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Daily Archive : Tuesday August 7, 2012

News

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    Documents: Plaintiff in civil rights suit drove car at Des Plaines cop

    A 40-year-old Villa Park man, who in a federal lawsuit has accused two Des Plaines police officers of beating him up, tried to run down a cop and fled arrest in 2010, according to documents obtained by the Daily Herald. According to police, Sergio Toutges has an extensive criminal history and gang affiliations.

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    The Buffalo Grove Park District plans to buy Congregation Beth Am’s building and convert it into a performing arts center.

    Buffalo Grove Park District plans performing arts center

    The Buffalo Grove Park District has contracted to buy the Congregation Beth Am property at 225 McHenry Road for redevelopment as a community performing arts center. The property, which currently houses the congregation and the Torah Academy school, was on the market and caught the park district's eye. "It looks like it's a win-win," Trustee Jeffrey Berman said.

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    Naperville's Sportsman's Park has been used for shooting sports since 1937. Lead used from such events prior to 1998 has now been found outside the park's fence line.

    Lead found at Naperville's Sportsman's Park

    Environmental experts have long suspected Naperville's Sportsman's Park of being contaminated with lead. Their suspicions were recently confirmed. Naperville Park District Executive Director Ray McGury said Tuesday that soil and water tests have discovered traces of lead just outside the eastern fence line and in the trapshooting section and the gun range.

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    Mathew Shane Huffman

    St. Charles lacrosse coach dies in skateboarding accident

    The St. Charles District 303 lacrosse community is mourning the loss of a 20-year-old assistant coach who died in a skateboarding accident. "There was not a bad bone in his body," said Huffman's father, Spencer Huffman. "He started playing lacrosse at a young age. He always loved it. ... His ultimate goal was he wanted to help people. He was just a good human being."

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    The Carol Stream village board has approved an ordinance that overturns a 2009 local ban of video gambling machines at licensed establishments that serve alcohol.

    Carol Stream says 'yes' to video gambling

    Carol Stream sports bar owner Cons Theros says he's been trying to compete with similar businesses in the area, but it's all been made tougher knowing some of them have something his bar doesn't: video gambling. Now Theros is one of the first Carol Stream bar owners to line up for a state license for video gambling machines, following the Carol Stream village board's approval this week of an...

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    Roy Silva with Jaktripper Band plays at the first day of the Lakemoor Fest in 2010. The band and other favorites are back this weekend Aug. 10-12 on Lily Lake in Lakemoor.

    Lakemoor Fest rolls along with more space on Lily Lake

    The annual Lakemoor Fest, featuring one of the more memorable suburban fireworks displays, is set for Aug. 10-12 at Morrison Park south of Route 120 on Lily Lake. "The word has gotten around. People plan their family reunions around our fireworks," said Terry Gaylord, a utility clerk and liaison to the village's Lakemoor Fest committee.

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    No video gambling in Carpentersville — for now

    Carpentersville is not ready to place its bets on video gambling — at least not yet. Although the village board voted 3-2 Tuesday night against video gambling, trustee Paul Humpfer left the door open to another vote at the next board meeting.

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    Woman, 76, falls through manhole in Palatine

    Without a cellphone, a 76-year-old woman would likely be dead after falling through an uncovered manhole behind a Palatine grocery store Monday morning. "Because of the location of the hole, nobody would have heard her and she might have expired down there," said Palatine Police Cmdr. Tom Murphy.

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    Former Oak Brook police officer Stephen Peterson, son of murder suspect Drew Peterson, attends a hearing before the village board of police and fire commissioners in February 2011.

    Judge orders Oak Brook to explain Peterson firing

    A judge ordered Oak Brook officials to review and explain their firing of former police officer Stephen Peterson, who was dismissed after he took possession of three guns belonging to his infamous father, Drew Peterson. "We're pleased because apparently the judge has some questions about whether there was sufficient evidence to explain the termination," Stephen Peterson's attorney said.

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    Randy’s Vegetables in Sleepy Hollow will hold a corn roast fundraiser Sunday, Aug. 12, as a fundraiser for Illinois Special Olympics.

    Randy’s Vegetables in Sleepy Hollow holds fundraiser

    The corn may be roasting in the fields, but some will be left at Randy's Vegetables Farm Stand in Sleepy Hollow to hold a fundraiser on Sunday, Aug. 12, for Illinois Special Olympics athletes. "The corn's not a problem," owner Christine Gaitsch said. "We have plenty, and it's in good shape."

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    GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney speaks at Acme Industries in Elk Grove Village on Tuesday.

    Romney hails Harper, business partnership in Elk Grove

    GOP presidential hopeful Mitt Romney's campaign used an Elk Grove Village manufacturing business Tuesday to strategically criticize President Obama on his home turf on issues of small business and the economy. The company learned that Romney would visit less than a week ago, with some employees finding out just yesterday. "It started as rumors and yesterday my supervisor told me he'd be here,"...

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    Aurora considers 2-way downtown traffic plan

    More two-way traffic may be coming to downtown Aurora, as the city council took its first look Tuesday at a proposed plan to change Benton Street and Downer Place to two-way streets. Benton already has been accommodating two-way traffic between Broadway Avenue and River Street since reconstruction of the Downer bridges began in February. "If we were going to move forward on a one-way to two-way...

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    Prison watchdog: St. Charles youth center now has safety beds

    The Illinois Youth Center St. Charles has installed safety beds intended to prevent suicides, a prison watchdog group reported Tuesday. Last year, the John Howard Association criticized the facility for not having the beds available for youth on suicide watch two years after 16-year-old committed suicide at the youth prison.

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    Sugar Grove leans toward video gambling ban

    Sugar Grove leaders are inclined to ban video gambling in the village, they said Tuesday night. Saying it wasn't in keeping with the village's aim of having a family-friendly environment, trustee Rick Montalto asked, "Do we want to become Rosemont?"

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    Marc Hans

    U-46 fills 3 key administrative roles

    Elgin Area School District U-46 has made a number of changes in its administrative ranks, filling the positions of director of school and community relations, director of instruction for K-12 and coordinator of math, science and industrial technology.

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    Algonquin man faces child pornography charges

    An Algonquin man has been accused of transporting and possessing child pornography, according to a federal indictment. John Carlson, 37, has been charged with two counts of transporting child pornography via the Internet and one count of possessing child pornography that had crossed state lines, according to the indictment.

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    S. Elgin sergeant hailed for saving woman, son in pit bull attack

    A 41-year-old woman and a 5-year-old boy were injured Saturday after a pit bull attacked them in South Elgin. Police officers are credited with stopping the attack and putting the dog down before more harm could be done.

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    Dimples the clown makes balloon animals for Little Miss Mundelein Abigail Hammer, 9, left, Miss Mundelein Shannon Baucus, 18 and Jr. Miss Mundelein Kate Hay, 11, during Mundelein Police Department’s annual National Night Out event at Santa Maria del Popolo Catholic Church in Mundelein Tuesday night.

    Images: National Night Out in the Suburbs
    Images of National Night Out Against Crime in the suburbs of Chicago. Various municipalities held events Tuesday night as an exercise to increase awareness about police programs in communities.

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    Glen Ellyn pledges to improve online transparency

    After receiving an "F" from the Illinois Policy Institute for the village's lack of online transparency, Glen Ellyn officials vowed Tuesday not to repeat their mistakes and unveiled plans to implement numerous changes to the village's website.

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    In this May 8, 2009 photo, former Bolingbrook police officer Drew Peterson leaves the Will County Courthouse after his arraignment on charges of first-degree murder in the 2004 death of his third wife, Kathleen Savio.

    Peterson trial focuses on botched investigation

    A deputy coroner kicked off a fifth day of testimony at Drew Peterson's murder trial, which is now focused on the shoddy investigation following the discovery of his third wife's body. Prosecutors called Michael VanOver Tuesday to describe how he arrived at the home where Kathleen Savio was found in her bathtub in 2004.

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    Antioch’s semi-pro football team suspended for sponsorship sales violations

    An Antioch semiprofessional football team in its first year has been suspended by the Ironman Football League for violating rules involving sponsorship sales, a league official said Tuesday. League attorney James Kelly of the Chicago law firm Matuszewich, Kelly & McKeever LLP said they are investigating claims made by several businesses in northern Illinois and southern Wisconsin against the...

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    Batavia’s July 1 storm-damage disposal bill: $32,000

    Disposing of downed tree debris after a July 1 storm cost Batavia bearly $32,000.

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    Traffic can leave Arlington Hts. hospital via Kirchhoff Road Monday

    Vehicles leaving the Northwest Community Hospital campus in Arlington Heights will be able to use the west entrance to Kirchhoff Road starting Monday, Aug. 13.

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    Melissa Seidemann of the United States celebrates after scoring a goal against Australia during their women’s semifinal water polo match at the 2012 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2012, in London.

    Images from the 2012 Summer Olympics on Tuesday, August 7, 2012
    Athletes from the United States competed in beach volleyball , water polo, gymnastics, and many other sports at the 2012 London Olympics Tuesday August 7th.

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    Giovanny Rodriguez, of Waukegan, grilled chicken at the Pincho’s Racing booth during last year’s BoriquaFest in Elgin. The festival, which celebrates Puerto Rican heritage, also includes live music, a domino tournament, salsa dance lessons and a children’s area.

    Elgin BoriquaFest: A struggle, but still here in 20th year

    A core group of dedicated Elgin Puerto Ricans have made sure the 20th annual BoriquaFest becomes a reality, even with funding hurdles that threatened the anniversary celebration. The Puerto Rican Heritage Organization found out this winter the city of Elgin would not be offering its standard sponsorship for the Aug. 11 festival, which created a huge funding gap.

