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Daily Archive : Monday October 22, 2012

News

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    Naperville's Luke Koupal atop a snow bank on Groundhog Day 2011.

    Naperville man overcomes physical challenges to join dad in shredding business

    If you were around on Groundhog Day in 2011, you likely remember when nearly 20 inches of snow blew into town. In the aftermath of the blizzard, huge mounds of the white stuff sat shoveled at the corners of intersections. I photographed a neighbor, Luke Koupal, after he had climbed high atop one of the mounds. I asked for a wave and Luke gave me one. Little did I know at the time the significance...

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    Judge ratings make daunting task easier for voters

    Numerous bar associations screen candidates for judge or judges who are running for retention, making it easier for voters in Cook County to navigate what can be a long and daunting list on the Nov. 6 ballot. Here are some of the judicial ratings.

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    Salmonella outbreak sickens 7 Cook, Lake county children

    A Wheeling company investigated in connection with seven cases of salmonella in schoolchildren in Cook and Lake counties has been cleared to resume preparing food, health officials said Monday. The students, who range from age 7 to 14, attend four schools in northern Cook County and one in Lake County

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    Jim and Eileen Wacker, and their daughter Julia give a hug to their hero, Bo, who woke them at 3 a.m. Monday to alert them their Palatine home was on fire. The Wackers and Bo escaped unharmed.

    Palatine family can thank Bo for safe escape from fire

    Bo, a young yellow Labrador, is being credited with saving the lives of his new owners after alerting them to a fire in their Palatine home early Monday morning. “We would have never got out without this dog,” said Bo’s owner, Eileen Wacker. “People have asked whether we rescued our dog and I told them ‘No, he rescued us’.”

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    A group of Tulane University students watch the third presidential debate at Tulane University in New Orleans on Monday. Tulane’s political science department sponsored the event.

    Fact Check: Missteps in final presidential debate

    Voters didn’t always get the straight goods when President Barack Obama and Republican Mitt Romney made their case for foreign policy and national security leadership Monday night before their last super-sized audience of the campaign. A few of their detours into domestic issues were problematic too.

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    More than 100 Campton Hills residents filled asked a series of questions about a proposed drug and alcohol treatment facility Monday night. Residents made it clear they don’t think the facility would be a positive addition to the community.

    Campton Hills rehab center plan draws more public ire

    The Campton Hills Plan Commission continues its discussion of the proposed drug rehabilitation center on the site of the former Glenwood School.

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    Corinne Pierog, left, Democratic candidate for the state 25th Senate District; Republican Jim Oberweis, her opponent; state Rep. Kay Hatcher, a Republican seeking re-election to the 50th House seat; and Democrat Andrew Bernard, her opponent, answer questions at a League of Women Voters of Central Kane County forum Monday in Geneva.

    Taxes, business, school funding on 50th House, 25th Senate forum agenda

    Candidates for the state House District 50 and Senate District 25 campaigned Monday at a League of Women Voters of Central Kane County forum in Geneva.

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    President Barack Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney meet family members after the third presidential debate at Lynn University Monday in Boca Raton, Fla.

    Analysis: Combative Obama finds subdued Romney
    President Barack Obama came ready Monday for a fighting finish, deriding Mitt Romney as reckless and overmatched inn world affairs. Instead he found a subdued challenger who was eager to agree and determined to show he was not a warmonger.

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    Dist. 300 adds high school math, science and languages courses

    Community Unit District 300 will add several courses in the 2013-2014 school year, including math, science and technology, music and world languages, to enhance oppportunities for all students from high achievers to those who struggle. The new math courses include AP Calculus, AP Statistics, math applications and computer science. The district also will add robotics, Spanish for Native Speakers...

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    This Feb. 19, 2007, image from video released by FOX News Chicago shows Anthony Abbate. then a Chicago police officer, beating bartender Karolina Obrycka.

    Former Chicago cop takes stand in beating lawsuit

    Allegations of a culture in which Chicago police jump to protect fellow officers accused of wrongdoing are at the heart of a federal civil trial beginning Monday that pits the victim of a barroom beating by an off-duty officer against the city.

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    Moderator Bob Schieffer, center, watches as Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, left and President Barack Obama wave to members of the audience during the third presidential debate at Lynn University, Monday, Oct. 22, 2012, in Boca Raton, Fla.

    Images: The final presidential debate
    The third and final presidential debate between President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney took place Monday night in Boca Raton, Florida. The event was moderated by Bob Schieffer.

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    Video gambling machines like these could soon be added to Mundelein bars and restaurants, among other locations in town.

    Mundelein votes to allow video gambling

    Mundelein bars, restaurants and other establishments will be able to install video gambling machines, officials decided Monday. Trustees were divided 3-3 on the proposal Monday night. Mayor Kenneth H. Kessler broke the tie with the fourth “yes” vote.

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    Plane lands on I-94 near Racine

    A twin-engine aircraft with two passengers was forced to land on I-94 Monday evening in southeast Wisconsin, according to the FAA. The aircraft was attempting to land at an airport in Sturtevant, Wis.

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    Daniel Baker

    Psychiatrist says Baker was insane at time of murder

    When Marina Aksman psychologically “attacked” Daniel Baker by calling him bipolar and threatening to end his relationship with her daughter, the result, according to psychiatrist Alexander Obolsky, was rage. Baker's mother, Diane Weber, also testified that her son, who's charged with first-degree murder, displayed odd behavior as early as 3 months.

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    A man sits on rubbles in the village of Onna on April 7, a day after a powerful earthquake struck the Abruzzo region in central Italy.

    7 experts convicted for not warning of quake risk

    In a verdict that sent shock waves through the scientific community, an Italian court convicted seven experts of manslaughter on Monday for failing to adequately warn residents of the risk before an earthquake struck central Italy in 2009, killing more than 300 people.

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    Brookfield Police Chief Dan Tushaus briefs reporters in an evening news conference in Brookfield, Wis., Sunday. Police say the man who killed his wife and two other women at a Milwaukee-area spa bought the gun used in the shooting spree two days after a court ordered him to turn in all firearms.

    Wife told court Wisconsin spa shooter terrorized her

    A Wisconsin man terrorized his wife for years, threatening to throw acid on her face, dousing her car with tomato juice and slashing her vehicle’s tires before finally going to the spa where she worked, opening fire and killing her and two others.

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    Marty Moylan opposes Susan Sweeney in the 55th State House District race.

    55th House hopefuls talk pension reform

    When it comes to fixing the state’s pension gap, 55th House District candidates agree the solution must be negotiated with employees. Political newcomer Republican Susan Sweeney faces Democrat Marty Moylan, mayor of Des Plaines, on Nov. 6.

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    Leslie Coolidge, left, opposes Peter Roskam in the 6th congressional district for the 2012 General Election.

    6th District candidates offer different cures for Medicare

    Republican Peter Roskam and Democrat Leslie Coolidge are at odds on Medicare in the race for the 6th Congressional District.

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    Republican Sandy Cole opposes Democrat Sam Yingling in the 62nd state House District race.

    Candidates for 62nd House seat agree pension system needs reform

    The state's pension systems need reform but neither candidate running for state representative in District 62 believes shifting the burden to local taxpayers is the answer. Incumbent Republican Sandy Cole, who is seeking a fourth term, is challenged by Avon Township Supervisor Sam Yingling. Both are from Grayslake.

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    Elgin police reports
    Alex S. Barrera, 26, of the 1500 block of Dundee Avenue in Elgin, appeared in bond court Monday on felony charges of aggravated battery to a police officer, disorderly conduct and damage to government property, according to court documents. Barrera was arrested shortly after midnight Monday on charges he was smashing landscape pavers from Carleton Rogers Park onto the sidewalk after falsely...

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    Elgin water study could end in new fee for 2014

    The City of Elgin will know by next fall how much it costs to get water to its residents and have a better idea of how best to implement a new fee based on stormwater management, should council members decide to do so.

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    Sandie Campo of Arlington Heights holds her voter information as she stands in a long line of early voters at the Arlington Heights village hall on Monday. Village hall was the second most popular early voting location Monday in suburban Cook County.

    Early voting starts with a bang in Cook County

    For more than 13,500 Cook County residents Monday, voting early proved more important than voting quickly. Heavy demand and an extraordinarily long ballot caused lines with waits of 45 minutes or longer at many polling places in the Northwest suburbs and elsewhere on the first day of early voting.

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    Vista hosts Fall Fest in Lindenhurst

    Vista Health System will host “Fall Fest 2012” on Friday, Oct. 26, from 6 to 9 p.m. on the Vista campus, 1025 Grand Ave., Lindenhurst.

