SCGT

Daily Archive : Saturday July 28, 2012

News

  •  

    Boy killed in Petite Lake boating accident

    A 10-year-old boy was killed late Saturday afternoon in a boating accident on Petite Lake near Lake Villa. The boy was riding on an inner tube being pulled by a motorboat, fell off and was hit by another motorboat.

  •  
    Associated Press/July 23, 2012 Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, hosts a small-business roundtable during a campaign stop at Endural LLC in Costa Mesa, Calif. Stubbornly close and deeply divisive, the presidential race throttles into its last 100 days as an enormous clash over economic vision, likely to come down to fall debates, final unemployment numbers and fierce efforts to mobilize voters.

    Undecided voters struggling as last 100 days start

    This weekend, the Obama campaign kicks off the last 100 days of campaigning with 4,600 small events around the country, including Olympics-watching parties, house parties and "Barbecues for Barack." The Romney campaign is taking a different approach. The candidate is in Israel this weekend as part of an overseas tour designed to enhance his image as an international statesman.

  •  
    Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and his wife Ann board his charter plane Saturday at London Stansted Airport as he travels to Israel.

    100 days: And flush with campaign cash

    The deluge is funded not only by Obama and his Republican challenger, Mitt Romney, but by a motley and shadowy mix of outside groups, many of them backed by millionaires. The contest also marks the first time since the post-Watergate era in which neither candidate is taking advantage of public financing, which would have limited the amount of money the campaigns could spend.

  •  
    Associated Press/Oct. 21, 2008 Then-Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama, an Illinois Democrat, speaks at a rally at Western Gateway Park in Des Moines, Iowa. The president’s re-election campaign is increasingly sounding like a nostalgia tour.

    100 Days: Eight questions for the home stretch

    1. Will this campaign be relentlessly negative to the end?

  •  
    Associated Press/March 5, 2012 President Barack Obama meets with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington.

    U.S. sees Israel as spy threat

    Despite inarguable ties between the U.S. and its closest ally in the Middle East and despite statements from U.S. politicians trumpeting the friendship, U.S. national security officials consider Israel to be, at times, a frustrating ally and a genuine counterintelligence threat.

  •  

    Park Ridge motorcyclist dies in collision
    The cause of death is still under investigation for a Park Ridge motorcyclist who died early Saturday morning after a crash on the Kennedy Expressway (I-90). William May, 41, was killed when his motorcycle hit a concrete wall at Foster Avenue, a Cook County Sheriff's Office spokeswoman said.

  •  
    Robert Ady

    Mt. Prospect resident pioneered the business of site selection

    Robert Ady, a pioneer in the site selection field and a beloved family man, died last week. He elevated the business of site selection into a profession while volunteering in his church and community.

  •  

    Researchers study secretions that let termites blow themselves up

    When trekking through a forest in French Guiana to study termites, a group of biologists noticed unique spots of blue on the backs of the insects in one nest. Curious, one scientist reached down to pick up one of these termites with a pair of forceps. It exploded.

  •  
    Aiden Bailey, 7, and his father, Patrick, both of Sugar Grove, join hands to cross the finish line together in the Sugar Grove Corn Boil 5K Run/Walk on Saturday. This was Aiden’s first race.

    Lots of corn and fun at Sugar Grove Corn Boil

    Contented visitors chowed down on thousands of ears of buttered sweet corn, rode carnival rides, did crafts and more at the annual Sugar Grove Corn Boil Saturday.

  •  
    Associated Press/July 2012 photo courtesy of Galit Weiss Climber Gil Weiss, 29, left, and Ben Horne, 32, pose for a photo as they climb the Palcaraju Peak in Peru.

    Missing climbers found dead

    Searchers have found the bodies of two U.S. mountaineers who perished on their way down from a glacier-capped Peruvian peak in mid-July.

  •  
    Associated Press Syrian rebels sit in a pickup truck Saturday in Aleppo, Syria.

    Syrian rebels survive regime onslaught in Aleppo

    The Syrian government launched an offensive Saturday to retake rebel-held neighborhoods in the nation's commercial hub of Aleppo, unleashing artillery, tanks and helicopter gunships against poorly armed opposition fighters.

  •  
    John Kacena

    Naperville heroin victim's mom vows to help others

    Caroline Kacena never felt as alone and embarrassed as she did while her son, John Kacena, battled his heroin addiction. Less than a week after losing her 20-year-old son to the addiction he fought for nearly a year, she's determined to never let another parent feel the same way.

  •  
    Leyla Garcia, 3, of Pingree Grove, chases bubbles in the food court on Saturday at the Art & Soul on the Fox festival in downtown Elgin. The festival features artists working with a variety of mediums including ceramics, glass, metal, photography, watercolors, wood and more.

    Unusual theater part of Elgin’s Art & Soul

    Musty basements with whirring dehumidifiers and flickering fluorescent lights might not sound like the best setting for live theater, but you wouldn't know how well it all works unless you try it. "Walkabout: Theater on Your Feet" presented is being held in conjunction with the 4th annual "Art and Soul on the Fox" taking place in downtown Elgin through Sunday.

