Farmers markets

Daily Archive : Sunday September 9, 2012

News

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    Mulder established girls teams with help from men

    Coaching the first girls softball, basketball and tennis teams at Niles West High School after the 1972 signing of Title IX, Arlene Mulder's approach was to ask for help -- from men. Mulder, now Arlington Heights village president, was then in her 20s and a newly hired physical education teacher. She says her strategy helped the school's early female athletes gain respect and success.

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    Reader Robert Steinberg turned in these photos of garage fire Sunday in South Barrington.

    Fire damages South Barrington home

    A South Barrington home suffered heavy smoke damage as the result of a fire that apparently started in the garage.

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    One World Trade Center rises above the lower Manhattan skyline and the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York. Eleven years after terrorists attacked the World Trade Center, the new World Trade Center now dominates the lower Manhattan skyline.

    WTC memorial magnificent, but at a steep price

    All the eye-welling magnificence of the National Sept. 11 Memorial and Museum at the World Trade Center in New York comes with a jaw-dropping price tag. The foundation that runs the memorial estimates that once the roughly $700 million project is complete, the memorial and museum will together cost $60 million a year to operate.

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    Associated Press This film image released by CBS Films shows Bradley Cooper and ZoÎ Saldana in a scene from “The Words,” which came in third at the box office with $5 million.

    ‘Lawless,’ ‘Words’ fail to sway moviegoers

    "The Possession," a fright flick with Kyra Sedgwick and Jeffrey Dean Morgan playing the parents of a girl possessed by a demon, earned $9.5 million in its second outing, the lowest-grossing weekend for the box office this year, and one of the worst weekends at the box office in a decade. It marked the first time since 2008 that no film managed to crack the $10 million mark.

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    Chicago teachers to strike after talks fail

    The Chicago Teachers Union says its members will go on strike Monday for the first time in 25 years. The union says contract talks with the district failed late Sunday night over issues including benefits and job security. "We will be on the (picket) line," Chicago Teachers Union President Karen Lewis said Sunday night, calling it a difficult decision and one the union hoped could be avoided.

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    Members of Community High School flag team perform Sunday while marching in Winfield’s Good Old Day festival parade.

    Volunteers saluted at Winfield parade

    The final day of Winfield's Good Old Days festival included the highlight of the four-day event: the parade. Hundreds lined the route to watch Sunday's parade, which paid tribute to local volunteers.

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    Re-enactor Tim Hess, of Streamwood, holds his newly baptized son, Ian, wrapped in a British flag, during a real baptism ceremony before a Revolutionary War battle re-enactment Sunday at Cantigny Park in Wheaton.

    Cantigny becomes Revolutionary War battlefield

    Hundreds of spectators converged on Cantigny Park in Wheaton Sunday to see American and British soldiers square off in a Revolutionary War re-enactment. The event was part of a weekendlong re-creation of late-18th-century life.

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    President Barack Obama speaks at the Palm Beach County Convention Center in West Palm Beach, Fla., Sunday.

    Does racial bias fuel Obama foes? How to tell?

    Is it because he's black? The question of whether race fuels opposition to President Barack Obama has become one of the most divisive topics of the election. It is sowing anger and frustration among conservatives who are labeled racist simply for opposing Obama's policies and liberals who see no other explanation for such deep dislike of the president.

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    Lake Villa celebrates the 100th anniversary celebration of the Lehmann Mansion with a party on the grounds Sunday.

    Lehmann mansion celebrates 100 years with grand style

    With its tall, white columns looming at the end of a tree-lined path, an elegant fountain burbling near its entrance, and the row of Model-A Ford vintage cars lined up on the adjacent greensward, the scene at Lehmann Mansion in Lake Villa Sunday was straight out of "The Great Gatsby." That is, until you saw the 1950s vintage cars parked in another area of the lawn, or noticed Chicago Bears...

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    Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney arrives at his campaign headquarters in Boston on Sunday to prepare for the presidential debates.

    Romney, Obama aim at swing voters on health care

    Mitt Romney said he would retain some popular parts of the new health care law he has pledged to repeal, while President Barack Obama focused attention in all-important Florida on the Republican ticket's stand on Medicare, an issue that's been more favorable to Democrats.

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    Boy, 6, killed in McHenry County hit-and-run

    Police are asking for the public's help in locating a driver who struck and killed a 6-year-old boy in rural McHenry County near Woodstock.

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    Bill Moggridge, a British industrial designer who designed an early portable computer with the flip-open shape that is common today, has died. He was 69.

    Early laptop designer Moggridge dies at 69

    Bill Moggridge, a British industrial designer who designed an early portable computer with the flip-open shape that is common today, has died. He was 69.

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    Judy Russell, left, Jessica Hooker’s mother, poses for a family portrait with Jessica, center, Jessica’s husband, Ryan Hooker, right, and their children; Ellyson and Daniel, right. Daniel was 18 months old when the Tennessee couple Ryan and Jessica Hooker began the process to adopt him in Guatemala. They just got him at age 6.

    Adopting Daniel: U.S. couple tests new Guatemala law

    GUATEMALA CITY — It should have been good news. The U.S. Embassy called to say the Guatemalan government would begin to authorize adoptions five years after a scandal froze the system that sent as many as 4,000 Guatemalan children a year to the United States.Ryan “Bubba” Hooker and his wife, Jess, might finally be able to collect the little boy they wanted to adopt and bring him home.

