Football Focus 2014

Daily Archive : Tuesday August 21, 2012

News

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    David Swanson, front, and Clark Rachfal, compete in July 2011.

    Cyclist from Arlington Hts. aims for Paralympic gold

    When Cathi Swanson was running behind her son, David, all those years ago, teaching him how to ride a bike, she couldn't know he'd eventually be speeding past her and almost everyone else in the world. This week David Swanson, 35, will race on the international stage as one of the few able-bodied athletes on the U.S. Paralympic team, pedalling the front half of a tandem bike team with his...

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    Miguel R. Lopez-Ochoa

    Aurora police: Man arrested with 42 pounds of pot

    Miguel R. Lopez-Ochoa, 34, of Chicago, was arrested in Aurora last Friday during a traffic stop and police said they found more than 42 pounds of marijuana in his car, a street value of $191,000. He's due in court Aug. 29 and faces six to 30 years if convicted.

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    Brunswick is in talks to buy Buffalo Grove’s eSkape bowling and entertainment center and convert it into a Brunswick Zone XL family entertainment center. A formal proposal is expected before the Buffalo Grove village board next month.

    Brunswick plans to buy, revamp Buffalo Grove’s eSkape

    Brunswick is in talks to buy Buffalo Grove's eSkape bowling and entertainment center and convert it into a Brunswick Zone XL family entertainment center. "In today's market, the customers are demanding multiple recreation choices when they come to the facility," said Michael Long, a vice president with Brunswick Bowling & Billiards.

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    Nora Peterson

    Ex-husband had order of protection against Elgin woman

    Bail was set at $750,000 for Nora Peterson, a 34-year-old Elgin woman accused of killing her boyfriend by hitting him on the head with a frying pan. She is charged with the murder of Michael N. Mielczarek, who died after hitting his head on the floor. Court records show that Peterson's previous husband filed for divorce in September 2008, citing irreconcilable differences and extreme mental...

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    Christopher Vaughn

    Slain wife’s father, sisters testify in Vaughn case

    The trial of an Oswego man accused of killing his wife and three children continued with testimony from the woman's father and sister. Christopher Vaughn is charged with first-degree murder in the 2007 shooting deaths of wife Kimberly Vaughn and their children, ages 12, 11 and 8.

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    Peterson jurors wear color-coordinated outfits

    There's apparently a daily color-coordination memo circulating the jury room at Drew Peterson's murder trial. Jurors hearing the case in Joliet have entered court each day for at least a week wearing the same colored clothing. Tuesday, virtually all wore some shade of green. Before starting a three-day break Friday, they wore black. On Thursday, it was blue and Wednesday it was red.

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    Drew Peterson

    Judge allows evidence that Peterson sought hit man

    The judge in Drew Peterson's murder trial handed prosecutors a legal victory Tuesday by giving them the go-ahead to introduce evidence in coming days that the former Bolingbrook police sergeant sought to hire a hit man to kill his third wife. Prosecutors allege Peterson, now 58, ended up killing his third wife, Kathleen Savio, himself in 2004. They want to bring up the hit-man evidence in an...

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    Ill. prison gardens donate 2 ½ tons of produce

    Local food banks have received 2 ½ tons of fresh produce grown by prison inmates at 23 Illinois facilities this year. Department of Corrections officials say the prison gardens started as a vocational opportunity for inmates to learn horticulture skills. Some have become large enough to feed inmates and prison staff as well as needy families nearby.

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    Italian bakery and cafe coming to Arlington Heights

    Dolce Bakery and Cafe, a new Italian cuisine eatery, will be opening soon in Arlington Heights after the village board approved plans for the project on Monday. "We want the place to be where someone steps back into Italy when they step inside with the atmosphere, the looks of it," said owner Tom Pollari.

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    Toni Preckwinkle

    Preckwinkle backtracks on comments about Reagan

    Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle is backtracking from comments she made about former President Ronald Reagan at a downstate function Tuesday. Preckwinkle is in hot water with GOP officials after saying that Reagan deserves "a special place in hell" for his part in politicizing and criminalizing drug addiction. " this is too complicated to lay all of it on President Reagan’s...

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    Rolling Meadows wants to lower summer sewer bills

    Jerry Sara did not complain when Rolling Meadows charged him $500 for the water he used to keep his landscaping alive in the summer drought. But the $171 automatically added for sewer fees made him upset because he knows most of that water did not go into the sewer.

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    Police reports
    A copper bar worth up to $4,000 was stolen between 5 and 6 a.m. Aug. 15 from Elgin Recycling, 1615 Dundee Ave., according to police reports. The offenders were caught on camera and believed to be employees of the business, reports said.

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    Cops: Man approached girl in Algonquin neighborhood

    Algonquin police are asking parents to speak with their children about safety after a man approached a girl and asked her if she wanted a ride home Tuesday afternoon.

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    Cubs prospect Jorge Soler jokes with Peoria Chiefs teammates before a game with the Beloit Snappers. Citing sources, one report says the Cubs Class A team may be moving to Kane County.

    Cubs working on Kane County move an MLB violation?

    Reports that the Cubs "are in the process of working out a player development agreement with the Kane County Cougars in an effort to move their Midwest League affiliate from Peoria would be against Major League Baseball policy, according to a Kansas City Royals executive. A violation of the rule would result in a $500,000 fine for major league teams and a $100,000 fine for minor league teams.

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    Carpentersville OKs video gambling

    Two Carpentersville trustees who previously voted against video gambling, had an about face on their positions Tuesday night, a move that was enough to officially bring it to town.

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    No referendum on video gambling in Sugar Grove

    If three trustees had their way, Sugar Grove residents would be asked in an advisory referendum whether the village should ban video gambling. But President Sean Michels ruled against that idea Tuesday night. And the proposal was likely moot, as the deadline for putting such a question on the November ballot was Aug. 20. "You don't believe in (being) democratic?" asked Trustee Tom Renk. "No, I...

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    District 121 ready to seek new superintendent

    Warren Township High School in Gurnee is preparing to launch a search for a permanent superintendent who would take over for the 2013-14 academic year.Mary Perry-Bates was appointed interim superintendent in late June after Jeff Brierton resigned from the post before he ever started. Perry-Bates has been assistant superintendent and is set to retire in June 2013.

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    Jack McCullough

    Defense says FBI reports back alibi in 1957 murder case

    Lawyers for a man charged in the 1957 kidnapping and killing of a 7-year-old Sycamore girl said Tuesday that FBI documents support his claims of an alibi. Jack McCullough has maintained he could not have abducted the girl on Dec. 3, 1957, saying he had traveled to Chicago that day for military medical exams required for enlisting in the Air Force.

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    Todd Akin, Republican candidate for U.S. Senator from Missouri, is fighting to salvage his Senate campaign even as members of his own party turned against him and a key source of campaign funding was cut off in outrage over the Missouri congressman’s comments that women are able to prevent pregnancies in cases of “legitimate rape.”

    Congressman defies leaders to stay in race

    Rep. Todd Akin defied the nation's top Republicans Tuesday to forge ahead with his besieged Senate campaign, declaring that GOP leaders were overreacting by abandoning him because of comments that women's bodies can prevent pregnancies in cases of "legitimate rape."

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    Megan Boken

    Wheaton murder victim’s friend: ‘It’s still not real.’

    When Sarah Entzeroth and her best friend Megan Boken parted ways Saturday afternoon, they were laughing and looking forward to becoming roommates. Five minutes later, Boken, a former volleyball star at Wheaton's St. Francis High School, was murdered during an apparent robbery in an upscale St. Louis neighborhood. "This is crazy," Entzeroth said Tuesday. "It's still not real."

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    Demographer: U-46 boundary changes were needed to stem overcrowding, account for new schools

    A demographer who studied student placement in Elgin Area School District U-46 said the 2004-2005 boundary changes that are at the center of a federal bias lawsuit were needed to combat overcrowding in some schools, eliminate satellite zones and accomodate three new schools in the district.

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    Diana Nyad is back on shore after a failed fourth attempt to swim across the Straits of Florida.

    Storms, stings push Nyad to end Cuba-to-Fla. swim

    Diana Nyad ended her fourth attempt to swim across the Straits of Florida on Tuesday, her decades-old dream thwarted, more than anything else, by jellyfish.

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    2012 Equity Jeff Award Nominees
    Here are all the nominees for the Joseph Jefferson Awards. The awards recognizing excellence in Chicago-area theater will be presented Oct. 15 at Drury Lane Theatre.

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    Highway, the Round Lake police department’s canine member, died Monday from cancer.

    Round Lake authorities mourn loss of Highway the police dog

    Round Lake police Tuesday mourned the loss of a valued member of the department, a go-getter who tracked criminals and narcotics with a rare drive. Highway, a sable-colored German shepherd, died Monday night of thyroid cancer, dealing a blow to the department where he had served as the canine in the K-9 unit the past five years.

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    66 men arrested in Cook County following nationwide prostitution sting

    Cook County Sheriff's police arrested 66 "Johns" this month during a nationwide prostitution sweep dubbed "Buyer Beware" and directed toward curtailing human trafficking. The Cook and Kane County sheriff's departments and the Aurora and Elgin police departments were among the law enforcement agencies participating in the nationwide sweep that took place this month.

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    Mundelein police open house:

    The Mundelein Police Department is sponsoring an open house on Saturday, Sept. 8, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., at 221 N. Lake St.

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    Beach Park man requests separate trial

    Defense attorneys for Eric Castillo, 24, of Beach Park, asked Lake County circuit court Judge George Bridges on Tuesday for a separate trial from three other suspects charged with the 2011 murder of a Waukegan man.

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    Head Start hosts free health fair:

    The Community Action Partnership of Lake County's Head Start program hosts a free health fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 23 at the CAP Banquet & Meeting Center, 1200 Glen Flora Ave., Waukegan.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Vandals scratched a 2004 Volvo SUV, 2006 Mercedes S430 sedan, 2006 BMW SUV, and 2005 Nissan XTerra in a sales lot at Metro Auto Traders, 600 Northwest Hwy., between 6 a.m. and 7:53 p.m. Aug. 15. Damage was estimated at $4,000.

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    Environmental concerns, time playing role in former landfill’s redevelopment

    A letter from Waste Management to the county says the redevelopment plans for the Fabyan Parkway campus are possible as long as everyone remembers during construction that a big chunk is a former landfill. Meanwhile, the presentation of a timeline for the improvements revealed some board members are more ambitious about a schedule than others. Any slowdown at this point could mean pushing the...