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    Ela drug-use presentation

    On Tuesday, Oct. 23, The Ela Coalition Against Youth Substance Abuse will host the presentation “Drug Use and the Teen Brain” from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Ela Community Center, 380 Surryse Road, Lake Zurich.

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    Round Lake dentist wants to buy your candy

    To promote dental health, Round Lake Family Dentistry will buy back Halloween candy at $1 per pound. Candies can be brought on Nov. 1, 2, and 3 to the office, 425 N. Wilson Road.

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    Juan Cuellar

    Shooting suspect arraigned in Willowbrook murder

    A Willowbrook man could face life in prison if convicted of murdering an 18-year-old who was repeatedly shot in broad daylight last month. Juan Cuellar, 23, of the 10S700 block of Lilac Lane, pleaded not guilty Monday to five counts of first-degree murder in the death of Joshua Holmes.

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    Another gambling vote could be coming up this November in Illinois, this time on overriding Gov. Pat Quinn’s veto of a bill that would allow slot machines at race tracks as well as new casinos.

    Gambling interests send lawmakers campaign cash

    As state lawmakers in the coming months could face a tough, possibly final vote over whether to expand gambling in Illinois, casino and horse racing interests with roots in the suburbs are giving thousands of dollars to candidates on both sides of the issue.

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    Gilberts residents must decide on new tax for parks and rec

    The second and final pre-election open house in Gilberts will be held Wednesday evening to give residents a chance to learn more about how money from a parks and recreation tax could be used. Voters will see a binding referendum question on the Nov. 6 ballot. About half of the revenue would go toward capital improvements with the other half for staffing costs, programming and maintenance. The tax...

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    Des Plaines man dies after being struck by van

    During an argument with his girlfriend, a 21-year-old Des Plaines man was was hit by a van traveling south on Milwaukee Avenue in Prospect Heights Monday morning when he walked in the street to talk to her. He was pronounced dead at the hospital.

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    More clinics, hospitals received recalled drugs

    The Food and Drug Administration says an additional 49 Illinois hospitals and clinics received recalled products from a Massachusetts pharmacy linked to a multi-state outbreak of fungal meningitis. The Illinois Department of Public Health is alerting the clinics and hospitals, which are located throughout the state, because of concerns that additional products may have been contaminated.

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    Naperville city hall wants to hear from you

    Naperville is again soliciting feedback from residents on a variety of city services, ranging from how the city handles its finances to snow removal.

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    Upper, from left, Democrat Sharon Bryant and Republican John Curran, and lower, from left, Republican Gary Grasso and Republican Brian Krajewski, are candidates for DuPage County Board District 3 in the 2012 General Election. Voters are asked to vote for three.

    DuPage Dist. 3 hopefuls differ on top priorities

    The four candidates running for three open seats on the DuPage County Board in the Nov. 6 election all point to different issues as their top priority for improving life in DuPage. While two Republican incumbents look to economic development and keeping property taxes down, a Republican hopeful wants better fiscal responsibility and a Democratic challenger said she aims for better communication...

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    Geneva teachers seek 1 percent raise in salary

    Geneva school teachers want a 1-percent increase in the salary schedule for the next two years, plus incremental increases for seniority and graduate education, according to the "final offer" posted on the union's website.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Tri blotter

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    Lightning strike causes Streamwood fire

    Fire broke out after lightning struck a house in the 200 block of Hackberry Drive in Streamwood Monday morning, a fire official said. The house was smoking when fire crews arrived and put out the small blaze. Damage was limited to the exterior of the house, the official said.

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    Renzo Barduagani

    District 204 closes two school bus stops near suspect’s home

    Indian Prairie Unit District 204 officials say they don’t know if a 50-year-old Naperville man accused of processing child pornography had his eye on any of the 15 children who waited at a bus stop less than 40 feet from his front door. But they’d rather be safe than sorry. The district has worked with its bus contractor to eliminate two stops on the 700 block of Violet Circle near where the...

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    Jesse Jackson Jr.

    Congressman Jackson gets visit from Davis, Rush

    Congressmen Danny Davis and Bobby Rush went to Jesse Jackson Jr.’s home in Washington Monday morning. Both reached out to the Chicago Democrat, who hasn’t returned to work after his release last month from Minnesota’s Mayo Clinic.

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    Dorothy Brown

    Cook County circuit clerk candidates spar over pay, perks

    Republican Diane Shapiro, a retired Cook County employee, says that she will forego the $105,000 per year salary and live on her pension if she's elected Cook County circuit court clerk. Democratic incumbent Dorothy Brown says she doesn't have that option.

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    DuPage County State's Attorney Bob Berlin is launching a new program that offers a second chance to some first-time felony offenders.

    DuPage program gives second chance to first-time offenders

    Sometimes good people make poor choices -- it shouldn't haunt them the rest of their lives. That's the thinking behind a new program that allows some first-time offenders in DuPage County to have a felony conviction wiped from their records. But, “This is no slap on the wrist,” State's Attorney Bob Berlin said.

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    Anna Walker, 13, looks through children’s books Saturday at the Friends of the Barrington Area Library book sale.

    Barrington library book sale’s future uncertain

    This past weekend's book sale by the Friends of the Barrington Area Library was the last one until the library's planned $5 million renovation is completed in 2014, and perhaps the final one altogether. "People stand there with their mouths open. They just can't believe it," said Friends board member Sue Allman.

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    Republican Judy Biggert is running against Democrat Bill Foster in the 11th Congressional District race.

    Fact-checking the ads in the 11th Congressional District race

    Fact-checking the competing attack ads over China by 11th Congressional District candidates Bill Foster and Judy Biggert, plus a look at why Foster paid no income taxes in his last tax return.

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    U-46 teacher gets special recognition from Chicago Bears

    Gloria Helin goes the extra mile to make sure students in her fourth-grade dual language class at Channing Elementary School have everything they need to learn. She often iis the first one at school in the morning and one of the last ones to leave. And she often buys supplies out of her own pocket. Tonight, Helin is expected to be among 16 teachers from across Illinois to be recognized as Heroes...

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    Jim Inman

    Once a student, now one of Harper’s distinguished grads

    Jim Inman was once a student and now he's a businessman -- and Harper College is proud to call him their own. Inman, an Arlington Heights resident who owns Elite Athletic Development, says Harper helped him turn his “dream turned into reality,” and on Monday the college will induct him as a Distinguished Alumni.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    An 18-year-old clerk at an Elk Grove Village Target has been charged with felony theft after he reportedly took money from a cash drawer six different times, including undercharging a customer by not ringing up a calculator, and giving a customer $100 in change for a candy bar valued at $2.81. Loss was estimated at $1,300.

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    Couple left homeless after West Dundee fire

    A Sunday evening house fire in West Dundee that started in a garage and spread to the main house was extinguished without any injuries but left a couple homeless, officials said. At 8:47 p.m. firefighters were dispatched to the blaze in the 2900 block of Dartmouth Lane — the area is east of Randall Road and south of Route 72.

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    Mundelein High School’s theater program has received a $500 grant from a local theater group.

    MHS theater program gets $500 grant from Kirk Players

    Mundelein High School's theater program has received a $500 grant from a local theater group.

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    Westbound traffic backs up on Route 137 heading toward Milwaukee Avenue in Libertyville, where the road has been narrowed to one lane in each direction during construction. Village leaders and local business affected by the construction are unhappy with the slow rate of progress.

    Roadwork a drag on Libertyville businesses

    As road projects unfold, those who deal with the delays and inconveniences are told to imagine how much better traffic will flow when the work is complete. That often is true. But in Libertyville, the frustration with a big project involving Milwaukee Avenue and Route 137 continues to simmer and some businesses wonder if they’ll survive to see the benefits. “Our businesses are really...

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    Jennifer Barconi, left, and Michael Kenyon

    Kane candidates argue over size of government

    Democrat Jennifer Barconi is seeking to unseat Republican Michael Kenyon from the Kane County Board, because she believes it's time for a change. The people of the 16th District are hurting and tired of the status quo under Kenyon's leadership, said Barconi, 39, of South Elgin.

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    Obama trying to hold off Romney with women voters

    President Barack Obama has been wearing a pink wristband in recognition of breast cancer awareness month and his challenger, Mitt Romney, donned a pink ribbon on his shirt during a factory stop in Ohio. The symbolic gestures are part of a determined competition in the campaign's closing weeks for suburban and working women who could help determine the winner in a series of toss-up states.

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    Aida Castillo places a sticker on her blouse indicating that she had voted during the early voting period, Saturday, Oct. 20, 2012, in Las Vegas. In the heavily-Hispanic neighborhoods of Las Vegas, unemployment is high and home values are down. But President Barack Obama’s immigration stand has locked in support from a fast-growing demographic group that has been trending sharply Democratic in the wake of increasingly hard-line Republican positions on immigration.