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    Centrum Valley Farms said in a statement the U.S. Food and Drug Administration found the strain of bacteria known as salmonella heidelberg in two of six poultry houses that were tested at its production facility in Clarion, Iowa, during a routine inspection in May.

    FDA warns Iowa egg firm over bacteria

    A company that promised to clean up Iowa's egg industry after a nationwide salmonella outbreak in 2010 said Friday that a recent government safety inspection discovered the bacteria in two of its barns and that it took steps to protect consumers.

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    Waukegan run for kids, arts

    Strap on your running shoes and join Dandelion Gallery for its inaugural 5K Run/Walk For the Arts & Kids 1 Mile Fun Run on Saturday, Sept. 22 in the downtown Waukegan Arts District.

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    Program aims to protect elderly from fraud

    The National Association of Triads and Home Instead Senior Care have launched a public information program to educate families and seniors about how to protect themselves from scams targeting the elderly.

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    Round Lake library dedication

    The Friends of the Library is dedicating the renovated front entrance space of the Round Lake Area Public Library on Wednesday, Sept. 12 at 6 p.m. at the main entrance. The library is at 906 Hart Road in Round Lake.

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    Iraq’s Vice President Tariq al-Hashemi speaks to the media as he leaves a meeting with Turkey’s Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu, unseen, in Ankara, Turkey. An Iraqi court found the nation’s Sunni vice president guilty Sunday of running death squads against security forces and Shiites, and sentenced him to death in absentia.

    Iraq’s fugitive VP convicted as attacks kill 92

    Iraq's fugitive Sunni vice president was sentenced Sunday to death by hanging on charges he masterminded death squads against rivals in a terror trial that has fueled sectarian tensions in the country.

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    Ken Caudle has been named the Huntley Fire Protection District’s new fire chief. He has been with the district for 13 years.

    New fire chief to take reins in Huntley

    The Huntley Fire Protection District didn't have to look far to find its next chief. Deputy Fire Chief Ken Caudle, a 13-year-department veteran, has been tapped to lead the fire protection district into the future.

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    Cab robbery costs Elgin man 29 years

    The lure of some quick cash has turned into a long prison sentence for an Elgin man. Aaron A. McGee, 22, of the 400 block of Belmont Street, recently was sentenced to 29 years in prison after being convicted of robbing a cabdriver at gunpoint.

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    D73 Girl Scouts meeting

    The Girl Scouts of Hawthorn Elementary District 73 are looking for girls ages 5 and older who are interested in joining troops.

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    Final Car Fun event in Libertyville

    MainStreet Libertyville is hosting the final Car Fun on 21 classic car show of the season on Wednesday, Sept. 19.

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    Dist. 50 special ed meeting

    Woodland Elementary District 50 will host a meeting on Sept. 25 about the district's plans for providing special education services to students with disabilities who attend private/parochial schools or are home-schooled.

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    Girl injured in Elgin Metra crash Saturday night

    A South Elgin man faces a number of charges after the car he was driving went off the road and collided with a Metra train late Saturday, severely injuring his 14-month-old daughter.

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    Watching his best friend, Carter Kettner, right, grow sick and die of cancer at age 6 fuels Ben Keaty in his quest to honor Carter by finishing a cancer run.

    Getting ready for race helps Huntley boy remember his best friend

    Young Ben Keaty used to race to the corner and back with his friend Carter Kettner, until Carter got sick. Now, 8 years old, Ben is running his first 5K to raise money in memory of Carter. When he grows up, Ben hopes to invent a "cancer blowup pill."

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    Geneva serves a tasty Festival of the Vine

    It's Festival of the Vine. Not Festival of the Wine, or Festival of the Whine. The annual Geneva soiree could not have asked for better weather Saturday for people to eat, drink and shop in the downtown business district. Who could complain, with temperatures in the low 70s and sunny blue skies?

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    Jean Walker, right, is joined by her sister, Diane Carley, during a ceremony dedicating the Prospect field house in Walker’s name in 2007.

    Prospect’s Walker helped girls sports hit the ground running

    When Jean Walker began teaching at Prospect High School in 1972, boys interscholastic sports were flourishing but the girls teams were only beginning to get established. Just a few years later, the school was featuring 12 girls teams thanks to Walker's guidance. "Each day, week, year, those of us involved in girls sports worked to make the experience better for the girls," she said.

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    Lauren Beth Gash

    Convention delegates home to focus on getting out suburban vote

    Now that the national political conventions are over, hundreds of Illinois convention delegates will be on the front lines in the final weeks of election campaigns. Armed with talking points and playbooks full of snappy applause lines, they'll go door-to-door, make phone calls, raise money and host events to try to get voters to swing their way.

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    Glenbard East sophomore volleyball player Catherine McKinney returns a practice volley during a coed summer camp at the Lombard school. Catherine said the school does a good job of offering equal athletic opportunities for girls and boys.

    Title IX moves beyond sports to ‘new frontier’ of STEM

    No one can dispute the opportunities Title IX has created for girls seeking to play high school sports. Their number has increased tenfold since the law was signed in 1972. But there's a catch. Title IX prohibits all schools that receive federal funds from discriminating on the basis of sex in any educational program or activity -- not just sports. Experts say science, technology, engineering and...

