for the Wolves, playing their second contest of a five-game road trip.

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    Next up for coach Lovie Smith and the Bears (7-1): the Houston Texas (7-1) at home and the San Francisco 49ers (6-2) on the road.

    The real fun begins now for Bears

    The patsy toss is over and it's time now for the Bears to prove against better competition that they're as formidable as their 7-1 record.

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    Chicago Bears middle linebacker Brian Urlacher celebrates with Julius Peppers and Tim Jennings after Urlacher returned an interception for a touchdown against the Tennessee Titans in the first quarter of an NFL football game on Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, in Nashville, Tenn.

    Images: Bears vs. Titans
    The Chicago Bears traveled to Nashville to face the Tennessee Titans on Sunday, November 4th.The Bears overwhelmed the Titans 51-20.

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    Runners who were planning to participate in the New York City Marathon run through Central Park in Manhattan in an alternative marathon Sunday in New York.

    NYC marathon canceled? Tell that to the runners

    Their race was called off, but marathoners were still on the move in New York on Sunday. Hundreds of runners wearing marathon shirts and backpacks full of supplies took the ferry to hard-hit Staten Island and ran to stricken neighborhoods to help. Thousands of others poured into Central Park to put in 26.2 miles after the last-minute cancellation of the world’s largest marathon because of Superstorm Sandy.

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    Green Bay Packers tight end Tom Crabtree pulls a pass in for a 72-yard touchdown in front of Arizona Cardinals linebacker Paris Lenon during the second half Sunday in Green Bay, Wis.

    Crabtree’s 72-yard TD leads Packers to 31-17 win

    Tom Crabtree’s slow-motion chug up the field was fast enough to beat out two Arizona Cardinals defenders. Crabtree tumbled into the end zone just ahead of Paris Lenon and William Gay for a 72-yard touchdown that was Green Bay’s longest of the season, and sealed the Packers’ 31-17 victory over the Cardinals. Randall Cobb added two TD receptions for the Packers, who handed Arizona its fifth straight loss after the Cardinals began the season 4-0.

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    Houston Texans linebacker Whitney Mercilus hits Buffalo Bills quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick, left, causing a fumble in the fourth quarter Sunday in Houston.

    Texans dominate Bills 21-9

    The Houston Texans are doing quite well without Mario Williams. Matt Schaub threw two touchdown passes, Arian Foster ran for 111 yards against Buffalo’s NFL-worst rush defense and the Texans beat the Bills and their former No. 1 draft pick 21-9 on Sunday.

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    Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck celebrates as he leaves the field Sunday after a win against the Miami Dolphins in Indianapolis.

    Colts follow Luck’s lead past Miami 23-20

    Andrew Luck and Ryan Tannehill put on a memorable show for Chuck Pagano on Sunday. The rookie quarterbacks traded jab for jab, hook for hook and TD pass for TD pass. When the duel finally ended, it was Luck who had the records — and another win for his ailing coach. Luck threw for 433 yards and two TD passes, breaking Cam Newton’s single-game passing record (422 yards) for a rookie as he led the Colts to a 23-20 victory over Miami.

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    Bears wide receiver Brandon Marshallcatches a 39-yard touchdown pass ahead of Tennessee Titans cornerback Jason McCourty in the fourth quarter Sunday in Nashville, Tenn. The Bears beat the Titans 51-20.

    Bears force 5 turnovers, rout Titans 51-20

    Charles Tillman forced four fumbles. Brian Urlacher scored on a 46-yard interception return. Plus, the Chicago Bears turned a blocked punt into a touchdown. Even when they don’t start with the ball, these Bears are exceptionally dangerous. Jay Cutler threw three TD passes to Brandon Marshall just for good measure as the Bears routed the Tennessee Titans 51-20 on Sunday for their sixth straight win.

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    Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning passes under pressure from Cincinnati Bengals defensive tackle Geno Atkins in the second half Sunday in Cincinnati.

    Manning’s 3 TDs rally Broncos over Bengals 31-23

    Another fourth-quarter comeback kept Peyton Manning perfect against Cincinnati. Manning overcame his two interceptions by throwing for three touchdown passes on Sunday, leading the Denver Broncos to a 31-23 victory over a Cincinnati Bengals team that can’t find a way to top him.