  •  
    Ten-year-old Abby Glenzinski of Lombard, second from right, and several of her friends hosted a Fun Fair Wednesday and raised more than $700 for the family of 5-year-old heart transplant recipient Tim Grobart of Lombard. Shown here with the crafts they sold for donations are Niamh Lashmet, 2, of Lombard; Fiona Lashmet, 10, of Lombard; Grace Van Petten, 10, of Lombard; Cleo Glenzinski, 5, of Lombard; Nicole Farrow, 10, of Elmhurst; Thomas Glenzinski, 9, of Lombard; Shannon Farrow, 8, of Elmhurst; Abby; and Callie Lashmet, 5, of Lombard.

    Kids raise funds for Lombard heart patient

    For the past five years, 10-year-old Abby Glenzinski of Lombard has been one kid helping other kids, raising money with an annual summer Fun Fair for a charity that provides baby supplies. This year, she changed it up a bit. She decided to be one kid helping one other kid, a boy whose medical condition and successful surgery have been making headlines.

  •  
    Richard Anderson

    Anti-gun group wants College of Lake County’s support

    College of Lake County trustees have been asked to support an organization working to prevent laws that would allow students and others to possess firearms on campuses of two- and four-year schools. However, CLC board Chairman Richard Anderson said elected officials tabled the proposal from New York-based Campaign to Keep Guns Off Campus for further review.

  •  
    Tom Bernard of Mundelein attempts to call Sasquatch on Friday night as emcee Matt Campbell opens his mouth in amazement at the Lake County Fair in Grayslake.

    How would you call a Sasquatch?

    The 84th annual Lake County Fair debuted its first Sasquatch calling contest on Friday night. Participants ranged in age from 5 years old to 52 as they gave their best shot at what they imagined sounded like a call for the mighty Big Foot.

  •  
    The Mayo Clinic says Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. is being treated for depression at its hospital in Rochester, Minn.

    Congressman’s move to Mayo could point to complications

    Jesse Jackson Jr.'s transfer to the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota could indicate a complicating physical illness arose during the Illinois congressman's treatment for depression, several experts in psychiatric care said Saturday. The Chicago Democrat has been on a secretive leave of absence for nearly seven weeks.

  •  
    Drew Peterson

    Peterson’s murder trial follows years of acrimony

    One relative of Drew Peterson's long-missing fourth wife calls him a dog who deserves to be chained. The former Bolingbrook police sergeant on trial in the death of his third wife makes unsavory comments about his alleged victims' families, calling some money-grubbers. Acrimony between Peterson and relatives of his third and fourth wives has swirled for years.

  •  
    The Justice Department has said the acquisition of Thomson Correctional Center, completed in 2001 and unused since, will help alleviate serious federal prison crowding.

    Durbin, Quinn ask for congressman’s support on Thomson

    Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin and Gov. Pat Quinn have asked a Republican congressman from Virginia to end his opposition to the purchase by the U.S. of the Thomson Correctional Center in western Illinois.

  •  

    Notable deaths: First American woman in space cracked glass ceiling

    Space used to be a man's world. Then came Sally Ride, who blazed a cosmic trail into orbit for U.S. women. With a pitch perfect name out of a pop song refrain, she joined the select club of American space heroes the public knew by heart: Shepard, Glenn, Armstrong and Aldrin.

  •  

    Thousands in rural Illinois to get broadband

    Thousands of residents in rural areas of Illinois will get access to high-speed Internet service for the first time under a federal government program. More than a quarter of the state's rural population lacks access to high-speed Internet.

  •  
    United States’ Ryan Lochte competes in the men’s 400-meter individual medley swimming final at the Aquatics Centre in the Olympic Park during the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, Saturday, July 28, 2012.

    Olympic Images from Saturday July 28, 2012
    Athletes from the United States competed in soccer, swimming, archery, tennis and many other sports at the 2012 London Olympics Saturday July, 28th.

  •  
    South Korean gymnast Kim Seungil performs on the parallel bars during the Artistic Gymnastic men’s qualification at the 2012 Summer Olympics, Saturday, July 28, 2012, in London.

    Images of Olympic pageantry
    The incredible photos of the athletes competing and their pageantry was everywhere during the 2012 London Olympic games Saturday July, 28th.

  •  
    Dignitaries walk back to the dock Saturday after christening the USS Somerset at the Huntington Ingalls Industries Shipyard in Avondale, La.

    Navy christens last of three ships honoring 9/11 sites

    The USS Somerset — the last of three Navy ships named for 9/11 attack sites — was christened Saturday in honor of the passengers and crew of the plane that crashed short of terrorists' intended target after passengers stormed the cockpit.

  •  
    Associated Press/July 26, 2012 The logo of Hyundai Motor Co. is seen on its car at the company’s showroom in Seoul, South Korea.