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    This photo is from a video taken during the NASA rover Mars landing, the heat shield falls away during Curiosity’s descent to the surface of Mars on Sunday.

    NASA mission gives a peek of rover’s Mars journey

    NASA's Curiosity rover has transmitted a low-resolution video showing the last 2 1/2 minutes of its white-knuckle dive through the Martian atmosphere, giving earthlings a sneak peek of a spacecraft landing on another world.As thumbnails of the video flashed on a big screen on Monday, scientists and engineers at the NASA Jet Propulsion let out "oohs" and "aahs." The recording began with the...

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    State Rep. Jack Franks

    Voters to decide on form of government in McHenry County

    McHenry County voters might get the chance to shape the future of county government via not just one, but two referendum questions on the November ballot. State Rep. Jack Franks filed a petition Monday with more than 1,500 signatures to place a referendum question on the Nov. 6 ballot asking voters to decide if they want a county executive form of government in McHenry County. "We need direct...

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    A 19-year-old Mount Prospect man was charged with felony burglary to motor vehicle. Police reports said witnesses saw him burglarize an unlocked Dodge Intrepid in the apartment building parking lot. Officers found him in his bedroom with a book, lighter, scissors, and stereo remote, reportedly stolen out of the Dodge. A witness saw him toss the victim's wallet from the apartment stairs, reports...

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    Huntley welcomes back talented performers

    A student-organized music group called Project Two will perform music from Broadway such as "Jersey Boys," "Mamma Mia," "Hairspray" and "Grease" Thursday at Del Webb Sun City Huntley.

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    Police report
    Solia Zuniga, 41, of Elgin was charged with obstructing identification at 12:40 a.m. Monday, according to police reports. Police heard an argument between two females and asked for identification. Zuniga furnished a false name and date of birth that would make her 20 years old. Police took her to the station and discovered she had an outstanding warrant for her arrest.

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    Sugar Grove Village President Sean Michels is seeking re-election in 2013.

    Michels will run for village president in 2013

    Sugar Grove Village President Sean Michels announced Monday he is running for re-election. Michels has been the village’s president since 1999. Michels was appointed a village trustee in 1995, and was elected in 1997. In 1999 he was appointed to the presidency.

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    Lung cancer walk in Rolling Meadows Saturday

    The family of Marty Speck Rubin will be hosting a walk to raise awareness and funds for lung cancer research in Rolling Meadows on Saturday, August 11. Tuni's Triumph 3 starts at 9 a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 11, at Flory's Park on Campbell Drive in Rolling Meadows. The walk will be approximately a three mile loop through the area near where Rubin grew up ending back at Flory's Park.

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    District 63 fills board vacancy

    The East Maine School District 63 school board unanimously selected Krystal Zec to fill a board vacancy. Zec will serve on the school board until the general elections in April 2013. Zec was sworn in at the Aug. 1 school board meeting.

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    Last concert in Mundelein

    The last free summer concert of the season in Mundelein features Bopology from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 12 at Kracklauer Park on Seymour Avenue downtown.

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    Barrelhouse Chuck and Friends concert

    Join Barrelhouse Chuck, Erwin Helfer and other music greats for an outdoor concert featuring blues, jazz, and big-band-era standards on Saturday, Aug. 12 from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Lake County Discovery Museum, on Route 176, west of Fairfield Road, near Wauconda.

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    Low-cost pet vaccinations in Fox Lake

    The Lake County Health Department in cooperation with the Fox Lake parks and recreation and police departments will offer a low-cost pet vaccination clinic from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Aug. 11, at Lakefront Park, 71 Nippersink Boulevard in Fox Lake.

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    Kirk Players receives grant

    The Kirk Players announced that its Children's Summer Workshop program was awarded a $2,000 grant from Target Corporation.

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    Damage to a townhouse complex on the 1700 block of Sussex Walk was from a fire on July 29 that fire officials say may have been started by charcoal grill waste.

    Hoffman Estates fire department urges caution with grills

    In the wake of two destructive fires possibly caused by grills, the Hoffman Estates Fire Department is reminding residents to be careful when cooking outside. Deputy Fire Chief Jeff Jorian said one of the most important tips he can give is to make sure hot coals are completely cooled off before disposal.

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    Vote on Illinois state pension reform will be held

    State lawmakers will vote on reforms to trim public sector pension costs when they return to Springfield for a special session this month, but the legislation is limited in scope and does not include one of Gov. Pat Quinn's key proposals for addressing Illinois' most serious budget challenge.House Speaker Michael Madigan, a Chicago Democrat, has decided to allow the vote on Aug. 17, The...

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    Gurnee joins other towns in ban on fertilizer phosphorus

    Fertilizer containing phosphorous no longer is welcome on Gurnee lawns in an effort to reduce how much of the nutrient gets into rivers, lakes and streams. Village board trustees Monday night voted 6-0 in favor of an ordinance amendment banning the use of phosphorus fertilizer on grass.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Two Batavia men were issued tickets at 12:31 a.m. Tuesday in the 0-99 block of Western Avenue, charging them with illegal consumption of alcohol by a minor. Austin S. Lewis, 19, of the 1200 block of Bradford Circle, and Noel M. Gaspari, 19, of the 500 block of Cypress Avenue were charged, according to a police report.

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    The new branch of the Indian Trails Public Library has opened at 99 E. Palatine Road to replace the recently closed location in Prospect Heights. It is located behind the McDonald’s restaurant north of the Palatine Road express lanes.

    New branch of Indian Trails Library opens

    A new branch of the Indian Trails Public Library District is now open in Prospect Heights, officials said. "It's fabulous," spokeswoman Susan Dennison said. "We recommend people go over there and take a look. It's really a beautiful space in a great location."

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    An international food court will feature roughly 30 different selections of vegetarian cuisine from around the world.

    Veggie Fest returns to Naperville

    Naperville's Veggie Fest started out as an experiment, organizers said. The Science of Spirituality Meditation Center, which sponsors the festival, held roughly 30 classes a month teaching the community about all aspects of spirituality and vegetarianism. It naturally progressed from there that organizers wanted some way to pull all of these lessons into a single event — and so the Veggie...

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    Associated Press Jared Lee Loughner

    Man pleads guilty to Giffords shooting

    Jared Lee Loughner pleaded guilty Tuesday to going on a shooting rampage at a political gathering, killing six people and wounding his intended target, then-Congresswoman Gabriele Giffords, and 12 others. "The pain and loss caused by the events of Jan. 8, 2011, are incalculable," Giffords said in a joint statement with her husband, Mark Kelly. "Avoiding a trial will allow us — and we hope...

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    View of the beach in Tulum, Mexico, Tuesday, as Tropical Storm Ernesto brings the threat of hurricane-force winds and torrential rains to the Caribbean coast. The heart of the storm was expected to hit south of Cancun and the Riviera Maya.

    Ernesto becomes hurricane, heads to Mexico

    Tropical Storm Ernesto strengthened into a hurricane and headed toward landfall near Mexico's border with Belize Tuesday, bringing the threat of powerful winds and torrential rains to the Caribbean coast.

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    Crystal Lake Class of 1962 celebrates 50th

    The Crystal Lake Community High School Class of 1962 will have its 50th reunion Sept. 28 and 29. Festivities begin at 4 p.m. Sept. 28 with the homecoming parade.

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    The first phase of roadwork at Routes 47 and 64 is nearly complete, and eastbound Route 64 should open to traffic Monday, according to the Illinois Department of Transportation.

    Road closure switch next week for Routes 64/47 project

    The first half of the widening of the intersection of Routes 64 and 47 in Lily Lake is about done, and eastbound Route 64 will be opened to through traffic. Southbound Route 47 will be shut down starting Aug. 13.

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    Man sets fire to home by microwaving socks, undies

    Note to self: A microwave is for leftovers, not your boxers. British firefighters say they saved an apartment from destruction after its domestically challenged resident tried to dry his wet socks and underwear in a microwave oven.

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    Acme Industries CEO Warren Young introduces GOP Presidential candidate Mitt Romney to workers at Acme Industries in Elk Grove Village on Tuesday, August 7.

    Images: Mitt Romney in Elk Grove Village
    GOP presidential hopeful Mitt Romney's campaign used an Elk Grove Village manufacturing business Tuesday to strategically strike out against President Obama on his home turf on issues of small business and the economy. Speaking inside Acme Industries' Pratt Boulevard shop, Romney said the president was "out of ideas" and "out of excuses" when it comes to helping American business.

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    Seth J. Parsons.

    Prosecutors: Carol Stream man kept child porn stash in safe

    A Carol Stream man was charged after police searched his apartment and found his child pornography collection stashed in a safe, prosecutors said Tuesday. "He admitted on video and in writing to possessing and viewing those images and videos," a prosecutor said of Seth Parsons.

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    Wheeling announces technology partnership with Intel, HP

    Wheeling officials on Monday announced an initiative partnering with Hewlett-Packard and Intel to bring supercomputing and manufacturing innovation to the village. The project, which has been in the works for about a year, will draw on the STEM curriculum at Wheeling High School and the 450 manufacturing companies in Wheeling to make the village the hub of supercomputing innovation of the future,...

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    Attendees of the DuPage Port Authority's Community Days Weekend will get the chance to tour and take flights in FIFI, a B-29 Superfortress.

    DuPage Airport to showcase a piece of history at Community Days Weekend

    Sitting in the cockpit of FIFI, a B-29 Superfortress aircraft, David Oliver sometimes looks around him and realizes he's sitting in a piece of history, and the overwhelming feeling of responsibility that comes with that realization hits him all at once. And part of that responsibility requires Oliver to travel the country and show people inside the only model that remains flying, take them up for...