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    Schaumburg, Elgin weigh orchestra’s fund requests

    Schaumburg's finance committee has recommended a one-time, $25,000 contribution to the Elgin Symphony Orchestra for its four performances atthe village's Prairie Center for the Arts this coming season. Meanwhile, the city of Elgin is weighing a $100,000 request from the ESO that's not only larger monetarily, but more complicated by the long-term decisions it touches on.

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    Downstate prosecutor refuses to enforce gun law

    The McLean County state's attorney is halting enforcement of Illinois gun laws that he considers unconstitutional. Ron Dozier said state law makes criminals out of people who simply carry weapons in the wrong place or the wrong type of container. Dozier says he refuses to "punish decent, otherwise law-abiding citizens" who exercise their Second Amendment rights.

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    Jordan Ratley

    Glendale Heights man gets 28 years in kidnapping

    A Glendale Heights man was sentenced Tuesday to 28 years in prison for kidnapping and severely beating his former girlfriend.

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    Chicago man accused of prompting JetBlue emergency landing

    A Chicago man is accused of groping a pregnant woman and refusing to follow crew instructions on a JetBlue flight, prompting the plane to make an emergency landing in Denver.

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    Pharmacists in Illinois now can administer vaccinations, such as the booster shot for diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus, to children as young as 10, with a doctor’s prescription.

    New law lowers age for pharmacist-administered vaccinations

    Illinois children as young as 10 years old can get vaccinated at pharmacies under an Illinois law signed Tuesday that lowers the age limit. Previously, the law allowed children age 14 and older get such shots — including vaccinations for the flu, tetanus, diphtheria and whooping cough — from pharmacists.

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    Gov. Pat Quinn heads into a meeting with legislative leaders to discuss a state pension overhaul last Friday at the Capitol in Springfield.

    Quinn won’t start pension reform campaign for weeks

    Gov. Pat Quinn said Tuesday that he'll wait until next month to debut his so-called grass-roots campaign raising awareness about Illinois' pension problem, a move that comes days after lawmakers failed to come up with a plan to overhaul the massively underfunded system.

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    Chief judge: Cook County readying for court cameras

    Cook County's chief judge says his court system should be ready to introduce cameras in courtrooms by the end of the year, although Illinois Supreme Court officials say there's no specific timetable for putting them in place.

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    Quinn hires longtime aide again

    Gov. Pat Quinn has again hired longtime aide Claude Walker to his communications staff. A spokeswoman said Walker is a senior policy writer and liaison to several government agencies. He is being paid $80,000 to draft communications, policies and analyses.

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    Legionnaires’ disease linked to Chicago hotel

    Health officials say they are investigating three confirmed cases of Legionnaires' disease among people who stayed at a Chicago hotel. The Chicago Department of Public Health and the JW Marriott Chicago Hotel issued an advisory Tuesday.

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    College Illinois tuition program to resume Oct. 1

    The state's College Illinois prepaid tuition program will soon be back in business. The Illinois Student Assistance Commission voted last week to reopen College Illinois on Oct. 1 and tentatively plans an $800,000 ad campaign to promote the program.

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    Harper board increases president’s housing allowance

    The Harper College board of trustees recently approved an amendment to President Ken Ender's contract raising his housing allowance from $20,000 to $32,000 annually. Officials said the money will offset some expenses Ender incurs when hosting events at his Inverness home that promote or benefit Harper.

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    DuPage County Forest Preserve officials have outlined a five-year business plan to guide the Danada Equestrian Center.

    DuPage forest preserve outlines 5-year Danada plan

    DuPage County forest preserve officials have unveiled a new five-year plan for Danada Equestrian Center in Wheaton that outlines programming, herd health and economic goals. The plan was created with feedback from an operational assessment conducted earlier this year. The assessment, along with measures like a vet checkup of the herd, was part of the response to complaints in November from some...

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    Celtic Thunder coming to Rosemont

    World-renowned Irish musical ensemble Celtic Thunder will embark on a 63-city tour of North America this fall, including an Oct. 21 appearance at the Akoo Theater in Rosemont.

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    Sunit Jain

    Technology exec cites passion for education in appointment to District 125 board

    Sunit Jain, a business technology executive from Long Grove, has been named to fill a vacancy on the District 125 school board. He fills a vacancy created last month when Lori Lyman resigned and will serve the remainder of her term, which ends in April 2013. Jain is the co-founder of Ubiquity IQ, a software company. The district governs Stevenson High School.

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    Tri-Cities police report
    A pellet shattered glass in a door at Louise White Elementary School, 800 N. Prairie St., it was reported at 1:27 a.m. Monday, police said.

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    Fox Lake has discontinued its senior shuttle van service after 12 years due to escalating costs.

    Fox Lake cancels senior shuttle service due to escalating cost

    A sluggish economy, high maintenance costs and redundant programs are behind a decision to discontinue the Fox Lake Senior Shuttle Service, village officials said. Village Administrator Nancy Schuerr said village officials elected to end the 12-year-old shuttle van service in early August to save the village the $50,000 annual maintenance and staff cost.

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    Fatal stabbing Sunday night of Palatine man ruled self defense

    The man who fatally stabbed a 21-year-old Palatine man Sunday night acted in self-defense and won't face criminal charges, police said today. Palatine police say the slain man, Corey Frazier, was the aggressor in the physical confrontation, which followed an eight-month feud over the sale of a pit bull.

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    A mature emerald ash borer on an ash tree in Campton Township, west of St. Charles.

    At ash borer ‘ground zero,’ landscape looks just fine

    The emerald ash borer was first discovered in Illinois in 2006, and ground zero is a subdivision west of St. Charles called The Windings of Ferson Creek. But instead of looking like a moonscape, the Windings is still a leafy, heavily wooded neighborhood. Why? Because ash trees make up only a small percentage of their trees.

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    Ruth Kramp signs her name and writes a message of hope on one of the pink fire engines during the 2012 Guardians of the Ribbon — Pink Heals Tour.

    Hot pink fire engines to roll into Aurora on Pink Heals Tour

    The Aurora Regional Fire Museum, often billed as the hottest place in town, is turning hot pink when three pink fire engines roll into town on Saturday, Aug. 25, as part of the Guardians of the Ribbon Pink Heals Tour.

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    The Glen Ellyn Festival of the Arts takes center stage Saturday and Sunday at Lake Ellyn Park near downtown. In addition to more than 80 juried artists who will display everything from paintings to pottery to photography, the celebration caters to a wide range of musical tastes.

    Glen Ellyn festival celebrates art and music

    Lake Ellyn Park will play host this weekend to an art festival that takes visitors well beyond just the visual arts. Oh, sure, there will be the usual sea of tents and booths, displaying staples such as handcrafted jewelry, paintings and photography. But the real focus of the two-day Glen Ellyn Festival of the Arts goes beyond all that.

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    Be thankful for farmers — and tomatoes

    Our Stephanie Penick made two summer trips to Indiana. Along the way, the dry landscape reminded her of an important expression passed along years ago when she helped the Wheatland Plowing Match Association with its newsletter. Simply put, "No farmers, no food."

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    William Hill Brown wrote the first American novel
    "Who was the first American to write a novel,?" asked students in Jen Janik's third grade class at Big Hollow Elementary School in Ingleside.

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    Neon Trees bassist Branden Campbell, left, said Saturday’s show at Benedictine University in Lisle will be a “conversation between the band and the crowd.”

    Neon Trees to perform at Benedictine University in Lisle

    "As the music gets out into homes and into people's businesses, it does surprise you who is on the other side of the radio," says Branden Campbell, bass player for Neon Trees.

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    The All-American Rejects rhythm guitarist Mike Kennerty, right, said fans at this Saturday’s show at Benedictine University in Lisle will hear songs from their new album, “Kids in the Street,” that expounds upon the band’s signature sounds.

    All-American Rejects bring evolving sound to Benedictine

    "With each record ... we try to make it more independent of the previous," Mike Kennerty of the All-American Rejects says. "We take a lot of time between albums. When we tour, we tour. So when we come back we are different people at that point, we are at a different mindset. And then we get to the studio and we just push ourselves even further and try things we've never tried before." His band...

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    Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney is starting to open up a bit more about his lifelong commitment to Mormonism and lay leadership in the church.

    Romney opening up — a little — about his religion

    Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney is starting to open up a bit more about his lifelong commitment to Mormonism.

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    A building tropical storm in the Atlantic Ocean could threaten the Republican National Convention to be held in Miami next week.

    Hurricane hunter checking out Atlantic storm

    A hurricane hunter aircraft is headed toward a tropical depression that forecasters say likely will become Tropical Storm Isaac and that organizers for the Republican National Convention being held in Tampa next week are watching.

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    Wheaton College gets nod to expand student housing

    Wheaton College has won city approval to expand its student housing into a residential area bordering its campus. City council members Monday unanimously approved the school's request to use several college-owned properties to house undergraduate students at 739 N. Irving Ave. and 510 and 520 Sears Lane. In total, a maximum of 26 students are expected to occupy the three houses.

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    Chef Alain Roby poses with his life-size chocolate kitchen in his downtown Geneva kitchen.

    Arcada Theater hosts ‘Back to Woodstock’ next weekend

    Dave Heun talks about 'Back to Woodstock,' hosted next weekend at the Arcada Theater in downtown St. Charles.

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    Martrell D. Harris

    $1M bail for North Aurora man accused of killing father

    Bail was set Tuesday morning at $1 million for Martrell Harris, a 23-year-old from North Aurora accused of stabbing and killing his father. Harris is due in court again on Aug. 30 and faces 20 years to 60 years in prison if convicted of first-degree murder. In order to be free while his case is pending, Harris must post $100,000.

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    Wheeling officials agreed Monday to offer up to $1.5 million in Tax Increment Financing funding to the developer of the Millbrook Pointe townhouses along Wolf Road. The funding will be turned over only as homes are completed and sold.

    Townhouse developer could get up to $1.5 million from Wheeling TIF

    The Wheeling Village Board agreed Monday to give Millbrook Pointe, a townhouse development along Wolf Road, up to $1.5 million in Tax Increment Financing funding as its developers complete its construction. The funds will come only as property taxes are paid on each completed unit.

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    Marjorie Sullivan Lee and her son, Kevin, make chocolate chip cookies together in their Glen Ellyn home. Kevin shares in other household chores such as vacuuming and grocery shopping.