    Hyundai recalls some Santa Fe, Sonata vehicles for air bags

    Hyundai Motor Co. is recalling some Santa Fe SUVs and Sonata sedans because of problems with their air bags.The Santa Fe recall involves nearly 200,000 vehicles in the 2007 to 2009 model years. Hyundai dealers will reprogram the front passenger air bag sensors so they will accurately detect when a small adult is seated.

  •  
    Associate dPress Shooting suspect Kevin Cleeves

    Three shot dead in Pennsylvania; girl found safe in Ohio

    QUINCY, Pa. — A man in south-central Pennsylvania confronting his wife about custody arrangements for their daughter shot to death three people, then fled with the 4-year-old girl before the two were found about 250 miles away in Ohio, authorities said Saturday.

  •  

    Officials: Ebola breaks out in Uganda

    The deadly Ebola virus has killed 14 people in western Uganda this month, Ugandan health officials said on Saturday, ending weeks of speculation about the cause of a strange disease that had many people fleeing their homes.

  •  

    Police: Man made threat, 'joker' reference

    PALMER PARK, Md. — A Maryland man accused of threatening to shoot up his workplace and who police say called himself “a joker” is a “gentle giant” who collected firearms for target practice and had expressed concerns about someone breaking into his apartment, a friend said Saturday.

  •  

    Save-A-Pet kicks off 40th anniversary celebration

    Save-A-Pet Adoption Center will officially kick off its 40th anniversary commemoration at noon Saturday, Aug. 4, with the 2012 "Celebration of Life" reunion to mark the long-standing commitment to providing no-kill rescue and adoption services in the Chicagoland area.

  •  
    After fighting back cancer twice, Phil Zielke launched Phil’s Friends to provide spiritual support to cancer patients. With donations and money raised at fundraisers — like the annual golf outing Zielke hosts with his wife, Carrie — the group sends prayers and care packages to patients.

    Roselle-based Phil’s Friends supports cancer patients through spirituality

    We never know how we'd deal with adversity or personal tragedy until we're staring it in the face with no choice but to go through it. We could curl up, wonder why and try to wish it away. Or we could gather our strength and attack it head on, use it to discover who we really are and where we fit into this world. That's the path Phil Zielke took.

  •  
    Dick Davis of Lombard was the first-place winner in the Photography Shoot-Out contest at the DuPage County Fair in Wheaton for this picture of a tired pig. “I think it was just a matter of being in the right place at the right time,” he said.

    Lombard man wins top spot in DuPage County Fair photo contest

    Dick Davis said his winning close-up shot of a pig lying in the hay was simply a matter of being in the right place at the right time. The Lombard man, 63, was the top finisher among 14 contestants that participated in the Photo Shoot-Out competition at the DuPage County Fair in Wheaton. "I'm glad that people appreciate my photos," he said. "It's nice to get a little bit of recognition for my...

  •  
    Jordyn Butler, 20, reacts in the seconds after she is named Miss McHenry County Fair Queen 2011 at last year’s McHenry County Fair in Woodstock. At right is Miss McHenry County Fair Queen 2010, Mary Ellen Walter.

    A new queen to be crowned at McHenry County Fair

    Miss McHenry County Jordyn Butler will complete her reign Wednesday when the crown is passed down to the next queen in the Miss McHenry County Fair Queen contest. She has attended every practice for this year's event to help prepare the contestants.

  •  
    Fifteen antique tractors paraded around last year’s McHenry County Fair in Woodstock. Antique machinery is an important part of the fair.

    63rd McHenry County Fair opens Wednesday

    The annual McHenry County Fair celebrates its 63rd year with barn renovations for 4-H, bigger demo derbies and tractor pulls, and nonstop games and events. The fair attracts more the 80,000 people each year.

  •  
    Naperville’s Julio Davis fronts the J. Davis Trio and has performed with Poi Dog Pondering.

    Our Stephanie Penick learns her neighbor has deep musical roots

    Our Stephanie Penick always knew her neighbor got long with her girl dog named Karl. But until recently, she didn't realize the depth of Julio Davis' talent for jazz and hip-hop.

  •  
    Sportscaster Bob Costas noted a controversy over honoring Israeli athletes killed at the Olympics 40 years ago during his coverage of the opening ceremony a the London Olympics, but stopped short of offering his own protest.

    Costas recalls Israel athletes killed at '72 Games

    NBC's Bob Costas noted a controversy over honoring Israeli athletes killed at the Olympics 40 years ago during his coverage of the opening ceremony but stopped short of offering his own protest.

  •  
    Mitt Romney and his wife Ann attend the Opening Ceremony at the 2012 Summer Olympics July 27 in London.

    Romney can expect warm Israeli reception

    JERUSALEM — Mitt Romney's support for Israel will likely earn the presumptive Republican presidential nominee a warm welcome from Israeli leaders when he visits on Sunday - and a frosty reception from Palestinians, who fear he would do little to advance their stalled statehood dreams.