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    This artist rendering provided by the U.S. Air Force, shows the AEHF-1 satellite in orbit above the earth.

    Experts say gravity in space causes satellites, other space jump to fall

    "How do satellites and stuff like that fall out of space if there isn't any gravity in space?" asked a student in Gregg Thompson's sixth-grade social studies class at Woodland Middle School in Gurnee. Experts say there is just enough gravity in space to keep satellites orbiting Earth. But once they go lower in orbit, they slow down and fall.

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    Parents: Add vaccines to your back-to-school list

    Parents, don't forget to ask your health care provider if your child needs updated immunizations. All school-aged children in Illinois must now have the diptheria, tetanus, and pertussis vacination before school begins later this month.

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    Youth music fest takes stage Saturday in Carol Stream

    Carol Stream's Youth Council Music Fest began seven years ago with what could best be described as hard metal "screamer bands." And while the fest still has that element, it's expanded in scope and popularity, says Village Trustee Matt McCarthy, adviser to the youth council.

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    Chickens meet resistance in Palatine

    Add Palatine to the list of suburbs unfriendly to raising chickens in the backyard. Officially Vanessa and Jason Barsanti's request to build and stock a coop was tabled Monday after a neighbor objected to the small flock. But Kollin Kozlowski was the only council member who voted in favor of the egg layers.

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    Lombard still searching for next fire chief

    Lombard officials say they will hire a permanent fire chief by the end of September, after going through an eight-month search and three interim leaders since January. The village has struggled to find a successor for Mike Torrence, who retired Jan. 20 after one year and three months as Lombard's chief. Two internal candidates had stints in the position and a retired chief from Matteson has been...

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    Shot nine times and left for dead as he tended to a wounded victim outside, Oak Creek Police Lt. Brian Murphy tried to wave off his colleagues’ aid, insisting worshippers indoors needed their help more.

    Sikh temple president, officers hailed as heroes

    Sikh Temple of Wisconsin president Satwant Singh Kaleka fought back with all his strength and a simple butter knife, trying to stab a murderous gunman before taking two fatal gunshots to the leg. Shot nine times and left for dead, Oak Creek Police Lt. Brian Murphy tried to wave off aid, insisting worshippers indoors needed their help more. Under fire in the parking lot, Oak Creek police officer...

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    Afghan Defense Minister Abdul Rahim Wardak, says he is stepping down, just days after receiving a no-confidence vote from parliament.

    Afghan defense minister steps down

    KABUL, Afghanistan — Afghanistan’s defense minister, who played a key role overseeing the rapid expansion of the country’s army, stepped down on Tuesday days after receiving a no-confidence vote from parliament.

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    More Syrians flee to Turkey as fighting spreads

    KILIS, Turkey — More than 1,300 Syrians fled to Turkey overnight to escape growing violence in their country as rebels try to expand their hold inside Syria’s largest city despite two weeks of withering counterattacks by President Bashar Assad’s troops.

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    Fire alarm blares 15 hours at Pa. public housing

    WILKINSBURG, Pa. — A fire alarm that blared for more than 15 hours at a Pittsburgh-area public housing complex has finally been shut off.Residents of Glenshaw Gardens in Wilkinsburg say the alarm’s strobe lights began flashing and a high-pitched screech began sounding Sunday evening when a resident burned some popcorn.

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    2 men charged with staging Pa. reality TV robbery

    INDIANA, Pa. — Police have charged two out-of-state men with robbing two other men in western Pennsylvania by claiming they were recording a video for a reality TV show called “You Just Got Robbed.”

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    Man in wife’s ICU shooting confused about charge

    AKRON, Ohio — An Ohio man suspected of the mercy killing of his wife seemed perplexed at the charge, asking a judge whether his wife was indeed dead.John Wise appeared before an Akron municipal court judge via video from jail Tuesday morning on an aggravated attempted murder charge. His bond was set at $1 million.

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    Mother of boy who died at mansion seeks new probe

    CORONADO, Calif. — The mother of a 6-year-old boy who died after falling down stairs at a San Diego County mansion wants to reopen the investigation into his death.

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    Alice Minter at her home in Springfield, Ill.

    Poisoned woman fights to recover

    Alice Minter is in a wheelchair. She's had three surgeries for glaucoma and can't move her toes.Ask her how she's doing and she'll reply, "I'm doing good."That's the answer you would expect — and hope to receive — from Alice Minter, who 10 years ago this fall began a slowly evolving nightmare from which most would not have recovered.

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    Workers at 2 Illinois agencies get delayed raises

    Hundreds of unionized workers at two Illinois state agencies will be getting the pay raises that Gov. Pat Quinn canceled last year.The State Journal-Register reports the raises will go to almost 1,700 employees at the Department of Revenue and another 56 at the Criminal Justice Information Authority.

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    3rd teen dies of injuries in Wisconsin crash

    A third teenager has died of injuries suffered in the collision of an SUV and a semi last week on Interstate 94 near Hudson.The Wisconsin State Patrol says Zachary D. Zajec, 17, died Monday of head, chest and other injuries from the July 30 crash, the St. Paul Pioneer Press reported

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    No arrests in fatal shooting near UIC campus

    Police are investigating the death of a 20-year-old man who was gunned down just blocks from the University of Illinois' Chicago campus.The Cook County Medical Examiner's Office says Dante Young was pronounced dead Monday night at Stroger Hospital of Cook County.

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    Chicago offers amnesty on overdue books

    The Chicago Public Library is offering an amnesty program on overdue materials for the first time in 20 years. Mayor Rahm Emanuel says it'll allow schoolchildren a chance to start the year with a clean slate and not be discouraged from using the library because fines are owed.

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    Dawn Patrol: Vigils for slain Sikhs; Romney comes to town

    Sikhs and non-Sikhs gather at memorials in Palatine and Wheaton. Romney will speak in Elk Grove today. MLS player from Lomabrd likely died a "natural death." Gurnee board rejects memorial settlement. Bartlett woman who was killed in crash remembered. DuPage sued over mosque rejection.

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    Des Plaines nixes expansion of pawn shops

    The Des Plaines city council Monday night denied an amendment to the zoning code that would allow pawn shops as a permitted use in the city's C-3 general commercial district. The city's zoning code currently does not allow for pawn shops within any zoning disrict.

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    Nigeria’s Richard Oruche, who attended Fenton High School in Bensenville, drives for a shot against France Monday.

    Our local Olympians to watch today
    Melissa Seidemann (Hoffman Estates) and the U.S. women’s water polo team take on Australia in the semifinal round. TV: 10:30 a.m. live, NBC. A volleyball player from Wheaton scored 12 Monday as the men's team moved closer to the medal round; a Crystal Lake woman and the U.S. women's soccer team will play Japan for the gold medal on Thursday.

Sports

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    Manager Manny Acta pats Chris Perez on the back after the Indians reliever blew a ninth-inning lead Tuesday against the Twins in Cleveland.

    Indians’ streak hits 11 with 7-5 loss to Twins

    Poor pitching and hitting have been constants in the Cleveland Indians' losing streak. Tuesday night they added shoddy defense to the mix. The Indians' 7-5 defeat to Minnesota was their 11th straight loss, tying a franchise record.

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    Tigers third base coach Gene Lamont congratulates Miguel Cabrera on his solo home run in the fourth inning Tuesday at home against New York.

    Tigers hold off Yankees 6-5

    Miguel Cabrera homered for the third straight game and drove in three runs, and Detroit held off the New York Yankees 6-5 on Tuesday night for their sixth straight victory.

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    Brewers starting pitcher Mike Fiers hasn’t allowed more than two runs in any of his last nine starts, racking up 61 strikeouts in 61 innings.

    Brewers rookie perfect until the seventh in win over Reds

    Mike Fiers was very impressive again Tuesday night as he took a perfect game into the seventh inning and led the Brewers to a 3-1 victory over the Reds.

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    Arizona’s Chris Johnson heads home on two-run home run off Pirates relief pitcher Jared Hughes, right, in the ninth inning Tuesday in Pittsburgh.

    Johnson’s homers lead D-Backs over Pirates

    Chris Johnson homered in the eighth and ninth innings Tuesday night, giving him five in eight games since he was traded from Houston, to rally Arizona to a 10-4 victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates.

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    Baltimore players swarm Adam Jones after he drove in the winning run against the Seattle Mariners in the 14th inning Tuesday at home.

    Orioles beat Mariners 8-7 in 14 innings

    Adam Jones singled home the winning run in the 14th inning, and Baltimore beat the Seattle Mariners 8-7 Tuesday night after rallying from a five-run deficit.

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    Oakland starter Bartolo Colon allowed four hits over seven innings Tuesday at home against the Angels.

    Colon extends scoreless streak in A’s 10-4 win

    Bartolo Colon took a shutout into the seventh inning, four Oakland players hit home runs and the Athletics beat the Los Angeles Angels 10-4 on Tuesday night.

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    The Rangers’ Ryan Dempster struck out six and walked one in 6 2-3 innings Tuesday in Boston.

    Dempster rebounds in Rangers’ 6-3 win over Red Sox

    Ryan Dempster rebounded from a rough debut with Texas by pitching shutout ball into the seventh inning, Ian Kinsler had a pair of RBI singles and the Rangers snapped a two-game losing streak with a 6-3 win over the Boston Red Sox on Tuesday night.

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    The Marlins’ Jose Reyes runs out a fourth-inning infield single Mets starting pitcher Jonathon Niese, extending his hitting streak to 25 games, Tuesday in New York.

    Reyes extends hit streak to 25 in Marlins’ win over Mets

    Jose Reyes extended his hitting streak to a career-high 25 games with an infield single that set up Miami's big inning, and the Marlins stretched the New York Mets' home losing skid to a month with a 4-2 win Tuesday night.