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    Baltimore Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco passes against the Cleveland Browns in the fourth quarter Sunday in Cleveland.

    Flacco’s TD pass leads Ravens over Browns 25-15

    Somehow, some way, Joe Flacco always finds a way to beat the Browns. Flacco threw a 19-yard touchdown pass to Torrey Smith with 4:26 left as the Baltimore Ravens won their 11th straight game inside the AFC North with a 25-15 comeback win over Cleveland on Sunday.

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    Carolina Panthers quarterback Cam Newton celebrates after his touchdown during the second half against the Washington Redskins on Sunday in Landover, Md.

    Panthers break 5-game skid, top Redskins 21-13

    His abilities as a leader in question and his team in desperate need of positive morale — not to mention a win — Cam Newton got the better of the first NFL matchup between the last two Heisman Trophy winners Sunday as the Carolina Panthers broke a five-game losing streak, beating the penalty-prone Washington Redskins 21-13.

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    Detroit Lions running back Mikel Leshoure (25) gets a pat on the helmet from tight end Will Heller after scoring a touchdown against the Jacksonville Jaguars during the first half Sunday in Jacksonville, Fla.

    Lions rout Jaguars 31-14 behind Leshoure’s 3 TDs

    Mikel Leshoure ran for three touchdowns, Calvin Johnson got involved early and the Lions turned in their most complete victory of the season, 31-14 over the Jacksonville Jaguars on Sunday. Detroit dominated from start to finish, building a three-score lead before halftime and coasting after the break.

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    Kentucky head coach Joker Phillips walks off the field after his team’s 40-0 loss to Vanderbilt on Saturday at Commonwealth Stadium in Lexington, Ky. Phillips was fired Sunday.

    Kentucky fires football coach Joker Phillips

    Kentucky football coach Joker Phillips has been saying lately in response to questions about his future that if he was going to be fired someone would have said something to him by now. The official word came on Sunday.

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    Alabama running back T.J. Yeldon scores the game winning touchdown past LSU defensive end Barkevious Mingo Saturday in the fourth quarter in Baton Rouge, La. Alabama won 21-17.

    Yeldon TD leads No. 1 Alabama past LSU 21-17

    With Alabama’s hopes of a second straight national title slipping away, A.J. McCarron shook off a dismal second half and guided the Crimson Tide right down the field. Talk about a Saturday night stunner in Death Valley. McCarron read an LSU blitz and flipped a screen pass to T.J. Yeldon, who did the rest on a 28-yard touchdown with 51 seconds remaining that gave the top-ranked Crimson Tide a 21-17 victory over No. 5 LSU.

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    Kansas State quarterback Collin Klein runs for a first down Saturday during the first half against Oklahoma State in Manhattan, Kan.

    Klein hurt while leading No. 3 K-State to win

    Third-ranked Kansas State’s perfect season remained intact Saturday night. So did its national title hopes. The future of both may be in jeopardy, though, after Heisman Trophy front-runner Collin Klein left in the third quarter of a 44-30 victory very Oklahoma State with an undisclosed injury.

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    Oregon running back De’Anthony Thomas is tackled by Southern California safety Drew McAllister Saturday during the first half in Los Angeles. Oregon won 62-51.

    Barner, No. 2 Oregon beat No. 18 USC 62-51

    Kenjon Barner knew it was his last chance to play back home in Southern California with dozens of friends and family members in the Coliseum stands, all of them waiting for something special. The Oregon tailback had a little something for them, all right — and with plenty of help he kept the No. 2 Ducks on track in the national title race.

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    Harte, Montini boot Sycamore

    It’s nice being able to turn to one of the best kickers in the state with the game on the line. What wasn’t so nice was for Sycamore to have to lose yet again to Montini Catholic in the state playoffs despite playing some great football. The 9-2 Broncos pulled out Saturday’s thrilling second-round Class 5A contest 24-22 after senior kicker Andrew Harte drilled a game-winning 34-yard field that sailed through the uprights with 1.1 seconds left on the clock.

Business

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    ASSOCIATED PRESS A United Airlines 787 Dreamliner receives a ceremonial wash as it arrives at O’Hare international Airport in Chicago Sunday from Houston after making United’s inaugural 787 revenue flight. The aircraft is touted to be much more fuel efficient than any other similar plane and has a host of passenger amenities, such as larger windows, special lighting and filtered air.