  •  

    Syria Olympic official: Army is protecting people

    LONDON (AP) — The leader of the Syrian Olympic team is choosing his words carefully to describe the ambitions of the country's athletes and the government, whose forces are besieging his home city.

  •  

    Chicago launches wellness program for workers

    CHICAGO — The City of Chicago is starting a new wellness program that is being offered to more than 47,000 city employees and eligible spouses.The program, managed by Tennessee-based Healthways Inc., is designed to promote a healthier workforce and keep health insurance costs down.

  •  

    Durbin, Quinn ask congressman's support on Thomson

    CHICAGO — Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin and Gov. Pat Quinn have asked a Republican congressman from Virginia to end his opposition to the purchase by the U.S. of the Thomson Correctional Center in western Illinois.

  •  
    Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr., D-Ill., is seen during the dedication of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington. When Jackson disappeared on a mysterious medical leave in June 2012, it took weeks for anyone in Washington to notice. Jackson has never lived up to the high expectations on the national stage. But none of that seems to matter in his district, where he’s brought home close to $1 billion in earmarks and other funding and won every election since 1995 in a landslide, despite nagging ethical questions over links to imprisoned former Gov. Rod Blagojevich. The dual roles could help explain why the Democrat has given so few details of his medical leave.

    Jesse Jackson Jr. in Mayo Clinic for depression

    Illinois Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr., whose whereabouts haven't been disclosed since he quietly took a medical leave from Congress several weeks ago, is being treated for depression at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, according to a statement released by the hospital.

  •  

    Ohio, Texas funerals set for 2 Colo. victims

    CINCINNATI (AP) — Jessica Ghawi was an aspiring sports journalist, a pretty, blue-eyed redhead who had survived a shooting at a Toronto mall only to be killed less than two months later in a massacre at a Colorado movie theater.

  •  

    Ask a scientist yourself about the Higgs

    Fermilab scientists will give a presentation on the Higgs boson news, for laymen, July 29, during "Ask-A-Scientist."

  •  
    Larry Linden and Paul Klonowski remove a log jam in the Des Plaines River. Crews have been taking advantage of the low water levels in the river to remove debris.

    Drought helping with Des Plaines River cleanup

    Drought has caused a variety of problems but the lack of rain has provided volunteers working to clear debris from the Des Plaines and other rivers with a rare opportunity. Low flows have made it easier to spot items that normally would be underwater, leading to clean up bonanzas for groups trying to make waterways safer and more enjoyable for canoeists and kayakers. The hauls have netted a...

  •  
    Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln

    What’s Higgs boson? We, Fermilab try to explain

    The scientific world was all atwitter earlier this month about how physicists think they have found evidence that the "God particle" does indeed exist and that they have a better idea where to find it. What does this mean to those of us who never even took physics in high school? "It is deeply, deeply fundamental," a Fermilab scientist said. "If you really turned off the Higgs field, the planet...

Sports

  •  

    Fire, Earthquakes play to a draw

    Stephen Lenhart returned from a four-game injury absence to score in the eighth minute of second-half stoppage time and lift the San Jose Earthquakes into a 1-1 draw with the Chicago Fire on Saturday night.

  •  
    The White Sox have acquired left-hander Francisco Liriano from the Chicago White Sox for shortstop Eduardo Escobar and pitching prospect Pedro Hernandez. The AL Central-leading White Sox Tweeted the news late Saturday night after the Twins beat the Cleveland Indians and Chicago won in Texas.

    Sox make big move with Liriano trade

    The Sox made a trade to stay on top of the AL Central, acquiring left-hander Francisco Liriano from division rival Minnesota Twins on Saturday night. The White Sox tweeted the news after the Twins beat the Cleveland Indians and Chicago won in Texas. He pitched a no-hitter last year against the White Sox but was 9-10 with a 5.09 ERA for 2011.

  •  
    The Reds’ Ryan Ludwick follows the flight of his home run against the Colorado Rockies in the eighth inning Saturday in Denver.

    Ludwick homers twice in Reds’ 9th straight win

    Johnny Cueto shook off his early struggles to pitch effectively for six innings, Ryan Ludwick hit two of the Reds' five home runs, and Cincinnati won its season-high ninth straight by beating the Colorado Rockies 9-7 Saturday night.

  •  
    The Mets’ Ike Davis hits his third home run of the game Saturday against the Diamondbacks in Phoenix.

    Davis hits 3 homers, but Mets lose to D-backs

    Ian Kennedy pitched into the seventh inning to extend his recent run of good starts and the Diamondbacks overcame Ike Davis' three homers in a 6-3 win over the skidding New York Mets on Saturday night.

  •  
    Paul Konerko hit a two-run homer for Chicago, which increased its AL Central lead to 2½ games over Detroit. The White Sox have won the first two in a three-game series between division leaders.

    Dunn, Humber lead White Sox past Rangers 5-2

    Adam Dunn hit his major league-leading 31st home run, Philip Humber pitched six solid innings and the White Sox won their fifth straight game by beating the Texas Rangers 5-2 on Saturday night.