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    Trixie, a female, beagle/hound mix, is about 6 years old and weighs 29 pounds.

    Keeping your dog’s nails trimmed protects the paws

    My dog, Kasey, and I recently spent several hours at our area emergency veterinary clinic. He came back into the house after being outside in the yard for about 10 minutes before bedtime. As I closed the door and turned around I saw blood all over the floor; a path of it leading from the door into the room. So, at 10:30 p.m., we found ourselves sitting in the emergency clinic.

Sports

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    Baseball success can be fleeting

    It's interesting to look back at what GM Jim Hendry did following the 2008 Cubs season. For the second consecutive year, the Cubs flopped in the playoffs, so he clearly was trying to tweak the makeup a bit. In the end, it didn't work out, which might speak to how fickle October baseball can be. Three bad days can unfortunately negate a great six months.

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    Starter Justin Verlander and the Detroit Tigers are in town to face the White Sox. Verlander pitches Thursday night.

    White Sox need quality starts against Tigers

    The Sox are going to have to get some quality starts, at least, out of Jose Quintana and Francisco Liriano. Obvious, I know. But considering Liriano hasn't given them one since Aug. 21 on top of allowing 8 runs in his last 9 innings, and that Quintana has thrown only 5 innings in his last 2 starts combined while allowing a total of 12 runs, it's safe to say these two guys have not given the White Sox a decent chance to win their last couple of turns in the rotation.

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    Cornerback Tim Jennings intercepts a pass intended for Colts wide receiver Donnie Avery on Sunday.

    Bears’ Jennings stars against his former team

    Cornerback Tim Jennings had his best game as a Bear against his former team Sunday. "It was huge," he said. "(Facing) a rookie quarterback, I knew I was going to get some opportunities, and I knew I could go out there and make some plays."

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    Bears middle linebacker Brian Urlacher returned to action Sunday against the Colts at Soldier Field, but he only played in the first half.

    Bears’ Urlacher not a happy reserve

    Eight-time Pro Bowl middle linebacker Brian Urlacher only played until just past halftime Sunday — not as nearly much as he would have liked. Urlacher had said earlier in the week that he expected to play the entire game against the Colts at Soldier Field, even after missing all of the preseason and the vast majority of training camp.

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    Bears wide receiver Brandon Marshall runs around Colts defender Jerrell Freeman on his way to 115 yards on 9 catches with a touchdown in Sunday’s season-opening victory.

    Marshall plan works to perfection for Bears

    After that rocky start, the Bears' Marshall Plan worked to perfection in an easy 41-21 season-opening victory over Indianapolis. After a disastrous couple of series, Cutler was 20 of 25 for 320 yards and 2 touchdowns and finished with a 98.9 passer rating. He was sacked only one other time and was rarely pressured throughout the day, thanks to a maligned offensive line that played extremely well.

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    Rory McIlroy, left, of Northern Ireland, celebrates with caddie J.P. Fitzgerald after finishing the BMW Championship PGA golf tournament at Crooked Stick Golf Club in Carmel, Ind., Sunday, Sept. 9, 2012. McIlroy won the event. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    McIlroy continues amazing run with victory at BMW

    Sunday's wrapup to the BMW Championship didn't bode well for the U.S. team's chances in the upcoming Ryder Cup matches at Medinah. Two members of the European Ryder Cup team, Rory McIlroy and Lee Westwood, played together in the next-to-the-last twosome and finished at the top of the leaderboard with McIlroy reinforcing his status as the world's No. 1 golfer.

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    Grading the Bears: Week 1

    Grading the Bears: Week 1

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    Bears wide receiver Brandon Marshall celebrates Sunday’s season-opening victory as he runs off the field.

    That’s one big wide receiver Bears have

    So this is what a big wide receiver looks like. Brandon Marshall looks like a tight end. He looks like a little taller heavyweight boxer. He looks like a little shorter NBA power forward. Mostly, a big receiver looks like Marshall looked Sunday during the Bears' 41-21 victory over the Colts.

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    (No heading)
    Scouting report: White Sox vs. Detroit Tigers

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    After a slow start, Bears quarterback Jay Cutler finished with 333 yards passing in Sunday’s victory over the Colts.

    As advertised, Bears offense carries the day

    After a terrible start, the Bears' offense showed up in full force and took apart the Colts. The scary part for the NFC is the offense has a chance to get a lot better.

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    Cubs scouting report
    Cubs scouting report

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    Mark Welsh/mwelsh@dailyherald.com Bears reciever Brandon Marshall lets this first quarter pass slips through his fingers during the Bears home opener at Soldier Field in Chicago.

    Bears romp to victory in season opener

    Jay Cutler threw for 333 yards and two touchdowns, Michael Bush added a pair of scoring runs and the Chicago Bears spoiled Andrew Luck's debut in beating the Indianapolis Colts 41-21 Sunday.

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    Phil Mickelson acknowledges the crowd with a thumbs-up after he birdied the 18th hole Saturday during the third round of the BMW Championship PGA golf tournament at Crooked Stick Golf Club in Carmel, Ind.

    Mickelson happy as can be at BMW this year

    Phil Mickelson was a reluctant competitor when the Western Golf Association held the Western Open and its successor, the BMW Championship, at Cog Hill in Lemont. He just didn't like the course, and he said so.