    United’s first Dreamliner touches down in Chicago

    United Airlines’ inaugural flight of Boeing’s 787 Dreamliner has touched down at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport. United is the first U.S. airline to get Boeing’s newest plane. United CEO Jeff Smisek was on Sunday’s flight from Houston to Chicago and called the 787 the “world’s leading airplane.”

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    Apparel worker Misti Keeton sews military apparel in Fayette, Ala., last month. Her employer, American Power Source, is laying off about 50 workers at her plant and another one in Columbus, Miss., after losing a contract to make Air Force exercise garb to Unicor.

    Prison factories caught in private biz debate

    On the outside, Unicor, with its big oaks and magnolia trees, looks like it could be part of a landscaped industrial park. Step a little closer and it’s clear the apparel shop lies in the middle of a medium-security federal prison in east Alabama.

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    Workers inspect a transformer box at a substation on Harrison and 2nd Street as surrounding neighborhoods remain without power due to damage caused by Superstorm Sandy on Sundayin Hoboken, N.J. Hiring in the long-depressed U.S. construction industry will likely get a boost from the rebuilding that will follow Superstorm Sandy.

    Post-storm construction hiring may aid US economy

    Hiring in the long-depressed U.S. construction industry will get a boost from the rebuilding that will follow Superstorm Sandy. Those jobs, in turn, could raise economic growth, analysts say.

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    Ross Napoli, left, and Rob Balletto fill gas canisters at a Hess station in the New Dorp section of the Staten Island borough of New York for use in their cars Saturday. They had waited in line for about 40 minutes. The line for cars at the station was much longer, with drivers waiting for up to two hours.

    Gas declines to $3.54 a gallon in latest survey

    The average price for regular gasoline at U.S. pumps fell 20.75 cents in the past two weeks to $3.5454 a gallon even as Hurricane Sandy shut refineries and terminals in the Northeast, according to Lundberg Survey.

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    The 2013 Toyota Prius c is seen during its debut at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit last winter. Toyota is pushing to broaden the popular hybrid car’s appeal.

    Toyota mulls new Prius with record sales nearing 700,000

    Toyota Motor Corp., closing in on record global sales of Prius models, is studying whether to keep the hybrid line’s aerodynamic wedge-shape as the automaker designs a next-generation car to boost demand.

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    A staff member of Apple Inc. hands a iPad Mini to a customer in Hong Kong. Apple Inc. paid a rate of only 1.9 percent income tax on its earnings outside the U.S. in its latest fiscal year, a regulatory filing by the company shows.

    Apple paid only 1.9 pct tax on earnings outside US

    Apple Inc. paid an income tax rate of only 1.9 percent on its earnings outside the U.S. in its latest fiscal year, a regulatory filing by the company shows.

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    Unemployed educated Indian women stand in queues to register themselves at the Employment Exchange Office in Allahabad, India. India, with the world’s largest chunk of illiterates at over 250 million, has to invest heavily in education and skills training, said Ashish Bose, a leading demographer. While millions of jobseekers have impressive sounding diplomas, many don’t have the skills promised by those certificates from colleges and technical institutes with poor standards.

    Population bulge tests India’s growth aspirations

    Millions of young Indians make up a population bulge that experts say will see India hit 1.6 billion people in less than 20 years, overtaking China as the world's most populated country. Over the next three to four decades India will become remarkably young, with more than half its population under 25.

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    Work advice: When should a worker drop the d-bomb?

    Karla L. Miller writes an advice column on navigating the modern workplace. Each week she will answer one or two questions from readers. This week's is about equal pay.

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    Career coach: Collaboration among competitors can be useful

    It's amazing to hear specifics on what schools are doing to help executive MBA students through career services, tailored content or leadership skills training, among other things. What's even more remarkable is that people genuinely share details about their programs in an effort to help other schools improve their programs.

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    Truck driver Earliest Madir inspects his truck while waiting for a load at a truck stop Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Atlanta. Even amid a struggling economy with high unemployment, trucking companies had a tough time hiring young drivers willing to hit the road for long hauls. Now the U.S. is speeding toward a critical shortage of truck drivers in the next few years as the economy recovers and demand for goods increases, an expert in the inner-workings of supply chains said in a report Tuesday.