  •  
    Oakland’s Yoenis Cespedes hits a two-run home run in the fourth inning Saturday in Baltimore.

    Streaking Athletics cruise past Orioles

    Yoenis Cespedes and Chris Carter hit two-run homers to back an effective pitching performance by Bartolo Colon, and Oakland beat the Baltimore Orioles 6-1 Saturday night for its ninth win in 10 games.

  •  
    Twins shortstop Brian Dozier makes a diving catch on a line drive by Cleveland’s Brent Lillibridge during the seventh inning Saturday in Minneapolis.

    Twins rout Indians 12-5

    Samuel Deduno pitched seven strong innings for his second major league win and Josh Willingham hit his 27th homer of the season, leading the Minnesota Twins to a 12-5 win over the Cleveland Indians on Saturday night.

  •  
    The Pittsburgh Pirates celebrate their win over the Astros Saturday in Houston.

    Pirates hand Astros club-record 12th straight loss

    Rod Barajas hit a tiebreaking single in the eighth inning and the Pittsburgh Pirates rallied past Houston 4-3 on Saturday night, sending the Astros to their club-record 12th straight loss.

  •  
    Washington’s Jordan Zimmermann struck out six and gave up five hits in six innings Saturday in Milwaukee.

    Nationals back Zimmerman in 4-1 win over Brewers

    Wisconsin-native Jordan Zimmermann pitched his first game against Milwaukee, and his teammates hit three home runs in the Washington Nationals' 4-1 victory over the Brewers on Saturday night.

  •  
    With Mike Tice in charge of the Bears' offense this season, there are plenty of people excited to see what Jay Cutler, Brandon Marshall, Matt Forte and Co. and achieve in 2012.

    Bears believe Tice is the man to guide offense

    The Bears have accumulated the offensive firepower worthy of a playoff team. Now it's up to first-year offensive coordinator Mike Tice to maximize those weapons.Early expectations are that he's more than up to the job, and it's not just exuberant fans and media jumping on the Tice bandwagon, it's the players, coaches and front office staff who are pumped up.

  •  
    Northwestern’s new uniform in partnership with Under Armor

    Wildcats downplay talk of in-state rivalry with Illini

    In his first year with the Illini, head coach Tim Beckman is has put his sights on the Illinois-Northwestern matchup, but the Wildcats are downplaying the in-state rivalry.

  •  
    Boston’s Pedro Ciriaco hits a go-ahead triple during the ninth inning Saturday against Yankees in New York.

    Ciriaco’s triple leads Red Sox over Yankees 8-6

    Curtis Granderson misplayed Peter Ciriaco's ninth-inning flyball into a go-ahead triple, and the Boston Red Sox beat the New York Yankees 8-6 Saturday night after Mark Teixeira had tied the score with a two-run homer off nemesis Vicente Padilla.

  •  
    Atlanta Braves starting pitcher Mike Minor allowed one run on four hits and no walks in eight innings Saturday at home against Philadelphia.

    Minor sharp as Braves top Phillies 2-1

    Mike Minor struck out nine and combined with Craig Kimbrel on a four-hitter, Jason Heyward had two hits and drove in a run, and the Atlanta Braves edged Joe Blanton and the Philadelphia Phillies 2-1 Saturday night.

  •  
    Brad Keselowski celebrates his win Saturday in the NASCAR Nationwide Series auto race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis.

    Sadler penalty hands Indy win to Keselowski

    Brad Keselowski planted an emphatic kiss on the yard of bricks at the finish line, becoming the first driver to celebrate a win at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in NASCAR's Nationwide Series. Elliott Sadler was fuming, certain that he should have been celebrating instead. Keselowski took the lead when Sadler was penalized for jumping a late restart, then held on to win a controversial finish.

  •  
    The United States’ Destinee Hooker, right, spikes the ball past South Korea’s Kim Yeon-koung during a women’s preliminary volleyball match Saturday at the London Olympics.

    U.S. women’s volleyball team opens with a win

    Destinee Hooker had 21 points and the United States held off late-charging South Korea 3-1 in their opening match at the London Olympics. The fans at Earls Court chanted "Des-tin-ee! Des-tin-ee!" at one point as she dominated the 25-19, 25-17, 20-25, 25-21 victory.

  •  
    Mariners starting pitcher Kevin Millwood throws against the Kansas City Royals on Saturday in Seattle.

    Mariners down Royals 4-3

    Kevin Millwood pitched effectively into the seventh inning, Jesus Montero hit a two-run homer and the Seattle Mariners beat the Kansas City Royals 4-3 on Saturday.

  •  
    The Dodgers’ Matt Kemp hits an RBI double in the ninth inning Saturday against the Giants in San Francisco.

    Dodgers pound Giants 10-0

    Matt Kemp homered among his four hits and drove in four runs, Chad Billingsley took a two-hitter into the eighth inning and the Los Angeles Dodgers beat the Giants 10-0 on Saturday.

