Daily Archive : Monday September 10, 2012

News

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    Teachers cheer as they march on streets surrounding the Chicago Public Schools district headquarters on Monday, the first day of their strike.

    Chicago teachers strike will continue Tuesday

    For the first time in a quarter-century, Chicago teachers walked out of the classroom Monday, taking a bitter contract dispute over evaluations and job security to the streets of the nation's third-largest city — and to a national audience — less than a week after most schools opened for fall. The walkout forced hundreds of thousands of parents to scramble for a place to send idle...

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    Runners start to gather near the finish line before last year’s Fox Valley Marathon Races in St. Charles. More than 2,000 competitors ran a half marathon, a 20 mile race, and a full 26.2 mile marathon, as well as a kid’s race. Eventual marathon winner Tim Cunningham of Virginia is at lower left, partly obscured by the sign. He ran the entire race in bare feet.

    Running on the river: Fox Valley Marathon

    Although registration is closed for the Fox Valley Marathon, Half Marathon and Fall Final 20, spectators are encouraged to come and cheer for their favorite runners. "Last year we had over 1,000 spectators, mostly family and friends (of the runners)," said Tony Andracki, media relations coordinator for the event, which starts at 7 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 16 in St. Charles.

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    Marine Cpl. Marshal Macri of the Marine Band San Diego plays “Taps” at the close of a 9/11 Patriot Day ceremony at Maryville Academy in Des Plaines.

    9/11 victims, heroes honored at Des Plaines ceremony

    Northwest suburban police, firefighters, veterans and dignitaries gathered on the Maryville Academy campus in Des Plaines this morning to mark the 11th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and honor the victims and heroes of that day.

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    Elgin council will consider creating Parks and Rec Foundation

    With a board chosen and bylaws drafted, the Elgin Parks and Recreation Foundation is just a couple steps away from reality. City council members will consider the nonprofit's creation at its committee of the whole meeting Wednesday, after which it can be registered with the state and the Internal Revenue Service. Mark Seigle, an inaugural board member, said the mission of the foundation is to...

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    The Centre may host job training program for people with disabilities

    The Association for Individual Development will be the latest group to try its hand at selling concessions from The Centre of Elgin if council members approve an agreement for a job training program Wednesday. AID serves people with developmental, physical and mental disabilities across the Fox Valley. The agency was looking for a site for its vocational skills program and the city was looking...

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    Steve Wynn, left, the casino mogul who added The Mirage, The Bellagio, Wynn and Encore to the Las Vegas Strip, was awarded $20 million by a jury that says “Girls Gone Wild” founder Joe Francis, right, slandered Wynn when he claimed the casino mogul threatened to kill him and bury him in the desert.

    Casino mogul awarded $20M in slander case against ‘Girls Gone Wild’ founder

    A jury on Monday awarded casino mogul Steve Wynn $20 million in his slander case against "Girls Gone Wild" founder Joe Francis, who claimed the creator of some of Las Vegas' most upscale resorts threatened to kill him over a gambling debt. Witnesses disputed Francis' claims during a four-day trial, including Grammy winning record producer Quincy Jones, who Francis said told him about Wynn's...

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    Arlington Hts. staying with ‘Discover Arlington’ campaign

    Arlington Heights is sticking with the "Discover Arlington" brand to increase retail spending and consumer traffic, but will invest in a consumer survey to determine what the village needs to do next to keep improving in the future.

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    Just as volunteers played a key role in the 2006 PGA tournament at Medinah Country Club, shown here, they will be critical to the success of the 2012 Ryder Cup at the club this month.

    Ryder Cup volunteers: A once-in-a-lifetime deal

    Thousands of people are coming from thoughtout the suburbs, the state and other countries to volunteer for the 2012 Ryder Cup at Medinah Country Club. They come for myriad reasons, but most agree its a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity despite the $235 uniform tab. “It’s clothes with the Ryder Cup logo that I probably would have bought anyway,” said volunteer Jerry Gordon.

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    Chris Bukowski of Bartlett, shown here on “The Bachelorette,” lost during the finale of ABC’s reality TV show “Bachelor Pad 3” that aired Monday night.

    Bartlett man loses for second time in ‘Bachelor’ series

    Bartlett native and "Bachelorette" finalist Chris Bukowski didn't walk home with the $250,000 grand prize Monday tonight on the season finale of ABC's reality TV show "Bachelor Pad 3," but a close friend said starring on both shows was a good experience for him. "I think its opening a lot of doors for him, and he's met a lot of great people along the way," said Shannon Smith, who nominated...

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    Biker suffers life-threatening injuries in Long Grove crash

    A motorcyclist suffered life-threatening injuries after a collision with an SUV in Long Grove Monday night.

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    Neighbors: Keep Fabyan preserve out of Settler’s Hill plans

    People who favor passive recreation like walking at Fabyan Forest Preserve's east woods asked again and again at a public hearing Monday night to keep the preserve out of plans for a recreational complex at the former Settlers' Hill landfill in Geneva.

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    E. Dundee to vote next week on video gambling ban

    The discussion on whether East Dundee should terminate its ban on video gambling is expected to conclude next week — with a vote. Monday night, the village board's committee of the whole agreed to put the issue to a vote at the next board meeting, which will happen next Monday.

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    The Carol Stream Library Board is deciding whether to sell vacant property on the west side of Kuhn Rd. just south of the College Of DuPage building.

    New Carol Stream library board may sell land

    A vacant 7.5-acre property owned by the Carol Stream Public Library could soon be going on the market. The land at 480 N. Kuhn Road was purchased by the library in 2003 with intentions of using it for a new library facility, but voters rejected those plans in three seperate referendums. Last year, the library board voted 4-3 to hold onto the property, but now, a new board that could have the...

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    A Universal Gaming Group Velocity poker gambling machine installed at the Assembly in Hoffman Estates. Mundelein officials are taking the first steps to allwoing video gambling in the village

    Mundelein closer to approving video gambling

    A divided village board on Monday paved the way for video gambling machines to be added to some Mundelein businesses. The 4-2 vote — asking village staffers to draft an ordinance that would formally allow video gambling in town — followed a debate about the benefits and risks of legalized gambling.

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    Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney and Sen. Rob Portman, an Ohio Republican, left, meet with Col. Mike Howard, center, as they arrive at Mansfield Lahm Air National Guard Base in Mansfield, Ohio, Monday.

    Romney: Chicago teachers turning backs on students

    Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney said Monday that striking Chicago teachers are turning their backs on thousands of students and that President Barack Obama is rooting for the absent educators.

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    Visitors to the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pa., participate in a sunset memorial service on Monday. Today marks the 11th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attack.

    Panetta lauds those aboard Flight 93

    Defense Secretary Leon Panetta says the Flight 93 National Memorial in western Pennsylvania "is the final resting place of American patriots."

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    5 charged after Lake in the Hills drug bust

    Five people were arrested and charged with drug-related offenses after police found approximately $4,500 worth of heroin and cannabis inside a Lake in the Hills home.

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    Kane officials request budget supplements

    Kane County department heads and elected officials were asked to hold spending to 2012 levels for the 2013 budget, and told their budgets should cover an anticipated 4.5 percent increase in the cost of health and dental insurance. But several put all or part of the increase into supplementary requests, a move the county board's finance committee frowned on Monday. Committee member Cathy Hurlbut...

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    A young supporter listens to President Barack Obama speak at a campaign event Sunday in West Palm Beach, Fla.

    Crucial Ohio at the heart of presidential campaign

    It's all about Ohio — again. The economy has improved here, and so has President Barack Obama's standing, putting pressure on Republican Mitt Romney in a state critical to his presidential hopes.

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    Republican presidential candidate Gov. Mitt Romney talks about his plan for creating jobs and improving the economy at a campaign stop in Las Vegas last week.

    Why it matters: the economy

    Differing approaches to a key issue of this election: the economy. President Barack Obama wants to create jobs with government spending on public works and targeted tax breaks to businesses. Mitt Romney aims to generate hiring by keeping income taxes low, slashing corporate taxes, relaxing or repealing regulations on businesses and encouraging production of oil and natural gas.

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    Sherman hopes Supreme Court hears library case

    Buffalo Grove resident Rob Sherman will ask the Illinois Supreme Court to hear an appeal of a recent appellate court ruling that the voters' decision to increase property taxes for the Indian Trails Public Library should stand.

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    James J. Slobodnik

    Bartlett man faces felony, misdemeanor charges

    A 52-year-old Bartlett man faces felony battery charges for an incident before a South Elgin football game Saturday. Police said Jamed J. Slobodnik argued with and shoved his son's high school football coach because Slobodnik was angry his son was not allowed to play because of a disciplinary issue. Slobodnik is due in court on Sept. 28.

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    Walter T. Beahan

    Colleagues recall Bloomingdale deputy chief as ‘remarkable firefighter’

    Colleagues say fire safety was the focus of Walter Beahan's life. Beahan, who served as deputy chief of Bloomingdale Fire Protection District 1, died Thursday. "He was a remarkable firefighter who dedicated his life to the Bloomingdale Fire Protection District and to the fire service and will be missed," Bloomingdale Chief Michael McNamara wrote.

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    State Sen. Matt Murphy of Palatine talks about how pension reform impacts the state’s ability to provide services for children while speaking at the Voices for Illinois Children’s Illinois Kids Count Symposium at St. Alexius Medical Center in Hoffman Estates.

    Children’s advocates learn how to further their cause

    While many public programs are being delayed, reduced or canceled as state and federal budget problems continue, the one thing that can't wait patiently are the childhoods of an entire generation, advocates say. How to get the best interests of today's children back on the front burner was the theme of the Illinois Kids Count Symposium hosted Monday by Voices for Illinois Children at St. Alexius...

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    Algonquin police: Stranger in white van approached girl

    Algonquin police are on the hunt for a man who approached an 11-year-old girl while he was driving a white van, Deputy Chief Ed Urban said. Just before 5 p.m. Sunday, a clean shaven, white man pulled up to the girl in front of her house on Foster Circle near Sleepy Hollow Road, and told her to get in, police said. She ran to her house and told her parents.

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    A house fire Monday morning on Spring Wood Lane in Campton Hills destroyed the home. A couple was home at the time of the fire and escaped.