    Truck driver jobs hard to fill even in bad economy

    Tribe Transportation is a growing company that just added 10 new trucks to its tractor-trailer fleet. The problem has been hiring people to drive them. So far the Georgia-based company has filled four of the jobs, leaving six vacancies. "It blows my mind that I'm looking for that many people and I can't find them," said an official from the company.

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    Chief Executive Officer of Solvay Jean Pierre Clamadieu, right, GDF Suez Chief Executive, Gerard Mestrallet, left, and Chief Executive of Imerys Gilles Michel, react with media after their meeting with French Prime Minister Jean Marc Ayrault, unseen, in the Matignon Palace in Paris Monday. The French government is hoping that gradual change is the way to go, and that a series of private meetings and cautious public statements in recent days will mollify both fearful workers and employers who say it's no longer worth the cost to hire. That failed to keep unemployment from rising, or some of France's biggest corporations from announcing thousands more layoffs, including carmaker Peugeot Citroen, Air France and retail giant Carrefour.

    Layoffs, perks, labor costs trap French government

    The 35-hour work week? Untouchable. The social safety net? Untrimmable. So how on earth can France's Socialist government keep its promise to make this country, and Europe, more competitive in the global marketplace? Slowly and carefully, according to President Francois Hollande.

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    In this Oct. 19, 2012, photo, electric wires are see outside Ray and Candice Arvin’s home in Charlotte, N.C. Romney supporter, Ray Arvin used to own a small business with five employees, selling equipment to power companies, but he went out of business in 2009. Polls consistently find that the economy is the top concern of voters, and Romney tends to get an edge over Obama when people are asked who might do better with it. Whether that truly drives how Americans vote is a crucial question for Election Day.

    An uneasy economy, and those living through it

    Across the country, reporters asked people to talk about their livelihoods before and after the December 2007-June 2009 recession and how those experiences have shaped their politics in the presidential election. Their answers help illuminate why the race is so close. "Americans have got to start taking full responsibility for our messes," one voter says. "We vote in ineffective politicians, we tolerate second-rate educational systems, we envy those who have worked to have more and resent those who burden our social services because they have great needs."

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    Jody Baugh lost his welding job in fall 2008 when his recreational vehicle factory in Wakarusa, Ind., closed, a casualty of the recession. He now makes modular homes and likes his job and company, but worries about gas prices, health care costs and more generally, the future.

    Economy better off 4 years later? A mixed bag of answers

    "Are you better off than you were four years ago?" Ronald Reagan asked in 1980 at the end of a televised debate. The answer was his landslide win. Since then, the question has become a cudgel for political challengers, a survey question for pollsters and a barometer for the mood of the country. Campaign 2012 is no exception.

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    Raymond Simpson, Jr., front, with Atlantic City’s Department of Public Works, looks out over debris Thursday from superstorm Sandy in Atlantic City, N.J. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses.

    After Sandy: Tips on filing home insurance claims

    Insurers will be dealing with a crush of claims in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy which inflicted billions of dollars in damages. Once homeowners can assess the extent of their personal losses, many will have to brace for another ordeal: navigating the insurance claims process. Preparation and planning well before a storm arrives can help homeowners avoid potential pitfalls. But how they handle the details when it comes time to file can help ensure receiving an adequate payout. Here are six tips to weather the claims process.

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    This July 3, 2011, photo released by Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO), taken through a window of a fork lift, shows iron sheets which protect workers from radiation on the ground floor of the Unit 3 reactor building at the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma town, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan. The operator of a Japanese nuclear plant that went into a tsunami-triggered meltdown knew the risks from highly radioactive water at the site but sent in crews without adequate protection or warnings, a worker said in a legal complaint filed Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2012. Asked about the allegations, a TEPCO spokesman said the plant was aware of water leaks elsewhere but couldn’t anticipate the water problem in Unit 3’s basement.

    Worker: Japan nuke crisis crew not told of danger

    The operator of a Japanese nuclear plant that went into a tsunami-triggered meltdown knew the risks from highly radioactive water at the site but sent in crews without adequate protection or warnings, a worker said in a legal complaint.The actions by Tokyo Electric Power Co. led to radiation injuries, said the contract worker, who was with a six-member team working at the crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi plant's Unit 3 reactor in the early days of last year's crisis.