  •  
    JOE LEWNARD/jlewnard@dailyherald.com Daily Herald Sports Columnist Mike Imrem throws out the first pitch before Wednesday's Schaumburg Boomers game.

    No more laughing at ceremonial first-pitch pitchers

    After decades of snickering at them, here's a pitch for ceremonial first-pitch pitchers from a new member of the club.

  •  
    Ryan Dempster’s refusal to accept a trade has left the Cubs in a tough spot.

    Dempster forcing Cubs to go dumpster diving

    Weekly baseball column by Matt Spiegel, who co-hosts "The McNeil & Spiegel Show" 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday on WSCR 670-AM, The Score, and "Hit and Run" at 9 a.m. Sundays with his Daily Herald colleague, Barry Rozner.

  •  
    Cubs manager Dale Sveum, left, argues with first base umpire Mike Winters before being tossed from a baseball game against the St Louis Cardinals in Chicago, Saturday, July 28, 2012.

    Johnson's RBI bunt single sparks crazy Cubs' win

    There were odd happenings all over the place Saturday at Wrigley Field as the Cubs beat the Cardinals 3-2. But the bottom line is that this was a game the Cubs likely would have lost earlier in the season. Of late, they've been winning the close ones.

  •  
    Tyler Greene steals second base in the ninth inning as Starlin Castro fails to handle the throw Saturday at Wrigley Field.

    Sveum says Cubs’ 2B deserves serious Gold Glove consideration

    Cubs manager Dale Sveum gave second baseman a bit of a breather Saturday, not starting him in the 3-2 victory over the Cardinals. Sveum said it was not easy giving Barney a partial day off because of Barney's defense, which has been Gold Glove caliber all season.

  •  
    Reed Johnson bunts home the winning run Saturday at Wrigley Field. Johnson is hitting .448 as a pinch hitter and may be a player contending teams are looking at with the nonwaiver trade deadline here Tuesday.

    Could contenders be after Cubs’ Johnson?

    Reed Johnson's pinch-hit RBI bunt single in the seventh was the difference in the Cubs’ 3-2 win over the Cardinals at Wrigley Field on Saturday. Afterward, manager Dale Sveum called his super sub a “valuable guy to a team that’s vying for a championship or trying to get in the playoffs.” Could other teams be chasing him too?

  •  
    Senior center Graham Pocic has become the leader of the offensive line.

    Illini look to senior quartet for leadership

    When Illini coach Tim Beckman was hired, he had to convince center Graham Pocic and defensive lineman Michael Buchanan to spend their senior years in Champaign. Both came back, and they're looking to lead the Illini to a better season than last year's disappointing finish.

  •  
    Pinch hitter Reed Johnson drove in the go-ahead with a bunt single in the seventh inning, giving the Cubs a 3-2 victory and ending the Cardinals' four-game winning streak.

    Cubs hold on against Cards, 3-2

    Pinch hitter Reed Johnson drove in the go-ahead with a bunt single in the seventh inning, giving the Cubs a 3-2 victory and ending the Cardinals' four-game winning streak.

  •  
    The United States' Ryan Lochte waves during the medal ceremony for men's 400-meter individual medley swimming final Saturday in London. Japan's Kosuke Hagino wears the bronze.

    Lochte wins first U.S. gold in London

    Ryan Lochte turned his much-anticipated duel with Michael Phelps into a blowout, pulling away to win the Olympic 400-meter individual medley by more than 3 seconds Saturday night. Even more stunning: Phelps didn't win any medal at all. After barely qualifying for the evening final in a performance that hinted at trouble ahead, Phelps struggled to a fourth-place finish and was denied his 17th career Olympic medal. When it was done, he could barely pull himself out of the pool.

  •  
    U.S. gymnast Jonathan Horton performs on the rings during men’s team preliminary round on Saturday in London.

    U.S. cruises to lead in men’s gymnastics qualifying

    While perennial gymnastics powerhouses China and Japan bobbled and wobbled their way through qualifying Saturday, the Americans proved they've got the big skills to back up their big hopes.

  •  
    U.S. players celebrate after scoring the opening goal in a match against Colombia on Saturday in Scotland. With the 3-0 win, Team USA advanced to the Olympic quarterfinals.

    U.S. women reach soccer quarterfinals

    Abby Wambach's second-half goal put her atop the all-time list Saturday as the Americans dominated feisty Colombia 3-0, guaranteeing a spot in the quarterfinals of the London Games soccer tournament.

  •  
    USA’s Candace Parker, right, is grabbed from behind by Croatia’s Jelena Ivezic during the second half of a preliminary women’s basketball game Saturday at the London Olympics.

    U.S. women overcome sloppy play, beat Croatia 81-56

    Tina Charles and Candace Parker each had double-doubles and Angel McCoughtry provided a spark off the bench to help the U.S. women's team overcome a sloppy performance Saturday to beat Croatia 81-56 in their Olympic opener. Coach Geno Auriemma had said he was hoping that the Americans could play a style of basketball that would be entertaining and help grow the women's game internationally. That didn't happen Saturday.