    Obama immigration stance locks in Hispanic support

    LAS VEGAS — Elizabeth Alvisar is exactly the sort of voter Mitt Romney needs.A victim of the brutal economy in this swing state, the 30-year-old tax preparer has been out of work for months. She’s a foe of abortion and gay marriage, and was naturally drawn to the Republican ticket.

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    Still neck-and-neck after all these months, Barack Obama and Mitt Romney head into their third and final debate with each man eager to project an aura of personal strength and leadership while raising doubts about the steadiness and foreign policy credentials of the other guy.

    Candidates seek foreign policy edge in 3rd debate

    Still neck-and-neck after all these months, Barack Obama and Mitt Romney head into their third and final debate with each man eager to project an aura of personal strength and leadership while raising doubts about the steadiness and foreign policy credentials of the other guy.

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    Prosecutor: RFK son kicked nurse in infant scuffle

    A New York prosecutor says a son of the late Sen. Robert F. Kennedy kicked a nurse to the floor as he tried take his newborn son out of a hospital without permission.

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    Family of train crash victim seeks crossing gate

    SOUTH BEND, Ind. — The family of a 22-year-old South Bend man is seeking to have warning gates installed at the railroad crossing where he was killed when a South Shore commuter train smashed into his SUV.The family of Ryan Vories believes a crossing gate would have prevented his SUV from rolling onto the tracks. Police say the train was going about 70 mph when the crash happened Oct. 7.

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    Chicago’s Public Housing Museum offers new, virtual tour

    People around the world may now take a virtual tour of the historic building that will become home to the National Public Housing Museum in Chicago.

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    Boat crash victims were from Iowa, Illinois

    MUSCATINE, Iowa — Authorities have released the names of two men who died after a boat carrying duck hunters crashed into a buoy on the Mississippi River between Iowa and Illinois.

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    Injured deer hunter found 4 hours after fall

    SHOALS, Ind. — Police say a deer hunter was injured on the ground for about four hours before a hunting partner found him in the southern Indiana woods.

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    A masked Sunni gunman stands guard on a road leading to a Shiite neighborhood after overnight clashes erupted between Sunni and Shiite gunmen in Beirut, Lebanon, Monday. Lebanese security officials say overnight clashes in Beirut between Sunni and Shiite gunmen have wounded several people. The officials say troops managed to separate the gunmen and calm returned Monday morning to the two neighborhoods in the capital where fighting happened.

    Lebanon launches major security operation

    Lebanese troops launched a major security operation on Monday to open all roads and force gunmen off the streets, trying to contain an outburst of violence set off by the assassination of a top intelligence official who was a powerful opponent of Syria. Sectarian clashes killed at least five people.

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    NTSB: Mich. train derailment probe to take months

    NILES, Mich. — Federal officials expect their investigation into a southwestern Michigan train derailment that injured about a dozen people to take six months to a year.National Transportation Safety Board railroad investigator Michael Flanigon spoke Monday at a news conference in nearby South Bend, Ind.

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    Without buyer, Dominion to close Wis. power plant

    RICHMOND, Va. — Dominion Resources Inc. said Monday that it plans to close and decommission its Kewaunee Power Station in Wisconsin after it was unable to find a buyer for the nuclear power plant.

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    Save the Dunes still has ‘fire in the belly’

    BEVERLY SHORES, Ind. — Sylvia Troy loved the Indiana Dunes as a girl growing up in New York City.“My father had National Geographic,” she said from her Beverly Shores living room overlooking Lake Michigan. “There was a 1917 article in National Geographic about the Dunes and I just fell in love.”

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    Free Syrian Army fighters crawl on the sidewalk Saturday as they attempt to rescue a Syrian civilian who was shot twice, in his stomach and his back, by a Syrian army sniper while he was walking on the front line in the Bustan al-Qasr neighborhood of Aleppo, Syria.

    Syrian violence spills into Jordan, Lebanon

    A Jordanian soldier was killed in clashes with armed militants trying to cross the border into Syria on Monday and sectarian clashes overnight in Lebanon left four dead as Syria's civil war spilled into neighboring countries.

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    Company is taking down voter-fraud billboards

    CLEVELAND — An outdoor advertising company says it is pulling down voter-fraud billboards in the swing states of Ohio and Wisconsin after complaints that they were meant to intimidate voters.

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    Russell Means, a former American Indian Movement activist who helped lead the 1973 uprising at Wounded Knee, reveled in stirring up attention and appeared in several Hollywood films, died early Monday at his ranch in Zzxin Porcupine, S.D. He was 72.

    Russell Means, Indian activist, actor, dies at 72

    Russell Means, a former American Indian Movement activist who helped lead the 1973 uprising at Wounded Knee, reveled in stirring up attention and appeared in several Hollywood films including "The Last of the Mohicans," has died. He was 72.

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    In a new policy statement released online Monday in the journal Pediatrics, the American Academy of Pediatrics says school sports associations should designate cheerleading as a sport, and make it subject to safety rules and better supervision.

    Cheerleading needs sports safety rules, docs say

    Cheerleading isn't just jumping and waving pompoms — it has become as athletic and potentially as dangerous as a sport and should be designated one to improve safety, the American Academy of Pediatrics says in a new policy statement released online Monday in the journal Pediatrics.

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    Al-Qaida’s No. 2 in Yemen says in audio he’s alive

    A man claiming to be al-Qaida's No. 2 in Yemen released an audio denying reports that he had died in a U.S. drone attack, as Yemeni officials said Monday that another top member of the terror network was killed in a drone strike earlier this month. The authenticity of the clip, purportedly made by Saeed al-Shihri, could not be confirmed.

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    11-year-old accused in Maine baby death arraigned

    The youngest person to be charged with homicide in Maine in at least 30 years bit her nails and looked down during her first court appearance Monday. The girl was charged at age 10 with juvenile manslaughter over the summer in the death of 3-month-old Brooklyn Foss-Greenaway, who was staying overnight in the girl's home in Fairfield in the care of the girl's mother.

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    Former U.S. attorney Fitzgerald takes job at Chicago law firm

    Former U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald has a new job.Fitzgerald plans to join Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP. Fitzgerald will become a partner in the corporate law firm’s Chicago office on Oct. 29.

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    Afghan National Civil Order Police (ANCAP) get ready to go out on patrol in Marjah, southern Helmand Province, Afghanistan, on Sunday. A string of attacks by Afghan police and armymen against their own colleagues and international forces has spiked in recent months.

    Weakened, al-Qaida in Afghanistan tries comeback

    A diminished but resilient al-Qaida, whose 9/11 attacks drew America into its longest war, is attempting a comeback in Afghanistan's mountainous east even as U.S. and allied forces wind down their combat mission and concede a small but steady toehold to the terrorist group.

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    Romney blimp makes emergency landing in south Fla.

    DAVIE, Fla. — High winds forced a blimp-like aircraft carrying an advertisement for Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney to make an emergency landing in South Florida.Davie police say the two people aboard the aircraft got out safely when it landed in a neighborhood around 7:10 p.m. Sunday.

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    Dozens injured when floor collapses at Fla. party

    Rescue workers and police found a scene of total chaos after the floor of a second-floor apartment collapsed under a late-night party in Tallahassee, Fla. The Tallahassee Democrat reports investigators still don't know what caused the floor to give way early Sunday. Officials say 55 people were injured.

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    UCI, the cycling governing body, agreed Monday to strip Lance Armstrong of his seven Tour de France titles.

    Lance Armstrong stripped of 7 Tour de France titles

    Lance Armstrong was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life by cycling's governing body Monday following a report from the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency that accused him of leading a massive doping program on his teams. "Lance Armstrong has no place in cycling and he deserves to be forgotten in cycling," McQuaid said at a news conference. "This is a landmark day for cycling."

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    Irfan Naseer, 31, left, Irfan Khalid and Ashik Ali, both 27, went trial at Woolwich Crown Court in London on Monday. They are accused of plotting a bombing campaign that prosecutors say could have been deadlier than the 2005 London transit attacks.

    3 British men go on trial over alleged terror plot

    Three British Muslim men went on trial in London on Monday, accused of plotting a bombing campaign that prosecutors say could have been deadlier than the 2005 London transit attacks. Prosecutors say Irfan Khalid and Ashik Ali, both 27, and 31-year-old Irfan Naseer were part of a plot to mount a terrorist attack "on a scale potentially greater than the London bombings in July 2005."