    Mom still advocating for her son and others with Down syndrome

    When Marjorie Sullivan Lee's son, Kevin, was born in 1960 with Down syndrome, the doctor suggested he could be institutionalized. Lee said "no" and has spent the rest of her life being an advocate for full inclusion for Kevin and other people with cognitive disabilities. Now 90 and still looking after her son, Lee has written about her family's story in her new book "Bloom Where You Are Planted."

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    Travis Glay, manager of LandScapes Concepts of Grayslake, points out the destructive grid pattern of the emerald ash borer beetle after they cut down one of the 1,500 hundred trees slated for the chopping block in Schaumburg.

    Could emerald ash borer disaster happen again?

    How do you keep the suburbs from falling prey to another monoculture, given how easy and inexpenseive it was to plant ash trees? Tree diversity is the key, say arborists, and it works only if towns, developers and nurseries are on the same page. "Even today it's an issue," said Robert Benjamin, a foreste. "If you have a $3 million project and you've got to cut costs, the first thing that gets cut...

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    Nancy Fike is retiring from her position as administrator at the McHenry County Historical Society in Union at the end of the month.

    Fike retires from McHenry County Historical Society

    Nancy Fike has a quick answer about what's been the most difficult part of her tenure with the McHenry County Historical Society. "Right now," Fike, 70, said of her impending retirement from the post of administrator after 40 years with the organization, including nine as a volunteer. "It's so bittersweet because I still enjoy doing it. But you've got to know when to fold."

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    President Barack Obama speaks in the White House briefing room in Washington, Monday, Aug. 20, 2012.

    Obama shifts attention to Ryan education plan

    PITTSBURGH — It’s not just Medicare. President Barack Obama plans to start picking apart other sections of Republican vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan’s sweeping budget proposals as he tries to paint the GOP ticket as too extreme for the nation.Next up: education.

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    Endangered blue whales, the world’s largest animals, are being seen in droves off the northern California coast, lured by an abundance of their favorite food — shrimplike creatures known as krill. Whale-watching tour operators are reporting a bumper harvest of blue whales, orcas, humpbacks and binocular-toting tourists eager to witness the coastal feeding frenzy.

    Endangered whales invade California coastal waters

    SANTA CRUZ, Calif. — Grab your camera and binoculars: There’s rarely been a better time to go whale-watching off the California coast.Tourists from around the world have been flocking to Monterey Bay to catch a glimpse of the massive marine mammals, including impressive numbers of blue whales, the largest animals on earth.

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    Afghan militants hit U.S. military chief’s plane

    KABUL, Afghanistan — Insurgents fired rockets into an American base in Afghanistan and damaged the parked plane of the visiting chairman of the U.S. joint chiefs of staff, the U.S.-led military coalition said Tuesday. The general was safe in his quarters at the time but had to take another aircraft out of the country.

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    Syrian forces kill 23 rebels in town near Damascus

    BEIRUT — Government forces stormed a rebel-held town outside Damascus Tuesday after days of fierce fighting, killing at least 23 fighters according to an activist group and a rebel spokesman.

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    An image of Japanese journalist Mika Yamamoto is shown on a large monitor screen in Tokyo Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2012 during a TV news broadcast reporting her death in Syria. Yamamoto, a veteran war correspondent with The Japan Press, an independent TV news provider that specializes in conflict zone coverage, was killed Monday in the northwestern city of Aleppo, said Masaru Sato, a spokesman with the Foreign Ministry in Tokyo.

    Japanese journalist killed covering Syria fighting

    TOKYO — A veteran Japanese war correspondent was shot and killed while covering Syria’s civil war, her family and the government said Tuesday.Mika Yamamoto worked for The Japan Press, an independent TV news provider that specializes in conflict zone coverage.

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    Teresa Carter, right, mother of Chavis Carter, comforts her other son Kizziah Carter on Monday, Aug. 20, 2012 following a prayer vigil held on the grounds of The National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tenn., for Chavis Carter, who Jonesboro, Arkansas, police say committed suicide while handcuffed.

    Suicide ruling doesn’t end questions in Ark. patrol car shooting

    MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Hours after police released an autopsy report that ruled the shooting death of a young man in the back of a patrol car a suicide, dozens of the man’s supporters and relatives gathered Monday night in Memphis for a candlelight vigil.

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    In this photo released by the New York City Police Department, NYC Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly, center, briefs other NYPD officials and John O. Brennan, assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism, center right, on events surrounding the alleged plot to bomb NYC commuter trains on Sept. 11, at Police Headquarters in New York, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2009.

    NYPD: Muslim spying led to no leads, terror cases

    NEW YORK — In more than six years of spying on Muslim neighborhoods, eavesdropping on conversations and cataloging mosques, the New York Police Department’s secret Demographics Unit never generated a lead or triggered a terrorism investigation, the department acknowledged in court testimony unsealed late Monday.

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    Five children killed in SUV crash in East Texas

    TYLER, Texas — Investigators say two boys and three girls died when the overloaded SUV they were traveling in crashed in East Texas.Department of Public Safety Trooper Jean Dark says five other children and two adults were hurt in the rollover Monday near Van, about 70 miles east of Dallas. No other vehicles were involved.

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    Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi died Monday, Aug. 20, 2012 following weeks of illness, Ethiopian State media reported. He was 57.

    Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi dead at 57

    ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — Meles Zenawi, Ethiopia’s longtime ruler who held tight control over this East African country but was a major U.S. counterterrorism ally, died of an undisclosed illness after not being seen in public for weeks, Ethiopian authorities announced Tuesday. He was 57.Meles died Monday just before midnight after contracting an infection, state TV said.

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    Officials stand near part of a CSX freight train that derailed overnight in Ellicott City, Md., Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2012. Authorities said two people not employed by the railroad were killed in the incident.

    CSX train derails outside Baltimore, killing 2

    ELLICOTT CITY, Md. — A CSX train hauling coal derailed and fell from a bridge in downtown Ellicott City outside Baltimore, killing two people who were on the tracks and crushing vehicles in a parking lot, authorities said.

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    Lose: Two EMTs also named in lawsuit
    Two EMTs could lose their licenses amid allegations they abused and mistreated patients and co-workers while working at the Antioch Rescue Squad, state officials confirmed.The Illinois Department of Public Health officials said they are investigating the conduct of Kyle Shouse and Chris McBrady and will decide if they should ever again work as EMTs or paramedics.

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    Wisconsin still leads nation in cheese production

    There's a reason Wisconsin is called the cheese capital of America. The Badger State produced 227 million pounds of cheese in June. That was one-fourth of the nation's cheese production that month, and a 2 percent increase over the state's production in June of last year.

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    Corruption trial starts for NW. Indiana official

    The federal corruption trial of a longtime northwestern Indiana elected official began with his defense attorney saying he wasn't trying to defraud anyone by taking about $24,000 in child support incentive payments over six years.

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    Chicago woman sentenced in tax, child-care fraud

    The U.S. Department of Justice says a Chicago woman has been sentenced to 11 years in prison for using stolen identities and other fraudulent documents to steal more than $200,000 in federal tax refunds and state child-care benefits. The Department of Justice says 41-year-old Katrina Pierce was sentenced in federal court Monday. She pleaded guilty in January to fraud and aggravated identity theft.

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    Sen. Durbin calls for passage of student loan bill

    There are big differences between private student loans and federal student loans. U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin is encouraging students to know the differences. Durbin held a news conference Monday in Chicago to call for passage of the Know Before You Owe Act. He introduced the bill to help students understand the range of loan options before borrowing.

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    Illinois governor signs payday lender law

    Gov. Pat Quinn has signed a new law he says will protect consumers from payday lenders. Quinn on Monday signed the law, which requires lenders to be licensed by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation or be charged with a felony. Right now the state agency has licensed 522 payday lenders.

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    Ind. panel to discuss Fort Wayne campus’ future

    A state legislative committee plans to discuss whether the joint campus run by Indiana and Purdue universities in Fort Wayne should become an independent school.The General Assembly's Select Commission on Education is to review the governance of Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne at its Sept. 4 meeting at the Statehouse in Indianapolis.

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    Lee Hirsch, author and director of the 2011 documentary “Bully,” will discuss his film during the first Glenbard Parent Series program of the 2012-13 school year Wednesday, Aug. 22, at Glenbard East High School.

    Glenbard Parent Series opens with program on bullying

    Another school year begins, and so with it comes pens and notebooks, band practice and football games. But so, too, back-to-school for many students means a return to bullying. That's why the organizer of the Glenbard Parent Series decided to kick off this year's series by inviting Lee Hirsch, author and director of the 2011 documentary "Bully," to discuss his film with students and parents.

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    Dawn Patrol: Elgin frying pan murder; N. Aurora stabbing death

    Elgin woman charged with murder after striking boyfriend with frying pan. Naperville District 203 picks permanent superintendent. Two Antioch Rescue Squad EMTs could lose their licenses. Police considering robbery motive in Wheaton native's murder. North Aurora man accused of killing dad. Aurora library urging employees to undergo TB test.

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    This Pomona College gate reads, “Let only the eager, thoughtful and reverent enter here.” That’s also good advice for suburban parents entering the college search process.

    Road to college can be as confusing as an L.A. freeway

    Many of us suburban parents look back on our own college decisions as something that just sort of happened. We took one of those required fill-in-the-circle tests and applied to our “dream” college and a “safety” school close to home. There was no Internet to scour in pursuit of the perfect college, no website enabling our parents to obsess about our chances of acceptance,...

Sports

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    Despite losses Sky continues to think positive

    For a team that has lost seven straight games and 11 of its last 12, the Chicago Sky is certainly winning in one area: optimism.

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    Kevin Youkilis connects on a grand slam off Yankees starter Ivan Nova in the fifth inning Tuesday night.

    Payback for trio of White Sox in win over Yankees

    Kevin Youkilis, Dewayne Wise and Francisco Liriano all settled scores with the Yankees Tuesday night at U.S. Cellular Field, lifting the White Sox to a 7-3 win in the process.

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    St. Charles East’s Izzie Bindseil competes in last year’s state meet. She’ll be trying to qualify for the 2012 state meet on Saturday at the St. Charles North sectional.

    St. Charles E. leads area’s state hopefuls

    Here's a look ahead to Saturday's girls swimming and diving sectionals meets, from the perspective of teams in the Tri-Cities area.

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    West Aurora, Waubonsie Valley survive

    Making its first largest-school regional semifinal appearance since the last year of the girls Class AA volleyball state tournament, Rosary desperately sought to force a third set against Waubonsie Valley.