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    Serena Williams reacts Sunday during her U.S. Open title match against Victoria Azarenka of Belarus.

    Serena Williams wins fourth U.S. Open title

    Serena Williams won her fourth U.S. Open championship Sunday with a 6-2, 2-6, 7-5 defeat of top-seeded Victoria Azarenka, completing a summer that also included a Wimbledon title and a gold medal at the London Olympics.

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    Serbia’s Novak Djokovic reacts Sunday after beating Spain’s David Ferrer in a semifinal match at the 2012 US Open tennis tournament in New York.

    Djokovic reaches 3rd U.S. Open final

    Under a cloudless blue sky, in only a hint of wind, defending U.S. Open champion Novak Djokovic got his game into high gear and reached his third consecutive final at Flushing Meadows by beating fourth-seeded David Ferrer of Spain 2-6, 6-1, 6-4, 6-2 in a match suspended a day earlier.

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    Chicago Bears running back Matt Forte celebrates after his 3rd quarter touchdown during the Bears season opener against the Indianapolis Colts Sunday at Soldier Field in Chicago. The Bears won 41-21

    Images: Chicago Bears vs. Indianapolis Colts
    The Chicago Bears opened the 2012 season at home against Andrew Luck and the Indianapolis Colts defeating the Colts 41-21.

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    A.J. Pierzynski, center, is caught in a rundown with first baseman Eric Hosmer, bottom, and shortstop Alcides Escobar in the second inning of the White Sox’ 2-1 loss to Kansas City at U.S. Cellular Field on Sunday.

    Royals have Sox’ number

    The White Sox couldn't deliver a clutch hit late in Sunday's game against the Royals and it proved costly. The Sox lost to Kansas City 2-1 in 10 innings while dropping two of three in the series.

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    Cubs outfielder Alfonso Soriano and Anthony Rizzo celebrate after Soriano drove in them both with a two-run home run in the eighth inning Sunday at PNC Park.

    Cubs complete sweep in Pittsburgh

    Alfonso Soriano hit a two-run homer in the eighth inning to give the Cubs the go-ahead runs and Chicago completed a three-game sweep of the Pittsburgh Pirates with a 4-2 win on Sunday. Soriano followed Anthony Rizzo's leadoff single in the eighth with his second homer in as many days and 28th of the season, sending the first pitch from Jason Grilli (1-6) into the Cubs bullpen in left-center.

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    Kansas City Royals catcher Salvador Perez, left, tags out the White Sox’ Alejandro De Aza, right, at home plate after De Aza tagged up at third base on a Dewayne Wise pop-up in Sunday’s first inning at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Sox stumble in 10th-inning loss

    Mike Moustakas stroked a go-ahead single in the 10th inning to lift the Kansas City Royals to a 2-1 win over the White Sox on Sunday. The Royals plated both their runs with two outs in the 10th off Brett Myers (2-3), the seventh of eight White Sox pitchers in the game. The rally started after Alcides Escobar was thrown out, leaving the bases empty and two outs. Myers walked Billy Butler, who was replaced by pinch runner Jarrod Dyson. Salvador Perez, Moustakas and Jeff Francoeur then hit consecutive singles, the last two driving in runs.

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    Clint Bowyer celebrates winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race at Richmond International Raceway in Richmond, Va., Saturday, Sept. 8, 2012.

    Bowyer wins race, Gordon gets into Chase

    Clint Bowyer won the rain-delayed race at Richmond, and Jeff Gordon drove his way into the title picture by grabbing the last wild-card berth in the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship. Bowyer came back from a mid-race spin to pick up his second win of the season. The Saturday night victory gave the Michael Waltrip Racing driver another three bonus points to take into the Chase.

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    Arizona State quarterback Michael Eubank throws over Illinois linebacker Houston Bates during Saturday’s first half in Tempe, Ariz.

    Illinois routed at ASU

    Taylor Kelly completed 18 of 24 passes for 249 yards and a touchdown, and Arizona State rolled past Illinois 45-14 on Saturday night to improve to 2-0 under new coach Todd Graham. Kelly's backup, Michael Eubank, was 5 of 5 passing for 69 yards and two touchdowns and ran 7 yards for a score. Chris Coyle matched a school record for tight ends with 10 catches, totaling 131 yards and two scores. He caught six passes for 73 yards all of last season.

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    Angels starting pitcher C.J. Wilson throws to the Detroit Tigers during the fourth inning Saturday in Anaheim, Calif.

    Wilson, Trout lead Angels over Tigers 6-1

    C.J. Wilson won his third straight start, Mike Trout hit a leadoff homer in the first inning and the Los Angeles Angels roughed up Justin Verlander en route to a 6-1 victory over the Detroit Tigers on Saturday night.

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    Texas’ Joe Bergeron, top, and teammates celebrate a touchdown against New Mexico during the fourth quarter Saturday in Austin, Texas.

    Long TDs propel No. 17 Texas over New Mexico 45-0

    Texas quarterback David Ash scored on a 49-yard touchdown run and had receivers turn short throws into two more scores and the No. 17 Longhorns routed New Mexico 45-0 Saturday night.

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    Georgia wide receiver Marlon Brown catches an 11-yard touchdown pass as Missouri linebacker Will Ebner (32) and safety Braylon Webb defend during the third quarter Saturday in Columbia, Mo.