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    Dawn Patrol: Wisconsin shooting suspect’s Wheeling ties

    Wisconsin shooting suspect had suburban ties; Wauconda mayor to run again; four hurt in Gurnee crash; Bears play Lions tonight.

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    Uggie, star of “The Arist,” is seen onstage at the 84th Academy Awards on Feb. 26 in Los Angeles. Uggie was in Elgin on Sunday to promote his book. He’ll stop by Anderson’s Bookshop in Naperville at 7 p.m. Monday to “pawtograph” copies of his autobiography.

    Weekend in Review: Uggie to visit Naperville after Elgin visit
    What you may have missed over the weekend: Uggie stops by Elgin; Schaumburg teacher wins state honor; Mount Prospect woman dies in fire; suburban men in Boy Scouts' "perversion files"; former Sen. George McGovern dies; Congressman Jackson issues first statement on absence via robocall; Wisconsin gunman has suburban ties; final presidential debate could have major impact; a lot on the line for...

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    Cary Collins, left, and Michael Noland

    Noland, Collins both claim party independence

    Democratic incumbent Michael Noland and his Republican challenger Cary Collins are both campaigning on the idea that they will stand up to their parties in the state senate when it is best for residents of the 22nd District. Noland tells voters to look at his record since he was elected in 2007 , while Collins points to his experience on the Hoffman Estates village board when claiming his...

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    Jonathan Greenberg, left, opposes state Rep. Elaine Nekritz in the race for 57th state House District seat.

    57th House candidates discuss tax credits, income tax

    State Rep. Elaine Nekritz and Jonathan Greenberg are facing off in the 57th House District race. The candidates discuss their views on the state's income tax and tax credits for businesses. Republican Jonathan Greenberg of Northbrook said the income tax hike was an insult. “We should repeal it and start over,” he said.

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    Students from Cumberland Elementary School in Des Plaines warm-up with stretches before walking Friday afternoon to raise money for new playground equipment.

    Images: The Week In Pictures
    This edition of Pictures Of The Week features fall color, festivals, pumpkins, and halloween events.

Sports

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    Chicago Bears linebacker Brian Urlacher (54) celebrates with Israel Idonije (71) and Nick Roach (53) after he recovered fumble against the Detroit Lions near the goal line in the second half of an NFL football game in Chicago, Monday, Oct. 22, 2012.

    Bears hold off Lions 13-7

    Jay Cutler shook off an apparent rib injury, Brian Urlacher made a key fumble recovery and the Bears won their fourth straight, beating the Detroit Lions 13-7 at Soldier Field on Monday night.It was certainly not an easy night for the NFC North leaders, particularly their quarterback, but they came away with the win after a week off and possibly buried Detroit (2-4) in the process despite getting a major scare along the way.That happened in the second quarter when Cutler was sacked by Ndamukong Suh and ultimately wound up going to the locker room to have his ribs examined.Cutler started the second half and was 16 of 31 for 150 yards and a touchdown in the game, but with the defense locking down the Lions, the Bears (5-1) prevailed. It was a huge blow for last-place Detroit, a team many expected to contend for the division championship after making the playoffs for the first time in more than a decade.

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    Football playoff pairings
    Here are the complete pairings for first-round IHSA football playoff games this weekend.

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    Bears quarterback Jay Cutler is sacked by the Lions’ Ndamukong Suh in the first half Monday at Soldier Field.

    Cutler guts it out after Suh’s scary sack

    It looked worst than last year, when he fractured his thumb against San Diego on a November night in Chicago and, consequently, broke the hearts of Bears fans. Caleb Hanie was about to become the Bears’ starting quarterback. The Bears’ playoff hopes were about to be dashed thanks to an ensuing five-game losing streak. This time, on a cool night on the lakefront against NFC North rival Detroit, Jay Cutler lay crumpled on Soldier Field, nearly motionless after being chased down and sacked by nasty Ndamukong Suh of the Lions late in the first half of the Bears’ 13-7 win Monday evening.

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    Bears cornerback D.J. Moore laughs as the referee signals interception late in the game Monday at Soldier Field.

    Bears defense tames the Lions

    The Bears’ offense didn’t do much to impress a national-TV audience Monday night against the Lions, but the defense clearly was ready for prime time. The defense has carried the Bears all year and Monday night was no different in a 13-7 victory that elevated the winners to 5-1 and kept them in first place in the NFC North. The loss dropped the Lions to 2-4.

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    Chicago Bears middle linebacker Brian Urlacher recovers a fumble on the one-yard line Monday night, stopping a Lions drive in the third quarter in their game at Soldier Field.

    Bears bring out worst in Lions again

    The Lions complained that they deserved better Monday night, but the truth is both teams got exactly what they deserved.

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    The Bears’ Brian Urlacher has Lions QB Matthew Stafford in his sights during the first half at Soldier Field on Monday. Stafford was forced to scramble and was sacked by Julius Peppers.

    Bears’ Cover-2 scheme provides plenty of pick chances

    Defensive coordinator Rod Marinelli credits the Cover-2 scheme the Bears prefer as a major factor in their NFL-best 13 interceptions through the first six weeks of the season. “When you’re playing this system, you have a lot of eyes on the ball in zone coverage, so you get breaks and you get guys playing with great speed,” Marinelli said.

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    Charles Tillman

    Grading the Bears: Game 6

    Grading the Bears: Game 6

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    Monday’s girls volleyball scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls volleyball matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Harper faces road test at Joliet

    The No. 3-seeded Harper College women’s soccer team travels to Joliet on Tuesday to take on No. 2 seed Joliet Junior College in Region IV tournament play at 3 p.m. “Joliet is the toughest team in the region for us to play against,” said Harper coach Dwayne Cruz.

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    Detroit Tigers pitcher Justin Verlander throws during a workout Monday at Comerica Park in Detroit. He’ll start Game 1 of the World Series against San Francisco.

    A look ahead at the World Series

    Detroit is loaded with power bats and arms, guided by wily Jim Leyland and coming off an impressive sweep of the Yankees. San Francisco is a surging squad boosted by its rotation and talented catcher Buster Posey, fresh from a Game 7 win over defending champion St. Louis.

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    Giants catcher Buster Posey and relief pitcher Sergio Romo celebrate the final out of Game 7 of the National League championship series against the St. Louis Cardinals on Monday in San Francisco.

    Giants headed back to World Series

    In a postseason full of twists and turns, the San Francisco Giants are headed back to the World Series after a big comeback against the defending champs. Hunter Pence got the Giants going with a weird double, Matt Cain pitched his second clincher of October and San Francisco closed out Game 7 of the NL championship series in a driving rainstorm, routing the St. Louis Cardinals 9-0 Monday night.

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    Benet’s Nicki Barnes committed last the weekend to play at Marquette next season.

    Postseason won’t be any easier for Benet

    As the volleyball playoffs are served up this week, Benet finds itself in a familiar spot. The team to beat. Funny how things have changed in two months’ time. In August, few outside the gymnasium in Lisle expected the Redwings to be a contender to repeat as Class 4A state champs. Too much firepower lost. Too many unknowns. Two months later, Benet is 33-2, perfect in the four tournaments it played in, with quality wins over Mother McAuley, Marist, Joliet Catholic, Naperville Central and West Aurora. Not bad for a team with a bunch of kids who don’t even start for their programs’ top club teams.

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    Naperville North reacts to a point won in their two-game win over Neuqua Valley in Class 4A girls volleyball regional semifinals at Naperville Central on Monday.

    Naperville North outlasts Neuqua Valley

    Colleen Larson knew not to expect a cakewalk into a rematch with Naperville Central. And Neuqua Valley sure didn’t make things easy on Naperville North Monday. The underdog, short-handed Wildcats pressed Larson and the Huskies to the finish before succumbing 26-24, 25-22 in first-round action at the Class 4A Naperville Central regional.

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    Mundelein tunes up with regional win

    At the Lake Zurich Class 4A girls volleyball regional Monday, No. 14 seed Mundelein rolled to a 25-18, 25-7 sweep over No. 19 Hoffman Estates, thanks in part to 4 kills apiece from Courtney Perreault and Ashley Dolin.

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    Rolling Meadows gaining momentum

    Three weeks ago, the Rolling Meadow girls volleyball team was 12-12. But the Mustangs have been kicking their heels ever since. They won for the ninth time in their last 10 matches on Monday night, defeating Deerfield in the play-in match of their own Class AA regional. The No. 12 Mustangs topped No. 21 Deerfield 25-21, 25-20 to advance to today’s 7 p.m. semifinal against No. 5 Glenbrook North.