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    Geneva stays hot, makes quick work of South Elgin

    Fresh off a win over Waubonsie Valley and a strong close to the regular season, South Elgin came into the Class 4A Batavia regional Tuesday on a bit of a roll. Unfortunately for the Storm, Geneva is even hotter. The No. 2 seeded Vikings didn’t have much trouble with No. 15 South Elgin, breaking free midway through Game 1 and then rolling to a 25-19, 25-9 victory.

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    Batavia sweeps York

    With four-year starter Kristen Koncelik getting York’s full attention in the second semifinal at the Class 4A Batavia regional Tuesday night, the Bulldogs picked a good time to show off their depth. The Evansville-bound Koncelik still put away 7 kills, and she got plenty of help from Heather Meyer (8 kills) and Shea Stanley (6 kills). Anysa Ocon put away 3 kills and combined with Shea Thayer for 3 blocks, while setter Audrey Faulhaber mixed up the Dukes defense with 21 assists and Batavia defended its home court with a 25-14, 25-21 victory.

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    Batavia leaves no doubt

    Accustomed to playing the front nine at Fox Valley Golf Club for its dual matches, Batavia simply turned it up a notch against archrival Geneva.

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    Kaneland runs past Burlington Central

    Kaneland coach Todd Weimer has a simple formula for winning volleyball — long runs — and the Knights used it in both games of their 25-17, 25-17 victory over Burlington Central Tuesday night in Maple Park.

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    A moment in praise of hard-hitting high school football

    The clear rise in awareness about the dangers of concussions in football is a good thing. Keep that in mind as you enjoy one of the great things about high school sports: opening weekend of the football season.

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    A’s second baseman Adam Rosales throws to first over the Twins’ Ryan Doumit, completing a triple play hit into by Trevor Plouffe in the fifth inning Tuesday in Oakland, Calif.

    A’s turn triple play, bounce Twins 4-1

    Oakland left-hander Brett Anderson pitched seven innings in his first start since undergoing elbow surgery nearly 15 months ago, and the Athletics turned a triple play behind him in a 4-1 win over the Minnesota Twins on Tuesday night.

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    Giants catcher Hector Sanchez holds up the ball after tagging out the Dodgers’ A.J. Ellis in the sixth inning Tuesday in Los Angeles.

    Giants beat Dodgers 4-1 to extend NL West lead

    Tim Lincecum bounced back from consecutive home losses with his third straight road win, and the San Francisco Giants defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers 4-1 on Tuesday night, increasing their NL West lead to 1½ games over their division rival.

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    Baltimore’s Manny Machado (13) is congratulated by Nate McLouth after scoring a run against the Texas Rangers in the fifth inning Tuesday in Arlington, Texas.

    McLouth’s HR keys Orioles’ 5-3 win over Rangers

    Nate McLouth hit a two-run home run in a decisive four-run fifth inning, and the Baltimore defeated Texas 5-3 Tuesday night.

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    The Angels’ Mark Trumbo runs to first after hitting a two-run home run against the Red Sox during the fifth inning Tuesday in Boston

    Trumbo hits 30th homer as Angels down Red Sox 5-3

    Mark Trumbo hit his 30th home run, Ervin Santana pitched 6 1-3 solid innings and the Angels beat the Boston Red Sox 5-3 on Tuesday night after getting swept in a four-game series against Tampa Bay.

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    Nationals starting pitcher Stephen Strasburg throws against the Atlanta Braves during the first inning on Tuesday in Washington, D.C.

    Strasburg guides Nationals to 4-1 win over Braves

    Stephen Strasburg weathered his first major league rain delay Tuesday, striking out 10 and allowing one run in six innings for his 15th win as the Nationals beat the Atlanta Braves 4-1.

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    Blue Jays pitcher Ricky Romero sits on the bench after being taken out in the sixth inning Tuesday in Detroit.

    Tigers take advantage of wild Romero to knock off Blue Jays

    Detroit took advantage of Ricky Romero's wildness Tuesday night in a 5-3 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays. The Tigers scored their first two runs on bases-loaded walks, and although they never really broke the game open with a big hit, they did enough to keep pace in the AL Central race.

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    Kansas City Royals starting pitcher Luke Hochevar delivers to the Tampa Bay Rays during the second inning of Tuesday’s game in St. Petersburg, Fla.

    Royals edge Rays in 10 innings

    Kansas City reliever Kelvin Herrera got his first major league victory Tuesday night after Royals starter Luke Hochevar and Tampa Bay's David Price staged a classic pitchers' duel.

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    Cardinals starting pitcher Adam Wainwright celebrates a 7-0 win over the Houston Astros on Tuesday in St. Louis.

    Wainwright dominates in Cards’ 7-0 win over Astros

    Adam Wainwright matched his career high with 12 strikeouts in a five-hitter, and the Cardinals punished rookie Lucas Harrell with six runs in the first three innings en route to a 7-0 victory over the Houston Astros on Tuesday night.

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    Roger Clemens talks with reporters Tuesday after a news conference officially announcing his signing with the Sugar Land Skeeters baseball team in Sugar Land, Texas.

    Astros sent scout to check out Clemens

    Roger Clemens thinks any talk about a return to the majors is premature. The Houston Astros decided to check him out anyway.

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    Fans stand to cheer as Mariners starting pitcher Felix Hernandez throws against the Cleveland Indians in the third inning Tuesday in Seattle.

    Hernandez leads Seattle past Indians 5-1

    Felix Hernandez wasn't perfect. He was still dominant. Hernandez allowed one run in 7 2-3 innings in the first start following his perfect game, Jesus Montero hit a three-run homer in Seattle's four-run seventh inning, and the Mariners won their seventh straight beating the Cleveland Indians 5-1 on Tuesday night.

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    San Francisco’s Melky Cabrera was batting .346 with 11 home runs and 60 RBI before his 50-game suspension.

    Giants cancel order for Cabrera T-shirts

    The San Francisco Giants canceled an order for 20,000 Melky Cabrera T-shirts just in time. Giants spokeswoman Staci Slaughter said Tuesday that the order was stopped just before printing after Cabrera received a 50-game suspension from Major League Baseball last Wednesday following his positive test of testosterone.

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    The Reds’ Zack Cozart swings on a sacrifice fly that scored a run in the seventh inning Tuesday against the Philadelphia Phillies on Tuesday. In the ninth, he hit a go-ahead home run.

    Cozart’s HR leads Reds over Phillies

    Zack Cozart hit a tiebreaking homer on Jonathan Papelbon's first pitch in the ninth, and the Cincinnati Reds beat the Phillies 5-4 Tuesday night to snap a seven-game losing streak against Philadelphia.

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    Rockies catcher Ramon Hernandez tags out the Mets’ Ruben Tejada at home plate during the sixth inning Tuesday in New York.

    Rockies defeat Mets 6-2

    Jhoulys Chacin made an impressive return from an extended absence, and the Colorado Rockies backed him with a pair of sharp defensive plays, beating the New York Mets 6-2 Tuesday night.

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    Tejay Van Garderen of the United States crosses the finish line Tuesday in Mount Crested Butte, Colo., winning the second stage of the USA Pro Cycling Challenge.

    Van Garderen takes stage, lead at USA Pro Challenge

    ejay van Garderen emerged at the front in last few hundred uphill yards, captured the Stage 2 and assumed the race lead at the USA Pro Challenge on Tuesday. Van Garderen, who rides for BMC, completed the 99.2-mile Montrose to Mt. Crested Butte road race in 3 hours, 52 minutes and 24 seconds.

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    Tuesday’s girls volleyball scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Tuesday's girls volleyball matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Tuesday’s girls tennis scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Tuesday's girls tennis meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Tuesday’s girls golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Tuesday's girls golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Tuesday’s boys soccer scoreboard
    High school varsity results of Tuesday's boys soccer matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Tuesday’s boys golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Tuesday's boys golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Tuesday’s boys cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Tuesday's boys cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Grayslake Central shoots past Richmond-Burton

    Grayslake Central's boys soccer team opened its season by winning in dramatic fashion Tuesday night. Steven Anderson's save on the final shooter gave the Rams a 3-2 win over Richmond-Burton in penalty kicks in opening-round action of the Cougar Classic at Vernon Hills.

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    Strong start for Libertyville

    Libertyville's girls volleyball team followed the strong defensive efforts of Rhiannon Prentiss and Kristen Webb to open the 2012 season with a 25-18, 25-11 win over Conant on Tuesday night.

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    Defense lets Cougars down

    Three errors from the Kane County Cougars’ defense led to 5 unearned runs as the Burlington Bees took advantage for a 6-3 victory on Tuesday night at Community Field.

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    Fremd edges Conant, Barrington

    Fremd improved to 2-0 in the Mid-Suburban League and Conant's Jackie Halden kept her game rolling on Tuesday at the Fox Run Golf Course in Elk Grove. The Vikings were back on the course where they finished second to defending state champion Prospect 10 days ago in the Conant Early Bird Invite. This time, coach Christine Vlaming's Vikings (172) won a tri-meet over Conant (177) and Barrington (179).

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    Otters blank Boomers

    The Schaumburg Boomers managed just 5 hits and stranded 10 men on base in a 4-0 loss to the Evansville Otters on Tuesday night at Boomers Stadium.

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    Milwaukee Brewers’ Rickie Weeks scores from third on a wild pitch as Chicago Cubs relief pitcher Alberto Cabrera cannot handle the throw during the sixth inning of a baseball game, Tuesday in Milwaukee.