    Campton Hills home destroyed in fire

    Authorities are investigating the cause of fire that completely destroyed the Campton Hills dream home of Debbie and Bob Notaro Monday morning. "It just burned. I don't know how it started," said Debbie Notaro, sitting on a bench overlooking the rubble of her home in the 3N100 block of Spring Wood Lane in Campton Hills.

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    Contract issues in the Chicago teachers strike

    As Chicago teachers walk the picket lines, their union and the city’s school district resumed negotiating Monday over a new contract that includes bigger salaries, more benefits, revised job security measures and revamped teacher evaluations. Here is a breakdown of the issues on the table:

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    Northwest suburban teachers among teacher of year finalists

    Two Northwest suburban teachers are among the nine finalists for the Illinois State Board of Education's 2012-2013 Illinois Teacher of the Year award, which will be announced on Oct. 20. The Northwest suburbs are represented by Andrew Conneen, a political science teacher at Adlai E. Stevenson High School in Lincolnshire, and Brian Curtin, an English teacher at Schaumburg High School in Schaumburg.

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    Schaumburg Boomers host Oktoberfest

    The Schaumburg Boomers baseball team will host a free Oktoberfest featuring live music, food and a large selection of seasonal beer from 4 to 9:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 6.

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    Chicago Flugtag won’t be rescheduled

    The Chicago Red Bull Flugtag, canceled Saturday due to unsafe marine conditions, will not be rescheduled, Red Bull said in an email to the Daily Herald on Monday. But the teams that spent weeks preparing to participate — including several from the suburbs — will receive some compensation: either $1,000 or a guaranteed spot in the next Chicago Red Bull Flugtag.

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    Suspicious incident Sunday in Mill Creek subdivision near Geneva

    Kane County Sheriff's deputies are investigating an incident Sundy night in the Mill Creek sudivision near Geneva in which a man pulled up in a car and asked a 10-year-old girl if she'd ever seen a grown man naked. The man never got out of his car and the girl reported the incident right away.

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    Christopher Vaughn

    Ballistics expert testifies in Vaughn murder trial

    As prosecutors began wrapping up their case against a man accused of killing his family, a Will County jury heard from several witnesses, including a ballistics expert who testified the way a gun was found was not consistent with a suicide scene.

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    Suburban truck driver charged in Nebraska crash

    LINCOLN, Neb. — Five people have died in two crashes in western Nebraska after mechanical problems forced a truck to stop on Interstate 80.Cheyenne County Attorney Paul Schaub says the first crash occurred early Sunday morning, when a semitrailer rig ran into the stalled truck. The driver who hit the stalled truck died.

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    Bike trail through Elgin’s northeast side inching closer to reality

    The City of Elgin is plugging along in its quest to be more bike friendly. Council members will consider partnering with the Illinois Department of Transportation Wednesday and approving a contract for engineering services in the second phase of a bike trail project that will run from the city's downtown toward Cook County on the east. Elgin received a grant to cover 80 percent of the work in...

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    Public school teachers picket outside Amundsen High School in Chicago on the first day of a strike by the Chicago Teachers Union Monday. The school is one of more than 140 schools in the Chicago Public Schools’ “Children First” contingency plan, which feeds and houses students for four hours during the strike.

    Thousands of teachers march downtown

    Thousands of teachers, parents and supporters marched through downtown Chicago on the first day of a school strike. The crowd Monday afternoon stretched for several blocks and was expected to swell through the early evening and into the city's rush hour.

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    Barrington candidates host forum Tuesday

    Barrington residents Jim Magnanenzi and Mike Kozel, who are creating an opposition slate of candidates to run for the village board next spring, will hold an open forum on the proposed Hough-Main development project and downtown tax increment finance district at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 11 in the second floor party room of Wool Street Grill & Sports Bar at 128 Wool Street.

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    Des Plaines man sentenced for 2011 murder

    A Cook County judge sentenced a 21-year-old Des Plaines man to 50 years in prison for the July 2011 murder of a 15-year-old on Chicago's far North Side. James Galambos was convicted last month in the shooting death of Sergio Torrez and of attempted murder of another teen.

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    Mary Marra

    Woodridge woman gets 10 years for $500,000 theft from law firm

    Mary Marra stole more than $500,000 from her former employer -- but it wasn't the worst of her crimes, a DuPage County judge said Monday. "Of all the things she stole, the worst is the time with their mother she stole from her own children," Judge Daniel Guerin said.

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    Round Lake library parking work

    The Round Lake Area Public Library is completely rebuilding its parking lot between Sept. 13 and 17. The lot will be inaccessible during this project, so visitors will need to find parking at alternate sites.

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    New twist on Mundelein Idol contest

    Mundelein High School's annual Mundelein Idol music competition will take place Saturday, Oct. 13.

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    Stevenson teacher among finalists for state’s best

    Andrew Conneen, a political science teacher at Adlai E. Stevenson High School in Lincolnshire, is one of nine finalists for the 2012-13 Illinois Teacher of the Year, Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) announced Monday.

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    ‘Normandy Revisited’ program in Libertyville

    The Libertyville-Mundelein Historical Society begins another season of programming at 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 17 with "Normandy Revisited" with local World War II veteran Don Carter.

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    Lake Zurich man pleads guilty in fatal drug case

    A 21-year-old Lake Zurich man could be sentenced to up to 14 years behind bars after he pleaded guilty to attempted drug-induced homicide, authorities said. Cody Searles was initially charged with two counts drug-induced homicide in August 2011 for the death of Christian Medina, 18, of Lake Zurich, but recently pleaded guilty to the lesser charge, Lake County Assistant State's Attorney Steven...

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    Former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani reads a poem during a memorial service commemorating the ninth anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York i 2010.

    At ground zero, can there be a politics-free 9/11?

    The Sept. 11 anniversary ceremony at ground zero has been stripped of politicians this year. But can it ever be stripped of politics? For the first time, elected officials won’t speak Tuesday at an occasion that has allowed them a solemn turn in the spotlight. The change was made in the name of sidelining politics, but some have rapped it as a political move in itself.

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    Antonio Crawford

    Chicago man sentenced for robbing Prospect Heights bank teller

    A Chicago man pleaded guilty to robbing a teller at a Prospect Heights bank during a failed bank robbery in July 2011. Antonio Crawford, 22, was sentenced to six years in prison in exchange for pleading guilty to attempted armed robbery. He will serve the sentence concurrenlty with an eight-year federal sentence.

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    In this Nov. 28, 1943, file photo, Soviet Union Premier Josef Stalin, U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, center, and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill sit together during the Tehran Conference in Tehran, Iran. The three leaders, meeting for the first time, discussed Allied plans for the war against Germany and for postwar cooperation in the United Nations.

    Memos show US hushed up Soviet crime

    American POWs sent secret coded messages to Washington with news of a Soviet atrocity in Poland in 1943. But the information mysteriously vanished. The long-held suspicion is President Franklin Delano Roosevelt didn't want to anger Josef Stalin, an ally that America counted on World War II.

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    A surfer paddles out into waves generated by Tropical Storm Leslie, at Lawrencetown Beach near Halifax, Nova Scotia, Sunday. Leslie is expected to make landfall in Newfoundland early in the week bringing heavy rain and high winds.

    Newfoundland braces for Tropical Storm Leslie

    Canada's east coast is bracing for the arrival of Tropical Storm Leslie, which is expected to make landfall Tuesday in Newfoundland, the Canadian Hurricane Centre said Monday.

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    Samuel I. Blitstein was a Third Class gunners mate in the U.S. Navy during World War II

    Local WWII vet remembered for special diploma

    Samuel Blitstein of Buffalo Grove was among the first World War II veterans in Illinois to receive his high school diploma, nearly 60 years after he left school to fight in the Pacific. Blitstein died at age 86. "He was thrilled to get his diploma," says his wife, Bernice, "but he was even more honored that there were so many servicemen who would benefit from this bill."

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    David Hatyina

    Bartlett man pleads not guilty in fatal boating crash on Petite Lake

    A Bartlett man pleaded not guilty to charges in the alcohol-related boating crash that killed a 10-year-old Libertyville boy, during an arraignment hearing Monday in Lake County court. David Hatyina, 50, remains free on $1 million bond in the death of Tony Borcia.

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    Referendums for Lake Michigan water and more on November ballots

    Certain Lake County voters in the November election will get to decide issues such as whether to borrow $41 million for a Lake Michigan drinking water pipeline or seek a program designed to buy electricity at a cheaper rate. In all, nine binding and three advisory referendum questions will be on Nov. 6 ballots throughout Lake County. The list was finalized at the Lake County clerk's office Aug.

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    Audit of $526M in Indiana tax mistakes pending

    Auditors reviewing $526 million in tax errors made by the state could begin reviewing the state's tax collection agency soon. Auditors for the international accounting firm Deloitte plan to brief state lawmakers Monday on what they would review once they begin their audit.

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    Prisoner dies at Guantanamo; details not released

    The U.S. military says another prisoner has died at the Guantanamo Bay Navy base in Cuba. A prison spokesman says the U.S. government is notifying the prisoner's family and his country. Navy Capt. Robert Durand says the U.S. has launched an investigation into the cause of death.

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    Highland Elementary School Principal Steve Johnson joins teachers and students in celebrating the school’s victory in the Elgin Area School District U-46 Summer Reading Program. More than 70 percent of the school’s population completed the challenge, which is sponsored by Superintendent Jose Torres.

    Highland Hounds devour books in summer reading challenge

    The results of U-46 Superintendent Jose Torres' Summer Reading Challenge in U-46 are in and there are two schools that will win a visit from the Jesse White Tumblers. Highland Elementary School wins based on the highest percentage of the student enrollment finishing the summer reading program at 27.4 percent. Sheridan Elementary School also wins by showing the greatest percentage increase in...

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    Naperville’s Sept. 11/Cmdr. Dan Shanower Memorial is the site of the city’s annual remembrance of the attacks and those who died, including Navy Cmdr. Dan Shanower, a Naperville native.

    Naperville memorial features survivor of Sept. 11 tragedy

    The piercing screams on the streets of Manhattan still haunt Joe Dittmar's mornings. His voice still trembles remembering the faces of firefighters, paramedics and police. Yet the 55-year-old defies the survivor's guilt that could have consumed him in the years since Sept. 11. Delivering speeches about what he lived through is his obligation, his responsibility, he says.

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    Kids stand in the Fox River to find unusual species of fish.