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    Lake Park ousts Willowbrook

    There’s something about the postseason in high school sports, that turns up the excitement level. Perhaps, it’s the fact that if you lose, you go home for good. Willowbrook, seeded 16th in the Class 4A Larkin sectional, and Lake Park seeded 17th, took to the court Monday night in quarterfinal play of the Glenbard West regional. The Lancers started out slow but caught a spark in the second set and prevailed 21-25, 25-14 and 25-23. They return to Glenbard West’s Biester Gym today for a 6 p.m. match against the top-seeded host.

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    San Diego Chargers kicker Nate Kaeding nails a field goal from the hold of punter Mike Scifres on Sept. 10 against the Oakland Raiders.

    Kaeding finished with Chargers

    The San Diego Chargers placed kicker Nate Kaeding on injured reserve Monday and will release him when he’s healthy. Kaeding kicked in the first three games before injuring his groin on Sept. 28. He is the most accurate kicker in NFL history, making 180 of 207 field goal attempts, or 87 percent.

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    Prospect outlasts determined Wheeling

    By the end of Monday’s play-in match, Prospect senior rightside hitter Holly Hunt admitted fatigue was becoming a factor. That’s because her No. 15 -seeded Knights and the No. 17 Wheeling’s girls volleyball team had reached the 30s with their scores. Prospect led 32-31 when senior setter Bree Geweniger lofted a soft set near the net to Hunt, who drilled it to the floor to give the Knights an exhausting but satisfying 26-24, 19-25, 33-31 victory.

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    Michigan cornerback Courtney Avery (5) and defensive tackle Jibreel Black wrap up Illinois quarterback Nathan Scheelhaase in the second quarter of the Wolverines’ 45-0 pummeling of the Illini on Oct. 13. Scheelhaase was injured on the play.

    Illinois adjusts focus after much-needed off week

    If any team needed last week off, it was Illinois. The Illini (2-5, 0-3 Big Ten) have lost four straight by a combined 163-45, including a 45-0 shutout at Michigan. On Saturday, Indiana will come to Champaign looking to end its own five-game losing streak, but the Hoosiers’ losses haven’t looked like Illinois’.

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    St. Edward knocks off Genoa-Kingston

    With the recent success of the St. Edward girls volleyball team in the Class 2A playoffs, the Green Wave gets to test its abilities in Class 3A this season. St. Edward showed Monday it can play with the bigger schools, at least for one night, as well. The fifth-seeded Green Wave beat No. 4 seed Genoa-Kingston, 25-20. 25-16, in the Class 3A Hampshire regional quarterfinals.

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    South Elgin tops Glenbard East

    Ashley Oandasan had 8 kills, Allison Osborne added 7 and Amanda Nadler had 5 Monday night to lead South Elgin’s girls volleyball team to a 25-18, 25-19 win over Glenbard East in the opening round of the Class 3A Batavia regional.Corbin Kehe added 25 assists for the Storm (20-9-3), who added to their season-record wins total.No. 15 seed South Elgin will take on second-seeded Geneva in tonight’s semifinals.Elgin Academy d. Faith Lutheran: Brigitte Keslinke had 6 kills, 11 digs and 10 aces to lead the Hilltoppers to a 25-12, 25-11 win at the Class 1A Westminster Christian regional. Claire Fugiel added 12 digs and 4 kills, while Ellie Johnson had 13 digs and Trennedy Kleczewski had 18 assists and 7 digs for Elgin Academy. The Hilltoppers (16-13) will take on Harvest Christian in tonight’s semifinals.

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    Larkin knocks off Elgin to advance

    The Elgin girls volleyball team was braced for the powerful spikes of 6-foot-1 Larkin junior Olivia Kofie and 5-11 junior Brianna Stewart, but the Royals threw multiple change-ups at their rivals to end their season in Schaumburg Monday night. “We were ready for their hitting, but we weren’t’ ready for their tips,” Maroons coach Scott Stewart said after No. 11 Larkin defeated No. 22 Elgin 25-18, 25-21 in opening-round play of the Class 4A Schaumburg regional. “Their tipping killed us.”

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    Jacobs’ Katie Mahoney, right, hits the ball as Dundee-Crown’s Gina Pagano and Kathryn Novy block during a regional game at Crystal Lake South High School on Monday night.

    Cary-Grove, Jacobs advance to semifinals

    It will be a tough road for Cary-Grove’s girls volleyball team to advance to the Class 4A state championship match for a fourth straight year.But, the Trojans aren’t quite ready to hang up the uniforms for the 2012 season. Losing the first game to fifth seeded Crystal Lake Central 25-22, the resilient Trojans bounced back to win the second and third games 25-17, 25-15 to defeat Central Monday night and advance to the semifinals of the Class 4A Crystal Lake South regional. Jacobs defeated Dundee-Crown in straight sets in the second match and will take on the host Gators in the semifinals.

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    Grayslake players Lisa Lowry, right, and Alaina Geissberger celebrate after scoring a point in the first game during Class 4A regional play against Grant on Monday in Grayslake.

    Grayslake North comes up big

    That powerful blocking squad lost 24 matches this fall? Hardly seems possible watching the net play of 6-foot middle hitter Alaina Geissberger and 6-foot-1 right side hitter Joanna Guhl. Grayslake North (12-24) never trailed on Monday night and ended Grant’s season 25-20, 25-16 in the opening round of the North Regional. The Knights get invited back on Tuesday to battle McHenry, the top seed in the regional, at 6 p.m.

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    Michigan safety Thomas Gordon breaks up a pass intended for Michigan State tight end Derek Hoebing in the fourth quarter of Saturday’s game in Ann Arbor. Michigan won 12-10.

    No. 20 Michigan leaning on its improving defense

    Michigan had one of the nation’s worst defenses just two years ago. Now — at least statistically — the unit is among the best in college football. The 20th-ranked Wolverines rank fourth against the pass in the country, 10th in total defense and 16th in points allowed.

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    Purdue eager to put summer lessons on display

    Purdue basketball coach Matt Painter watched his team get closer off the court and better on it in Italy this summer. He knows it’s a progression that must continue through the winter if the Boilermakers are going to live up to their own expectations.

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    Padres to move in portion of Petco’s fences

    The vast outfield at Petco Park will no longer be a place where long fly balls go to die. The San Diego Padres said Monday that work will begin this week to bring in the fences in right field and left-center, and to move the visitor’s bullpen from right-field foul territory to behind the home bullpen beyond the fence in left-center.

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    Minnesota assistant coach Saul Smith talks to guard Julian Welch during a game against Michigan last January in Ann Arbor, Mich. Smith is on indefinite leave after a weekend arrest on suspicion of drunken driving.

    Minnesota AD calls Saul Smith’s DWI arrest ‘embarrassing’

    Minnesota Athletic Director Norwood Teague said Monday that the unpaid leave for assistant basketball coach Saul Smith following his weekend arrest on a drunken driving charge is indefinite and the discipline is up to him, not Smith’s famous father.

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    Wyoming coach suspended 1 week, fined

    Wyoming coach Dave Christensen has been suspended one week and fined $50,000 for his actions following an Oct. 13 loss to Air Force.

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    Tight end Chris Cooley has passed a physical exam and agreed to rejoin the Redskins.

    Cooley returns to Redskins as Davis heads to IR

    As soon as the Washington Redskins arrived home from a 27-23 loss at the New York Giants, coach Mike Shanahan phoned out-of-work tight end Chris Cooley to see whether he was fit enough to replace Robert Griffin III’s top target, an injured Fred Davis.

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    Brian Hill/bhill@dailyherald.com Week 8 — Images from the Batavia vs. St. Charles East football game Friday, October 12, 2012.

    Time of year when everyone’s excited to be 0-0

    This column is brought to you by the number five and the letter W. Five is the magic number shared by area football playoff qualifiers this season. Aurora Central Catholic, Aurora Christian, Batavia, Kaneland and St. Charles East all reached postseason play and will kick off their “second” seasons this weekend.

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    Oklahoma wide receivers Kenny Stills (4) and Justin Brown (19) celebrate following Stills’ touchdown against Kansas on Saturday.