    Cubs make it interesting but still fall to Brewers

    MILWAUKEE — Marco Estrada allowed two hits in six solid innings to win for the first time in almost a year, leading the Milwaukee Brewers over the Cubs 5-2 Tuesday night.Estrada (1-5) started for the 16th time this year and made 14 relief appearances over two seasons since his 11-4 win at Pittsburgh on Aug. 23, 2011.The Brewers right-hander gave up Alfonso Soriano’s double leading off the second and rookie starter Chris Rusin’s first major league hit, a one-out triple in the third. Estrada worked retired David DeJesus on a comebacker and then Josh Vitters took a called third strike to end the inning.Estrada retired 18 of 21 batters before turning over a 1-0 lead to Kameron Loe to start the seventh.Loe pitched a scoreless seventh. Francisco Rodriguez did the same in the eighth.The Cubs made it interesting in the ninth against Manny Parra.Vitters doubled with one out. After Parra walked the next batter, Anthony Rizzo, Brewers manager Ron Roenicke pulled Parra. Jim Henderson took over to face Soriano who drove in Vitters with a single to right. Starlin Castro ended Henderson’s appearance when he drove in the second run grounding out to third.Roenicke brought in John Axford, who had lost his role as closer after blowing eight saves, to preserve the victory. He got Wellington Castillo to ground out to second for his 19th save.Estrada had been denied a win four times earlier in the season when the bullpen blew a save opportunity.The Brewers’ victory spoiled the pitching debut of Rusin, who had his contract purchased from Triple-A Iowa.Rusin retired Milwaukee in order through three innings. Then ran into trouble in the fourth when the Brewers scored out a run.The left-hander hit the first batter, Norichka Aoki, who stole second. He walked Ryan Braun with one out before plunking Aramis Ramirez to load the bases. Corey Hart lined a shot off Rusin’s left shin to score Aoki.Cubs manager Dale Sveum and assistant athletic trainer Ed Halbur came out to check on Rusin (0-1). He threw a few pitches and stayed in the game. He got Lucroy, the next batter, to hit into a double play to hold Milwaukee to just one run.Rusin, the ninth Cubs rookie pitcher to make his major league debut this season, threw 76 pitches. He struck out four and walked two before Cabrera came out to start the sixth.The Brewers added three runs in the sixth on three walks, a wild pitch and Jonathan Lucroy’s two-run double off reliever Alberto Cabrera.Carlos Gomez added a run-scoring single in the eighth.

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    Lisle, Westmont trying to catch Wilmington

    Wilmington has won the Interstate Eight Conference's Small Division four years in a row, but Westmont and Lisle will try to stop that streak this season.

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    Rosary edges Huntley in season opener

    There were a lot of jitters. Definitely some nerves, too. And undoubtedly, some firsts. Rosary and Huntley made their volleyball season debuts in Huntley Tuesday night, so there would be rust. But Huntley's Karen Liss and Rosary's Rachel Hartmann were on display coaching for the first time for their new schools, so it was an understatement of firsts to say the least. Except for Liss — she'll have to wait at least one more match to notch win No. 1 as a Red Raider.

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    Sky lose seventh straight

    Cappie Pondexter scored 25 points and Plenette Pierson added 21 as the New York Liberty beat the Sky 77-67 Tuesday night. The Liberty (8-13) saw an 18-point second half lead trimmed to six early in the fourth quarter, then rebuilt a double-digit advantage and maintained it the rest of the way.

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    Chicago White Sox's Alejandro De Aza, pinch running for Manny Ramirez, scores the go-ahead run from third base on a single by A.J. Pierzynski in the 10th inning of a baseball game against the Detroit Tigers Monday, Sept. 6, 2010 in Detroit. The White Sox defeated the Tigers 5-4 in 10 innings. (AP Photo/Duane Burleson)

    De Aza headed to DL

    As expected, White Sox center fielder Alejandro De Aza went on the 15-day disabled list Tuesday with bruised left ribs. Jordan Danks was called up from Class AAA Charlotte, but Dewayne Wise should get most of the playing time in De Aza's absence.

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    No Baader? No matter — Stevenson handles Barrington

    One of the best girls volleyball players in the state is listed as a manager for the Stevenson's team this fall. Unfortunately, the Patriots have to manage without Rachel Baader, who suffered a knee injury in a national AAU tournament in July while playing for Sky High. The Pats honored Baader with a 25-13, 25-15 triumph over host Barrington, the defending Mid-Suburban League champion, on Tuesday.

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    Boys soccer/Fox Valley roundup

    Phil Saccameno scored 2 goals Tuesday to lead South Elgin to a 3-1 boys soccer win over Elgin.Alberto Bustamante added the other goal for the Storm (1-0) and Adam Smith had an assist. Michael Cortez made 8 saves in goal for South Elgin.Tony Camilla scored Elgin’s lone goal.Lake Park 2, Streamwood 1: The Sabres dropped their season opener on the road. Christian Rodriguez scored for Streamwood and Phil Lewy had 6 saves in goal.Huntley 2, Glenbard East 0: Matt Kitsis and Christian Ramos scored for the Red Raiders as they opened the season with a nonconference win. Austin Emery had 9 saves in goal for Huntley.Westminster Christian 2, St. Edward 1: Tim Rogers and Will Woodhouse scored goals and Nick Jnan had 2 assists to lead the Warriors to a win in the St. Edward tournament. Sam Carani had 16 saves in goal for Westminster.Harvest Christian 1, Christian Liberty 1: Dan Turpin scored the Harvest Christian goal off an assist from Stuart Wolff in the St. Edward tournament.Lakes 2, Dundee-Crown 1: Eduardo Arellano scored Dundee-Crown’s goal in this season-opening loss at the North Shore tournament. Christian Martinez had 5 saves in goal for the Chargers.

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    Chicago White Sox's Kevin Youkilis hits a grand slam off a pitch by New York Yankees' Ivan Nova during the fifth inning of a baseball game, Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2012, in Chicago. Also scoring on the play was Alexei Ramirez, Gordon Beckham, and Dewayne Wise. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    Youkilis’ slam leads White Sox past Yanks 7-3

    Kevin Youkilis hit a grand slam, Paul Konerko homered and Dewayne Wise had four hits Tuesday night as the White Sox rallied for the second straight game to beat the New York Yankees 7-3.

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    Bears free safety Chris Conte injured his shoulder tackling Redskins running back Evan Royster on Saturday. Conte hopes to be back for the season opener.

    Nothing safe about Bears’ safety position

    The Bears have endured 56 changes at the starting safety positions since Lovie Smith became head coach in 2004, so the absence of injured free safeties Chris Conte and Brandon Hardin is hardly unprecedented. With Bears safeties, strong or free, it often comes down to the last man standing. But the injuries don’t usually start piling up until the regular season.

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    Carmel, including Elizabeth Rengers (15) and Alyssa Armada (9), celebrates after a point during a comeback to win the first game Tuesday against visiting Lake Zurich in nonconference play.

    Kepski, Carmel rise up against LZ

    At first glance, this fast girl Sierra Kepski could pass as a soccer player. She's really that quick. And clearly she's not tall enough to play volleyball. She might, yes might, pass for 5-foot-1. Kepski might have been the shortest girl on the volleyball court on Tuesday night in Mundelein. It didn't matter. The Carmel sophomore provided some deadly serves and played stellar defense. Carmel registered its second win of the early season by stopping visiting Lake Zurich 25-23, 25-20.

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    New Trier tests Hersey

    Junior Sam Markin scored with a short-range strike at seven minutes and later earned the helper on a late goal from teammate Phillipe Boury as visiting New Trier defeated Hersey 2-0 in the boys soccer season opener for both sides Tuesday night in Arlington Heights.

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    Glenbard West High School’s Scott Andrews prepares for the upcoming football season.

    West Suburban could be tougher than ever

    If the last couple of football seasons showed anything, it's that the gap has narrowed in both divisions of the West Suburban Conference. This year the Gold and Silver may be more competitive than ever.

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    Women being left out was not right

    A candid conversation can come in handy on a sensitive subject like Augusta National finally admitting women to become members.

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    Frank Hohenadel, who won the 89th Illinois PGA title last year at Medinah Country Club, is looking forward to seeing Team USA and Team Europe compete in the 2012 Ryder Cup next month. In the meantime, he'll try to defend his Illinois PGA title at Stonewall Orchard next week.

    Local pro looking forward to big matchup

    Frank Hohenadel, a little-known assistant pro at Midlothian Country Club, ended Mike Small's eight-year reign as the IPGA champion over Medinah's No. 1 course last August. The lanky left-handed golfer defends his title next week at Stonewall Orchard in Grayslake, but he's more interested in the big event coming to Medinah beginning Sept. 25.

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    Elk Grove and linebacker Mike Maize are trying to retain possession of the Mid-Suburban East title.

    Will changes carry over in MSL?

    The off-season saw dramatic changes in the Mid-Suburban League with the arrival of five new head coaches. But will anything change at the top where Palatine and Elk Grove appear poised to defend division titles?

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    Special Ryder Cup exhibit opens Friday in Oak Brook

    For the first time in its storied history, a special Ryder Cup Exhibit will be opened to the public to showcase items from some of the tournaments legends. Oakbrook Shopping Center will host the 4,000-square-foot display starting at noon Friday and running through the final day of Ryder Cup play on Sept. 30.

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    Michael Jordan signed his Ryder Cup Magnificant Moments golf ball at Michael Jordan's Steakhouse in Chicago this week. The ball will go on display with other celebrity-signed pieces that were decorated as part of a special fundraising campaign for local charities. The Ryder Cup balls will be showcases on the Magnificent Mile throughout September.

    Jordan gives Ryder Cup a signature moment

    The Ryder Cup's Magnificent Moments campaign for local charities has entered Rare Air status.Former Chicago Bulls great Michael Jordan has signed his "Jumpman" golf ball for the upcoming "Tartan Art on the Avenue" public art exhibit in Chicago. The exhibit is part of Magnificent Moments, an officially sanctioned charitable fundraising campaign of the 39th Ryder Cup, which will be played Sept. 25-30 at Medinah Country Club.

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    Jacobs defensive back Greg Sidor (23) pressures Prairie Ridge running back Jordan Getzelman during a Fox Valley Conference Valley Division game last season.