    No. 7 Georgia puts away Missouri 41-20

    Aaron Murray hit Marlon Brown for two of his three touchdown passes, the second for the go-ahead score as No. 7 Georgia recover from a shaky start with 32 second-half points that spoiled Missouri's SEC debut in a 41-20 victory on Saturday night.

Business

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    Hurricane Isaac was a big contributor to a recent rise in the price of gasoline across the country.

    Gasoline rises to $3.84 a gallon

    The average price for regular gasoline at U.S. filling stations rose 7.85 cents in the past two weeks to $3.84 a gallon, according to Lundberg Survey Inc.

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    ASSOCIATED PRESS Axiron, an underarm gel that rolls on like deodorant, is one drug used by men struggling with symptoms of growing older associated with low testosterone such as poor sex drive, weight gain and fatigue. It’s one of a growing number of prescription gels, patches and injections aimed at boosting levels of the male hormone that begins to decline in men after about age 40.

    Testosterone marketing frenzy draws skepticism

    There are a growing number of prescription gels, patches and injections aimed at boosting testosterone, the male hormone that begins to decline after about age 40. Drugmakers and some doctors claim testosterone therapy can reverse some of the signs of aging — even though the safety and effectiveness of such treatments is unclear.

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    A hot-air balloon flies over a container port in Qingdao in east China’s Shandong province Sunday. China’s industrial slowdown continues.

    China’s slowdown signals more stimulus before power shift

    China's industrial output grew at the slowest pace in three years and President Hu Jintao said economic expansion faces "notable downward pressure," signaling that officials may need to add further to stimulus after approving subway and road projects.

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    Riot police confront protesters in northern Greece’s Halkidiki peninsula on Sunday. Hundreds of protesters have battled riot police for hours over plans for a gold mine in northern Greece’s Halkidiki peninsula. Police say protesters threw firebombs at them, setting ablaze a forested area on the site.

    Greece fails to agree on spending cuts

    The leaders of the three parties in Greece's coalition government failed to agree Sunday on a package of spending cuts worth $14.7 billion, a raft of measures the prime minister had said is crucial to restoring the country's financial credibility and sustaining its bailout funding.

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    Many now expect the Fed to unveil a new bond-buying program at its meeting this week. The goal would be to lower long-term interest rates and encourage borrowing and spending.

    The Fed and the stock market; 3 experts weigh in

    Will the stock market get more ammunition from central banks to go higher? We will find out this week when Federal Reserve officials meet.

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    More than half of U.S. mobile app users say they have decided not to use an app on their phone because of concerns over privacy.

    Survey: cellphone users concerned about privacy

    More than half of U.S. mobile app users say they have decided not to use an app on their phone because of concerns over privacy.

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    Wine production in France is forecast to slide to 42.9 million hectoliters (1.13 billion gallons) from 50.9 million hectoliters in 2011, the ministry wrote in a report on its website.

    French wine output may slump 16% on heat wave, storms

    Wine production in France, the biggest exporter, may slump 16 percent this year to a four-year low after frost, thunderstorms and an August heat wave harmed vines and grapes, the Agriculture Ministry said.

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    A survey released by PayNet, a research firm that tracks loans to small business, shows that lending rose 3 percent after falling five out of the previous six months. The Thomson Reuters/PayNet Small Business Lending Index rose to 103.8 in July from a revised 100.5 in June.

    Small companies borrow more but are still cautious

    Lending to small businesses rose only slightly in July, another sign that companies are hunkering down because of uncertainty about the economy. A survey shows that lending rose 3 percent after falling five out of the previous six months.

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    The Federal Trade Commission said that it is mailing refund checks to 13,000 Medicare Part D beneficiaries who were overcharged for drugs because a CVS Caremark Corp. business understated the price of the medications.

    Refunds on way to cover CVS business’ price error

    The Federal Trade Commission said that it is mailing refund checks to 13,000 Medicare Part D beneficiaries who were overcharged for drugs because a CVS Caremark Corp. business understated the price of the medications.

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    How to convince your boss that you’re right