    Kids go fishing for the unusual in Fox River

    Crayfish, blackstripe minnows and bluegills. Oh, my! Those were just some of the 14 species of freshwater fish that children catalogued during a recent seining class with members of Citizens for Conservation, based in Barrington. "We want them to see just how much diversity of life there is in the water," says Pat Winkelman of Deer Park, the youth education coordinator for Citizens for...

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    A photo by Libertyville photographer Jeanne’ Sapienza is among those to be displayed at the David Adler Music and Arts Center.

    Libertyville photographer kicks off Adler Center series

    Starting Sept. 14, the David Adler Music and Arts Center, 1700 N. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville, will be displaying the works of a different artist every month in its first "Adler Center Exhibition Series."

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    Angilique Uriostegui, right, of Lake Villa, shows off the tattoo she got Sunday from artist Kinsey Branch, of Woodstock, during a fundraiser to help make the overdose prevention drug, Naloxone, more available in the Chicago suburbs.

    Tattoo event raises money for lifesaving drug

    More than a dozen people got tattoos in Fox Lake Sunday at a fundraiser for the Chicago Recovery Alliance, which will use the proceeds to purchase Naloxone, also known as Narcan, for use in the Chicago suburbs.

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    Gary Giordano, who was held for months in Aruba in the presumed death of his traveling companion, says he’s being sued by American Express, which issued an insurance policy in the woman’s name before their 2011 trip.

    Md. man held in Aruba sued by insurer

    American Express is suing a Maryland man detained for months in Aruba in the suspected death of his traveling companion last year. The federal lawsuit seeks to void a travel insurance policy that Gary Giordano, of Gaithersburg, took out in Robyn Gardner's name before their trip.

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    Hoffman Estates to inform businesses of energy savings

    Hoffman Estates wants local businesses not included in the village's electric aggregation program to know they can save money through a program offered by the Metropolitan Mayors Caucus. "It should definitely be offered to them," Mayor William McLeod said . "They can make their own decision."

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    A Syrian rebel fighter holds his rifle as he and other fighters head to Aleppo, Syria, to fight government forces Monday.

    Syria raises death toll in Aleppo blast to 30

    The death toll from a car bomb in Syria's largest city has risen to 30, state media said Monday, as the new international envoy to the country said the Syrian people are desperate to see peace and stability.

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    Illinois gives $8 million for National Guard site

    The state of Illinois is contributing $8 million to build an Illinois Army National Guard facility on the campus of Heartland Community College in Normal.

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    Adrianna Delhotal eventually played football at Elgin High School.

    Title IX compliance a result of lawsuit against Elgin U-46

    What began as one girl's desire to play football at Elgin High School some 11 years ago ultimately changed how girls in sports were treated at Elgin Area School District U-46 as well as the Upstate Eight Conference. And it was as a result of Title IX. "You had to have a daughter playing sports to know what it felt like to have your daughter be treated like a second-class citizen," said retired...

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    From left, Elgin Woman’s Club President Linda Fagan poses with Dr. Ian Jones, vice president of clinical performance at Sherman Hospital; Pat Heitman, Illinois president of the General Federation of Women’s Clubs; and Georgia Ross, past president of the Elgin Woman’s Club, during a recent anniversary function.

    Elgin Woman’s Club marks 125 years of service

    Can you imagine starting a new club for women with just an ad in the newspaper and expecting the group to last 125 years? While the odds might seem against you, that's exactly how the Elgin Woman's Club, which is celebrating its 125th anniversary this year, got its start.

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    World Trade Center site 11 years later

    NEW YORK — Here is a look at the status of the trade center’s major components, according to its developers:

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    ‘Seagull’ author Bach speaking

    Writer Richard Bach, author of the inspirational best-seller “Jonathan Livingston Seagull,” is able to speak a few words and respond to simple commands as he remains hospitalized in intensive care more than a week after his small plane went down in Washington state.

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    Congress back for short pre-election session

    WASHINGTON — Fresh off a five-week vacation, lawmakers return to Washington today for a truncated pre-election session in which Congress will do what it often does best: punt problems to the future.

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    Bicyclist dies in Utah-to-Wyoming race

    A bicyclist competing in a race from Logan, Utah, to Jackson Hole, Wyo., crashed on a bridge in Wyoming and fell about 35 feet to his death into the Snake River.

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    Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency Yukiya Amano of Japan made an unusually strong demand Monday for Iran to cooperate with an investigation into suspected secret work on nuclear weapons.

    U.N. nuke chief: Access to Iran site necessary now

    The head of the U.N. nuclear agency made an unusually strong demand Monday for Iran to cooperate with an investigation into suspected secret work on nuclear weapons, expressing his frustration with the lack of headway in the probe.

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    Plane from Wheeling airport crashes; pilot killed

    Officials from the Racine County medical examiner's office still have not released the name of the pilot of who was killed when the single-engine Beechcraft Bonanza that was flying from Chicago Executive Airport in Wheeling to Minocqua in north-central Wisconsin crashed Sunday.

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    Al-Qaida’s No. 2 in Yemen killed in airstrike

    An airstrike killed al-Qaida's No. 2 leader in Yemen along with five others traveling with him in one car on Monday, senior Yemeni Defense Ministry officials reported. If confirmed, Saeed al-Shihri's death would be a major blow to the militant group.

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    Illinois Wesleyan gets more than $500K in grants

    BLOOMINGTON — Illinois Wesleyan University is getting grants totaling more than $500,000 for the study of asteroids and molecules.More than $250,000 is in the form of a three-year grant from the National Science Foundation for the study of Trojan asteroids. Those asteroids are a group of more than 5,000 objects sharing Jupiter’s orbit around the sun.

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    Vice President Joe Biden be campaigning in Eau Claire, Wis., on Thursday.

    Biden, Ryan plan Wisconsin stops as race heats up

    Vice President Joe Biden and Republican vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan plan campaign stops in Wisconsin this week, another sign that the race to win the state's 10 electoral votes is heating up.

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    The home of Saad al-Hilli, in Claygate, England, who was shot dead on Wednesday with three others while vacationing in the French Alps, continued to be guarded Sunday by Surrey Police, who are assisting French police.

    Bomb squad checks home of Britons slain in France

    A bomb squad was called temporarily Monday to the suburban home of a British-Iraqi couple slain in the French Alps as investigators searched the house for clues to their brutal killing. Neighbors were evacuated and a broader security cordon was installed as bomb disposal experts went to Claygate, a village 17 miles southwest of London, after what local police described as "concerns around items...

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    Kids find grenades in C. Indiana city park

    Police say children found five grenades and several rounds of ammunition at a city park in central Indiana. State police say the grenades were found Sunday afternoon in a wooded area of Athletic Park near downtown Anderson.

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    Federal agents arrested Trenton, N.J., Mayor Tony Mack, along with his brother, Ralphiel, and convicted sex offender Joseph Giorgianni Monday as part of an ongoing corruption investigation. Federal prosecutors allege Mack agreed to use his influence in connection with a proposed parking garage project.

    Mayor of N.J.’s capital arrested in corruption probe

    Federal agents arrested the mayor of New Jersey's capital city early Monday as part of an ongoing corruption investigation into bribery allegations related to a parking garage project that was concocted as part of an FBI sting operation.

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    Afghan security men salute as U.S. officials handed over formal control of Afghanistan’s only large-scale U.S.-run prison to Kabul on Monday, even as disagreements between the two countries over the thousands of Taliban and terror suspects held there marred the transfer.

    U.S. hands over Bagram prison to Afghans

    U.S. officials handed over formal control of Afghanistan's only large-scale U.S.-run prison to Kabul on Monday, even as disagreements between the two countries over the thousands of Taliban and terror suspects held there marred the transfer.

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    The trial for Jack McCullough, who is accused in the 1957 kidnapping and death of 7-year-old Maria Ridulph of Sycamore is set to begin Monday, Sept. 10, in Sycamore. McCullough was arrested last year in Seattle and brought to Illinois. He’s pleaded not guilty.

    Trial expected to begin in girl’s 1957 killing

    More than 50 years after a young Sycamore girl's kidnapping and death grabbed national headlines, the man accused in the crimes is expected in court.

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    Wis. police to release video from Sikh shooting

    Police in suburban Milwaukee plan to release video that could show the final moments of life for the gunman who killed six worshippers at a Sikh temple last month.

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    Milwaukee ceremony to honor Sept. 11 victims

    The Wisconsin governor and Milwaukee-area officials are honoring the victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks with a special ceremony. Wreaths will be placed in the reflecting pool at the War Memorial Center in downtown Milwaukee Tuesday. Afterward the public can ring the bell of the USS Milwaukee in memory of the victims.

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    Ex-boyfriend being held in death of young Wis. mom

    Friends in Marshfield are remembering a young homicide victim as a doting mother, hard worker and a generous, compassionate person. Police are holding the former boyfriend of 18-year-old Maisie McCullough as a suspect in her death.

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    4 charged with retaliating over sorority complaint

    Prosecutors have charged four women with vandalizing a Ball State University student's car in retaliation for making a hazing complaint against a sorority. The four current or former Ball State students face felony criminal mischief charges.

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    Japan’s government says it has decided to purchase several disputed islands from their private owners in a step that is likely to anger China.

    Japan to buy disputed islands, angering China

    Japan's government said Monday it has decided to purchase several disputed islands from their private owners. China reacted swiftly, warning Japan of "serious consequences" if it proceeds with the plan. Chief Cabinet Secretary Osamu Fujimura said Japan will buy the three uninhabited islands in the East China Sea from a Japanese family it recognizes as the owner. China and Taiwan also claim the...

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    Suicide bomber kills at least 15 in Afghanistan

    An Afghan official says a suicide bomber has blown himself up in a crowded main square in the northern city of Kunduz, killing at least 15 people.

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    President Barack Obama greets people during a campaign stop at Florida Institute of Technology’s Charles and Ruth Clemente Center in Melbourne, Fla., Sunday, Sept. 9. President Barack Obama squeaked out a fundraising victory over Mitt Romney in August.

    Obama squeaks out Aug. fundraising win over Romney

    President Barack Obama squeaked out a fundraising victory over Mitt Romney in August as the candidates gear up for the final stretch of their closely contested campaign. Obama raised more than $114 million in August, while Romney brought in a little more than $111 million, according to numbers released early Monday by the rival campaigns.