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    The Giants’ Buster Posey rounds the bases after hitting a three-run home run off Cardinals starting pitcher Lance Lynn in the first inning Tuesday in St. Louis.

    Giants knock off Cardinals 4-2

    Buster Posey stayed hot with a three-run homer, and Barry Zito pitched 6 2-3 innings to make that stand up as the Giants beat the St. Louis Cardinals 4-2 on Tuesday night.

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    The Nationals’ Danny Espinosa swings for an RBI single for the go-ahead run in the 12th inning Tuesday in Houston.

    Espinosa’s single in 12th lifts Nats over Astros

    Danny Espinosa hit a two-run homer early, and his RBI single in the 12th inning lifted the Washington Nationals to a 3-2 win over the Houston Astros on Tuesday night.

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    Cubs starter Brooks Raley wipes his brow after surrendering a 3-run home run to the Padres’ Carlos Quentin during the fourth inning Tuesday night. Raley lasted 4 innings and gave up 7 runs and 8 hits.

    Raley pinned with ‘L’ in debut
    The Cubs' youth movement continued Tuesday night in San Diego. Left-hander Brooks Raley came up from Class AAA Iowa to start against the Padres. Even though Raley was hit around over 4 innings, giving up 7 runs, he's likely to remain in the rotation as Matt Garza went on the disabled list.

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    White Sox starting pitcher Jake Peavy allowed 3 runs on 7 hits in 6 innings Tuesday night and took the 5-2 loss against the Kansas City Royals.

    Peavy gets little support again in loss to Royals

    With 10 wins in their last 13 games heading into Tuesday night's matchup with the last-place Royals, the White Sox should have been relaxed and ready to play baseball. They Sox actually have stayed loose all season because first-year manager Robin Ventura doesn't make any rash lineup changes when inevitable mistakes occur.

  •  
    White Sox first baseman Paul Konerko holds his head after colliding with the Kansas City Royals' Jarrod Dyson Tuesday during the seventh inning.

    Chen gets win as Royals beat White Sox 5-2

    The Kansas City Royals wanted Bruce Chen to show more aggression. He finally did. Chen outpitched Jake Peavy for his first win in six weeks, Billy Butler hit his career-high 22nd homer and the Royals beat the Chicago White Sox 5-2 on Tuesday night. The White Sox had won 10 of 13, but saw their lead over Detroit in the AL Central shrink to a half game when the Tigers beat the New York Yankees 6-5 earlier in the night.

  •  
    Gordon Beckham heads for home on a solo shot in the first inning Tuesday night.

    Beckham heats up at plate for White Sox

    Gordon Beckham made an adjustment at the plate and so far it's been paying off. Beckham has slowed down his swing, and he's hit home runs in consecutive games following a lengthy power drought.

  •  

    Boomers snap four-game losing streak

    O’FALLON, Mo. — The Schaumburg Boomers put the brakes on a four-game losing streak, gaining ground in the Frontier League playoff race with a 4-0 win over the host River City Rascals in the opener of a road trip.The Boomers (42-31) rode the arm of starting pitcher Cody Griebling, who worked 7 shutout innings to improve to 4-1 on the season. The rookie allowed 7 hits with a walk and 4 strikeouts.Griebling outdueled Tony Marsala, who suffered the loss after allowing 1 earned run in 6 innings for the Rascals.The Boomers grabbed a 1-0 lead in the fourth inning and added a run in the fifth on Nate Baumann’s sacrifice fly.Steve McQuail hit his 14th homer in the eighth and Frank Pfister contributed his 50th RBI with a single in the ninth. The Boomers collected 10 hits, including 3 from Pfister and a pair by McQuail.Relief pitcher Sam Robinson left the bases loaded in the ninth to preserve the shutout.Boomers right-hander Robby Donovan (7-4, 3.55) starts the second game of the series today against Rascals righty Justin Sarratt (0-1, 5.68) at 7:05 p.m.

  •  

    Wheaton forced out of American Legion regional

    Wheaton's American Legion baseball team had planned on a bus ride Wednesday morning to Midland, Mich., to play in the Great Lakes Regional Tournament. But Wheaton had to forfeit its spot because it did not meet the minimum player roster requirements. Now, Northbrook may be going to the regional instead.

  •  

    Smith whiffs a dozen as Cougars blank Kernels

    Kyle Smith rang up a career-high 12 strikeouts as the Kane County Cougars shut out the Cedar Rapids Kernels 5-0 on Tuesday night at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark in Geneva.Smith (2-1) mowed down the Kernels (45-69, 13-13) through 7 innings, allowing 3 hits. Smith had at least 1 strikeout in every inning except the sixth, including 10 through 5 innings.In the bottom of the fourth inning, Danny Mateo singled with one out and scored on a two-out double by Michael Antonio to stake Smith to the only run he needed.Mateo helped the Cougars (57-57, 23-21) add to the lead in the bottom of the sixth with a sacrifice fly that scored Justin Trapp, who had opened the inning with a bunt single and took second on a throwing error by pitcher Ryan Crowley (1-3). Crowley allowed 1 earned run on 5 hits in 7 innings.The Cougars broke open the game in the bottom of the eighth. R.J. Alvarez walked Trapp and Jack Lopez to begin the inning. They both scored when Mateo lined a triple past center fielder Andy Workman. Mateo scored on Antonio’s sacrifice fly.Malcom Culver worked the last 2 innings and earned his sixth save.

  •  
    Los Angeles Dodgers outfielder Matt Kemp, right, celebrates as he runs toward Hanley Ramirez after he scored on a walk off single by Ramirez and Cubs catcher Welington Castillo, left, walks off the field Sunday.

    While Cubs wait, it’s a go for Dodgers

    Perhaps Cubs chairman Tom Ricketts felt pangs of envy Tuesday morning if he punched up latimes.com. "The new Dodger Stadium: Aggressive plans under way; planner hired," a headline read. The Dodgers created a position for Janet Marie Smith, a ballpark design specialist whom the Cubs consulted in the past. Smith, who worked on the Fenway Park renovation that the Cubs consider a model for Wrigley Field, views the political climate much more agreeable in Boston than in Chicago.

  •  
    Philadelphia Phillies first baseman Ryan Howard watches his two-run home run against the Atlanta Braves Tuesday during the first inning.

    Hamels tosses 5-hitter as Phillies beat Braves 3-0

    Cole Hamels threw a five-hitter for his fifth career shutout, Ryan Howard hit a two-run homer and the Philadelphia Phillies beat Atlanta 3-0 Tuesday night to snap a seven-game losing streak against the Braves. Hamels (12-6) struck out six and didn't walk a batter to record his 11th career complete game and his first win in three tries since signing a $144 million, six-year contract July 25.

  •  
    Tampa Bay Rays third baseman Evan Longoria is congratulated by teammates after his sacrifice fly Tuesday during the third inning against the Toronto Blue Jays.

    Shields stellar as Rays beat Toronto 4-1

    James Shields threw eight strong innings, Evan Longoria drove in a run in his return from an injury, and the Tampa Bay Rays beat the Toronto Blue Jays 4-1 on Tuesday night. Shields (10-7) allowed one run and two hits.

  •  
    Nick Roach Roach started 15 games on the strong side and has started 45 games the past four seasons, including three in the middle in 2009, when Urlacher missed 15 games with a dislocated wrist.

    Bears’ Roach to fill in for Urlacher

    With middle linebacker Brian Urlacher (knee) missing his sixth straight practice and second straight for personal reasons, strongside linebacker Nick Roach continues to get a lot of work in the middle. “Nick had an outstanding day (Monday),” coach Lovie Smith said. “Nick’s played good, winning football around here for us.” But he needs to make eight more Pro Bowls before he’s on the same level as Urlacher.

  •  

    Sizing up the U.S. Ryder Cup roster coming down the stretch

    By the time Sunday evening rolls around, we'll know who will comprise two-thirds of the United States Ryder Cup team that will take on the Europeans at Medinah Country Club in late September.That's because shortly after the final putt of the PGA Championship at Kiawah Island Golf Resort is sunk, the Ryder Cup points standings will be finalized, and those in the top eight spots on the list will automatically qualify to be on captain Davis Love III's 2012 team.So no pressure to perform this weekend, huh?

  •  

    First NFL female official not intimidated

    The NFL's first female official is welcoming her role as a sports pioneer. Shannon Eastin says she's excited and a bit nervous but not at all intimidated by the challenge of working a pro game. Eastin makes her NFL debut Thursday night as the line judge when the Green Bay Packers play at San Diego in the preseason opener for both teams.

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    Penn State adds names, ribbon to football jerseys

    Players' names are being added to Penn State's football jerseys for the coming season, the university announced Tuesday, along with blue ribbons to show support for victims of child abuse. The team's generic look — blue-and-white, no names on jerseys — has long been a trademark and was associated with the buttoned-down style of former coach Joe Paterno, who was fired last year after his former assistant Jerry Sandusky was arrested on child molestation charges.

  •  
    There always seems to be an issue with the Bears’ offensive line, but offensive coordinator Mike Tice has a knack for putting the pieces in the right places.

    Bears offensive line always work in progress

    Just weeks ago we were promised that the Bears' offensive line would no longer be a concern. Guess what? Mike Tice seems concerned.

  •  
    Illinois athletic director Mike Thomas has agreed to have the Illini play Washington in a college football game at Soldier Field in 2013.

    Illini to play at Soldier Field in 2013

    Illinois will play a game against Washington at Soldier Field in 2013. The Sept. 14 game will be the Illini's second on the Chicago Bears' home turf. The first was a 10-9 loss to Washington State in 1994.