Life & Entertainment

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    Ralph the villainous destructor (John C. Reilly) offers up some fruity concessions in Walt Disney's 3-D animated comedy "Wreck-It Ralph."

    ‘Ralph’ and his video game friends top box office

    The weekend box office was not only undeterred by the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy, it was buoyed, as Disney’s “Wreck it Ralph” opened strongly with $49.1 million. The animated family film was aided by the large number of East Coast children out of school on Friday and families looking for matinee diversion. It’s the largest box-office opening ever for a Disney Animations release.

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    George Lucas looks to move on from his “Star Wars” legacy to pursue other “personal films.”

    Lucas plans ‘little personal films’

    George Lucas is done with “Star Wars,” but not with filmmaking. The “Star Wars” creator says he’s looking forward to making his “own little personal films” that he doubts will be for the theater crowd.

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    The labyrinthine Egyptian oasis of Siwa, with the famous Roman-era necropolis known as the Mountain of the Dead in the background, is roughly 450 miles southwest of Cairo.

    Adventurous travelers enjoy dune surfing at Egyptian oasis

    Siwa, a Berber town of some 27,000 people roughly 450 miles southwest of Cairo, was largely inaccessible to the outside world until the 1980s, when the road that leads to the closest city of Marsa Matrouh was paved, putting it on the tourist map. It's an admittedly daunting trip, but the reward for making the trek is a glimpse of what paradise might look like.

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    Cyclists, if you're wearing headphones, you're asking for trouble.

    Biking with headphones is foolish

    As opposed to texting while driving, listening to music while you pedal isn't so transparently stupid that it invites universal condemnation. A sensible-seeming, spandex-swaddled fellow might tell you that hearing isn't all that important when you're on a bike — and besides, a headphoned rider can hear a lot better than a dude blasting his car stereo. But, really, isn't this just common sense?

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    Two students see how manufacturing works and parts are joined together to create a new shape in the new exhibit How People Make Things at the DuPage Children's Museum.

    Kids learn How People Make Things at DuPage Children's Museum

    For nearly 40 years, "Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood" took young viewers on factory tours, showing them the origins of objects they used everyday like crayons. Those videos are the centerpiece of the new traveling exhibit How People Make Things at the DuPage Children's Museum. “With this exhibit the children will not only see the process of manufacturing, they are making things with their own hands,” said Bri Bromberek, the museum marketing manager.

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    Dan Rollman, co-founder of a movement called the Sabbath Manifesto, walks his bicycle on Canal Street in New York. The Manifesto is a call to unplug one day a week to find solitude or to simply take a day of rest with family and friends.

    Can true solitude be found in a wired world?

    When was the last time you were alone, and unwired? Really, truly by yourself. Just you and your thoughts — no cellphone, no tablet, no laptop. Many of us crave that kind of solitude, though in an increasingly wired world, it's a rare commodity. "What might have felt like an obligation at first has become an addiction. It's almost as if we don't know how to be alone, or we are afraid of what we'll find when we are alone with ourselves," says a tech and communication consultant.

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    This Saturday, Oct. 27, 2012, photo provided by Natural Balance and Thedogphotographer.com shows the bulldog, Tillman, being inducted as an honorary Marine, on stage at Sky Ball in the American Airlines Hangar at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, in Dallas.

    New national monument honors military service dogs

    The first national monument to pay tribute to military dogs will be unveiled in California in just two months. It depicts the modern military handler and four dogs — a Doberman, German shepherd, Labrador retriever and Belgian Malinois, all breeds used in wars. The silicon bronze handler stands more than 9 feet tall and weighs 1,500 pounds. Each dog is about 5 feet tall and weighs 550 pounds.

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    This glass, metal and exposed wire chandelier complements the rectangular shape of the custom dining room table.

    Chandelier can add sophistication or whimsy to a home

    Some interior designers tout paint as the best way to change the look of a room. With the holidays approaching, a new chandelier could be a fun and affordable way to make over the dining room.

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    What to do about a noisy bathroom vent fan

    Q. Our bathroom vent fan has been getting noisier for years, so I want to install a new quiet one. How can I tell which are most quiet? Is it more energy efficient to run the vent fan or open the window?