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    Illegal immigrants prepare to enter a bus after being processed at Tucson Sector U.S. Border Patrol Headquarters Thursday in Tucson, Ariz. New strategies being implemented by the U.S. government, including the halting of one-way flights back to the interior cities in Mexico, are in place to streamline processing and expedite a return to Mexico.

    Border Patrol halts Mexico flights

    The U.S. government has halted flights home for Mexicans caught entering the country illegally in the deadly summer heat of Arizona's deserts, a money-saving move that ends a seven-year experiment that cost taxpayers nearly $100 million.

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    PSU to weigh renaming Schultz child care center

    Penn State's trustees will consider renaming a child care center named for a retired administrator charged with failing to report suspected child abuse committed by Jerry Sandusky.

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    Rendering of a proposed new Island Lake Village Hall building.

    Proponents of Island Lake referendum looking ahead

    Not a single vote has been cast, but the Island Lake resident who led a grass-roots campaign to put a referendum about a proposed building plan on the November ballot feels like he's already won. “We’ve got the public involved now,” Beeson said. “The word is getting out, and it’s getting out strong.”

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    Police: Officer fatally shot in suburban Detroit

    A man suspected in the fatal shooting of a 12-year veteran police officer barricaded himself inside a suburban Detroit home Monday morning as police surrounded the area, authorities said.

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    2 rescued from sinking plane off Calif. central coast

    A father and his adult son were rescued from a sinking plane that crashed into the ocean off California's central coast on Sunday, authorities said.

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    Carol Miller of Glen Ellyn will wear her husband’s great-grandmother’s wedding dress from 1860 when she gives a presentation on the history of the Glen Ellyn Woman’s Club on Tuesday, Sept. 11.

    Glen Ellyn Woman’s Club still active after 117 years

    Back in the fall of 1895 when Glen Ellyn had only 600 residents, women of the community decided to get together to study topics of the day and work for the improvement of the village. One hundred seventeen years later, the group now called the Glen Ellyn Woman's Club, still is still getting together and working for the betterment of the community.

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    The Knights of Columbus of Wheeling and village leaders recently saluted Ted Scanlon for his and his family’s 100 years of service in Wheeling. The village also renamed a conference room in village hall after the Scanlon family.

    Scanlon family honored in Wheeling

    The village of Wheeling honored one local family for 100 years of service with a special recognition ceremony and renamed the village hall's community room after them. "It's quite an honor," said Dave Scanlon. "My dad (Ted) just turned 90, so it was nice to have him still be around for this. You start working here at the age of 20 and you don't expect it to turn into something like this."

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    Dawn Patrol: Pilot dies in plane crash; hit-and-run driver sought

    A pilot was killed Sunday when a small plane from Wheeling crashed into a yard along Eagle Lake in Kansasville in southeastern Wisconsin. Father ticketed after crash into train that injures young South Elgin girl. Chicago Teachers Union set to strike. Boy killed in McHenry County hit-and-run. Lehmann Mansion celebrates 100th anniversary. Bears offense leads team to win.

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    Courtney Wilt, 16, of Inverness explains her physics project to her fellow classmates as her project partner Leah Thomas, 16, of Barrington looks on during summer school at Barrington High School.

    Title IX: Local high schools work to bridge achievement gap

    While girls consistently outdo boys in reading, female students seem to still struggle to keep up in math and science. Although girls and women have made significant progress in the 40 years since the introduction of Title IX — the law that prohibits educational programs that receive federal funding from discriminating on the basis of sex — students and educators say more work is...

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    Chicago Bears Brandon Marshall lets this first quarter pass slips through his fingers during the Bears home opener at Soldier Field in Chicago.

    Weekend in Review: Title IX turns 40, Bears win

    What you may have missed over the weekend: Title IX turns 40; Huntley 8-year-old honors his childhood friend who died of cancer; 6-year-old killed in hit-and-run; Chicago teachers strike for first time in 25 years; S. Elgin dad charged in car-train collision; Rosemont's Stephens to run for re-election; Serena Williams wins U.S. Open; Bears rout Colts; Royals beat Sox; and Cubs sweep Pirates.

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    Passengers board Pace Route 855 at Wabash and Monroe streets in the Loop Wednesday.

    Transit writer takes ride on wild side — almost

    I get my kicks on Route 855. It’s my kind of maverick, stick-it-to-the-man Pace bus. Now, if you’ve ever sat stupefied in a Pace bus as it bumbles through suburban traffic, going rogue is the last thing you associate with a Pace commute. But Route 855 is special. Why? Shoulder-riding. On the Stevenson Expressway (I-55).

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    Glen Ellyn Village President Mark Pfefferman won’t seek a second term — a village custom — though he admits some supporters urged him to buck the trend.

    Glen Ellyn mayor won’t buck trend, seek 2nd term

    Though some residents have encouraged him to do so, Glen Ellyn Village President Mark Pfefferman says he won't be seeking a second term at the helm of village government. That fits the town tradition of elected officials serving only a single term. "I realized I would be taking my attention off completion of this year’s (village) goals if I were to seek re-election,” Pfefferman wrote.

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    Looking like the cat in the hat with her painted face, Savannah Alexander, 3, of Pingree Grove shows her excitement with an award winning smile on the second day of Septemberfest in Schaumburg on Saturday.

    Images: The Week In Pictures
    This edition of The Week In Pictures features several festivals, an old-fashioned fair, an olympian, and a Miss Piggy impersonator.

Sports

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    Laura Stoecker/lstoecker@dailyherald.com Week Three — Images from the Geneva vs. Batavia football game Friday, September 7, 2012.

    Batavia’s dynamic duo running on all cylinders

    With one-third of the high school football regular season already in the books, this is a good opportunity to review some of the early happenings.

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    Turning 60 a good time to reflect on sports, life

    As he turns 60, Mike North looks back on the important role that sports have played in his life.

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    Britain’s Andy Murray poses with the trophy after beating Serbia’s Novak Djokovic in the championship match Monday at the U.S. Open in New York.

    Murray finally wins Grand Slam with U.S. Open title

    His considerable lead, and chance at history, slipping away, Andy Murray dug deep for stamina and mental strength, shrugging off a comeback bid and outlasting Novak Djokovic 7-6 (10), 7-5, 2-6, 3-6, 6-2 on Monday to win the U.S. Open championship at Flushing Meadows. "Even after I won the Olympics," Murray recalled Monday, "I still got asked, `When are you going to win a Grand Slam?"'

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    San Diego Chargers kicker Nate Kaeding boots one of his five field goals Monday against the Oakland Raiders in Oakland, Calif.

    Chargers beat Raiders 22-14 in opener

    Philip Rivers and the San Diego Chargers capitalized on mistakes instead of making them for a change. Rivers threw a 6-yard touchdown pass to Malcom Floyd and Nate Kaeding kicked five field goals to spoil Dennis Allen's debut as Oakland coach by beating the Raiders 22-14 on Monday night.

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    Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco throws to a receiver in the second half Monday against the Cincinnati Bengals in Baltimore.

    Ravens roll over Bengals

    Joe Flacco threw for 299 yards and two touchdowns, Ed Reed took an interception 34 yards for a score, and the Ravens rolled to a 44-13 victory Monday night to extend their home winning streak to 11 games.

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    Wins for Vernon Hills, Carmel

    Vernon Hills 2, North Chicago 0: Jeremy Cohen and Roger Ramirez each scored a second-half goal for Vernon Hills to break up a scoreless tie at halftime. The Cougars improve to 7-2-1 on the season.Carmel 2, Stevenson 1: Adam Cloe scored a goal and assisted on another to lead Carmel (4-3-1) to the win. Jeremy Jenich scored the Corsairs’ other goal. Stevenson scored on a penalty kick.

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    Girls golf roundup

    Barrington wins: At Barrington Hills Country Club, Barrington (181) defeated Crystal Lake Co-op (188) and Stevenson (192).Stevenson’s top finisher was Stephanie Miller with a 39.Lake Forest d. Libertyville: Despite a 40 from Camilla Ou, Libertyville was edged out by Lake Forest, 166-174. The Wildcats fall to 6-1.Mundelein d. Warren: Mundelein got a 179-200 victory over Warren at Countryside.Lake Zurich d. Grant: Lake Zurich got a 206-269 victory over Grant at Antioch Golf Club.

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    Antioch, Vernon Hills claim victory

    Antioch d. Grant: Despite a first-place finish from Grant’s Lindsey Lewis (20:07), Antioch got a 21-38 win over Grant. Antioch’s top finisher was Alyssa Aschenbrener. She took second place with a 20:51.Vernon Hills wins: Vernon Hills won a three-way meet involving Wauconda (18-35) and Round Lake (15-50).Kristen Whitney of Vernon Hills took first place with a 19:54. Wauconda’s top finisher was Lexi Brunn. She finished third with a 20:05 and Round Lake’s Bianca Orteaga was tenth with a 21:36.

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    Audrain paces Grant victory

    Grant d. Antioch: Peter Audrain took first place with a 17:41 to lead Grant to a 24-33 win over Antioch. Antioch’s top finisher was Anthony Formella with an 18:03.Vernon Hills wins: Vernon Hills won a three-way meet involving Wauconda (15-49) and Round Lake (18-43).Kyle Whitney took first place for Vernon Hills with a 16:18. Round Lake’s Angel Carrera finished in third place with a 16:34 and Wauconda’s top finisher was Austin Pequeno, who placed ninth with an 18:00.Stevenson d. Libertyville: Stevenson dominated by sweeping the first nine places in getting a 15-50 victory over Libertyville.Sam Oh led the way with a first-place finish of 16:08. Libertyville’s Nick Korhymel finished tenth with a 17:28.

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    Lakes gets victory No. 10

    The Lakes girls volleyball team improved to 10-1 on the season with a 25-19, 25-23 victory over Carmel in nonconference play Monday.Sarah Horner led the way with 15 kills. She also had 6 digs. Shannon Grant rolled up a team-high 21 digs for the Eagles, who also got 27 assists and 2 aces from setter Stephanie Reed. Haley Halberg added 4 blocks.For Carmel, which drops to 11-5, Sierra Kepski and Maura Zawaski each had 6 digs.Libertyville d. St. Ignatius: Julia Smagacz and Taylor Zant each had 7 kills to lead Libertyville past St. Ignatius, 25-19, 25-20.Setter Cindy Zhou rolled up 17 assists and Kristen Webb finished with a team-high 14 digs.Zion-Benton d. Grant: Zion-Benton outlasted Grant, 25-15, 24-26, 25-17.The Bulldogs got 8 kills out of Brooke Buckley, 11 digs out of Jamie Reiser and 15 assists out of setter Taylor Rossi.Glenbard West d. Antioch: Antioch dropped to 7-3 with a 21-25, 16-25 loss to Glenbard West.Marissa Grant had 6 assists and Sam Falco had 3 kills for the Sequoits.Fremd d. Lake Zurich: Fremd moved to 9-2 with a 25-23, 28-26 victory over the Bears.