  •  
    Australia’s Sally Pearson, front left, crosses the finish line to win gold ahead of United States’ Dawn Harper, front right, in the women’s 100-meter hurdles final Tuesday.

    Pearson edges Harper in Olympic 100 hurdles final

    Sally Pearson provided a rare bright spot for Australia at the London Games, earning the country's fourth gold medal by edging defending champion Dawn Harper of the U.S. to win the 100-meter hurdles in an Olympics-record 12.35 seconds Tuesday night.

  •  
    Phil Mickelson watches his shot out of the rough along the seventh hole Tuesday during a practice round for the PGA Championship on the Ocean Course of the Kiawah Island Golf Club in Kiawah Island, S.C.

    PGA Championship is one last shot for Tiger

    Tiger Woods gazed up every time he heard thunder crackling in the distance or the rain pounding the tent Tuesday, the kind of weather that could keep Kiawah Island from playing the way he would prefer at the PGA Championship. Even more of a nuisance were the words written on a banner below the table where he sat. "The Season's Final Major. Glory's Last Shot."

  •  
    Gold medalist Laura Trott of Britain adjusts her gold medal for the track cycling women’s omnium event Tuesday during the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. Britain has now won more Olympic gold medals than at any Summer Games in 104 years.

    Britain sets best Olympic gold total in 100 years

    Riding a wave of passionate home support, Britain has now won more Olympic gold medals than at any Summer Games in 104 years. The British team raised its total of golds to 22 on Tuesday and trails only superpowers China and the United States in the medal table. Cyclists Chris Hoy and Laura Trott, triathlete Alistair Brownlee and the equestrian dressage team have lifted the tally above the 19-gold haul at the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

  •  
    Former Chicago Bears offensive coordinator Mike Martz, here talking with Jay Cutler, has joined FOX as an NFL analyst this fall.

    FOX hires Martz for its NFL broadcast team

    Former ESPN reporter Erin Andrews won't be the only new NFL face at FOX this fall. In addition to adding Andrews to its NFL broadcast lineup, FOX has hired former Bears offensive coordinator Mike Martz to its stable of analysts, along with former NFL fullback Heath Evans.

  •  
    The United States’ Andre Iguodala, right, celebrates Monday next to Argentina’s Marcos Mata, left, in the second half.

    US men confident heading to Olympic hoop quarters

    Defiant and defensive, Mike Krzyzewski hardly sounded like he coaches the best team in the world. He's tired of the criticisms of the U.S. men's Olympic basketball team, fed up with questions about why it isn't as easy for the Americans as it used to be. For more than 13 minutes Tuesday, Krzyzewski fought back against every notion that his squad should never dare find itself in a close game.

  •  
    USA forward Kevin Durant reacts Monday after hitting a three pointer during a preliminary game against Argentina.

    Durant taking aim at Olympic gold with US team

    The skinny kid needed a talking to, not a lecture. It was time for a chat to remind him why the U.S. team needed him to be more selfish. Kevin Durant wasn't listening. So Kobe Bryant spoke to him first. LeBron James followed. "I told him, If we don't have the K.D. from Oklahoma City on this team then it makes no sense for you to be here,"' James said Tuesday while getting ready for practice.

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    Melissa Seidemann, right, of the United States looks to pass against Nicola Zagame of Australia Tuesday during a women’s semifinal water polo match at the 2012 Summer Olympics.

    US women advance to Olympic water polo final

    Maggie Steffens scored four goals to help the United States outlast Australia for an 11-9 win in extra time to advance to the women's water polo final at the London Olympics. In a bruising match between the two fierce rivals, the Americans appeared to have the win wrapped up in regulation after Australia captain Kate Gynther's shot rattled the crossbar in the closing seconds.

  •  
    U.S. gymnast Jordyn Wieber, left, hugs teammate Alexandra Raisman after Raisman’s performance on the floor Tuesday.

    Raisman finishes Olympics in style with floor gold

    Aly Raisman finished the Olympics in style. The U.S. captain matched Gabby Douglas in gold medals, winning the title on floor exercise Tuesday. Add in the bronze on balance beam from earlier in the day, and she becomes the most decorated of the Fierce Five. "It definitely went better than I thought it would," Raisman said.

  •  
    Mike Small, head golf coach at the University of Illinois, answers questions posed by high school coaches attending a recent clinic at Naperville Country Club. This week Small is playing in the PGA Championship.

    Another big PGA week for Illini golf coach Small

    This would figure to be a big week for Mike Small, the Illinois men's coach who will make his 11th appearance in a major championship when he tees off Thursday at the Ocean Course at Kiawah Island, S.C., in the PGA Championship. In his weekly golf column, Len Ziehm catches up with the successful golf coach to talk about the PGA Championship and about one of his top players, Luke Guthrie, who has won nearly $300,000 since turning pro in June.

  •  
    Curtis Martin poses with a bust of himself during induction ceremonies Saturday at the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

    Hall of Famer Martin bares his soul

    If you want a good cry, listen to Curtis Martin's induction speech at the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Then ponder whether athletes just might be human beings, too.

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    Imrem: New Hall of Famer Curtis Martin bares his soul
    I’m not ashamed to admit that a lot of events bring me to tears, from social injustice to unfunny movies by funnyman Adam Sandler.So it wasn’t surprising that Sunday morning I sat on my recliner and cried as a radio station replayed a clip of Curtis Martin’s induction speech the night before at the Pro Football Hall of Fame.It was a vivid reminder that professional athletes aren’t cardboard cutouts. Sports aren’t their entire lives. Other elements reside inside them and outside the lines.Acknowledging that is a bit uncomfortable. It’s much easier to criticize someone without considering that he’s a real human being.More significantly, it’s a lot easier to condemn someone for transgressions off the field without considering how he became what he is.Not everyone is like us, regardless of whatever we are like, wherever we grew up, however we came to be what we happen to be.Americans come from diverse environments — big cities, suburbs, medium cities, rural areas, small cities and overseas.Curtis Martin comes from one of the worst neighborhoods in Pittsburgh.Football fans might know that Martin ranks fourth on the NFL’s all-time rushing list, which explains why he is in the Hall of Fame.But maybe even in the NFL towns where he played, Martin was cheered for the yards and booed for the fumbles while the man behind the face mask remained relatively unknown.Until Saturday night when Curtis Martin bared all at Canton.If you need a good cry occasionally, find a copy or tape of the surprises Martin revealed.Like, that he never was a football fan. Like, that he hates to run. Like, most relevantly, that he always thought he would be dead before 21 years of age.As a child, Martin watched his father torture his mother by burning her hair with a lighter, putting out cigarettes on her body, throwing her down stairs and beating “her up like she was a man.”After Martin’s father left them when his son was 10, Curtis’ mother’s mother and sister helped raise him ... until they were murdered in separate incidents.Martin didn’t bring this up for sympathy. He did it to express appreciation for everything his mother endured to make him the man he is. He also mentioned a teacher and a pastor who helped show him the way.And he thanked the Lord.At age 20 and not at all religious yet, Martin visited a church, sat in the balcony and made a deal with God because he “didn’t want to make a deal with the devil.”“Listen, man,” Martin said he said to God, “I don’t know nothing about you or this Jesus cat that everybody talk about, but I’m going to make a deal with you. If you let me live past 21, dude, I promise that I’ll just try to do my best and try to live right and try to do whatever you want me to do.”Martin was told football would be a platform to help others. He used his troubled background as incentive to do right rather than an excuse to do wrong.There are so many stories within so many athletes — the honorable and dishonorable that we cheer, boo and essentially know little about.After hearing Curtis Martin’s, is it still possible to look down on the field of play without wondering who these guys really are?mimrem@dailyherald.com

  •  

    Padres sale agreement in place, needs MLB approval

    John Moores has agreed to sell the San Diego Padres to a group headed by former Los Angeles Dodgers owner Peter O'Malley and including pro golfer Phil Mickelson.

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    Ottavino, Rockies beat Dodgers 2-0

    Adam Ottavino gave up one hit in three innings of relief, a single that was the result of a reversed call, and the Colorado Rockies beat the Los Angeles Dodgers 2-0 Monday night.

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    Weaver’s 4-hitter leads Angels past A’s 4-0

    Jered Weaver pitched a four-hitter for his major-league leading 15th victory, and the Los Angeles Angels beat the Oakland Athletics 4-0 on Monday night to overtake the final spot in the crowded AL wild card standings. Weaver (15-1) struck out nine, walked none and faced the minimum through 4 1-3 innings. The Angels ace has won a career-best 10 straight starts, matching Chuck Finley's franchise record set in 1997.

Business

  •  
    A 70,000-square-foot Caputo´s Fresh Markets grocery store will open early next year in what is now a vacant warehouse at North Avenue and Schmale Road in Carol Stream.

    Carol Stream to get Caputo’s grocery store, headquarters

    A 70,000-square-foot Caputo's Fresh Markets grocery store will be the anchor tenant of a planned shopping center development at a prominent corner in Carol Stream. The store will be moving into a currently vacant 300,000-square-foot warehouse building on the southwest corner of North Avenue and Schmale Road that will also include space for Caputo's corporate headquarters and distribution and production facilities.

  •  
    Stronger corporate earnings reports and expectations that central banks will act to support the economy powered the Standard & Poor’s 500 index past 1,400 for the first time in three months. The index rose 7 points to close at 1,401.

    S&P closes over 1,400 for first time in 3 months

    Stocks are trading higher on Wall Street as investors turn their focus to U.S. corporations that are reporting better results than analysts had expected. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 70 points to 13,187 in the first half-hour of trading on Tuesday.