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    Don’t let transition tag rule your relationship

    Q. Two years ago my husband died of cancer. I am ready to date again, but the man I'm seeing is terrified because he believes he is my transition guy. In his mind, transition guy can never be long-term guy.

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    Roof membrane: too much of a good thing?

    Q. I am a homeowner with good do-it-yourself skills. I followed the advice of two local contractors (one a building inspector) and covered my entire roof with Grace Ice & Water Shield before applying Owens Corning shingles. Now I am told that the roof will not be able to breathe and that this situation will create mildew, rot and all forms of homeowner disasters.

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    Short sales usually close without lender making repairs

    Q. We made an offer on a short sale. The furnace needs repair, and we asked the bank for a credit. The bank said it would not offer any money toward repairs; We had to take the property as it was or walk away from the deal.

  •  

    Make sure biodiesel won’t void warranty

    Q. Im looking at a new vehicle and like the idea of a diesel SUV. However, I've heard talk that Illinois diesel-fuel blends have caused many manufacturers to say they will void warranties if it's used.

  •  
    Lino Tagliapietra’s “Fenice,” represented by the Schantz Galleries, is one of the objects featured in the SOFA Chicago 2012 at Navy Pier.

    Sunday picks: Be inspired at SOFA Chicago 2012

    Head down to Navy Pier for the last day of the international art fair SOFA CHICAGO 2012, which offers masterworks of contemporary and modern art for sale. Miniature fans won't want to miss the Toy Soldier Show at Cantigny Park in Wheaton. Who makes Palatine's best pizza? Decide for yourself Sunday at the annual pizza showdown at Durty Nellie's.

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    Be thankful for Thanksgiving travel options

    When the children were young, we headed across the pond each Thanksgiving. Because Europeans aren't particularly interested in what our pilgrims did, flights and hotels are often discounted. But if I were on my own — like my neighbors, I would head for a spa.

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    See ancient art of the Mediterranean including this cameo portraying Emperor Claudius as the God Jupiter at the Art Institute of Chicago's Of Gods and Glamour exhibit.

    On the road: Fresh look for Art Institute's ancient art

    Art from the ancient Mediterranean will be on display at the Art Institute of Chicago in the new Mary and Michael Jaharis Galleries of Greek, Roman and Byzantine Art. Also, Branson, Mo., is ready to ring in the holiday season with a variety of special shows and its Festival of Lights.

  •  
    Any collector interested in German porcelain, or horse and hunting pieces, would be interested in this garniture set.

    Porcelain garniture set hails from Germany

    Q. These three pieces have been in my garage for years. The set consists of two candelabra and a large bowl supported by a column. They were originally in my in-laws’ house in the late 1940s or early ’50s.

  •  
    Quality accessories that match and complement your plumbing fixtures can be the finishing touch that puts your bathroom over the top.

    Don’t skimp on new bathroom accessories

    Q. I'm doing a total remodel job of my master bathroom, complete with new plumbing fixtures. If you can give me a word of advice on what not to forget or overlook, what would that be?

  •  
    This richly dressed bed is exploding with wonderful patterns. With a mix of tartan plaid, paisley, toile and floral fabric, it looks divine.

    Snuggle with sensational winter bedding

    One of my favorite rites of fall is to watch the leaves on the trees around my home turn amber, persimmon and ruby. Another is to see bedding ensembles transformed from summer into wintry works of art.

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    In their kitchen renovation, the Warsaws’ carpenter replaced the doors of their cabinets with more contemporary designs in white oak veneer.

    Renovating a home without demolishing your budget

    Kitchen and bathroom renovations top the list of improvements for increasing the value of a home. But this labor-intensive remodeling can get expensive. However, budget-minded homeowners are finding cheaper solutions in the $10,000 to $20,000 range.

  •  
    Monty Python alumnus Terry Jones is among those featured in the 3-D animated film “A Liar’s Autobiography: The Untrue Story of Monty Python’s Graham Chapman.” Jones was on hand for the film’s premiere at the 2012 Toronto Film Festival. Jones thinks Chapman would have loved the cryptic mishmash of observations, self-analysis, bizarre asides, flights of fancy and revisionist personal history that make up the film.