    Q: I am preparing a paper for an international conference. My boss, who has been helping me with editing, consistently makes a “correction” I know to be wrong: inserting double spaces after every period. I don’t want to submit this paper in my name with errors. I feel awkward calling his attention to it, but I worry he will distrust me if I remove the spaces and he notices. How can I get rid of this error while maintaining a good relationship with my boss?A: OK, co-workers, ‘fess up. Which of you sent this?In the business writing classes I teach, the most contentious issue is spaces between sentences. (Use one.) Another hot topic: dealing with a boss who insists on changes you know are wrong. (Weigh need to be right against need to be employed.)You could forward him Slate columnist Farhad Manjoo’s January 2011 article-gone-viral, “Space Invaders,” and say, “This says we shouldn’t use double spaces anymore. Isn’t that weird?” He may grudgingly let you undo his “corrections.”If there’s no persuading him, try appealing to a higher authority: the conference organizers. Ask for their style and formatting guidelines. They may even reformat submissions themselves; your boss can hardly blame you for that.If the organizers don’t have a style guide (eek!) or are themselves two-spacers (augh!), you may have to let it go. Anyone who scorns your work because of a formatting gaffe can take it up with your boss. (Set up a conference call, and get some popcorn ready.)Q: I’m moving from my first job out of college to another division within the company. While I’ve performed well overall, one thing is dragging me down: my lack of personal relationships at work. I don’t have friends in my division as most of my colleagues seem to; as an introvert, I find socializing with colleagues challenging and exhausting. I worry that the longer I’m here without making friends, the stranger and more standoffish I seem. This might hurt my career — plus, I’m lonely. Any practical suggestions for how to give off a friendly-but-professional vibe?A: Learning any job takes effort and energy. If it helps, think of extroversion as just another job skill to master — not a wholesale personality shift.Small talk, albeit shallow, is a classic lubricant. Learn who your co-workers become off the clock. Ask after their kids/pets/vacations (non-creepily). Seek their advice.Notice others. Hold elevator doors. Bring goodies to share. Make a habit of “Good morning,” “See you” and “Have a good weekend.” Smile with your eyes. Attend work-sponsored events, just for an hour.Finally, give it time. Solid reputations and relationships take years to develop. And true friendships at work are rare gems. But being known as friendly, competent and pleasant to work with? That’s golden.Ÿ Miller has written for and edited tax publications for 16 years, most recently for the accounting firm KPMG’s Washington National Tax office.

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    Nobel Prize winner Milton Friedman famously claimed that the sole purpose of a company is indeed to maximize profits, but a new generation of psychologists looking to analyze the ethics behind the profits. Some are now thinking about how to create ethical leaders in business and in other professions, based on the notion that good people often do bad things unconsciously.

    Ethics courses fall short in business schools

    A new generation of psychologists is now thinking about how to create ethical leaders in business and in other professions, based on the notion that good people often do bad things unconsciously. It may transform not just education in the professions, but the way we think about encouraging people to do the right thing in general. At present, the ethics curriculum at business schools can best be described as an unsuccessful work-in-progress.

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    Tiger Woods finished third in the Deutsche Bank Championship to earn $544,000 and push his career total to $100,350,700.

    Woods tops $100 million in earnings

    Tiger Woods has become the first $100 million man on the PGA Tour. Woods finished third in the Deutsche Bank Championship to earn $544,000 and push his career total to $100,350,700. Next on the list is Phil Mickelson — more than $30 million behind at $66,805,498 after finishing fourth at the TPC Boston.

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    President of European Central Bank Mario Draghi currently holds more sway over the global economy that Ben Bernanke, chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve.

    European Central Bank chef wielding more sway than Bernanke

    Move over, Ben Bernanke. This is Mario Draghi's moment. The European Central Bank president is overtaking the Federal Reserve chairman — at least for now — as the central banker with the most influence on the global economy and markets. Faced with a growing recession and a possible breakup of the 17-country euro alliance, Draghi has bigger problems than Bernanke, who's overseeing an economy in recovery.

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    Is it smart to aggressively pay off your student loans? It depends on the type you have.

    Should you pay off your student loans quickly?

    Student loan borrowers owe nearly $25,000 on average. Paying back the minimum means it can take years to make a significant dent. But is it smart to aggressively pay off student loans? It depends on whether you have other types of debt.

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    Zong Qinghou, head of China’s third-largest beverage maker, has a net worth of $21.6 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index.

    Richest man in China worth $21.6 billion

    Zong Qinghou, head of China's third-largest beverage maker, has a net worth of $21.6 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index. Zong, a chain-smoking member of the Chinese legislature who says he spends just $20 a day, ranks No. 23 globally.

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    In this Aug. 30, 2012 photo, Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney speaks at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla.

    How weak is U.S. job market? Depends on your numbers

    Is the U.S. job market dismal as Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney says? Or is it steadily improving as President Barack Obama contends? Not to dodge the question or anything, but both men are correct. It's all about how you slice the data. Romney like to point to the unemployment rate while Obama prefers to stress job creation.

Life & Entertainment

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    Swans and ducks wade across from the river ship Avalon Felicity on the Rhine River in Breisach, Germany. The small scale of river ships, which typically carry no more than a couple hundred passengers, is a large part of their appeal, in contrast to oceangoing mega-ships that carry thousands.

    Going with the flow on the romantic Rhine River

    After returning from a cruise on the legendary Rhine, I’m happily considering trips to other iconic waterways such as the Danube for next year. Sure, there were a few wrinkles, but they didn’t take away from what I found was a charming, intimate experience — with not only the river but the people on the ship.

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    Tickets for comedian Bill Cosby’s Dec. 1 show at the Genesee Theatre in Waukegan go on sale Sept. 14.

    Tickets on sale Friday for Cosby, Winston

    Tickets for comedian Bill Cosby's Saturday, Dec. 1, show and pianist George Winston's Friday, Dec. 21, show at the Genesee Theatre in Waukegan go on sale to the public at 10 a.m. Friday, Sept. 14.

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    Ricki Lake films the first day of taping for her new daytime talk show, “The Ricki Lake Show,” in Los Angeles on July 25, 2012. The nationally syndicated show, which will cover topics ranging from parenting, weight loss, health, beauty, career, and love, premieres on Sept. 10.