    Irish will face tough test against Sooners

    NORMAN, Okla. — Oklahoma’s first marquee game of the season on Owen Field ended up being a flop.One month later, there’s an opportunity for the eighth-ranked Sooners (5-1) to climb onto the fringes of the national championship debate if they can find a way to beat No. 5 Notre Dame on Saturday night.The Sooners’ results in big-time games have been mixed of late. They’ve been dominant in the Red River Rivalry against Texas but lost to Missouri two years ago when they were the No. 1 team in the BCS standings and dropped Top 25 showdowns against Baylor and Oklahoma State last season.After winning their past three games against Big 12 competition by a combined margin of 156-48, the expectations are high once again — maybe even more so than over the past two seasons, when various rankings had them pegged as the No. 1 team in the country.“I think maybe as a unit we’re playing better. I think we have more confidence right now going into games than I think there’s ever been around this place, just knowing what we can do and what we’re capable of,” quarterback Landry Jones said Monday.The starting defense has allowed only 1 touchdown over the past three games, and not a single point over the past two weeks. The offense has seemingly found a new gear after struggling through a 3-turnover outing in the 24-19 loss to Kansas State.“That’s our goal every week is keep getting better,” center Gabe Ikard said. “We’ve been improving in practice every week since that K-State loss and just been building in a really positive way. ... We’re not peaking but we’re definitely on an upslope.“We just can’t be satisfied with the way we’ve played and we’re facing the biggest challenge of the year so far, when it comes to their defense.”Led by standout linebacker Manti Te’o, the Fighting Irish (7-0) have been stingier than anyone in the country except defending champion Alabama this season. That has the attention of Jones and the rest of the Oklahoma offense.Jones said he believes his improvement in recent weeks is due to trusting his new set of receivers more, allowing him to go through his normal progressions instead of trying to make plays that aren’t there.“I’ve been playing a lot better. Just obviously after games like Texas Tech, Texas and last week against Kansas, you’re going to have higher confidence,” Jones said. “And I think everybody on this team is going to have higher confidence just the way that we’ve been playing.”The Sooners will get a boost, too, from the return of suspended defensive tackle Stacy McGee, who started three games last season.Stoops said his confidence in his team was never shaken after the loss to Kansas State, because he understood how good the Wildcats — now up to No. 4 — could be and that his team could have won if not for the critical turnovers.“What people failed to realize is we played a heck of a game against them the entire time and we just had two major mistakes that you can’t overcome when you’re playing another really good football team. ... As far as being physical and tough and those kind of things, we were toe-to-toe with them the entire day,” Stoops said.

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    A survey of NBA GMs posits that the Indiana Pacers will win the Central Division this season. Indiana forward Paul George, left, is seen shooting under pressure from Bulls guard Ronnie Brewer in this game from last December.

    NBA GMs: Indiana will win Central, not Bulls

    The Bulls didn't need another reminder that Derrick Rose is unlikely to play until February or March, but they got one in the form of the annual NBA general managers survey. A third straight Central Division title is not in the cards, according to league bosses.

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    IHSA sanctions cost Glenbard North home game

    As soon as the Class 8A football pairings were announced by the IHSA Saturday night, Glenbard North coach Ryan Wilkens knew exactly what was about to happen.The Panthers were about to lose a home playoff game.Because of sanctions dating back to incidents following Glenbard North’s 2007 playoff victory over visiting Fremd, the IHSA is forcing the Panthers to surrender this weekend’s first-round home game to the Vikings. With a 5-4 record, 13th-seeded Fremd normally would play No. 4 Glenbard North (8-1) in Carol Stream. Instead of playing in Carol Stream, however, Glenbard North will play on Fremd’s home turf at 6 p.m. Saturday in Palatine.

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    Football / Top 20
    Glenbard West, Batavia and Cary-Grove kept their hold on the top three spots in the Daily Herald's Top 20 rankings of area football teams.

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    Girls volleyball / Top 20
    Benet, St. Francis and Glenbard West remain the top 3 teams in the final Daily Herald Top 20 girls volleyball rankings for the regular season.

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    Minnesota Twins Pedro Florimon works with Tom Brunansky during a 2012 spring training session. Brunansky was hired Monday as the new hitting coach for the Twins.

    Twins add Brunansky, Cuellar, Steinbach to staff

    MINNEAPOLIS — After failing to challenge the Detroit Tigers or the Chicago White Sox for the Central Division last season, the Minnesota Twins have hired Tom Brunansky as their hitting coach, Bobby Cuellar to be the bullpen coach and Terry Steinbach as a bench coach and catching instructor.

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    Carolina Panthers general manager Marty Hurney was fired Monday. The NFL club is 1-5 this season.

    After 1-5 start, Panthers fire GM Hurney

    CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Marty Hurney was fired Monday as general manager of the Carolina Panthers, who are off to a 1-5 start and have not made the playoffs since 2008.Brandon Beane, the team's director of football operations, will handle day-to-day football matters until a new GM is hired, a person familiar with the situation told The Associated Press. The person spoke on the condition of anonymity because the move has not been announced.The Panthers have the worst record in the NFC in a season that began with big expectations. The dismissal came a day after a 19-14 loss to Dallas.

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    Mike North video: NFL sports talk censorship

    Live from the Tasty Trade studios, Mike North talks censorship in sports talk. He also talks about NFL football announcers, including the Monday night crew of John Gruden and Mike Tirico, and the top ten best-dressed guys in sports.

Business

  •  
    The Prospect Heights City Council approved a tax-sharing agreement to help bring an Ultra Foods Store to the long-vacant former Dominick’s site.

    Prospect Hts. agrees to share tax with Ultra Foods

    The Prospect Heights City Council Monday approved a sales tax-sharing agreement to help bring an Ultra Foods Store to a long-vacant Dominick’s site. William Nazha, an owner of the Prospect Crossing shopping center, said the lease with SVT, the owner of Ultra, will be signed soon, and the grocery store should open next summer.

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    Apple CEO Tim Cook announces a new iPad during an Apple announcement March 7. Those who follow Apple believe they have figured out most of the particulars of a smaller iPad expected to be revealed on Tuesday.

    Smaller iPad coming, but at what price?

    Those who follow Apple believe they have figured out most of the particulars of a smaller iPad expected to be revealed today. One big question remains, though: What will it cost?

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    Yahoo has ushered in Marissa Mayer as its new CEO with a third-quarter earnings report on Monday that topped analyst estimates.

    Yahoo’s earnings, revenue top forecast

    Yahoo ushered in Marissa Mayer as its new CEO with a third-quarter earnings report that topped analyst estimates.

  •  
    U.S. stocks erased earlier losses, sending the benchmark Standard & Poor’s 500 Index higher for the first time in three days, as an advance in Apple Inc. shares overshadowed disappointing corporate results.

    Market waits for election; earnings disappoint

    The stock market is waiting for the presidential election as much as anyone. The U.S. stock market struggled for direction Monday. All three major indexes waffled between gains and losses before closing slightly higher.

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    The settlement means AMC’s award-winning shows like “Mad Men,” seen here, and “Breaking Bad” can again be seen by Dish viewers.

    AMC’s Voom settlement returns ‘Mad Men’ to Dish

    AMC Networks Inc. and pay-TV provider Dish Network Corp. reached a $700 million settlement of their lawsuit over AMC’s claim that Dish wrongfully terminated their contract for high-definition television programming.

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    Natural gas holding tanks sit near a drilling sight in Grapevine, Texas. Natural gas prices are dropping.

    Natural gas declines amid demand concern

    Natural gas dropped from a 10-month high in New York on speculation that an expected cold spell won’t be enough to make up for a drop in demand.

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    Navistar, Cummins finalize agreement to supply engines
    Navistar International Corp. finalized an agreement to have Cummins Inc. supply heavy-duty diesel engines and emissions aftertreatment technologies for Navistar-built trucks.

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    Oil price rises on Middle East conflict fears

    Oil prices rose Monday after violence in Lebanon sparked fears of wider unrest in the Middle East.By early afternoon in Europe, benchmark oil for November delivery was up 75 cents to $90.80 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract fell $2.05 to end at $90.05 per barrel on Friday.In London, Brent crude was up 59 cents to $110.73 on the ICE Futures exchange.Fears of instability in the Middle East flared anew Friday, when Lebanon’s intelligence chief, Brig. Gen. Wissam al-Hassan, was assassinated in a massive car bombing. He was a powerful opponent of Syria, which for decades has wielded political and military influence in Lebanon.Syria itself has been riven with violence since an uprising against President Bashar Assad began in February 2011.“At present, we do not expect conflict to spread outside of Syria and Lebanon but the Middle East holds several key oil transit routes — the Suez Canal and Strait of Hormuz,” said Edward Bell, commodities analyst at the Economist Intelligence Unit. “Any disruption in passing through these chokepoints would contribute to a momentary upward shift in oil prices.”Brent prices were also supported by the delayed return to production of the Buzzard oil field in the North Sea.“Buzzard is now in its seventh week of complete shut-in, despite initially having been expected to start up after about five weeks of maintenance and be fully back on stream around the middle of October,” said a report from KBC Energy Economics in London.In other energy futures trading in New York:- Heating oil rose 0.55 cent to $3.1231 per gallon.- Wholesale gasoline added 1.05 cents to $2.6826 per gallon.- Natural gas was up 2 cents at $3.637 per 1,000 cubic feet.