    Film tells the ‘Untrue Story’ of late Python member

    Some call Graham Chapman the forgotten Python. Some call him the enigmatic one. John Cleese calls him the dead one. Don't expect the animated film "A Liar's Autobiography: The Untrue Story of Monty Python's Graham Chapman" to sort out his place in the British comedy troupe. The film doesn't reveal much that Python fans don't already know about the facts of his life.

  •  
    In this April 16, 2005, file photo, tables and chairs line the Sistine Chapel at the Vatican in preparation for the conclave. Five centuries after Michelangelo’s ceiling frescoes were inaugurated at the Sistine Chapel, at least 10,000 people visit the site each day, raising concerns about temperature, dust and humidity affecting the famed art. But a Vatican Museums official said in the Vatican newspaper Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012 that there are no plans to try to limit tourists’ access.

    Despite volume, no plan to limit Sistine tourists

    Five centuries after Michelangelo's ceiling frescoes were inaugurated at the Sistine Chapel, at least 10,000 people visit the site each day, raising concerns about temperature, dust and humidity affecting the famed art.

  •  
    Egyptians relax outside a cafe in Cairo, Egypt Wednesday. Egypt's capital prides itself on being city that never sleeps, with crowds filling cafes and shops open into the small hours. So the government is facing a backlash from businesses and the public as it vows to impose new nationwide rules closing stores and restaurants early. Officials say the crisis-ridden nation has to conserve electricity, but they also seem intent on taming a population they see as too unruly.

    24/7 Egypt resists push to shut down, sleep

    Egypt's capital prides itself on being a city that truly never sleeps, with crowds filling cafes and shops open into the small hours. So, the government is facing a backlash from businesses and the public as it vows to impose new nationwide rules closing stores and restaurants early.

Discuss

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    ‘Nicest letter’ a welcome break from the vitriol

    A thoughful, polite letter from a Naperville couple respectfully disagreeing with our editorial endorsement for president provided a welcome break from all the vitriol in national and local campaigns, DuPage Editor Jim Davis says.

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    The great, ideological choice

    Columnist Charles Krauthammer: Every four years we are told that the coming election is the most important of one's life. This time it might actually be true. At stake is the relation between citizen and state, the very nature of the American social contract.

  •  
    Patrick Cannon of Oak Park

    Two political changes I’d like to see

    Guest columnist Patrick Cannon: I am not as sanguine about two of the items on my wish list, but of course we must live in hope. They are direct election of the president, and eliminating gerrymandered voting districts at all levels.

  •  

    Milwaukee tragedy exposes vulnerability
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: As a social service agency serving victims of domestic violence in DuPage County, we know that no neighborhood is immune to this devastating issue. We serve nearly 2,000 women and children each year, and sadly, we know this is just the "tip of the iceberg."

  •  

    Extend tax credit for wind energy
    A Palatine letter to the editor: With so much talk on energy and jobs, allowing this tax credit to expire is inexcusable. The very profitable industries of coal, oil and natural gas receive many times more tax credits and subsidies than renewables. It's time to level the playing field.

  •  

    Article was unfair to soccer player
    A Bartlett letter to the editor: The article talks about holding female athletes to a higher standard than male athletes, an offensive comment on its own. Just days before a big series you don't see baseball players at a junior clinic as Ms. Wambach was. She encourages children to be active and improves their communities through fundraising.

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    Too many holidays for county court workers
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: In an attempt to look up my old subcircuit judicial district on the Cook County Court system's website, I stumbled upon the 13 slated holidays for court workers.

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    Without life, what else matters?
    A Campton Hills letter to the editor: According to Froma Harrop's column on Oct. 29, titled "Access'" to birth control doesn't count," she equates "free" contraceptives with a "virtuous economic cycle" as touted by Melinda Gates, who obviously isn't a Catholic who follows the fundamental teachings of the Catholic Church against complying with intrinsic evils.

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    Time we shared and shared alike
    An Elgin letter to the editor: It does not benefit the country as a whole to be selfish with regional resources. With careful and thoughtful planning, many resources can be tapped and shared with minimal impact on a region's quality of life and lifestyle.

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    Don’t vent over money legally spent
    A Naperville letter to the editor: Mark Bodett's Fence Post letter has Margaret Thatcher saying that "the problem of socialism (people spending other people's money) is that eventually you run out of other people's money." Whether or not she actually said this, both she and Mr. Bodett have used the concept incorrectly to tarnish what both their governments are authorized to do.

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