  •  
    Developer Chuck Malk speaks to the Buffalo Grove Village Board on Monday about his plans for a massive development on the site of the village hall and municipal golf course.

    Huge development proposed in Buffalo Grove

    Chuck Malk, who created a successful retail development in Deerfield more than a decade ago, presented plans Monday for what could be the biggest development in Buffalo Grove's history. It calls for the creation of a downtown on the site of the village offices and golf course. "It's a game changer," Trustee Jeffrey Berman said.

  •  
    Smoke pours from a fire at the Chevron Richmond Refinery, seen behind Alcatraz Island in San Francisco.

    Experts: Calif refinery fire will boost gas prices

    A major fire at one of the country's biggest oil refineries that sent scores of people to hospitals with breathing problems will push gas prices above $4 a gallon on the West Coast, analysts said Tuesday.

  •  
    Halsted Street Deli Inc. is a new business coming to the Vernon Hills Town Center at Route 45 and Milwaukee Ave.

    Incentives, economic growth fuel Vernon Hills sales tax boost

    Sales tax receipts in Vernon Hills reached a four-year high making local officials optimistic the tide may have turned. And though the corner has not been completely turned, the village has made up a considerable amount of ground, largely through the use of sales tax rebates.

  •  
    Pfizer Inc., the world’s biggest drugmaker, agreed to pay $60.2 million to settle foreign bribery cases it brought to U.S. authorities involving alleged payments paid by employees and agents of subsidiaries.

    Pfizer pays $60 million to settle bribery charges

    Pfizer has agreed to pay the federal government $60 million to settle allegations that its employees bribed doctors and other foreign officials in Europe and Asia to win business and boost sales.

  •  
    The Federal Aviation Administration said it notified a court overseeing the bankruptcy of American Airlines parent AMR Corp. that the agency might seek penalties against the carrier for safety violations.

    US seeks $162M in fines against AMR, American Air

    Federal safety regulators are seeking up to $162.4 million in fines against American Airlines and its affiliates for alleged violations of U.S. safety standards going back several years. Those sanctions would dwarf any previous penalties against an airline.

  •  

    Tax rebate coming for downtown Wheaton

    Wheaton taxpayers in a special taxing district that expired earlier this year can expect to receive a rebate. A special service area that dissolved April 30 was a major funding source for the Downtown Wheaton Association, a group charged with promoting the central business district.

  •  
    Roselle leaders will begin talks Monday on the results of a study looking at how to bring more business to the village, including areas like Main Street downtown.

    Study to guide Roselle in business talks

    After hiring a firm for $30,000 to suggest options for developing land and attracting retailers to Roselle, village officials on Monday will begin discussing strategies to make it happen. "This plan provides them options, but the board needs to decide what, if anything, they want to do," Village Administrator Jeff O'Dell said.

  •  

    UOP technology selected for Romania’s synthetic rubber facility

    UOP Ltd., a Honeywell company, announced its technology has been selected to boost yields at Romania's largest synthetic rubber production facility.

  •  

    Delta Dental Foundation launches new community grants program

    The Delta Dental of Illinois Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Delta Dental of Illinois, is launching a new community grants program to provide funding for programs and organizations that improve the oral health of children within the state.

  •  

    Central States to use Context 4 Healthcare system

    Central States Health and Welfare Fund of Rosemont has selected Context 4 Healthcare Inc.'s DecisionPoint Health Payment System's Usual, Customary & Reasonable (UCR) benchmarking databases for its business applications.

  •  

    Gallagher acquires Blenheim Park Ltd.

    Arthur J. Gallagher & Co. said it has acquired Blenheim Park Ltd, headquartered in Croydon, England. Terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

  •  

    Abbott stent system gets FDA approval

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Abbott Laboratories' Omnilink Elite Vascular Balloon-Expandable Stent System for the treatment of iliac artery disease, a form of peripheral artery disease that affects the lower extremities.

  •  
    Job seekers wait in line at a job fair expo in Anaheim, Calif. U.S. employers posted the most job openings in four years in June, a positive sign that hiring may pick up. The increase comes after employers added the most jobs in five months in July.

    U.S. employers post the most jobs in 4 years

    U.S. employers posted the most job openings in four years in June, a positive sign that hiring may pick up. The Labor Department said Tuesday job openings rose to a seasonally adjusted 3.8 million in June, up from 3.7 million in May. That's the most since July 2008. Layoffs also fell.

  •  
    Signage for the MGM Macau casino resort, operated by MGM China Holdings Ltd., is displayed outside the casino in Macau, China, on Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2012. MGM Resorts International, which holds 51 percent of MGM China, is expected to announce second-quarter earnings today.

    MGM posts loss, but revenue leaps on hotel, casino

    MGM Resorts International on Tuesday posted a second-quarter loss double what Wall Street was expecting, but revenue surged 29 percent on gambling and hotel room gains.

  •  
    Freddie Mac posted a gain for the second quarter and isn’t requesting any additional federal for the period. McLean, Va.-based Freddie Mac said Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2012 that its net income attributable to common shareholders was $1.2 billion, or 37 cents per share, in the April-June period.

    Freddie Mac posts $1.2B net income for 2Q

    Government-controlled mortgage giant Freddie Mac posted net income of $1.2 billion for the second quarter and isn't requesting any additional federal aid for the period. The government rescued Freddie and larger sibling Fannie Mae in September 2008 after massive losses on risky mortgages threatened to topple them.

  •  
    Standard Chartered Plc fell the most in at least 24 years as an analyst estimated it may face costs of $5.5 billion after the lender was accused of violating U.S. money laundering laws relating to its dealings with Iranian banks.

    Standard Chartered shares dive after allegation of laundering money for Iran

    Standard Chartered PLC saw around $9.9 billion wiped off its market value Tuesday after the New York state regulator accused the U.K. bank of being involved in laundering money for Iran, dealing a further blow to the City of London's reputation as a financial center. The charges were a shock for a bank that proudly described itself recently as "boring."

  •  
    CVS Caremark says its second-quarter net income jumped more than 18 percent, as new business and an expansion of its pharmacy benefits management business pushed revenue higher.

    CVS Caremark profit jumps 18 pct, boosts outlook

    CVS Caremark says its second-quarter net income jumped more than 18 percent, as new business and an expansion of its pharmacy benefits management business pushed revenue higher. The Woonsocket, R.I., company says it earned $966 million, or 75 cents per share, in the three months that ended June 30. That's up from $816 million, or 60 cents per share, a year ago.

  •  
    A woman walks past movie posters of Hollywood movies “Kung Fu Panda 2,” left, and China’s propaganda film “Beginning of the Great Revival” on display side by side outside a cinema in Beijing.

    DreamWorks to make `Kung Fu Panda 3’ in China

    DreamWorks Animation and Chinese partners announced plans Tuesday to co-produce the next "Kung Fu Panda" movie and develop an entertainment district in Shanghai, expanding Hollywood's fast-growing ties to China.Hollywood studios have announced a flurry of deals with local partners to gain access to Chinese financing and a government-controlled film market that is growing strongly at a time of weak ticket sales in the United States and Europe.

  •  
    A German national flag, right, and a European Union (EU) flag fly above the Reichstag, Germany’s parliament building, in Berlin, Germany.

    German industrial orders down 1.7 pct in June

    Industrial orders in Germany fell by an unexpectedly large 1.7 percent in June from the previous month, led by a slide in orders from other countries that use the euro, official data showed Tuesday. However, the Economy Ministry said recent figures show no "clear trend."The drop in the often-volatile index followed a 0.7 percent monthly increase in May. That was revised upward slightly from the initial reading of 0.6 percent.

  •  

    Padres sale agreement in place, needs MLB approval

    John Moores has agreed to sell the San Diego Padres to a group headed by former Los Angeles Dodgers owner Peter O'Malley and including pro golfer Phil Mickelson.O'Malley is the son of Walter O'Malley, who bought the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1950 and moved them to Los Angeles before the 1958 season.

  •  

    Oil hovers near $92 ahead of weekly U.S. supply data

    Oil hovered above $92 a barrel Tuesday in Asia as analysts estimated that supplies of U.S. crude and gasoline likely fell last week. Benchmark crude was up 20 cents at $92.40 a barrel at late afternoon Singapore time in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract rose 80 cents on Monday to settle at $92.20 in New York. In London, Brent crude was up 66 cents at $110.21 on the ICE Futures exchange.

  •  
    Christopher Del Mastro, head of anti submarine warfare mobil targets at the Naval Undersea War Center, next to a mock up of their Manta Test Vehicle in Middletown, RI.

    Navy tests ocean drones in RI’s Narragansett Bay

    Just beneath the placid, sailboat-dotted surface of Narragansett Bay, torpedo-shaped vehicles spin and pivot to their own rhythm, carrying out missions programmed by their U.S. Navy masters.The bay known as a playground for the rich is the testing ground for the Naval Undersea Warfare Center in Newport, where the Navy is working toward its goal of achieving a squadron of self-driven, undersea vehicles. One of the gadgets recently navigated its own way from Woods Hole, Mass., to Newport, completing several pre-set tasks in what the military calls an unprecedented feat.

  •  
    An investor, center, speaks to another while they look at the stock price monitor at a private securities company in Shanghai, China.

    World stocks gain on hints of economic recovery

    World stock markets were moderately higher Tuesday, continuing to get a boost from an unexpected improvement in U.S. hiring that added to signs the global economy might be emerging from its downturn.Sentiment was also underpinned by expectations that the European Central Bank will support struggling countries such as Spain and Italy by buying their sovereign bonds.

  •  
    Pfizer Inc., Johnson & Johnson and Elan Corp. ended most plans to develop an Alzheimer’s drug after a second trial failure, a blow to the companies’ efforts to market the first product to slow progress of the disease.