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    Philips Q3 earnings rise, growth economies help

    Royal Philips Electronics NV, the maker of electric shavers, light bulbs and medical imaging equipment, saw earnings more than double in the third quarter, thanks to modest growth at all its business lines as well as the disposal of its loss-making television business.

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    Black cab maker goes into administration

    LONDON — The maker of London’s world famous black cabs says it will go into administration after failing to secure an injection of cash from one of its largest shareholders.Manganese Bronze ran into trouble after discovering a defect with its new steering systems. The problem forced a recall and a suspension of sales that it predicted would have a “material and detrimental” impact on its cash flow.It had been in talks about a cash injection with Chinese company Geeley, which already owns a 20 percent stake. Manganese said in a statement Monday that a “speedy resolution” of the product recall remained a top priority for the group, which will continue to operate throughout the administration process.The firm employs 300 people and is based in Coventry in central England.

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    FedEx sees online shoppers powering holiday record

    FedEx expects to ship 280 million packages between Thanksgiving and Christmas, up 13 percent from a year ago, thanks to consumers' growing fondness for shopping online.

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    Schaumburg-based Motorola Solutions debuts the HC1, a wearable computer in the form of a headset that takes voice commands for business and government workers. It could sell for $4,000 to $5,000.

    No hands required: new Motorola headset is a wearable computer

    Motorola Solutions unveiled a new "wearable computer" today that doesn't require your hands to operate it. The so-called HC1 is a headset that takes voice commands, understands head gestures and does video streaming to navigate your applications. It also can be used in locations where using a laptop or handheld device just isn't practical.

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    Hasbro Inc. announced that its third-quarter net income was down by 4 percent. But the Pawtucket, R.I.-based company remains confident heading into the critical holiday season, which is when toy makers can earn up to 40 percent of annual revenue.

    Hasbro 3Q profit falls 4 pct, revenue drops

    Weakness in its boys and preschool categories globally and the stronger dollar pushed toy maker Hasbro Inc.'s third-quarter net income down by 4 percent. But the company's adjusted results topped Wall Street's forecasts on Monday, and it remains confident heading into the critical holiday season, which is when toy makers can earn up to 40 percent of annual revenue.

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    Peoria-based Caterpillar cut its profit and revenue guidance on Monday, Oct. 22, 2012, saying the world’s economic conditions “are weaker than we had previously expected.”

    Caterpillar cuts 2012 guidance on weak economy

    Caterpillar Inc. cut its profit and revenue guidance on Monday, saying the world's economic conditions "are weaker than we had previously expected." The Peoria-based company is the world's largest construction and mining equipment maker, so its results are watched closely as a sign of where the broader economy is headed.

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    British oil company BP says it has agreed to sell its stake in its TNK-BP joint venture to Russian oil company Rosneft for $17.1 billion in cash and a 12.84 percent stake in Rosneft. BP announced Monday, Oct. 22, 2012, that it would use some of the money to buy more shares in Rosneft to raise its stake to 19.75 percent.

    Russia’s Rosneft buys out TNK-BP

    Russian state-owned oil giant Rosneft strengthened its hold on the country's lucrative oil industry when it sealed a $61 billion deal, buying TNK-BP, the joint venture between a group of Russian oil oligarchs and the British energy company. BP is not ending its 15-year involvement in Russia, though.

  •  
    Greg Smith was a vice president at Goldman Sachs until March when he announced his departure from the investment bank with a blistering editorial in The New York Times, accusing Goldman of routinely deceiving clients and relentlessly pursuing profit at the expense of morality.

    Why Greg Smith left Goldman Sachs

    Greg Smith wrote the essay that echoed across Wall Street like a thunderclap. Smith was a vice president at Goldman Sachs until March. He announced his departure from the investment bank with a blistering Op-Ed in The New York Times, accusing Goldman of routinely deceiving clients and relentlessly pursuing profit at the expense of morality. And he struck a nerve.

  •  
    Halsted Street Deli / Yogen Fruz recently opened in Vernon Hills. The owners are attempting to bring the feel of an authentic Chicago deli to Lake County.

    Chicago-style deli opens in Vernon Hills
    An interview with Ralph Menotti, co-owner of Halsted Street Deli / Yogen Fruz in Vernon Hills.Q: Describe your business. What do you do?A: Halsted Street Deli serves homemade soups, chilis, chicken salad, egg salad, tuna salad and many other items daily. We also offer low-carb wraps, gluten free breads, fresh baked breads, pretzel rolls and focaccia bread choices. All our deli meats are Boars Head, a top-rated line within the deli meat industry. We also offer Mannys corned beef from Chicago and pastrami and potato pancakes. All our meats, soups and chilies can be purchased to be taken home. Catering is available for any occasion. Yogen Fruz is a healthy yogurt choice. Our self-serve flavors are low in fat, we have 42 different toppings to choose from. What sets us apart from other self-serve yogurt stores is our custom blending. Fresh fruit protein shakes and Froyo shakes are popular. The probiotic low fat yogurt bars blended with our fresh fruits are one of the most refreshing desserts you will find. They are very healthy for you as well.Q: What made you start your business? A: Dave and I felt that the area needed a true deli with fair pricing, a chance to talk with the owners everyday, be greeted with a personal welcome and to serve freshly made choices like the neighborhood delis in the city. We also knew that Yogen Fruz would be the perfect partner store. They complement each other very well.Q: What has been the biggest obstacle in starting the business? A: The biggest obstacle for us was the build out process. Many different permit issues, building issues and equipment issues to overcome. Q: What do you enjoy most about running the business? A: Our biggest enjoyment is dealing with the public every day, it’s a job I personally can’t wait to wake up for. We offer 10 percent discount in both stores to any students up until 4 p.m. every weekday. We have many regular high school students already.Q: Is this what you pictured yourself doing when you were young? A: I have always wanted to open a small deli, this has been a dream since I was young going into our neighborhood deli with my parents.Q: What keeps you up at night?A: I think about what changes we can make to make the experience of every one of our customers the best it can be both at Halsted and Yogen Fruz. We offer a 10 for 10 deal every evening. After 4 p.m. every night our customers are offered 10 percent off any Yogen Fruz choice with every $10 spent at Halsted Street. Q: If you could give one tip to a rookie business owner, what would it be?A: The biggest tip I could give is to be prepared financially. There are many hidden costs in starting a small business. Also, don’t hold back when it comes to offering the best quality possible to your customers. That’s what will keep them coming back. — Kim MikusŸ Every Monday we feature a small, suburban business. We want to hear about yours. Contact us at kmikus@dailyherald.com.

  •  

    Palatine author shares e-publishing tips with business owners

    A Palatine author shares e-publishing tips with Small Business Columnist Jim Kendall. He gives helpful tips on what and what not to do.

  •  
    Daniel Gruber of Grayslake, left, Edwin Layman of Chicago, Lloyd Roin of North Aurora, and Nathan Hoffberg of St. Charles head up Des Plaines-based E-View Connections, a start up that recently launched an app for the deaf and hearing-impaired.

    N. Aurora man helps deaf community with new app

    Kukec's People column features North Aurora resident Lloyd Roin, who can hear what you say but the rest of his family cannot. His parents and siblings are deaf, but he isn't. Their disability has led him to make inroads working with the deaf and hearing-impaired community, including the development of a new smartphone app.

  •  
    West Dundee Village President Larry Keller in the lot of his village’s recently shuttered Best Buy store. Best Buy had generated about $400,000 in sales tax.

    How some towns cope when big-box stores leave

    When a big box retailer announces plans to close, or leave a municipality and take its tax dollars with it, some suburbs find themselves making eleventh-hour budget decisions, cutting deals and making money in ways they never thought they would before. The smaller the town, the bigger the impact.

Life & Entertainment

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    Future doctor belittles friend’s career goals

    Her friend is going to medical school, while she is studying to be a physical therapist. The friend keeps "unintentionally" putting down her career aspirations, hurting her feelings.

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    Prosecutors are not moving forward with charges against actress Lindsay Lohan after she was accused of clipping a man with her car outside a New York nightclub.

    Lohan won’t face charges in alleged NYC car scrape

    Lindsay Lohan won’t face criminal charges after being accused of clipping a man with her car outside a nightclub, one of a string of troubles the actress has encountered behind the wheel and elsewhere in recent months.

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    Season five of “Mad Men,” starring Jon Hamm as advertising executive Don Draper, is out on DVD.

    Follow ‘Mad Men’ as season five hits DVD

    Winner of four best drama Emmys, “Mad Men” is one of the most popular and critically acclaimed shows in the history of AMC. Fans eagerly awaited the fifth season, which continued to deliver great writing and strong performances from the ensemble cast. The season is now out on DVD.