    All things equal, FVC Valley is wide open

    McHenry won 15 Fox Valley Conference titles between 1988 and 2003.Cary-Grove took its turn as league behemoth by winning conference or division titles every year from 2004-2009.The days of FVC dynasties may be at an end, however. As the level of coaching in recent years has risen leaguewide, so has the overall quality of play. The Valley Division of the FVC has developed into a tougher, more balanced league than ever before.Take Crystal Lake South, for example. The Gators are coming off back-to-back seasons in which they won more games (21) than in any previous two-year period in program history. Yet, CL South couldn’t lay claim to being the best team in the FVC Valley last year. That honor belonged to Prairie Ridge. In their first season in the Valley Division, the Wolves defeated the Gators 41-16 in Week 6 and went on to win the Class 6A state championship. Prairie Ridge’s only defeat in 14 outings? A 22-21, Week 9, overtime upset on its home field at the hands of Cary-Grove. That result allowed CL South to finish tied with PR for the Valley Division title, the Gators’ second straight. Cary-Grove, in turn, was beaten by Jacobs, 28-21, and Jacobs was beaten by Crystal Lake South, 21-6. In other words, a league once dominated by powerhouse teams now finds itself neck-deep in parity at a very high level. Prairie Ride opens the season ranked No. 4 in Class 6A, Crystal Lake South is No. 9 in Class 7A and Cary-Grove is 10th in 7A.“I think its going to be just like last year with four teams that are going to battle it out,” Jacobs coach Bill Mitz said. “Not sure if anyone will go undefeated. If anyone does, they’ve had a great season. There are some good football teams out there and some good coaches. Anything can happen.”Prairie Ridge lost much to graduation but retools with a junior class that went 8-1 as freshmen and 7-2 as sophomores despite several players lost to the varsity. The Wolves return three starters on either side of the ball, most notably, third-year safety Sean Folliard (6-2, 206), a senior committed to Northern Illinois. Junior defensive lineman Austin Nirva (6-0, 180) started every game for the state title team as a sophomore.Offensively, junior tackle Shane Evans (6-4, 260) has started every game since he was a freshman. Starting center Bennett Tomlin (6-0, 250) also returns. They’ll protect an all-new but talented backfield, led by junior option quarterback Oliver Kremer.Most of the carries will go to athletic junior Steven Ladd and senior fullback Kingsley Ebirim, a short, stocky power runner. “We’re extremely young with a lot of juniors, but they’re pretty solid juniors,” Prairie Ridge coach Chris Schremp said. “I think our defense will be athletic enough to keep us in games, and I really think our offensive line is strong enough to let us run the ball.”Prairie Ridge hosts Crystal Lake South in Week 6, Jacobs in Week 7 and travels to Cary-Grove in Week 9.“The schedule sets up pretty good for us with a lot of our tough conference games at the end of the year,” Schremp said. “It’s just a matter of how quickly we mature. If we grow up quickly, we could be right up there.”The Cary-Grove triple option offense possesses explosive potential. Returning senior all-area quarterback Quinn Baker (5-11, 185) returns after rushing for 1,104 yards and 18 touchdowns on 179 attempts last season (6.4-yard avg.). The backfield includes third-year tailback Ryan Mahoney (5-11, 170) and converted fullback Kyle Norberg (6-2, 211), a linebacker the last two seasons. All-area safety Zach Marszal (6-0, 182) snared 5 interceptions last season. He’ll also see time on offense at split end.While cognizant of the overall quality of play leaguewide, second-year Cary-Grove coach Brad Seaburg expects the Trojans to make a run at their first FVC Valley title since the 2009 state championship season.

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    In a Jan. 18, 2000 photo, Nebraska's Casey Leonhardt (55) and Charlie Rogers (33) block a shot by Missour'si Amanda Lassiter (24). Rogers, who told police she was the victim of a vicious hate crime in July, 2012, was charged with making a false report Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2012 pleaded not guilty to the misdemeanor charge. Authorities issued an arrest warrant for Rogers Tuesday morning. (AP Photo/Lincoln Journal Star, Robert Becker)

    Police: Ex-Nebraska hoops star woman faked hate attack
    Associated PressLINCOLN, Neb. — A former University of Nebraska women’s basketball star faked an attack in which she allegedly carved anti-gay slurs into her skin because she felt it would spark change, police said Tuesday.Four days before Charlie Rogers crawled naked and bleeding from her Lincoln home, screaming for help, she outlined in a Facebook posting what investigators believe was her motive for faking the July 22 attack, Police Chief Jim Peschong said at a news conference.“So maybe I am too idealistic, but I believe way deep inside me that we can make things better for everyone. I will be a catalyst. I will do what it takes. I will. Watch me,” read the July 18 posting, according to police.Furthermore, genetic testing on evidence gathered at the crime scene undermines Rogers’ account of what happened, Peschong said.Charlie Rogers, 33, pleaded not guilty Tuesday to making a false police report and was released on her own recognizance. She didn’t respond to a message seeking comment left Tuesday at a number listed as hers, but her lawyer, Brett McArthur, said she maintains the attack happened and plans to vigorously defend herself.“This has been a very traumatic event for her, and having the focus of the investigation turn toward her has been really hard,” said McArthur, who described Rogers as reserved and soft-spoken, and not the type to seek attention.“She has no reason to lie about what happened. She’s pretty devastated, when you go to authorities and things kind of get turned around on you,” he said.Rogers, a lesbian who ranks second all-time in blocked shots for the Cornhuskers, reported the attack amid a charged debate in Lincoln over the city’s proposed “fairness ordinance,” which would ban discrimination against gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people. The City Council approved the ordinance in May, 5-0, but two conservative groups gathered enough signatures to force a popular vote on it before it can take effect.According to police, Rogers said three masked men broke into her home, and that one of them pinned her down while another sliced a cross into her chest, cut the front of her thighs and shins and carved derogatory words in her arms and abdomen. She said they then rolled her onto her stomach and cut her buttocks, the back of her thighs and the back of her right calf. She also said they tried to burn down her house.Rogers crawled from her home naked, bleeding and screaming for help, a neighbor told police. The community’s gay community responded swiftly, and hundreds turned out for a rally that weekend outside the state Capitol.On Tuesday, four Nebraska gay-rights groups that followed the case released a joint statement crediting police for conducting what they believe was a balanced and thorough investigation.“It is important not to focus on the actions of any single individual,” the groups said in the statement. “As residents of Lincoln we must continue to bring our community together to declare that violence and hate are not the values of our city.”According to Peschong, police found a pile of clothes, white knit gloves and a red box cutter on the living room floor after the alleged attack. Rogers said the gloves didn’t belong to her, but investigators determined that a lot of the DNA found inside the glove was Rogers’ and that none of it came from a male.Peschong said investigators discovered that Rogers deleted numerous text messages she had sent the evening of the alleged attack, and that she bought cotton gloves, a box cutter and zip ties from an Ace Hardware Store in Lincoln on July 17. All of the items were later found in her house, he said. When confronted about the evidence weeks later, he said, Rogers admitted to purchasing all of the items except the gloves.She also sent a photo of a cross-shaped cut on her chest to a friend a few days before the reported attack, Peschong said.

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    Joe Posnanski author of "Paterno" gestures during an interview with the Associated Press, Tuesday, Aug. 21 2012, in New York. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

    Author: Paternos never tried to influence book

    The author of a new biography of Joe Paterno says the late Penn State coach and his family never tried to limit his access to them after the Jerry Sandusky scandal broke.

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    Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Michael Vick (7) is helped up by a teammate after he was hurt during a preseason NFL football game between the Patriots and the Philadelphia Eagles in Foxborough, Mass. Monday, Aug. 20, 2012. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

    Injury-prone Vick down again for Eagles

    Michael Vick has required four medical tests and completed four passes in the first two preseason games. That's an ominous sign for the Philadelphia Eagles. The three-time Pro Bowl quarterback left Monday night's win at New England after injuring his ribs on his sixth play. He lasted just six plays against Pittsburgh before leaving with an injured left thumb.

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    Fire scouting report
    Chicago Fire at D.C. UnitedWhen: 6:30 p.m. at RFK StadiumTV: Comcast SportsNetScouting the Fire: The Fire (12-7-5, 41 points) is riding a three-game winning streak, but those wins came against teams that probably won’t make the playoffs. United will present more of a challenge. Chris Rolfe has scored 4 goals in the last four games.Scouting D.C. United: The defense for D.C. United (11-8-4, 37 points) will be hard-pressed to deal with the speedy Fire, especially without suspended center back Emilaino Dudar. Branko Boskovic also was red-carded Sunday and will be suspended for this match. Chris Pontius has 10 goals, and Dwayne De Rosario has 10 assists.Next: Houston Dynamo at Toyota Park, 7:30 p.m., Sept. 2— Orrin Schwarz

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    Glenbard South favored to repeat in MSC

    Last season Glenbard South's football team took the Metro Suburban Conference by storm in its first year in the league. The storm's gathering again.

Business

  •  
    If brand-name prescription medicines cost you as little as generic pills, which would you choose? A few drugmakers are betting Americans will stick with the name they know. They’ve begun offering U.S. patients coupons to reduce copayments on brand-name medicines and compete with new generic versions of the drugs. The medicines include staples in the American medicine cabinet — cholesterol fighter Lipitor, blood thinner Plavix and blood pressure drug Diovan — along with drugs for depression and breast cancer.

    New coupons aim to keep people off generic drugs

    If brand-name prescription medicines cost you as little as generic pills, which would you choose? A few drugmakers are betting Americans will stick with the name they know. They've begun offering U.S. patients coupons to reduce copayments on brand-name medicines and compete with new generic versions of the drugs.

  •  
    General Motors Co. sells a model in China so popular with executives that it’s often lined up outside galas and high-end restaurants: A Buick minivan. If it’s surprising that China’s business elite prefer these big, boxy models to luxury sedans, it’s perhaps more striking that GM’s Buick GL8 is the hands-down leader. The Detroit-based automaker did so poorly in minivans that it quit making them in the U.S.

    Ceos prefer Buick minivans in China where GL8 has no peer

    General Motors Co. sells a model in China so popular with executives that it's often lined up outside galas and high-end restaurants: A Buick minivan. If it's surprising that China's business elite prefer these big, boxy models to luxury sedans, it's perhaps more striking that GM's Buick GL8 is the hands-down leader. The Detroit-based automaker did so poorly in minivans that it quit making them in the U.S.

  •  
    Araceli Cortes, an illegal immigrant who wants to go to medical school, is shown at her home in the Los Angeles-area suburb of Canyon Country, Calif. Cortes had made up her mind to return to Mexico to pursue her dream of becoming a doctor. She quit her job, purchased an airline ticket and reserved a seat to take a medical school entrance exam. Then, a week before her departure, President Barack Obama announced that young illegal immigrants like Cortes would be given the chance to remain in the United States and obtain a work visa. Cortes canceled her ticket and decided to stay. But sheís still having second thoughts.

    Young immigrants may find college elusive

    President Barack Obama recently gave young, illegal immgrants a change to stay in the U.S. For some, that removed a barrier to going to college. But for most, the main hurdle of costs remains. Parent and student loans, grants and scholarships help the average student pay about 55 percent of the cost of going to college.

  •  
    Patrons who hold a Roselle Public Library card or obtain a new one can get discounts at 18 local businesses throughout September.

    Roselle library card comes with store discounts

    As part of a national library card sign-up program, the Roselle Public Library District has partnered with several area businesses for a new promotion that gives free items or discounts to Roselle library cardholders.