    Pfizer, J&J halt trials of Alzheimer’s drug in research setback

    Pfizer Inc., Johnson & Johnson and Elan Corp. ended most plans to develop an Alzheimer’s drug after a second trial failure, a blow to the companies’ efforts to market the first product to slow progress of the disease.Bapineuzumab, designed to attack the brain plaques that serve as a hallmark of Alzheimer’s, failed to improve symptoms of dementia in the second of four final-stage trials of the drug, Pfizer and J&J said yesterday in statements.Drugmakers have been trying for more than a decade to find therapies to slow Alzheimer’s. While companies have focused on developing drugs to hinder the amyloid deposits, scientists aren’t certain whether the clumps cause or are a minor contributor to the disease or merely a consequence.“Alzheimer’s is a tough nut for any drug company to crack,” said Erik Gordon, a professor at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business, in an e-mail. “We don’t know for sure what causes it or even what it really is. There will be more failures before we see a success.”In the Pfizer-J&J trial, the compound called Bapineuzumab didn’t help patients who don’t have a gene, called ApoE4, that boosts the risk of getting the disease. New York-based Pfizer announced on July 23 that a final-stage study of the product failed in patients with the ApoE4 gene.The failure is “a black eye for Pfizer’s new ‘strong pipeline’ happy face,” he said.Pfizer FocusPfizer, the world’s biggest drugmaker, has been shedding units, cutting costs and focusing on therapies in development as Chief Executive Officer Ian Read tries to refocus the world’s largest drugmaker on its core mission to replace revenue lost when its best-selling cholesterol pill Lipitor began facing generic competition last November.“We believe the bapi program is shut down and the company has no plans to file for approval based on the data thus far,” Mark Schoenebaum, an analyst at ISI Group, wrote in a research note about Pfizer, using the drug’s nickname. “The company has very likely already analyzed subgroups and found no signal that they believe could lead to a commercial future at this time.”Bapineuzumab isn’t the first experimental Alzheimer’s drug against amyloid that has failed in a large trial. In August 2010, an experimental drug from Eli Lilly & Co. that attacked amyloid in a different way failed to improve cognition in two large studies, prompting Lilly to stop developing the product.Until the bapineuzumab trials were stopped yesterday, Pfizer, Elan and J&J were competing with a second experimental Alzheimer’s drug from Indianapolis-based Lilly to create the first therapy to target a cause for Alzheimer’s, rather than just its symptoms. Trial results for this Lilly therapy are due soon.‘Tremendous’ OpportunityCompanies continue to pursue Alzheimer’s drugs in the face of so many unknowns because “the market is tremendous -- multiple billions,” Les Funtleyder, a fund manager at Poliwogg, a private equity and hedge fund in New York, said in a telephone interview.If a medicine clearly worked to slow the disease, “you could be talking about the biggest drug ever.” doctors can start prescribing it as a treatment, she said.About 5.4 million Americans have Alzheimer’s, the most common type of dementia, a number expected to increase to as many as 16 million people by 2050, according to the Alzheimer’s Association, a Chicago-based advocacy and research group.Trial FailureNumerous reasons may account for the bapineuzumab trial failures, said Lon Schneider, director of the University of Southern California Alzheimer’s Disease Research and Clinical Center in Los Angeles. It could be that intervening earlier in the disease process is necessary, or that researchers need to attack amyloid in a different way, he said.

  •  
    Michael Hash of HHS, left, and White House health reform director Nancy-Ann DeParle, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Republican governors whoíve balked at creating new consumer health insurance markets under President Barack Obamaís health care law may end up getting stuck .

    Governors aside, feds building health care markets

    Don't look now: The feds may be gaining on GOP governors who've balked at carrying out a key part of President Barack Obama's health care overhaul law.Opponents of the law say they won't set up new private health insurance markets called exchanges. But increasingly it's looking like Washington will just do it for them.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Time spent without TV, air conditioning or email during my family's annual pilgrimage to the Fountain Park Chautauqua in rural Remington, Ind., always gives me an appreciation for simple things such as family, friends and pie.

    Going from 'really busy' to 'eating pie' is good for soul

    Our summers still are hazy, but we lost the lazy. Who saw that coming? Caught up in the suburban trap of always answering “really, really busy" in response to a simple, "How are you?" I spend a vacation week in which my most-demanding task is finding a pair of plastic baby doll arms.

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    ‘Avengers’ helps Disney smash 3Q profit forecast

    A box office blast from "The Avengers" and an enthusiastic response to the revamp of Disneyland's California Adventure theme park helped The Walt Disney Co. reap a better-than-expected third-quarter profit.Disney's movie studio was behind much of the earnings gain as studio profit surged to $313 million from $49 million a year ago, backed by upbeat ticket sales to movies like "The Avengers" and "Brave."

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    Country music superstar Alan Jackson comes to the Sears Centre Arena in Hoffman Estates on Nov. 9.

    Alan Jackson to perform in Hoffman Estates
    Tickets for country superstar Alan Jackson's Friday, Nov. 9, concert at the Sears Centre Arena in Hoffman Estates go on sale ot the public at 10 a.m. Friday, Aug. 10.

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    Olympic athletes and training personnel dine at the dining hall inside the Olympic Village in London. The athletes’ dining room in the Olympic village is a food court like no other, offering the world’s elite athletes healthy, hearty food and fuel, 24 hours a day — and doing it the Slow Food way.

    Olympic athletes can choose — a curry or a Quarter Pounder?

    Fancy a traditional English fry-up for breakfast? Step right this way. The athletes' dining room in the Olympic village is a food court like no other, offering the world's elite athletes healthy, hearty food and fuel, 24 hours a day — and doing it the Slow Food way. And yet, off in the back corner of the dining room lurks McDonald's and its Sausage & Egg McMuffins.

  •  

    Film critic Judith Crist dies at 90

    Judith Crist, a blunt and popular film critic for the "Today" show, TV Guide and the New York Herald Tribune whose reviews were at times so harsh that director Otto Preminger labeled her "Judas Crist," has died. She was 90. Her son, Steven Crist, said his mother died Tuesday at her Manhattan home after a long illness.

  •  
    Colt Ford’s “Declaration of Independence”

    Belly up to the bar with Colt Ford

    Colt Ford's new album, "Declaration of Independence," proves that his breakthrough success doesn't mean he'll start playing by contemporary country music's rules. The title not only emphasizes that he records for an independent label, it underscores he has the freedom to speak his mind in ways many corporate-groomed country stars are too cautious to do.

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    Barbra Streisand has added a Chicago date at the United Center on Friday, Oct. 26, to her upcoming concert tour.

    Barbra Streisand sets Chicago concert date

    Barbra's back ... and heading for Chicago. Singer Barbra Streisand is set to return to Chicago to perform in concert at the United Center on Friday, Oct. 26. Tickets go on sale to the public Monday.

  •  

    Tony’s Famous Cheesecake
    Tony's Famous Cheesecake: Tony Holister

  •  
    Brian Hill/bhill@dailyherald.com Tony Hollister of Elgin is known for his homemade chicken pot pie.

    Tony’s Chicken Pot Pie
    Tony's Chicken Pot Pie: Tony Holister

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    Chicken Shish-kebabs
    Chicken Shish-Kebabs:Tony Holister

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    Tony Hollister likes one-dish meals, like his hearty chicken potpie.

    Elgin school bus driver takes to cooking like a pro
    The next time you see the driver of an 18-wheeler talking on his radio, consider this, he might be exchanging recipes. "Oh yeah, we'd talk about cooking," Elgin resident Tony Hollister laughs. Tony drove an 18-wheeler for Coca-Cola for 36 years. He remembers one time on the road when a rib special drew the drivers into a truck stop like magnets and they all spent a long time talking ribs. These days he drives a school bus. His unique work schedule, with the hours off between taking the kids to school and picking them up, works perfectly for Tony.

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    Award-winning composer Marvin Hamlisch, best known for the torch song “The Way We Were,” died Monday, Aug. 6, in Los Angeles. He was 68.

    Composer Marvin Hamlisch dies at 68 in Los Angeles

    Marvin Hamlisch, who composed the scores for dozens of movies including "The Sting" and won a Tony for "A Chorus Line," has died in Los Angeles at 68. Family spokesman Jason Lee says Hamlisch died Monday after a brief illness. Hamlisch's career included composing, conducting and arranging music from Broadway to Hollywood.

  •  
    Michael Clarke Duncan remains hospitalized following his July 13 heart attack.

    Michael Clarke Duncan remains hospitalized

    "The Green Mile" star Michael Clarke Duncan remains hospitalized in Los Angeles more than three weeks after suffering a heart attack. Publicist Joy Fehily said in a brief email statement Monday that the 54-year-old actor "was just moved from the intensive care unit, but remains hospitalized" following his July 13 heart attack.

  •  
    Dan Auerbach, lead singer of The Black Keys, along with Foo Fighters, Neil Young and Crazy Horse, and others will perform at the Global Festival 2012 on Sept. 29, 2012.