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    Taylor Swift has released her new album, “Red.”

    Taylor Swift bears glare of spotlight for success

    Taylor Swift, the 22-year-old superstar with a new album called "Red," has come to embrace her larger-than-life status — and all the headaches that come with it. "You're scared of a lot of things for a lot of the time, but the trade-off of being able to get on a big stage and sing your songs — it's worth it," Swift says.

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    Taylor Swift’s newest album “Red.”

    Taylor Swift’s ‘Red’ far from vibrant

    Taylor Swift's "Red," the Grammy winner's fourth album, is a 16-track set that has the singer continuing to step away from her country roots to take on a more rock and pop sound. The album features songs that are big and stadium ready (she has a U2-like moment on album opener, "State of Grace") and others that are soft and slow. But while "Red" contains its share of winners, many of the songs lack the colorfulness and vitality the album title suggests, leading to an overall letdown.

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    “The New Way to Cook Light” by the editors at Cooking Light

    Lean and lovin; it: Cooking Light’s new cookbook flawed but flavorful

    Cooking Light just released its weightiest (more than 4 pounds) cookbook, "The New Way to Cook Light" (Oxmoor, $34.95). There's a lot to like in this sleek, encyclopedic hardcover, such as a boatload of fresh recipes (400-plus) and more than 200 color pictures.

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    “The New Way to Cook Light”

    Beer-Cheddar Soup
    Beer Cheddar Soup

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    This autumnal Vanilla-Bourbon Pumpkin Tart is one of the many too-good-to-be-true recipes in “The New Way to Cook Light” by the editors at Cooking Light magazine.

    Vanilla-Bourbon Pumpkin Tart
    Vanilla Bourbon Pumpkin Tart

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    British singer and songwriter and the former frontman for The Smiths, Morrissey, has postponed concert dates in Pittsburgh, Columbus, Flint and Chicago due to an illness in the family. Ticketholders are asked to keep their tickets until a rescheduled date is announced.

    Morrissey postpones Chicago Theatre concert
    Morrissey has postponed his sold-out Chicago Theatre concert scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 27, due to an illness in the family. Ticketholders are requested to keep their tickets until a rescheduled date is announced.

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    The Kennedy Center in Washington is awarding Ellen DeGeneres the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor on Monday. The show will be broadcast on PBS stations Oct. 30.

    Ellen DeGeneres to receive top humor prize

    Jane Lynch and John Leguizamo are joining a lineup that includes Jimmy Kimmel and Kristin Chenoweth to honor Ellen DeGeneres with the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor on Monday night.

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    While the majority of Dr. Marvin E. Buehner’s work in Rapid City, S.D., is delivering babies, he can perform pregnancy terminations only when there is a risk to the mother’s life.

    States throw up hurdles to getting abortions

    It's legal to get an abortion in America, but in many places it is hard and getting harder. Just this year, 17 states set new limits on abortion; 24 did last year, according to the Guttmacher Institute, a pro-abortion rights nonprofit whose numbers are widely respected. In several states with the most restrictive laws, the number of abortions has fallen slightly, pleasing abortion opponents who say the laws are working.

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    Garth Brooks, left, stands with George Strait after being inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame on Sunday in Nashville, Tenn.

    Emotional Brooks goes into Country Hall of Fame

    Garth Brooks promised he'd be emotional during his Country Music Hall of Fame induction. But the tears started before he made it all the way into the building. "I moved to this town for one reason and that was to get Much Too Young to Feel This Damn Old' cut by George Strait," Brooks said before the ceremony as his eyes began to redden. "That's what George is singing tonight. It's gonna be so cool. I'm a fan. So I get to be a fan tonight." Brooks was inducted along with trailblazing singer Connie Smith and keyboard player Hargus "Pig" Robbins, whose rolling signature sound has adorned countless hits across the radio dial.

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    Teaching kids how to cope with colorblindness

    Colorblindness is a minor inconvenience for most affected schoolchildren. Color vision defects can, however, cause problems since students are often expected to differentiate colors on classroom graphs and whiteboards. Colorblindness can also be socially challenging as affected kids try to coordinate matching clothes for each school day.

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    Fat-bellied people have higher death risk, study says

    Normal-weight people with fat bellies have a higher risk of death than the obese, according to data presented at the European Society of Cardiology conference in Munich. People with a normal body mass index, or BMI, and "central obesity" as defined by a high waist-to-hip ratio had the greatest risk of cardiovascular-related death and the highest death risk overall, researchers said in a statement.

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    Some children may be more susceptible to sugar addictions than others. It also depends on their age.

    Kids often sweet on desserts

    How often should kids be given dessert? There really isn't one right answer, because not all children are the same. Some are more susceptible to a sugar addiction, some eat healthfully throughout the day while others do not, and a toddler is a different creature than a teenager.

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    A young Rockford woman, left, and her husband decided to go ahead with an abortion in 2011 when her doctor said a medical condition made her unplanned pregnancy too risky.

    Women struggle when choosing an abortion

    Nearly 1 million women have abortions in the U.S. each year. What leads them to that choice? "There's this false idea that certain types of women have abortions and different types of women have babies," says bioethicist and gynecologist Dr. Lisa Harris. "They're really the same types of women at different points in their lives."

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    Winter is on its way. Is your body winterized?

    How to stay healthy in the winter months ahead

    With shorter days and falling temperatures, Mother Earth is sending out a blunt, tough-love message: Time to grow more hair, bulk up with fat and find a nice cave to ride out the coming starvation months of winter. Your body is telling you to slow down, sleep more, huddle by the fire, tell stories and conserve your calories. But there are ways to winterize your body and minimize the impact of those prehistoric messages.

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    Following a few daily tips can help you maintain a healthy weight.

    Your health: Chew over advice
    Take some pointers from thin people on how to maintain a healthy weight and stay that way. Also, be mindful of some running tips now that races are in full swing.

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    Child’s ear infections can be treated with minor surgery

    Ear infections are very common and can make children miserable. Most go away and don't cause problems, even without treatment. But a few can lead to complications, including more serious infections of the bone near the ear or even the brain. Surgery is recommended for recurring or persistent infections, particularly if a child has hearing loss.

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    The 1958 Cadillac Series 86 commercial chassis could be modified into a hearse or ambulance — or both — by Ohio-based Superior Coach.

    Pulling double shifts, this 1958 Cadillac still a working stiff

    As a fourth-generation funeral director, it's only natural that Doug Ahlgrim, along with his wife Sandy, would be readily open to purchasing something as otherworldly as a stately 1958 Cadillac Series 86 hearse. "Given my family's long-standing trade heritage, I've just always loved old hearses," Doug said.

Discuss

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    Editorial: A show of acceptance for any age

    A Daily Herald editorial reflects on the spirit of inclusion suburban high school students are displaying these days in the selection of their homecoming kings and queens.

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    Skating on electoral thin ice

    Columnist Richard Cohen: If we had a simple popular vote system, my vote would count the same as someone’s in Ohio or Virginia. I would not be taken for granted and, even better, the winner of the popular vote would be the winner of the election. As things stand now, this is not always the case.

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    Why the chill on climate change?

    Columnist Eugene Robinson: Not a word has been said in the presidential debates about what may be the most urgent and consequential issue in the world: climate change.

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    Exhausting the insignificant

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: I defer to Time's Mark Halperin, who doubtless spoke for many of us when he said on "Morning Joe": "The binder thing is what's wrong with our politics."

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    Seeds of our dysfunction

    Columnist George Will: Democracy is representative government, which is the problem. Democracy represents the public's preferences, which are mutable, but also represents human nature, which is constant. People flinch from confronting difficult problems until driven to by necessity's lash.

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    Additional cigarette tax will save lives
    A letter to the editor: The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network strongly supports Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle's recent proposal for a $1 per pack cigarette tax increase in Cook County. Smoking remains the leading cause of cancer, which continues to devastate far too many of our family members, friends and neighbors.

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    Remember the old days of Halloween?
    A Rolling Meadows letter to the editor: On Halloween, we took to the streets after those lights went on and without parents hovering nearby. Parents' involvement in was limited to taking charge of our loot and doling it out until that day we came home from school to find they had thrown it out because "it was getting too stale." Kids of 2012 are cursed and blessed at once.

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    Wearing the flag shows disrespect
    A Hoffman Estates letter to the editor: My husband and I thoroughly enjoyed watching the play of the Ryder Cup in Medinah. We are also pleased with the advantages this event brought to our local communities. However, we were disappointed in seeing so many in the gallery wearing costumes made from our American flag.

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