  •  

    Service scheduled for Palatine girls sports pioneer Tefft

    A Life Celebration Service will be held at Kolssak Funeral Home today from noon to 4:30 p.m. for former Palatine teacher and coach Linda Tefft, who recently passed away. Tefft served as the first softball coach at Palatine High school, where she taught driver’s education and physical education. She also coached bowling and gymnastics at the District 211 school. Longtime softball coach Jerry Kublank, who retired in 2002, and his wife Karen, began teaching and coaching with Tefft in 1972 at Palatine. Tefft’s husband Jim was also a physics teacher at Palatine High School. “Linda even taught a motorcycle class at one time,” Kublank said. “She was a wonderful person, and a true pioneer of the early years of girls athletics. Sometimes the first coaches do not get the credit in laying a foundation for players and coaches who follow them. If they failed, it would have taken a lot longer to develop other programs. Linda will really be missed.” Donations may be made to the National Breast Cancer Foundation. For funeral information, call (847) 537-6600 or visit www.funerals.pro or facebook. Soccer: Liberty’s Scott Sutarik, a 2011 Fremd graduate, is one of five collegiate goalkeepers featured in Top Drawer Soccer’s 91st minute. Last season, Sutarik ranked seventh nationally and led the Big South Conference with a 0.56 goals-against average. He also led the conference with a .850 save percentage. The Palatine native posted a 5-2-3 record, earning both Big South All-Tournament and All-Freshman team honors, helping Liberty (11-6-3) capture the Big South title. Sutarik and the 2012 Flames will open their defense of their 2011 Big South Conference title by hosting the N.C. State Wolfpack on Aug. 24 at Osborne Stadium. Diving: Palatine graduate Ian McNair , a junior at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, won his second NAIA national diving championship on the 1-meter diving board with a score of 326.85. The meet was held at Oklahoma Baptist University. McNair placed second on the 3-meter board with a score of 281.00. He currently holds the school records for the 6 and 11-meter dives at IIT where he is majoring in physics and science education.

  •  

    Mamlic pitches Wheaton to crown

    There was some question whether Wheaton right-hander Andrew Mamlic finally gave up his first earned run of the summer in Friday’s Second Division American Legion baseball championship game at Barrington.There was no question Mamlic was in control as he has been all summer. He scattered 8 hits and improved to 8-0 as Wheaton (29-10) advanced to the state tournament for the second time in three years with a 4-1 victory over Barrington.“The guy is unbelievable — he’s one of the best pitchers I’ve seen in awhile,” Barrington coach Pat Wire said. “One of our kids said it’s like he’s up there throwing whiffle balls.”Wheaton credited the only run off Mamlic as unearned as he had 7 strikeouts and 3 walks and threw 124 pitches. Wire and Wheaton coach Jerry Miller said Mamlic didn’t throw quite as hard as the first time he pitched against Barrington this summer, but Mamlic was still throwing in the mid-80s to send his team to the state tournament in Mattoon, where it will open at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday against the Fourth Division champion.“He had his slider going today really well,” Miller said of Mamlic, who has given up only 3 unearned runs this summer in 59 innings according to Wheaton’s statistics. “All season he’s been blowing kids away.”Barrington (25-18) got a title shot by beating 10th District rival Lake Zurich 8-7 on Dan Kubiuk’s two-out RBI double in the bottom of the ninth inning in Friday’s first game. But Wheaton jumped to a 4-0 lead after three innings as Lake Bachar went 3-for-5, catcher Mike Rothstein went 2-for-5 and Mamlic had a 2-run single.Miller said Wheaton “played some great defense” with shortstop Colin Ford, third baseman Eric Bacon and Rothstein leading the way. Outfielder-first baseman Ryan Gallagher received a $1,000 American Legion scholarship as the team’s tournament MVP.Max Redpath came back after beating Lake Zurich in relief to throw 6 shutout innings to keep Barrington in the game and Jake Petersen went 2-for-3. But Mamlic got out of a first-and-third threat in the ninth.“Redpath was a monster and I’m really proud of him,” Wire said. “I couldn’t be any more proud of our guys. They battled all the way to the end.”Kubiuk’s double capped a comeback from a 7-3 deficit against Lake Zurich. Kubiuk came in when Scott Nelson, who had a 2-run double, had to leave the game after getting hit with a pitch in his left arm.Mitchell Pfeiffer went 3-for-5 with 2 RBI, Notre Dame-bound catcher Ryan Lidge went 2-for-3 with an RBI and Petersen and Redpath had 2 hits apiece. Wyatt Trautwein went 6 innings before Redpath came in to get the victory.Greg Gerrard earned a $1,000 Legion scholarship as Barrington’s tournament MVP after throwing a complete-game shutout Thursday.