    Ricki Lake brings updated talk show, life to TV

    Ricki Lake was a babe in the talk show woods when her syndicated program launched nearly two decades ago, although "Ricki Lake" quickly won over a young-adult audience that wanted a peppy take on life and love from someone like them. "I didn't know what I was signing up for. I didn't know how to host a show. I didn't know who I was or have a point of view. I basically was grateful to have the job." Lake, who turns 44 this month, has been changed by marriage, children, divorce and remarriage. So have her ambitions for her return to the daytime arena with "The Ricki Lake Show," debuting Monday.

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    Jeff Probst is part of a crowded Class of 2012 in the daytime talk world. Maybe he’ll succeed and maybe he won’t. But he’s determined to have fun trying.

    Can Jeff Probst survive the talk show jungle?

    As Jeff Probst planned his new talk show, he test-drove variations of the typical daytime program — an hour on the couch talking about social issues. "They were so boring I couldn't even sit through the focus groups," he recalled. So the "Survivor" man threw it out, started over and is premiering a daytime show Monday filled with ideas united only by his enthusiasm. There's a party room. An ambush adventure. Guys on the couch. An end-of-show jury. Maybe he'll succeed and maybe he won't. But he's determined to have fun trying.

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    Damien Echols, left, one of the West Memphis Three, and actor Johnny Depp at a press conference for the film “West of Memphis” at the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival in Toronto on Saturday.

    Johnny Depp shares ‘ink’ with Damien Echols

    The man Johnny Depp helped release from Arkansas' death row has become like a brother to him, right down to getting matching tattoos. "We have some," Depp said Saturday as he touched a tattoo on the right side of his chest. "This one Damien designed. It's one of my all-time favorites, and it means quite a lot to me."

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    “Time for Kids Big Book of What?” (Time Home Entertainment, 2012), $19.95, 192 pages.

    Who knew learning could be this much fun?

    You plan to really impress everybody with your superior intelligence because, well, this is going to be the best year ever and they need to know you're a smart kid. And there's no better way to get smart(er) than by reading "Time for Kids Big Book of What?" and "Sports Illustrated Kids Big Book of Why."

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    Thom Reeves, owner of the Isis theater, holds a photo showing the building’s facade in 1932 during the showing of the movie “The Kid from Spain”, starring Eddie Cantor, in Crete, Neb.

    Small theaters struggle as Hollywood goes digital

    Small-theater owners are facing the prospect of shutting their doors or raising roughly $100,000 as the movie industry switches from 35mm film to digital. While the digital format is cheaper for both studios and distributors, it means theater owners must buy expensive new projection equipment, computers and a sound system.

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    Emmett Malloy pours a glass of wine for a customer during last year’s Festival of the Vine in Geneva. This year’s fest ends Sunday.

    Sunday picks: Sip, sup at Festival of the Vine

    Today is your last chance to sample a variety of wines and local fare at Geneva's annual Festival of the Vine. Theatre-Hikes brings Shakespeare's “The Tempest” to the Morton Arboretum in Lisle. Or head into the city for the 10th annual Chicago Turkish Festival, Harvest Days at Garfield Park Conservatory or Ferraris in the Loop event.

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    Director/actor Mike Birbiglia, who stars in, co-writes and makes his directing debut with “Sleepwalk With Me,” names his five favorite NYC romantic comedies.

    Mike Birbiglia’s 5 favorite NYC romantic comedies

    Mike Birbiglia, a stand-up comic with a sleep disorder, stars in, co-writes and makes his directing debut with "Sleepwalk With Me," which is about ... a stand-up comic with a sleep disorder. As the indie critical hit expands to more theaters this week, Birbiglia was kind enough to take the time to choose his five favorite romantic comedies set in New York City.

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    Clint Eastwood plays an aging and ailing baseball scout with Justin Timberlake as his rival in “Trouble With the Curve,” which will be released on Sept. 21.

    Did Eastwood’s RNC act cause trouble for ‘Curve’?

    A week after Clint Eastwood's appearance before the Republican National Convention, mocking continues about the Hollywood veteran's peculiar, rambling conversation with an imaginary President Barack Obama in an empty chair, raising the question: Will his latest film, "Trouble With the Curve," also be playing to empty seats when it debuts later this month?

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    The public is invited to watch as thousands of bats swarm out of Carlsbad Caverns each evening at sunset through mid-October.

    Bats draw crowds to New Mexico caverns

    There's nothing like bats to draw a crowd to the scorching Chihuahuan Desert in the late summer heat. Several hundred people, myself and my son included, gathered a little before sunset one recent weekend outside the natural, open-mouth entrance to Carlsbad Caverns, eager to witness the nightly spectacle of bats spiraling out by the thousands and winging their way toward a buggy dinner.

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    The new Green County Cheese Days mascot “Wedgie” is ready to welcome guests to the oldest food fest in the Midwest, Sept. 14-16, in downtown Monroe, Wis.

    On the road: Milking those Cheese Days

    Green County Cheese Days in downtown Monroe, Wis., will offer many time-honored traditions like cheese tasting, live music, dairy farm tours, Swiss entertainment and a parade that lasts more than three hours. Also more than 80 artists will perform at more than 30 venues across the city when the World Music Festival hits Chicago.

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    The debate continues on which kind of razor and how many blades provide the best shave.

    Do more blades mean a better shave?