  •  

    Health advocates want Indiana melon farm linked to salmonella identified

    A southwestern Indiana farm that grew cantaloupes linked to a deadly salmonella outbreak must be identified, along with its distribution network, so the public can make informed decisions about their purchases, health safety advocates said. The salmonella outbreak is blamed in the deaths of at least two people in Kentucky and has sickened another 150 people in 20 states including two dozen in Indiana.

  •  

    BP recalls unleaded regular gas from Whiting

    BP is alerting northwestern Indiana fuel distributors that it's recalling unleaded regular gasoline shipped from its Whiting fuel storage terminal Aug. 13-17.

  •  
    BP has heard from more than 5,000 customers whose cars have required repairs because of the gasoline with a high level of a polymeric residue.

    BP: Recalled gas also went to Chicago, Milwaukee

    BP says recalled gasoline went to Chicago's south suburbs and Milwaukee and may involve grades other thaN regular.

  •  

    Most Motorola Beijing workers accept sweetened layoff deal

    Almost all the laid-off staff at Motorola Mobility Holdings Inc. in Beijing have accepted the manufacturer's termination package, Will Moss, the company's Asia director of communications said today.

  •  
    Best Buy Co. is reporting a 90 percent drop in net income during the second quarter, dragged down by restructuring charges and weak sales. The company also withdrew its earnings guidance for the year.

    Best Buy 2Q profit drops 90 pct, misses estimates

    To top off an already eventful several days for the nation's largest consumer electronics retailer, Best Buy Co. withdrew its full-year earnings guidance Tuesday after reporting a 90-percent drop in net income during the second quarter, dragged down by restructuring charges and weak sales.

  •  
    The Apple share price is shown on a stock ticker at the Nasdaq MarketSite, Tuesday, in New York. On Monday, Apple’s surging stock propelled the company’s value to $624 billion, the world’s highest ever.

    S&P touches highest level since 2008, then falls

    The Standard & Poor's 500 index touched its highest point in more than four years Tuesday, helped by more talk that the European Central Bank may buy struggling countries' bonds. But a morning rally faded, and stocks ended lower.

  •  

    Porn group: Filming to halt during syphilis probe

    A pornography trade group has called for a nationwide filming moratorium while performers are tested for syphilis and Los Angeles County public health officials investigate a possible outbreak of the sexually transmitted disease. One performer has tested positive, and the performer's sexual partners are being notified, according to Joanne Cachapero, a spokeswoman for the Free Speech Coalition.

  •  
    Barnes & Noble says its fiscal first-quarter loss narrowed, lifted by sales of e-books and other digital content as well as sales of the “Fifty Shades of Grey” series at its bookstores.

    ‘Fifty Shades’ helps Barnes & Noble in 1Q

    Barnes & Noble's fiscal first quarter was a tale of modern and traditional. Tech-savvy consumers snapped up its e-books and other digital content during the period, while traditionalists headed to its bookstores for the popular "Fifty Shades of Grey" series. The double dose of good news, coupled with cost-control efforts and lower expenses, helped the New York company's loss narrow while its revenue rose.

  •  

    UK government wants hospitals to expand overseas

    The British government said Tuesday that it wants the country's state-funded hospitals to help support themselves by setting up profit-making branches in other countries.

  •  

    AAA: 33M Americans plan to travel over Labor Day

    Americans plan to hit the road this Labor Day weekend despite rising gas prices. Thirty three million people will travel 50 miles or more, a 2.9 percent increase from last year, according to AAA, a federation of auto clubs which sell vacations, insurance and lobby on behalf of car owners. That's the highest level of travel for Labor Day since the start of the recession in late 2007.

  •  
    Billionaire financier George Soros announced Monday, Aug. 21, 2012, that he is taking a minority stake in soccer club Manchester United. Soros disclosed in a regulatory filing on Monday that he owns 7.85 percent of Manchester United’s Class A shares.

    Billionaire Soros takes piece of Manchester United

    Billionaire financier George Soros is getting in on the game, taking a minority stake in soccer club Manchester United. Soros disclosed in a regulatory filing on Monday that he owns 7.85 percent of Manchester United's Class A shares. The filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission was made by Soros' hedge fund, Soros Fund Management LLC.

  •  
    More Americans are making their car payments on time, a trend that has sent the rate of overdue auto loans to the lowest level on records dating back more than a decade.

    TransUnion: Late auto-loan payments fall in 2Q

    More Americans are making their car payments on time, a trend that has sent the rate of overdue auto loans to the lowest level on records dating back more than a decade.The rate of U.S. auto loan payments at least 60 days overdue fell in the second quarter to 0.33 percent. That's down about 25 percent from the same period last year and 8 percent from the first three months of this year, credit reporting agency TransUnion said Tuesday.

  •  

    Europe’s leaders face post-holiday blues

    After their holidays spent soaking up the August sun, Europe's political leaders are bracing themselves for storm clouds this fall. The latest economic figures show that Europe is edging closer to recession, dragged down by the crippling debt problems of the 17 countries that use the euro. These debt troubles have tormented the eurozone for close to three years and so far have defied leaders' efforts to fix them.

  •  

    Epic patent trial over iPhone technology wraps up

    After three weeks of listening to technology experts, patent professionals and company executives debate the complicated legal claims of Apple Corp. and Samsung Electronics Co., a jury of nine men and women are set to decide one of the biggest technology disputes in history. Apple is demanding Samsung pay it $2.5 billion and pull its most popular smartphones and computer tablets from the U.S. market after accusing the South Korean company of "ripping off" its iPhone and iPad technology.

  •  

    Hopes for European rescue plan underpin markets

    Hopes that the European Central Bank will reach a deal to help Spain and Italy borrow at cheaper rates nudged financial markets higher on Tuesday. Investors are increasingly convinced that the ECB will buy some eurozone countries' government bonds to help reduce their borrowing costs. The German central bank, a key member of the ECB, is alone in opposing such a move and some traders are betting that a compromise will be reached.

  •  

    Feds close Calif. slaughterhouse after abuse video

    Federal regulators have shut down a Central California slaughterhouse after receiving undercover video showing dairy cows — some unable to walk — being repeatedly shocked and shot before being slaughtered. Officials with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which inspects meat facilities, suspended operations Monday at Central Valley Meat Co. in Hanford, Calif., which slaughters cows when they lose their value as milk producers.

  •  
    Asimo, Honda’s walking talking robot shows its new product lawn mower Milmo.

    Honda robotics powers first product for homes

    Honda Motor Co. finally has its first product for the home packed with its prized robotics technology — a sensor-equipped lawn mower.Miimo goes on sale next year, in only Europe, where spacious lawns are often enclosed in gates, targeting 4,000 unit sales a year.

  •  
    Top officials with the U.N. weather agency say there’s an urgent need for nations to adopt drought-management policies as farmers from Africa to India struggle with lack of rainfall and the United States endures the worst drought it has experienced in decades.

    UN calls on nations to adopt drought policies

    Top officials with the U.N. weather agency say there's an urgent need for nations to adopt drought-management policies as farmers from Africa to India struggle with lack of rainfall and the United States endures the worst drought it has experienced in decades.The World Meteorological Organization says the U.S. drought and its ripple effects on global food markets show the need for policies with more water conservation and less consumption.

  •  
    Iraqis fill up at a gas station in Baghdad, Iraq. Iraq is fast becoming an oil producing powerhouse.

    Oil prices above $96 amid broader market gains

    The price of oil rose Tuesday, buoyed by gains in other financial markets, as investors awaited the release this week of the minutes from the Federal Reserve's last meeting that will give clues as to the intentions of the U.S. central bank.Benchmark oil for September delivery rose 71 cents to $96.68 per barrel in midday trading in London in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange.

  •  

    Unshuffled cards a costly headache for AC casinos

    At first, it seemed like a coincidence, the kind of thing that happens from time to time at a casino, where the same number or same sequence of cards happens twice in a row.But when the players at an April game of mini-baccarat at the Golden Nugget Atlantic City kept seeing the same sequence of cards dealt, over and over and over again, their eyes grew wide and their bets grew bigger, zooming from $10 a hand to $5,000.

Life & Entertainment

  •  

    Car show calendar and area auto clubs
    The Chicago suburbs are home to many auto enthusiasts, car shows and clubs devoted to models ranging from the Alfa Romeo to Volkswagen. The Daily Herald has compiled a list of classic car clubs, car shows and meetings of motorcycle groups.

  •  
    Drury Lane Theatre’s revival of “Hairspray”has been nominated for six 2012 equity Jefferson Awards, including best large-theater musical.

    Drury Lane’s ‘Hairspray,’ Marriott’s ‘Pirates’ earn six Jeff nods

    Oak Brook's Drury Lane Theatre received 17 equity Jeff Award nominations Tuesday, placing it behind Goodman and Chicago Shakespeare theaters, which tied for the most nominations iwth 18. Lincolnshire's Marriott Theatre received 14 nominations, while Glencoe's Writers' Theatre earned 10 and Oak Brook's First Folio Theatre received two. The awards recognizing excellence in Chicago-area theater will be presented Oct. 15 at Drury Lane Theatre.

  •  

    Outdoor A/C unit is OK in the sun

    Q. We moved into a fixer-upper and have been doing a lot of work to get it just right. One question I have is about our air conditioner. The exterior unit sits on the patio slab and is directly in the sun. Is the unit OK in the heat?

  •  
    Charlie Bronson (Dax Shepard) makes time with a pretty local college professor (Kristen Bell) in “Hit & Run.”

    Action/comedy ‘Hit & Run’ races along

    The R-rated "Hit & Run" may not be up to the standards of a "Smokey and the Bandit," but Dax Shepard — juggling director, actor and writer duties — updates the redneck, blue-collar NASCAR comedy genre with a coming-out gay subplot, a redeemable scalawag of a hero, and many (make that too many) slow-motion speeding car homages to Hal Needham's high octane-powered body of work from the '70s.

  •  
    The NBC comedy “The Office,” which starred Steve Carell as regional manager Michael Scott, will conclude business at Dunder Mifflin after the upcoming ninth season it was announced Tuesday.

    ‘The Office’ will end its run on NBC next season

    "The Office" will be closing next year. Producer Greg Daniels says the NBC comedy will conclude business at Dunder Mifflin after the upcoming ninth season.

  •  

    CMA Awards nominations to be announced in NYC

    The Country Music Association Awards will be bringing a little twang to the big city when nominations are announced next month. Country superstars Jason Aldean and Lady Antebellum plan to reveal nominees in five categories on ABC's "Good Morning America" on Wednesday, Sept. 5. They'll finish off the list later that morning at The Hard Rock Cafe in New York's Times Square.