    Black Keys, Foo Fighters sign on for charity show

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. — The Black Keys, Foo Fighters and Neil Young & Crazy Horse will headline one of this year’s hottest concerts, but don’t bother trying to buy tickets.Fans will have to earn entry to Global Festival 2012 on Sept. 29 in New York City’s Central Park by taking action against extreme poverty around the world through a website and app designed to get people moving before a big event, not after.“The scale of things that they’re trying do just felt really cool, and we’re trying to get the ball rolling,” said Patrick Carney, The Black Keys’ drummer. “Especially with everything that’s been going on for the last three years, I suppose, after the stock market crashed. There’s attention on the amount of people living below the poverty line and the disparity between the rich and the poor and everything that’s going on now ... It just felt like the right time to do something.”Organizer Hugh Evans of Global Poverty Project calls the concert a “crescendo” to an ambitious anti-poverty effort that coincides with the United Nations meeting in New York.Fans can attend through a special lottery of 54,000 tickets. They earn their way in with points awarded for charitable acts performed through the Global Citizen website, which launched Tuesday. Points can be earned by simple acts like posting information on social media, donating money to charity or signing a petition, among other simple activities.Evans hopes the chance to see some of rock’s biggest acts will spur fans to take 100,000 actions by September. The overall goal is to raise $500 million in practical solutions by leveraging commitments from the world’s leaders while they’re in New York.Evans said a difference can be made for children trapped in extreme poverty with a polio vaccine that costs just 30 cents. A Tuesday news release announcing the project says there are an estimated 1.3 billion people living on the equivalent of less than $1.50 a day.“I think what’s exciting is all the world leaders are going to be in town that week for the United Nations meeting,” Evans said in a phone interview. “And this concert and the associated campaign will give us the opportunity to ask these world leaders to make practical and tangible monetary commitments to the world’s poor and to the achievement of the UN’s Millenium Development Goals.”Produced by Goldenvoice/AEG, the concert has partnered with a number of charities and is supported by Sumner M. Redstone and the Pratt Foundation.The musical acts, which include Band of Horses and K’Naan, also have donated their time.The Keys have a charity they founded in their hometown of Akron, Ohio, to help the mentally handicapped. And Carney and guitarist Dan Auerbach donated a few dollars from each concert ticket on this year’s tour to a variety of charities as well. But the chance to affect change on such a large scale drew them to the Global Festival.“Dan and I try not to be too political about things,” Carney said. “ ... This is not a political thing. This is a humanitarian cause.”

  •  
    Sharon Osbourne, a judge on “America’s Got Talent” has said she is quitting the show over a dispute involving her son and NBC.

    Sharon Osbourne feuding with NBC

    NBC defended itself Monday against Sharon Osbourne's claim the network discriminated against her afflicted son in casting a new reality show. The "America's Got Talent" judge told The New York Post that she's quitting the show because NBC fired her son, Jack Osbourne, by email two days before he was to co-star on the reality show "Stars Earn Stripes."

  •  

    Music pumping up Olympic competition

    At the London Olympics, Adele is served with tennis, Beyoncé bounces around the basketball court and Queen's "We Will Rock You" spikes up beach volleyball. A walk around Olympic Park is a nonstop musical mystery tour — all part of a boisterous music policy that aims to keep spectators pumped up.

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    Musician Mick Jagger, left, Monday watches an evening session of athletics competition with L’Wren Scott, right, in the Olympic Stadium at the 2012 Summer Olympics.

    Celebrities keeping a low profile at the Olympics

    Mick Jagger has dropped by Olympic Stadium to watch some track and field. It didn't help Britain's medal count, but it reassured celebrity-watchers worried that the world's biggest sporting event might be lacking in star power. Jagger was photographed chatting with London games chief Sebastian Coe at the stadium on Monday evening.

  •  
    Director Jay Chandrasekhar, who grew up in Hinsdale, makes a cameo appearance in his new comedy movie “The Babymakers,” now playing in theaters.

    Hinsdale's Jay Chandrasekhar: A Broken Lizard makes good

    Before he became a founding member of the comedy troupe Broken Lizard and began directing films such as "Super Troopers," "Club Dread" and "Beerfest," Jay Chandrasekhar lived in Hinsdale. “The thing about people from Chicago and the Northwest suburbs is that they're very cocky. I think that serves us well in the show business world.”

  •  
    The action in “Theatrhythm Final Fantasy” will feel familiar if you've ever played a rhythm game on the DS.

    'Final Fantasy' music sings on 3DS

    Square Enix's "Final Fantasy" video-game franchise is celebrating its 25th anniversary. And while the series has stumbled a bit over the last decade, fans of role-playing adventures can all cite their favorite moments. What makes those emotional moments so effective? The lavish orchestral scores. "Theatrhythm Final Fantasy" is Square's own tribute to a quarter-century of terrific game music.

  •  
    Beef medallions are among the entrees at Flour + Wine in Glen Ellyn.

    Flour + Wine offers seasonal fare alongside signature delights

    While Flour + Wine in Glen Ellyn only took over The Grotto's former space May 9, the spot has already won a huge following and operates with a smoothness not found in many well-established spots. Its excellent menu and laidback atmosphere make it a perfect place for a night out.

  •  
    “Broken Harbor” by Tana French

    Tana French delivers another winner

    "Broken Harbor," the fourth novel in Tana French's Dublin Murder Squad series, takes its name from the former seaside resort where detective Mick "Scorcher" Kennedy vacationed as a teen with his family. Scorcher is called in to investigate a triple homicide. It's a typical murder investigation on the surface, but of course in French's novels nothing is ever straightforward procedure.

  •  
    The Taste of Arlington Heights will return to the intersection of Campbell and Vail streets in Arlington Heights.

    Best bets: Mane Event, Taste take over Arlington Heights

    It's a festival weekend in downtown Arlington Heights. First up is the Mane Event block party on Friday, then the Taste of Arlington Heights on Saturday when the final five finalists of Suburban Chicago's Got Talent perform and the winner and Fan Favorite will be announced. And they're both free! Other options include comedian Sebastian Maniscalco at Rosemont's Zanies Comedy Club and Macy's Glamorama 2012 event in Chicago.

  •  
    Treat kids to a fun and healthy snack of Fruit Kebabs with Fluffy Fruit Dip.

    Fruit Kebabs with Fluffy Fruit Dip
    Rainbow Wands with Fluffy Fruit Dip: Eat Right, Live Well

  •  
    Treat kids to a fun and healthy snack of Fruit Kebabs with Fluffy Fruit Dip.

    Teaching kids life lessons in the kitchen

    August always seems to be a very busy month, especially for parents getting children ready to return to school. I bet you have used the phrase "so much to do and so little time." This year my back to school message is all about enlisting your children to help you with meal or snack preparation in the kitchen.

Discuss

  •  

    Editorial: A road map to transparency

    Those local governments that need to be more transparent must make it a priority and emulate those who are doing it well as graded by the Illinois Policy Institute, a Daily Herald editorial says.

  •  

    First lady blues

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: Not surprisingly, Barbara Bush said it most succinctly: "The first lady is going to be criticized no matter what she does." And how.

  •  

    Coolidge knows about finances
    A Barrington letter to the editor:Leslie Coolidge told us that she had become passionate about running while watching Congress push the country to the brink of financial ruin during the debt ceiling debate.

  •  

    Not everyone is a fan of the Olympics
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: The reader poll on July 262 had all the obvious answers to the question: "What Olympic sport are you most looking forward to?" However, you failed to include an answer which a great many of us would have chosen.

  •  

    Some solutions would create new problems
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: Please give some serious thought to where you think the line should be between cutting taxes and improving public services before making these impulsive comments and decisions.

  •  

    Health care law looks like winner
    Letter to the editor: The 30-plus million people the new health care act will cover will pay premiums for their coverage helping to spread cost. Insurance exchanges will be established and in 2014 members of Congress will be getting their health care insurance through exchanges. It looks like a winner to me.

  •  

    Gun control argument flawed
    A Big Rock letter to the editor: A letter writer who recommends gun control suggests that the police ought to be disarmed. They are people, too, and just as susceptible to "alcohol, uncontrolled rage or human error" as you and I, even though I deem them to be very "confident in their ability to handle the gun."

  •  

    God is creator, not a particle
    A Naperville lettre to the editor: In response to the July 28 article about Higgs boson, God is not a "particle." He is the creator and sustainer of the universe.

  •  

    Efforts of many made storm cleanup success
    Efforts of many made storm cleanup successOn July 1, Milton Township again suffered through a major microburst with winds around 117 miles per hour. The Milton Township Highway Department crews were dispatched immediately after the storm passed to clear township roads with heavy equipment so that emergency vehicles, etc. could have access to our residents. The “after the storm” cleanup is complete almost four weeks later even with the help from neighboring township highway departments, cities, villages, CERT volunteers and DuPage County Sheriff’s office SWAP.Again, I’d like to thank the residents of Milton Township for their patience and cooperation in this extreme event. Also, a big thank you to all the cooperating friends who assisted us with the storm clean up: DuPage County Sheriff’s office – SWAP; Downers Grove Township Highway Department; Lisle Township Highway Department; Naperville Township Highway Department; Lemont Township Highway Department; the village of Hinsdale; and the many volunteers with the Milton Township CERT program and our own Milton Township Highway Department crew, along with other municipalities, townships and DuPage County Highway Department, for getting all roads open in such an extreme weather event.The great spirit of cooperation and quick turn around after so much damage is a good indicator that Milton Township is a community that works. Thank you all.Gary MuehlfeltHighway CommissionerMilton Township

  •  

    Editorial cartoons expose bias
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: The cartoons in the Saturday, July 28 paper I would score as three against those meany Republicans and one neutral. Other times it may be two against the Republicans. Maybe, just maybe, there is one making fun of the Democrats and one neutral.

  •  

    Wheaton band fest coverage appreciated
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: Thank you for your coverage of the 13th annual Wheaton Band Festival. We appreciated your including our event on the summer festival section, in the "Mark Your Calendar" listings and the photo of the Chicago Brass Band on the Saturday of our festival.

  •  

    Drought nation heads for dry federal well

    Columnist Froma Harrop: Both the House and Senate agree on ending direct cash payments to farmers, at a savings of $5 billion. But some in Congress want to replace it with insurance programs that make the old spending look shabby by comparison.

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