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    Monday’s girls volleyball scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls volleyball matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls tennis scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls tennis meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls swimming scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls swimming meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s boys soccer scoreboard
    High school varsity results of Monday's boys soccer matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s boys golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's boys golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s boys cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's boys cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Ventura’s grade still ‘incomplete’

    Things look good for White Sox manager Robin Ventura right now but his final grade will be based on his performance down the stretch.

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    Alex Rios is greeted at home by A.J. Pierzynski after Rios hit a 3-run home run off Detroit Tigers starting pitcher Rick Porcello on Monday night. Dewayne Wise and Paul Konerko scored on the sixth-inning homer. Pierzynski followed with a solo shot.

    White Sox turn on the power to take series opener

    The White Sox have some warts, sure. Hitting with runners in scoring position has been a losing battle the past few weeks, when it often has looked like the Sox would have trouble driving a nail into a snowdrift. They are too reliant on home runs, which just might ultimately come back and bite them. The starting rotation has been sputtering, and the White Sox' pitching staff as a whole has been having some location issues.

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    Recent Cubs call-up Dave Sappelt watches his two-RBI double during Monday’s seventh inning in Houston.

    Triple-A call-up drives in 3 for Cubs

    Dave Sappelt scored the go-ahead run on a wild pitch and had three RBIs, leading the Cubs to a 4-1 win against the Astros on Monday night in a matchup of the teams with the worst records in the majors. Sappelt, who was recalled from Triple-A Iowa on Sept. 1, drove in his first run for the Cubs with a double to the left field corner to put Chicago up 1-0 in the second inning.

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    Fremd prevails at Lake Zurich

    Fremd's girls volleyball team improved to 9-2 with a 25-23, 28-26 at Lake Zurich on Monday night.

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    Consistent Kaneland too much for Rosary

    The first doubles match told the story Monday afternoon in Aurora. Rosary senior Paige Robinson and her partner, junior Andrea Goyao, had all the early momentum against Kaneland sophomores Madi Jurcenko and Angelica Jelly' Emmanouil in the schools' nonconference girls tennis dual match at Marmion. But the Knights' No. 1 partnership, with Jurcenko, a returning state qualifier in the event, came alive with an unfettered abandon. The duo captured 12 of the next 13 games to win going away, 6-3 and 6-1, to power the Knights to a 5-2 victory over the Royals.

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    West Chicago enjoys sister act

    Two sisters on one team is hardly unheard of to West Chicago coach Kris Hasty. But three? "I don't think I've had that before," said Hasty, now in her 19th year. "It's a new experience." It seems to be working like a charm. West Chicago, with recently called up freshman Ronni Katarzynski joining sisters Mary Kate (a junior) and Kayla (a senior) on the varsity Wildcats, bounced back from a three-match losing streak to win the Bartlett Invite over the weekend.

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    White Sox catcher A.J. Pierzynski is greeted outside the dugout by the bat boy, left, and Alexei Ramirez after hitting a home run off Detroit Tigers starting pitcher Rick Porcello during Monday’s sixth inning at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Sox power past Tigers in key matchup

    Jose Quintana pitched effectively into the eighth inning, Alex Rios and A.J. Pierzynski hit back-to-back homers in the sixth and the White Sox beat the Detroit Tigers 6-1 Monday night to increase their AL Central lead to three games. The White Sox had lost seven straight to Detroit, managed just two hits against Rick Porcello (9-12) and were 0 for 10 with runners in scoring position when an error on Detroit second baseman Omar Infante gave them an opening.

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    Benet keeps proving itself

    Benet and Downers Grove North both lost key pieces off last year's winning teams. Rebuilding is going in two distinctly different directions. The No. 3 Redwings remained unbeaten Monday, rolling past winless Downers Grove North 25-18, 25-13 in Lisle.

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    White Sox starting pitcher Gavin Floyd is expected to return to the mound Wednesday against the Tigers.

    Looks like Sox’ Floyd will be a ‘go’ Wednesday

    Gavin Floyd's elbow is feeling good, so the White Sox' right-handed starter is expected to come off the disabled list and start against the Tigers Wednesday night, moving Francisco Liriano to the bullpen.

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    Stevenson’s Liza Pflugradt (16) gets a shot past Hersey’s Abby Fesl on Monday night at Hersey.

    Stevenson takes Hersey’s best shot

    Stevenson outside hitter Liza Pflugradt summed it up well."When we play a great team, it just makes us play better," said the 6-foot Jacksonville State-bound senior after a battle between two of the top Daily Herald girls volleyball teams on Tuesday night. Sure enough, every time Hersey (8-3) appeared to be making a winning move in both sets, Stevenson (11-1) smartly answered the call with quality play of its own. And when Khalia Donaldson put down back-to-back kills for the match's final 2 points, the Patriots held off the host Huskies 25-22, 25-23 at the Ken Carter Gymnasium in Arlington Heights.

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    Boys soccer/Top 20
    Naperville Central, Warren and West Chicago have the top three spots in the Daily Herald's boys soccer Top 20.

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    Girls volleyball/Top 20
    St. Francis, Glenbard West and Benet remained the top 3 teams in this week's Daily Herald Top 20 girls volleyball rankings.

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    St. Edward’s Katie Swanson hits past Aurora Christian’s Faith Montalbano Monday in Elgin.

    St. Edward doesn’t fold in the end

    A young team could easily have folded after falling behind by 7 points in a deciding third game. The St. Edward girls volleyball team did not Monday night. The Green Wave rallied from a 9-2 deficit in Game 3 to defeat Aurora Christian, 25-20, 23-25, 25-22, in Suburban Christian Conference action in Elgin.

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    Jacobs Athletic Hall of Fame set for first inductions

    The Jacobs Athletic Hall of Fame will hold its inaugural induction ceremony on Friday prior to and during the Golden Eagles' football game with McHenry. Sarah (Ahnen) Rappaport, Kelly Becker, Don Biagioni, Kim Kelly, Jorie (Miguel) Fontana, Tom Schafer, Joe Scime, Mark Slimko, Matt Whalen and Pat Whalen will make up the first class of former Golden Eagles athletes/coaches to be inducted into the Hall of Fame.

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    Hernandez, Herrera combine for Glenbard West

    Glenbard West senior Jimmy Hernandez crossed the soccer ball into the penalty area, and Shawn Herrera headed it past Willowbrook goalkeeper Luke Ruszkowski in the seventh minute of Monday's West Suburban Conference crossover.

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    Barrington’s Conrad shares medalist honors at Inverness

    Barrington golfer Greg Conrad has picked up this season where he left off last year — and the year before. That's a very good thing for the Broncos. The senior's unprecented run of success continues unabated in 2012, as Conrad shot a sparkling 72 at Inverness Golf Club to share medalist honors at the Fremd Invitational despite some difficult conditions Monday.

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    Northwestern’s Venric Mark celebrates a touchdown against Vanderbilt during the second half of the Wildcats’ victory last Saturday.

    Northwestern RB off to solid start

    When Venric Mark arrived on campus at Norhwestern, even the coaches underestimated his talent. They thought the 5-foot-8 Texas native was better suited at wide receiver and return specialist. Now that he's the starting running back, Mark leads the Big Ten in all-purpose yards.

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    Bears defensive end Henry Melton sacks Colts quarterback Andrew Luck in Sunday’s season-opening victory.

    Bears’ Melton looking to build on success

    The Bears don't get much time to savor the flavor of their opening-day victory since they face the Packers Thursday night in Green Bay. But for a player like Henry Melton it means only a couple days wait to see if he can build on an exceptional first-game performance.

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    Fireworks explode in the Astrodome as the Cubs, left, and Houston Astros lined up before the start of the last season opener to be played in the Astrodome, Tuesday, April 6, 1999, in Houston.

    Cubs not exactly sad to see Houston depart for AL

    The Cubs are making their final visit this week to Houston as a National League city. Although the Astros have played in sparkling Minute Maid Park since 2000, longtime Cubs fans remember nightmarish games in the Astrodome. So does Cubs Hall of Famer Billy Williams.

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    Carmel’s Hendricks navigates successful summer in wooden bat league

    Former Carmel baseball standouts Tim and Kevin Hendricks were asked to play for the North Shore Navigators in the Futures Collegiate Baseball League this past summer.Unfortunately, due to surgery for a tear in his labrum, Kevin was unable to play in the New England wooden bat league this summer. But Tim made his presence felt in a big way for the Navigators, who are managed by ex-major leaguer Richie Hebner.

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    Tom Calbi of Barrington Prairie Middle School won the 2012 Illinois State Elementary School Association state golf championship for the second straight year on Saturday. Here he’s flanked by IJGA tournament directors Brad Slocum, left, and Matt Wennmaker.

    Pro basketball career takes flight for Wheeling’s McClellan

    Chris McClellan played basketball the last four years at Lewis, a university in Romeoville which specializes in aviation. McClellan will now know first-hand about flying long distance. The former Lewis and Wheeling basketball standout has signed a contract to play for Uni-Riesen Leipzig in Germany's Pro A Division.

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    Tim Jennings picked off 2 passes during the Bears’ win over the Colts on Sunday.

    No WR duties coming for sure-handed Jennings

    Bears cornerback Tim Jennings showed ball skills worthy of a wide receiver while picking off a pair of passes Sunday, but coach Lovie Smith is content to keep him on the defensive side of the ball.

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    Most memorable Cubs games in Houston since 1998

    The Cubs will be done with Houston as a National League city after this week's series with the Astros. But the memories remain. Daily Herald Cubs writer Bruce Miles looks at a few from the past 15 seasons.

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    JOE LEWNARD/jlewnard@dailyherald.com Bertha, 87, and Peter Broustis, soon to turn 89, of Park Ridge will be the oldest volunteers working at the Ryder Cup golf tournament at the Medinah Country Club later this month.