  •  
    Borscht, an Eastern European soup that starts with cabbage and beets, can be served warm or cold.

    Easy Borscht
    Easy Borscht: Soupalooza

  •  
    Dick Van Dyke will receive the Screen Actors Guild’s highest honor: The Life Achievement Award, which will be presented at the awards ceremony in January.

    Dick Van Dyke to get SAG Life Achievement Award

    Dick Van Dyke will receive the Screen Actors Guild's highest honor: The Life Achievement Award. The 86-year-old entertainer will receive the honor at the annual Screen Actors Guild Awards ceremony in January.

  •  
    ABC says it’s moving “Jimmy Kimmel Live” into the thick of the late-night fight against Jay Leno and David Letterman. Starting in January, Kimmel’s talk show will take over the 10:35 p.m. time slot long held by the news magazine “Nightline,” ABC said Tuesday.

    Kimmel moving into thick of late-night fight

    ABC says it's moving "Jimmy Kimmel Live" into the thick of the late-night fight against Jay Leno and David Letterman. The network said Tuesday that starting in January, Kimmel's talk show will take over the 10:35 p.m. time slot long held by the news magazine "Nightline."

  •  
    S’mores pancakes take everything you love about this campfire treat and turn it into breakfast.

    S’mores Pancakes
    Sm'mores Pancakes

  •  
    Borscht, an Eastern European soup that starts with cabbage and beets, can be served warm or cold.

    Easy borscht can’t be beet

    Are we undergoing a beet renaissance? Maybe, maybe not, but this underappreciated veggie deserves a second look. And that means making borscht.

  •  
    Kevin Cooper, 45, of Wheaton, directs a scene in “I Heart Shakey,” the family comedy filmed mostly in the suburbs. They used a green screen and re-created Chicago’s DuSable bridge rather than filming the scenes downtown.

    Wheaton filmmakers put suburbs on the big screen

    If everything goes as planned, filmmakers Kevin and DeAnna Cooper hope to do for the suburbs what John Hughes did for the North Shore. The husband-and-wife team filmed most of the movie, "I Heart Shakey" in Naperville and Wheaton, and plan to film more movies in the suburbs. "We're hoping everything we shoot can be shot here," said writer and director Kevin Cooper, 45, of Wheaton, who also heads the film production department at Columbia College in Chicago.

  •  
    Carrie Coon, left, Madison Dirks, Amy Morton and Tracy Letts star in “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf” on Broadway.

    Star-studded season on Broadway’s bill

    There's a bit of everything for theatergoers this fall in New York, from a play about porn to a musical about proselytizing Christians. Al Pacino and Katie Holmes are the star headliners, while David Mamet makes a big return and the sun comes out for "Annie." Even The Fonz makes it to Broadway for the 2012-13 season.

  •  
    “Miss Me When I’m Gone” by Emily Aesenault

    Arsenault’s ‘Miss Me’ is evocative, lovely story

    Emily Arsenault's third novel, "Miss Me When I'm Gone," begins with a newspaper article detailing the recent death of author Gretchen Waters, who fell down a flight of stairs after a reading. At first it seems an accidental death, but various details converge to lead Jamie, Gretchen's best friend from college, to believe it might have been murder.

  •  
    Michael J. Fox will be returning to network television with a new show.

    NBC commits to new Michael J. Fox series

    NBC has made it official: Michael J. Fox is coming back to series TV more than a decade after he left to concentrate on fighting Parkinson's disease. His new comedy series, based loosely on his personal life, has a 22-episode commitment from NBC and is set to premiere in fall 2013, the network announced Monday.

  •  
    Taraji P. Henson last year announced the Grammy song of year nominations in a concert in Los Angeles. The National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences will have its annual live nominations concert special in Nashville Dec. 5.

    Grammy noms concert shifted to Nashville

    This year's Grammy Awards nominations will come with a Southern accent. The Recording Academy is moving its annual live nominations concert special to Music City. The show will air Dec. 5 live on CBS from Bridgestone Arena. This is the fifth time The Recording Academy has held "The Grammy Nominations Concert Live," but the first outside Los Angeles.

  •  
    The gold medal-winning U.S. Women’s Gymnastics Team, from left, Kyla Ross, Aly Raisman, McKayla Marone, Jordyn Wieber and Gabby Douglas will be presenters at the 2012 MTV Video Music Awards in September.

    Taylor Swift to perform at VMAs, gymnasts to present

    Six-time Grammy winner Taylor Swift will perform at the 2012 MTV Video Music Awards next month. But she won't be the only gold winner in the room. The U.S. Women's Gymnastics team — better known as the Fierce Five — will present at the Sept. 6 show.

  •  
    2 Chainz, a former member of the rap duo Playaz Circle, is going solo with his debut album, “Based On A T.R.U. Story,” released this week. It features collaborations with Kanye West, Lil Wayne, Drake, Nicki Minaj and John Legend.

    2 Chainz looks to build on revived career with CD

    Rapper 2 Chainz took some major risks two years ago when he bolted from Ludacris' Disturbing tha Peace record label, changed his stage name and left a group to pursue a solo career. The Atlanta-based rapper, initially known as Tity Boi, scored big as a member of the rap duo Playaz Circle with the Lil Wayne-assisted 2007 hit "Duffle Bag Boy." So, he went solo. "I figured if I was going to do bad, I'd rather be bad all by myself," 2 Chainz said.

  •  
    The acclaimed modern dance troupe Momix performs Moses Pendleton’s “Botanica” at the Ravinia Festival in Highland Park on Tuesday, Aug. 28.

    Best bets: Dancers channel nature in 'Botanica'

    The acclaimed modern dance troupe Momix performs Moses Pendleton's "Botanica" at the Ravinia Festival, blending nature with dance. The Chicago Bandits play in the National Pro Fastpitch Championship this weekend in Rosemont. And St. Charles-based teen band The Giving Moon joins the Independent Arts and Music Festival at the House of Blues Saturday.

  •  
    “Survivor” by Gregg Hurwitz

    'The Survivor' will keep readers turning the pages

    Gregg Hurwitz, writer for television's "V" and comics set in the "Wolverine" and "Batman" universe, also writes amazing thrillers. He outdoes himself with his latest, "The Survivor." Nate Overbay, a former soldier, stands on a window ledge getting ready to jump. His marriage has fallen apart and he has Lou Gehrig's disease. A gunshot brings him back to reality, and he discovers the bank building he's using as a dive platform is being robbed.

  •  
    Despite the grim subject matter, “Darksiders II” is almost gleeful, with vivid character design, lively animation and a wicked sense of humor.

    Death takes a holiday in ‘Darksiders II’

    In "Darksiders II" humanity has already been extinguished. The question is: What next? The protagonist is one of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse — specifically, Death. He's more concerned with restoring the reputation of his brother, War, who was unjustly blamed for the global massacre in 2010's "Darksiders." Despite the grim subject matter, the game's almost gleeful, with vivid character design, lively animation and a wicked sense of humor.

  •  
    Jerry Roberts’s Teriyaki Turkey starts with lean ground meat and sweet peppers.

    JR’s Turkey Teriyaki
    JR's Turkey Teriyaki:Jerry Roberts

  •  

    Garlic Shrimp on the Grill
    Garlic Shrimp on the Grill: Jerry Roberts

  •  
    Jerry Roberts does much of the cooking at home and says his three kids like this teriyaki turkey.

    Home-cooking part of the curriculum for gym teacher

    Jerry Roberts of Glen Ellyn has been cooking since he left home for college -- and he still knows his way around a kitchen. "I wasn't someone who ate mac and cheese or ramen noodles, so I had to learn how to cook. I do a lot of typical male stuff, like steak on the grill. My dad owns a butcher shop so I've had access to really good meat all my life."

  •  

    Cream of Chicken with Rice Soup
    Cream of Chicken with Rice Soup :Jerry Roberts

Discuss

  •  
    An Emerald Ash Borer sits on an ash tree in Campton Township, where the first outbreak of the beetle infestation in Illinois was found.

    Editorial: What the emerald ash borer teaches us

    The widespread damage from the emerald ash bore could have been reduced if we'd taken care to keep the urban tree population more diverse. It's a lesson we must learn to prevent a repeat, a Daily Herald editorial says.

  •  
    Marc Levine

    Op-ed column: Cost shift would worsen pension problem

    Guest columnist Marc Levine: Gov. Quinn and Speaker Madigan were unwilling to implement real cost savings reforms. Instead, their plan shifts future pension costs onto local school districts that are funded predominantly with property taxes.

  •  

    Romney’s present, Ryan’s future

    Columnist Charles Krauthammer: While Ryan's effect on 2012 is as yet undetermined — it depends on the success or failure of Mediscare — there is less doubt about the meaning of Ryan's selection for beyond 2012. He could well become the face of Republicanism for a generation.

  •  

    Limit postretirement pay not just for teachers
    A Barrington letter to the editor: Let's not put teachers into the same category as the police chiefs and municipal administrators when it comes to evaluating a solution to the pension debt.

  •  

    Democrats’ ad was short on facts
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: What the ad neglected to mention was that the man's wife passed away seven years after Mitt Romney left Bain.

  •  

    President had his chance on economy
    A long Grove letter to the editor:The ball is in your court now, Mr. President, so, yes, under your administration "there will be setbacks," and the economy is not where it should be. Whom should we blame now?

  •  

    A manager is not the answer
    An Elgin letter to the editor: There is a notion out there that what this country really needs as President of the United States is a manager and not a politician. It isn't so.

  •  

    Why Boy Scouts right to prohibit gays
    An Elgin letter to the editor: Too many Christians are afraid to be a messenger of God's warning because their fear of being labeled intolerant or a hate monger outweighs their fear of God, which is "the beginning of Wisdom." In my opinion, the Boy Scouts of America chose wisely.

  •  

    Better fact-checking of letters needed
    A Glen Ellyn leter to the editor: The Daily Herald too often prints letters to the editor about serious topics that are either factually incorrect or lack enough facts to reasonably support the writer's position.

  •  

    A Medicare question for Paul Ryan
    A Lombard letter to the editor: If vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan's Medicare proposal is as wonderful as he, Mitt Romney, and his supporters all say it is, then why do Ryan and his supporters always rush to assure today's seniors that it won't be enacted for them?

  •  

    Can’t fire citizens of this country
    An Itasca leter to the editor: In response to the "Obama clueless on building businesses" letter from July 31, I'm not impressed with the fact that Willard ran a business. You cannot govern a country the way you run a business.

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