    As anyone with a television knows, shaving razors are high-tech. Men's razors have gone from one blade to six, and they feature vibrating blades, rubber fins to stretch the skin and gooey strips to reduce friction. But a band of contrarians claim that, for all the change in men's razors, we've made no progress. They say that multi-blade razors — often touted in commercials for their ability to "lift and cut" the hair beneath the skin line — are a major cause of ingrown hairs.

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    Brake fluid moisture can cause failure

    Q. Over the past few years, I've had an auto repair shop tell me the brake fluid needed to be flushed in the car since the oxidation level was high. Is this something that needs to be done, or is really unnecessary?

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    A participant makes a trial blend of wine while taking part in the winemaker-for-a-day program at Raymond Vineyards in St. Helena, Calif.

    A little hip to the sip at California wineries

    The tiki tasting hut in the barrel room of the Judd's Hill winery is a tipoff: This isn't your old-school faux château. Which is just the way Napa Valley winemaker Judd Finkelstein and his family want things. "Much to my delight, one of the most common compliments is, This has been a lot of fun. We really like coming here; it's not stuffy,"' says Finkelstein. "That's music to my ears."

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    Twentysomething can deflect marriage question with better answer

    Q. I am a woman in my early 20s, and I decided a while ago that I do not ever want to get married. There is a long list of reasons: I don't want children; I don't know how you can predict at 30 that you'd want to be with the same person when you're 80; and I don't want all of the marital problems people write in to you about.

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    Price short sales according to comparable area homes

    Q. I am underwater on my house and I would like to try a short sale. I'm not sure how to price the house. Will my mortgage company tell me what to list it for or at least tell me the least amount they will accept?

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    A Balinese man offers food to a local god in Kuta, Bali, Indonesia. It can be hard to find Bali’s serenity and beauty amid the villas with infinity pools and ads for Italian restaurants.

    It takes effort to find beauty, serenity in bustling Bali

    With Bali developing so fast, my husband and I realized we would have to look harder this time to rediscover the Indonesian island's serenity and beauty. Bali is a longtime favorite of honeymooners, surfers and travelers drawn to its dancing, music and religion.The tiny island also offers a touch of adventure and all the creature comforts.

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    Home repair: Second-floor bedrooms too hot for sleeping

    Q. I need advice before we invest in a new roof for our Cape Cod-style house. The house has two front dormers and one large dormer off the back of the house where the original owner added a bedroom upstairs. The roof on that dormer has been leaking around a vent pipe and has to be replaced.

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    There are many things to consider when purchasing a new toilet.

    Create a ‘checklist’ when choosing a toilet

    Q. I recently looked into getting a new toilet and was confused at all the choices I needed to make when buying one.Can you help guide me through the process?

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    A black dry sink contrasts nicely with the honey-hued grandfather clock. A distressed sign reading “pumpkins” breaks up the dry sink’s front.

    Glen Ellyn home ready for fall with nature-inspired craft decor

    Don't be fooled by Susan Voitik's cheerful disposition and equally warm decorating style — the Glen Ellyn homeowner still has a case of the blues. Luckily, her "condition" manifests itself in a beautiful collection of Blue Willow and Flow Blue china. She and her husband, Dan, have enjoyed gathering pieces together for years, but Susan credits an even earlier source as the inspiration for her hobby.

Discuss

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    Editorial: A good voter also brings objectivity to an election

    With the election campaigns kicking into full gear, a Daily Herald editorial reflects on the newspaper's obligations in the political process -- and the voters'.

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    Obama fails, revealingly

    Columnist Michael Gerson: President Obama's speech made almost no mention of the continuing jobs crisis. He offered nothing new or creative on a fiscal and debt crisis that undermines economic confidence.

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    PSAE scores are embarrassing
    A West Dundee letter to the editor: When the scores from the first PSAE were released in 2001, administrators were confident the scores would be different in future tests. They were right, they are worse.

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    A rudderless ship spells disaster
    A Lake Bluff letter to the editor: Despite positive reports and hype to the contrary, lawmakers failed to come up with a measure to rein in public employee pension costs even as they were called to Springfield for a special legislative session by Gov. Quin on Aug. 17.

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    Argument was built out of context
    A Prospect Heights letter to the editor: The much larger theme of President Obama's July speech focused on the role government has played in providing the infrastructure needed to support and fuel the unprecedented economic growth the U.S. has experienced over the past 60 years.

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    ‘Charisma’ won’t fix nation’s problems
    A letter to the editor: Have any of the "political junkies" on your editorial board actually read any of Mitt Romney's ideas or plans for content? Our country is in dire need of a real leader, and you're concerned that Mr. Romney doesn't have any charisma?

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    Only explaining grade-school civics
    A Glen Ellyn letter to the editor: Here is what is galling about the Republicans crying over Obama's "You didn't build that." Obama's little disquisition of the role of government in society should be wholly unnecessary. It is no more or less than seventh-grade civics.

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    Weighing in on vaccinations
    A Glen Ellyn letter to the editor: When I was a teenager a major reason for not wearing safety belts was the danger of being trapped in a burning car. The fear was real and supported by "facts." Convincing people to wear safety belts for their own good was a battle. Though statistics clearly showed that wearing safety belts dramatically reduced the severity of injuries and the chance of death many people clung to their "facts."

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    Robert Davis

    Farewell to the man who gave great advice

    DuPage Editor Jim Davis reflects on the passing of the man who gave him great advice in journalism and in life: his father.

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