    Oldest Ryder Cup volunteers are young at heart

    Peter Broustis, who will turn 89 on the final day of competition, will serve as the oldest Ryder Cup volunteer. And he won't simply be another course marshal, no sir, he'll be smack dab in the middle of the mania as he takes his spot on the first tee box Friday morning, perhaps the rowdiest place on the course."I'm looking forward to it," he says.

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    Sky scouting report
    Sky scout for Tuesday: Minnesota Lynx at Sky

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    UIC basketball adds 6-9 transfer, Crittle

    UIC basketball has added former UCF and Oregon center Josh Crittle to is 2012-13 roster, head coach Howard Moore announced Monday. Crittle is transferring to UIC to complete his college basketball eligibility and attend graduate school. Crittle, a 6-foot-9 center and native of Bellwood, will have one season of eligibility remaining.

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    Northern Illinois quarterback Jordan Lynch and the Huskies will hit the road to play Army this weekend. NIU's next home game is Sept. 22 against Kansas.

    ESPN3 to carry NIU-Kansas football game

    Northern Illinois' home game versus Kansas on Sept. 22 will kick off at 2:30 p.m. (CT) and will be streamed online at ESPN3, Mid-American Conference officials announced Monday.

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    Ryder Cup week adds star-studded celebrity lineup

    You might not think comedian Bill Murray, hockey legend Stan Mikita, singer Justin Timberlake, former Bulls star Scottie Pippen, Olympian Michael Phelps and comedian George Lopez have much in common, but they do. They’ll all take part in the first Ryder Cup Captains & Celebrity Scramble golf tournament Sept. 25 at Medinah Country Club, host venue of the 39th Ryder Cup.

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    Vanderbilt's Jordan Rodgers (11) scrambles away from the tackle of Northwesterns's Dean Lowry during Saturday's game in Evanston. Lowry's teammmate, linebacker Chi Chi Ariguzo, earned Defensive Player of the Week in the Big Ten for compiling 10 tackles in the contest.

    Northwestern linebacker earns Big Ten honors

    Northwestern linebacker Chi Chi Ariguzo earned Big Ten Defensive Player of the Week honors for his efforts in the Wildcats' win over Vanderbilt Saturday. Big Ten officials also honored Michigan quarterback Denard Robinson, punter Cody Webster of Purdue and freshman Devin Funchess of Michigan for their play last weekend.

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    Mike North video: Mike reviews Week One of the NFL season

    The Bears win big and could beat Green Bay this week to make  the Pack  0-2. The Buffalo  Bills looked ordinary against the New York Jets, but the Washington Redskins' quarterback, RG 3, sure didn't in his victory over the New Orleans Saints.

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    Sky loses lead, falls to Sun 82-77

    The Connecticut Sun needed to mix things up Sunday to get a needed home win. Tina Charles scored 24 points to rally first-place Connecticut to an 82-77 victory over the Chicago Sky. Renee Montgomery had 12 points, Tan White added 11 and Kelsey Griffin 10 for Sun (21-8), which trailed by 14 late in the second quarter.

Business

  •  
    Lake County and municipal officials have reached a tentative deal that could pave the way for a shopping center on the Dimucci family's vacant property near Hawthorn Woods shown here in the background.

    Critics to have their say about Dimucci proposal

    Critics of a plan that would allow a shopping center to be built near Hawthorn Woods will have their turn at the podium Tuesday during the latest public discussion of the controversial proposal. The Lake County zoning board of appeals isn't expected to rule on whether the Dimucci family's land at Route 12 and Old McHenry Road should be rezoned from estate to commercial. That could happen at a meeting tentatively scheduled for Thursday.

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    The former Wyndham O’Hare Hotel at 6810 N. Mannheim Road in Rosemont reportedly has been sold to new owners.

    Sale of former Wyndham O’Hare in the works

    The shuttered Wyndham O'Hare Hotel in Rosemont reportedly has been sold to an investment group, officials said. Rosemont Mayor Bradley Stephens and Unite Here, a union that represents area hotel workers, confirmed that a group of new investors plans to reopen the building, at 6810 Mannheim Road, though the date isn't yet available.

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    Can the wind power the entire world? Two new scientific studies say yes — technically.

    Studies: Wind potentially could power the world

    Earth has more than enough wind to power the entire world, at least technically, two new studies find.

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    Workers load goods on a truck near a wholesale market for fashion clothing in Beijing Monday. China’s imports shrank unexpectedly in August in a sign its economic slump is worsening and Chinese President Hu Jintao warned growth could slow further, prompting expectations of possible new stimulus spending.

    Stocks end lower ahead of Fed meeting

    Stocks slipped on Wall Street as troubling economic news from China and the U.S. outweighed optimism about more stimulus from the Federal Reserve.

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    Navistar CEO Lewis Campbell, seen here, is being pressured by billionaire investor Carl Icahn, who on Sunday threatened a proxy fight and called the truckmaker a “poster child for abysmal business decisions and poor corporate governance” in a letter to Navistar’s board.

    Navistar criticizes Icahn’s ‘unproductive tactics’

    Lisle-based Navistar International Corp., which ousted its chief executive officer amid an inquiry from regulators and a failed engine strategy, called billionaire investor Carl Icahn's threat of a proxy fight "unproductive."

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    Zynga employees work in the Mafia Wars 2 studio after a Zynga event, in San Francisco. Aynga and Facebook might be sjputtering, but optimism in Silicon Valley can be seen in a variety of ways in this area that covers roughly 40 miles from San Jose to San Francisco.

    Silicon Valley isn’t sharing Facebook’s misery

    Silicon Valley, it turns out, doesn't revolve around the stock prices of Facebook and its playful sidekick, Zynga. By most indications, tech companies in this hub of innovation are humming along.

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    In this 2008 file photo, then-Democratic vice presidential candidate Sen. Joe Biden mingles with passengers aboard the Amtrak Acela train from Washington to Wilmington, Del. The platform Republicans adopted at their convention last week includes a call for full privatization and an end to subsidies for the nation’s passenger rail operator.

    Amtrak funding in crosshairs in presidential race

    The platform Republicans adopted at their recent convention includes a call for full privatization and an end to subsidies for the nation's passenger rail operator, which gobbled up almost $1.5 billion in federal funds last year.

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    Las Vegas strip gambling revenue jumps 28% in july on baccarat

    Gambling revenue on the Las Vegas Strip surged 28 percent to $597.5 million in July, driven by an increase in baccarat play.Total Nevada gaming revenue rose 17 percent to $1.01 billion in July from a year earlier, the state’s Gaming Control Board said today in a statement. Monthly proceeds for Clark County, which includes downtown Las Vegas as well as the Strip, increased 21 percent to $867 million, the board said.Strip baccarat revenue more than doubled to $190 million in July, compared to the same period last year. Craps also gained.MGM Resorts International, the largest casino operator on the Las Vegas Strip, rose 1 percent to $10.81 at 10:51 a.m. in New York. Wynn Resorts Ltd. gained 0.3 percent to $103.01 while Caesars Entertainment Corp. fell 0.3 percent to $7.20.

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    How iPhone availability has grown in US

    Since Verizon Wireless broke AT&T's exclusive grip on the iPhone last year, several other phone carriers now offer Apple's popular smartphone. On Monday, T-Mobile said it will make a stronger bid for used iPhones from AT&T as Apple prepares to launch a new version. Here's a look at how iPhone availability has expanded in the U.S.

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    T-Mobile USA, the only “Big 4” phone company that doesn’t sell the iPhone, now wants to snag used ones from AT&T.

    T-Mobile launches campaign to lure iPhone users

    T-Mobile USA, the only "Big 4" phone company that doesn't sell the iPhone, now wants to snag used ones from AT&T. Starting Wednesday, when Apple is expected to reveal a new iPhone model, T-Mobile will start advertising that AT&T iPhone owners who are out of contract can switch to T-Mobile. "We expect that consumers will start trading in older devices," said Harry Thomas, T-Mobile's director of marketing.

  •  
    Toys R Us plans to launch its own tablet computer aimed at children called Tabeo on Oct. 21, a low-priced entry into the increasingly crowded tablet business.

    Toys R Us to release own tablet

    Toys R Us plans to launch its own tablet computer aimed at children called Tabeo on Oct. 21, a low-priced entry into the increasingly crowded tablet business. The news comes ahead of the holiday season, which can account for up to 40 percent of retailers’ annual sales. Toys R Us has focused on exclusive toys rather than discounts as it faces tough competition from online retailers like Amazon.com and discounters like Wal-Mart Stores Inc.

  •  
    Kodak is reshuffling some executives and continuing to cut jobs as the pioneering photography company tries to emerge from bankruptcy protection.

    Kodak job cuts continue as it aims to exit Ch. 11

    Kodak is reshuffling some executives and continuing to cut jobs as the pioneering photography company tries to emerge from bankruptcy protection. Eastman Kodak Co. said it cut approximately 2,700 employees worldwide since the beginning of the year, and plans to eliminate roughly 1,000 more by 2012's end. Annual savings from these cuts should reach about $330 million, the company said Monday in a regulatory filing.

  •  

    Groupon names ex-KPMG executive as accounting chief

    Groupon Inc., operator of the largest daily-deal website, named former KPMG LLC executive Brian Stevens as Chief Accounting Officer.

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    HP expands job cuts by 2,000

    ewlett-Packard Co. is planning to cut about 2,000 more jobs than it had previously announced, as CEO Meg Whitman tries to turn the company around.

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    Beth McAndrews of Barrington is employed at the Village of Deer Park.

    Barrington firm helps people find jobs

    When Beth McAndrews of Barrington started looking for a job, she didn't necessarily have high hopes to find anything: She had been out of a job since 1996, looking after her four children. Through Barrington's CareerPlace, however, she found a job at the Village of Deer Park -- and even helped another person find a position there, too.

  •  

    BP sells some Gulf of Mexico assets for $5.55 billion

    Oil company BP said Monday it is selling some deep-water assets in the Gulf Mexico to Plains Exploration & Production Co. for $5.55 billion, a big step in BP's drive to cover the cost of its oil well blowout in the Gulf two years ago and concentrate investment elsewhere.

  •  
    Michael Richards, a certified personal trainer and Dr. Gail Bryant are the owners of Wellness 365 in Arlington Heights.

    Arlington Heights business owners talk about wellness

    Michael Richards and Dr. Gail Bryant, owners of Wellness 365 in Arlington Heights, talk about how they have integrated medical and wellness care through a variety of services, including traditional medicine, personal training, lifestyle coaching, nutrition counseling, and stress management education.

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    Who’s your best sales rep? Probably Google

    Google may well be your best salesperson. Small Business Columnist Jim Kendall talks to a Naperville business owner about how it's the search engine's job to get people to your website.

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    Camille Caffarelli

    Vision of Crystal Lake executive helps others

    Kukec's People features Camille Caffarelli, a blind businesswoman who started Horizons for the Blind in Crystal Lake.

  •  
    A Seoul court ruled last month that Apple and Samsung Electronics Co. infringed each other’s patents, ordering the companies to stop selling some smartphones and tablet computers in South Korea and pay damages.

    Apple asks Seoul court to delay sales ban in Korea

    Apple Inc. asked a Seoul court to put on hold its Aug. 24 order barring sales of some of its smartphones and tablet computers in South Korea. No timeframe has been set for a decision on Apple's request, according to Kim Mun Sung, a spokesman for the Seoul Central District Court.

  •  
    Japan Airlines passenger planes park on the tarmac of Tokyo’s Haneda Airport in Tokyo Monday, Sept. 10, 2012. Japan Airlines Co. is raising 663 billion yen ($8.5 billion) in its initial public offering, pricing its shares at the top of its range at 3,790 yen ($48) ó the world’s second biggest IPO this year after Facebook.

    Japan Airlines $8.5 billion IPO is priced at top of range

    Japan Airlines Co.'s parent priced a 663 billion yen ($8.5 billion) initial public offering in the carrier at the top of a range after record earnings lured investors to the biggest IPO since Facebook Inc. The stock price was set at 3,790 yen, according to a regulatory filing today. Shares in the Tokyo-based carrier will begin trading on the city's stock exchange Sept. 19.

  •  
    Financial markets have started the week on a fairly flat note as traders wait for further developments in Europe’s debt crisis and the U.S. Federal Reserve’s latest policy meeting.

    Markets steady as traders await key euro events

    Financial markets have started the week on a fairly flat note as traders wait for further developments in Europe's debt crisis and the U.S. Federal Reserve's latest policy meeting. Traders will have a number of events to monitor in Europe over the next few days including a meeting of euro finance ministers as well as the German Constitutional Court's verdict on the legality of Europe's planned permanent bailout fund.

  •  
    China’s vehicle sales grew by an unexpectedly strong 8.3 percent in August despite the countryís economic slowdown. Data released Monday, Sept. 10 by an industry group showed customers bought 1.5 million passenger cars and other vehicles. The growth rate was up slightly from the previous month.

    China’s imports shrink in sign downturn worsening

    China's imports shrank unexpectedly in August in a sign its economic slump is worsening and the Chinese president warned growth could slow further, prompting expectations of possible new stimulus spending. Imports declined 2.6 percent from a year earlier, below analysts' expectations of growth in low single digits, data showed Monday. That came on top of August's decline in factory output to a three-year low and other signs growth is still decelerating despite repeated stimulus efforts.

  •  
    The U.S. government is selling more of its shares in insurer American International Group Inc. in a move that should decrease its holdings below a majority stake for the first time since the $182 billion bailout in 2008. AIG said Sunday, Sept. 9, 2012 that the Treasury Department was selling $18 billion worth of AIG common shares.

    Treasury to cut AIG stake below half in $18B sale

    he U.S. government is selling more of its shares in insurer American International Group Inc., in a move that should decrease its holdings below a majority stake for the first time since the $182 billion bailout in 2008. The sale is the latest step to recoup taxpayer money spent on the largest bailout of the financial crisis. AIG said Sunday that the Treasury Department is selling $18 billion worth of its common shares to institutional investors.

  •  
    Gold, trading near a six-month high, may gain for a third day on speculation central banks from the U.S. to China will add to stimulus as economic data disappoints. Palladium rallied to the highest level in four months.

    Gold advances toward six-month high as stimulus bets increase

    Gold, trading near a six-month high, may gain for a third day on speculation central banks from the U.S. to China will add to stimulus as economic data disappoints. Palladium rallied to the highest level in four months.

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    J.C. Penney brings back free haircuts for kids

    Children who missed the opportunity to get a free haircut at J.C. Penney last month will get plenty more chances. After an overwhelming response to the chain's free haircut program offer for children in August —1.6 million haircuts, to be exact — Penney will be making it a permanent offer every Sunday, starting Nov. 4.

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    EBay, Expedia see mobile bookings gaining

    Expedia Inc., Fandango Inc. and EBay Inc. are among online retailers benefiting from surging mobile sales, as on-the-go consumers increasingly use wireless devices to book hotels and buy event tickets. Expedia, operator of a travel bookings website, may see U.S. hotel purchases via handheld devices taking up half its total within two years, according Joe Megibow, general manager of Expedia.com. Fandango said 30 percent of movie tickets it sold this summer were through smartphones and tablets.

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    Hooters tries to keep image, but lure female customers

    Hooters Chief Executive Officer Terry Marks wants to remove the Hooters stigma so men aren't embarrassed to put the chain on an expense account and women aren't as quick to veto a meal there.

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    Nokia said last week it was sorry for not making clear that a promotional video and still photos within an advertisement weren’t captured with its new Lumia 920 smartphone.

    Nokia conducts ethics review after publishing misleading ad

    Nokia Oyj, the smartphone maker trying to revive sales with new devices unveiled last week, said an ethics officer will conduct a review into why the company published misleading marketing materials for the products. The ethics and compliance officer is working on an independent report "to understand what happened," Susan Sheehan, a Nokia spokeswoman, said. Nokia said last week it was sorry for not making clear that a promotional video and still photos within that clip weren't captured with its new Lumia 920 smartphone.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Vicki Hofer with son Terry at their home.

    Cerebral palsy doesn’t stop son, mom from training

    When Vickie Hoefer sets off on her daily three-mile neighborhood run, her son is keeping pace beside her. For most, the run wouldn't be much of a challenge. But for Terry, a 19-year-old with cerebral palsy who relies on a motorized wheelchair, it's an exercise of perseverance and will. Vickie started running to get healthy. It wasn't long before Terry was asking to join her.

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    Galeras vases in Portuguese ceramic have an earthy, yet modern vibe.

    From vintage to vavoom, some fall decor trends

    With nods to nostalgia, exotic motifs and tailored contemporary looks, the fall season in decor has lots to inspire home decorators. A warm palette of garnet, plum, sapphire, olive, chocolate, mustard and cream mixes with soft yet textural fabrics and muted metallics as our focus moves back indoors.

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    A gorp-stuffed apple is a brown-bag treat kids and adults can enjoy.

    Tips for turning lunch box drudgery into a pleasant picnic

    When you think of lunch as an opportunity to pack a special meal, it can go from dull to delicious! I learned long ago that I would be happier if I brought the foods that I like to eat from home instead of hoping that the cafeteria or nearby food court would satisfy me.

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    Gorp-stuffed apples make a nice treat for children and adults.

    Gorp-stuffed apples
    Gorp-stuffed apples make a nice treat for children and adults.

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    If you have time to decorate only one outside spot this fall, make it your front door.

    Three important areas to decorate this fall

    Even if you are pressed for time this year when you decorate for autumn, be sure to add a touch or two to these three important areas: the front walkway, the front door and your garden. If you have the time, let your creativity run wild. If you don't have time to spare, focus on decorating your front door. It's here that you set the stage for guests.

  •  
    Henry Svetina is legally blind, but that does not deter him from his passion to bowl. Svetina paired up with some of his favorite pro bowlers during a recent Professional Bowlers Association Pro-Am event.

    Blind bowler knocks down doubts

    When legally blind bowler Henry Svetina touts his two nonsanctioned perfect games, the average person would be skeptical. This is a man, after all, who has trouble walking around because of his sight. And when he speaks to you, he seems to be looking right through you because, to him, you are just a bunch of cloudy colors. The skepticism vanishes, however, when you see Svetina toss eight strikes in his first nine frames of a game, including seven in a row.

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    Knowing nutritional information and what to order ahead of time can help you keep your diet in check when eating out at restaurants.

    Your health: Helpful guidelines for eating out
    Learn how to eat your best when restaurants are your only option. If you are on a gluten-free diet, use a website to check which restaurants have menu options for you.

  •  
    Katie Couric’s new talk show “Katie” debuts at 3 p.m. Monday, Sept. 10, on ABC.

    Katie Couric stakes a claim in daytime talk TV

    "What's good is: people are interested. What's bad is: people are TOO interested, sometimes." Katie Couric is grinning as she says this, but she isn't kidding. And she has a point. The fact that she's about to launch a new daytime talk show at 3 p.m. Monday, Sept. 10, on ABC has escaped almost no one's notice, and Couric has done her best to bring her show to everyone's attention, having thrown herself into a publicity blitz for weeks.

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    ‘SNL’ adds 3 new performers with Chicago roots

    "Saturday Night Live" announced Monday that Cecily Strong, Aidy Bryant and Tim Robinson, who all have performed at improv theaters in Chicago, will be joining "SNL" for its 38th season.

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    McAfee said Monday that Emma Watson is the “most dangerous”celebrity to search for online. That’s because many sites use Watson to trick users into downloading malicious software or to steal personal information.

    Emma Watson named most ‘dangerous’ cyber celebrity

    Emma Watson is the favorite celebrity bait for cyber criminals trying to lure Internet users. McAfee said Monday that the "Harry Potter" star is the "most dangerous" celebrity to search for online.

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    Clearing blocked carotid artery can prevent bigger stroke

    There are many possible causes of a blockage that causes an ischemic stroke. Diseases of the heart, aorta and arteries in the neck or inside the brain can all lead to blockages. A carotid endarterectomy is a surgical procedure to remove a blockage in a carotid artery. In general, carotid endarterectomy is performed on people who have had a TIA (not a stroke) or a mild stroke and in whom a major stroke appears imminent.

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    Leana Wen works in the emergency department at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Wen chose emergency medicine because the hours are more flexible.

    Younger docs embrace technology, teamwork

    Don't call today's young doctors slackers. True, they may shun a 24/7 on-call solo practice and try to have a life outside of work. Yet they say they're just as committed to medicine as kindly Marcus Welby from 1970s TV, or even grumpy Dr. House. The practice of medicine is in the midst of an evolution, and millennial and Gen X doctors seem to be perfectly suited for it and in some ways may be driving it. The federal health care law is speeding some of these changes, too.

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    Weighty advice: keep a journal, don’t skip meals, eat in

    Keep a food journal; don't skip meals and avoid going out to eat, especially lunch.That's the advice suggested for post-menopausal dieters after a yearlong dietary weight-loss intervention study of 123 overweight-to-obese, sedentary women ages 50 to 75.

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    Nicole D. James, of Elkridge, Md., spent two extra weeks in the hospital when a doctor added an unneeded medication to her usual care for sickle care anemia without consulting her first.

    Project emphasizes patient safety in hospitals

    Hospitals are rife with infections and opportunities for medical mistakes. Now, a nearly $9 million project at Johns Hopkins University aims to combine engineering with the power of patients and their families to prevent some of the most common threats. The idea: Design patient safety to be more like a car's dashboard, which automatically signals drivers when the oil needs changing or if a passenger forgot to buckle up, or like the countdown systems that make sure no step is missed when a satellite is launched.

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    Chest X-rays don’t detect all lung cancers, study says

    Chest X-rays fail to detect some types of lung cancers, according to a new study that further supports the use of computerized tomography scans as an alternative tool for diagnosis. In the study of 77,445 men and women recruited between 1992 and 2001, 65 percent of the 152 lung cancer patients not identified by a chest X-ray remained undetected even after a second review of the images, according to researchers.

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    Dad’s job may impact risk of birth defects

    It's long been known that the behavior and environment of the mother during pregnancy can affect a newborn's health. But new research suggests that a father's behavior is important, too. Scientists at University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill have found that different parental occupations may bring increased risk of birth defects.

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    Sixty-two-year-old race organizer Jay Jacob Wind, of Arlington, Va., ran a full marathon (105½ laps) on the Falls Church High School track. With the qualifying period for the 2013 Boston Marathon nearly over, he wanted to give runners one last chance to gain entry to the historic race.

    Track marathon extreme even in running circles

    If misery could be measured in meters, surely the place to do it, with agonizing precision, was the outdoor track at Falls Church High School on a Saturday afternoon. That's where 10 hardy masochists decided to run a marathon, covering 26.2 miles 400 meters at a time, 105½ laps in all, around and around like human stock cars at Daytona.

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    Exercise, no junk food the new lesson plans at schools

    If there was a way to guarantee kids would get at least one nutritious meal each day and get some exercise, where would that be? The people who run our schools at the local, state and federal levels have, in recent years, recognized the unique opportunity they have to influence the eating and exercise habits of children from prekindergarten through 12th grade.

  •  
    Scott Garske, his hands spread as part of a “single whip” step, teaches Sun (“soon”) style tai chi at Harper College in Palatine.

    Tai chi plays role in recovery of two men

    By the law of averages, two men as sick as Randy Visina and Scott Garske should not have survived their illnesses. Both were at death's door but neither walked through — helped they say by a combination of Western medicine, faith and a dedication to Eastern healing arts, primarily tai chi. "The tai chi is like taking medicine for me," Garske says. "The daily practice is medicine for the body, mind, and spirit."

  •  
    Hantavirus, West Nile, Lyme disease and bubonic plague can be spread by ticks, top photo, mosquitoes and rats.

    Reducing your exposure to West Nile, hantavirus, plague

    The "bugs" of late summer are biting. The nation is having its worst West Nile virus season in a decade, and up to 10,000 people who stayed in California cabins are at risk of hantavirus. A second case of bubonic plague in the West has been confirmed — in a girl in Colorado — and scientists fear that a bumper crop of ticks could spread Lyme disease, the nation's most common bug-borne malady. Yet the risk of getting these scary-sounding diseases is small.

  •  

    Fertility treatments’ success improves with repeated attempts

    Women may need more than two cycles of fertility treatments to get pregnant and older women may need to use donor eggs to achieve success, a study found. Women younger than 31 gave birth to a child 63 percent to 75 percent of the time with a third cycle of in vitro fertilization, while women ages 40 to 42 had a 19 percent to 28 percent success rate and those 43 and older had a 7 percent to 11 percent success rate, according to a study in the New England Journal of Medicine. When using donor eggs, the likelihood of delivering a child was 60 percent to 80 percent for all ages, the research showed.

  •  
    There are still some nagging questions about drinking diet soda and its artificial sweeteners.

    Is it OK to drink diet soda?

    Scientific studies suggest you should probably lay off the sugar-packed Big Gulp. But what about their zero-calorie counterparts? "There is this cultural lore that has people thinking that diet soda is what's really bad for you and that the other stuff (sugar-sweetened soda) isn't as bad," said Harold Goldstein of the California Center for Public Health Advocacy. Worries include that artificially sweetened drinks will cause cancer or diabetes.

  •  

    Brain scans giving insights into development

    Four decades of increasingly sophisticated imaging techniques have given physicians and researchers many tools to get real-time looks at what's happening — or not — in the brain. But scientists are still working to match brain-scan images with understanding of what's normal for a certain age and what's worrisome in each region of the brain, along with figuring out how connections between different regions behave.

  •  
    Lucy (Sirena Irwin) and Ricky (Bill Mendieta) share a tender moment at home in “I Love Lucy Live On Stage,” which plays the Broadway Playhouse at Water Tower Place in Chicago from Wednesday, Sept. 12, through Sunday, Nov. 11.

    Stage version’s popularity shows fans still loving ‘Lucy’

    "I Love Lucy Live On Stage" executive producer Steve Kahn expects die-hard fans of the beloved 1950s sitcom "I Love Lucy" to help make the show's Chicago run a sell-out at the Broadway Playhouse at Water Tower Place.

  •  
    Social worker Shannon Coyne with her 11-month-old son in Philadelphia said she and her husband have decided against circumcision for their son. The nation’s most influential pediatricians group says the health benefits of circumcision in newborn boys outweigh any risks and insurance companies should pay for it.

    Circumcision pluses outweight risks, pediatricians say

    The nation's most influential pediatricians group says the health benefits of circumcision in newborn boys outweigh any risks and insurance companies should pay for it. In its latest policy statement on circumcision, a procedure that has been declining nationwide, the American Academy of Pediatrics moves closer to an endorsement but says the decision should be up to parents.

  •  

    Not using blood transfusions may help patients

    A recent study suggests that Jehovah's Witnesses are on to something. In the Archives of Internal Medicine, doctors from the Cleveland Clinic reported that Witnesses who underwent cardiac surgery without a blood transfusion fared better than non-Witnesses in terms of infection and complication rates, length of hospital stays and short- and long-term survival.

  •  

    New push to test boomers for hepatatis C

    More than 15,000 Americans die each year from illnesses related to hepatitis C, a number that has nearly doubled in the past decade. That growing toll and an unusual combination of risk factors has prompted federal public health officials to propose that all Americans born between 1945 and 1965 get a one-time screening test for the virus.

  •  
    These models built at the end of the muscle-car era combine European styling and American-made brawn. Clockwise, from left, a 1966 Sunbeam Tiger MK1A, the 1965 Shelby Cobra and 1972 De Tomaso Pantera.

    High-power hybrids mix American, European ideas

    While the current engineering focus in the auto industry is all about hybids and gas mileage, there was a point in automotive history when a certain cadre of cars were designed to balance both a sleek European style and the brawn of a big American V-8 underhood. We've assembled a trio of American/European hybrids that fit this build.

Discuss

  •  

    Editorial: A wish for compromising political leadership

    If only more of the suburbs, state and nation could have been made to model the 10th Congressional District, a Daily Herald editorial says, where both major party candidates are talking about bipartisanship and compromise.

  •  

    Pigskin progressivism

    Columnist George Will: Walter Camp, an early shaper of the rules and structure of intercollegiate football, saw football as basic training for the managerial elites demanded by corporations. Progressives saw football as training managers for the modern regulatory state.

  •  

    A tale of two conventions

    Columnist Eugene Robinson: Coming to Charlotte, I expected to see a party on the defensive. Instead, Democrats orchestrated a convention that felt strikingly focused and spirited.

  •  

    The empathy gap

    Columnist Charles Krauthammer: Given the state of the economy, by any historical standard, Barack Obama should be 15 points behind Mitt Romney. But on "caring about average people," Obama wins by 22 points. Maintaining the empathy gap was a principal goal of the Democratic convention.

  •  

    Kudos to Wheeling Public Works Dept.
    Letter to the editor: Laurel Anderson of Wheeling was impressed with the professionalism the Wheeling Public Works crews showed in the wake of a broken water main on her street. "It is a good feeling to know they are there when you need them," she writes.

  •  

    Photo showed poor judgment all around
    Letter to the editor: "I was not only shocked but very surprised that the Daily Herald would have a photo of an individual jumping into Lake Michigan ("Your Images," Sept. 2)," writes Carol Pfister. "With so many people who have drowned recently in Lake Michigan ... he is setting a very poor example for those on his boat as well as readers who see this picture."

  •  

    Residents filling big hole at food pantry
    Letter to the editor: Elk Grove Township Supervisor Nanci Vanderweel was overwhelmed by the response to her plea for supplies for the township food pantry. "I learned a fabulous lesson; our residents have very big hearts," she writes. "I learned I did not have to beg, I really just had to ask."

  •  

    Moylan needed to step aside at game
    Letter to the editor: William McNutt of Des Plaines was among the veterans who were honored Aug. 24 at the Maine West football game. The event was lovely, he said, but for Mayor Marty Moylan stepping in. "There should be a moral limit on political campaigning," he writes. "Moylan was never a veteran and should be able to step aside on some of his picture-taking events."

  •  

    Thumbs down to downtown BG plan
    Letter to the editor: Marilyn Weisberg of Buffalo Grove is opposed to the proposal to create a new, vibrant downtown for Buffalo Grove. "This seems a very grandiose idea in these economic times and for this location," she writes.

  •  

    Says it’s time for Mulder to step aside
    Letter to the editor: Keith Moens writes that five terms is enough, and Arlington Hts. Village President Arlene Mulder should not run for re-election in April. "The village ... faces many challenges in the future," he says. "Number one is the structural high vacancy rates created by failed economic policies of trustees currently on the board and president during the 1990s."

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