  •  
    White Sox shortstop Alexei Ramirez, right, is greeted by teammates in the dugout Friday after hitting a 2-run home run during the ninth inning against the Texas Rangers. The White Sox won 9-5.

    De Aza, Sale lift White Sox over Rangers 9-5

    ARLINGTON, Texas — Alejandro De Aza hit a 2-run single before leaving the game after an outfield collision, and the White Sox beat the Texas Rangers 9-5 Friday night in a series opener between American League division leaders.Chris Sale rebounded from a shaky start to earn his 12th win and the White Sox got homers from Kevin Youkilis and Alexei Ramirez in their fourth straight victory.The Sox rallied from a 4-1 deficit against Yu Darvish in a matchup off All-Star pitchers who were lacking their best stuff. The White Sox held on after Sale (12-3) left in the seventh inning.Sale was touched up for 4 runs in the first, including a 3-run homer by Nelson Cruz, before settling down. The left-hander allowed 6 hits and 5 runs while striking out six. Darvish (11-7) gave up 6 runs in 6 innings, losing his second consecutive home start. He yielded 8 hits, walked three and struck out six. De Aza had a 2-run single in the fourth that gave the Sox the lead for good before he was involved in a scary collision.In the seventh, De Aza and Ramirez ran into each other chasing a pop fly in shallow center. The trainer examined De Aza’s left wrist for several minutes before he was replaced by Jordan Danks.De Aza walked off the field under his own power and Ramirez stayed in the game. Ramirez gave the White Sox a 9-5 lead with a 2-run homer in the ninth.Josh Hamilton’s struggles at the plate continued. The Rangers slugger went 0-for-4 with 2 strikeouts, dropping his average in July to .145. After his strikeouts, he heard rare boos from the home crowd. Texas scored a run without a hit after Sale left in the seventh. Hamilton had an RBI groundout with the bases loaded to cut Chicago’s lead to 6-5. Matt Thornton walked Adrian Beltre to load the bases again, but he got out of trouble when Michael Young grounded out to end the inning.Brett Myers and Addison Reed each pitched a scoreless inning to close out the game. The White Sox snapped a 5-game road losing streak and increased their lead in the AL Central to 1½ games over Detroit.Tyler Flowers led off the fourth with a single and Gordon Beckham followed with a double. De Aza hit a sharp single to right to push the Sox ahead 5-4. The White Sox won their fourth straight over the Rangers.The teams combined for 7 runs in the first 2 innings.Alex Rios, who had 3 RBI, gave the White Sox a 1-0 lead with a sacrifice fly. He added an RBI grounder in the seventh and a run-scoring double in the ninth. After Hamilton’s sacrifice fly tied the game at 1, Cruz capped Texas’ outburst in the first with his 14th home run.Youkilis hit a 2-run shot that traveled an estimated 425 feet to center, cutting Texas’ lead to 4-3 in the second.

Business

  •  
    Associated Press/Courtesy of Heritage Auctions Todd McFarlane’s Spider-Man #1 Cover Original Art (Marvel, 1990). The cover, which sold for $358,500, was among several sold by Heritage Auctions.

    McFarlane ‘Spider-Man’ cover sold for $657,250

    PHILADELPHIA — Artist Todd McFarlane’s original cover art for “The Amazing Spider-Man” No. 328 has sold for a record $657,250 at auction, just one among several pieces from the 1990s that went for hundreds of thousands of dollars.The McFarlane cover, which shows Spider-Man gut-punching the Hulk, was part of a collection of original art owned Martin Shamus, a Long Island, N.Y.-based comics and memorabilia shop owner.McFarlane drew several titles for Marvel Comics in the 1990s and then left to develop his own character, “Spawn,” and form Image Comics with other artists and writers.The cover was among several sold by Heritage Auctions, and also included McFarlane’s cover for “Spider-Man” No. 1, which was bought for $358,500.

  •  
    Response teams from Inland Salvage work a 24-hour operation patching and refloating a stranded drill barge near Cocodrie, La., in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Researcher: Smaller ‘dead zone’ recorded in Gulf
    A new report says this year's Gulf of Mexico "dead zone," an area of low oxygen that develops every spring and summer, is the fourth-smallest since measurements of the zones began in 1985.

  •  
    Associated Press In this Street View image provided by Google you can see Inspiration Point at Yosemite National Park in California.

    A Death Valley drive with the click of a mouse

    The Google Street View service that has brought us Earth as we might not be able to afford to see it — as well criticism that some scenes along its 5 million miles of the globe's roadways invade privacy — this month has turned its 360-degree cameras on road trips through five national parks in California.

  •  
    Tourists stop to watch the canopy light show at the Fremont Street Experience in Las Vegas. D

    Nevada residents watching economy more than politics

    "Most people in this community have been in survival mode," said D. Taylor, secretary-treasurer of a hotel workers union. "Of the things that are important to them, politics are about 18th on the checklist."

  •  
    Everyone in the tech world knows that the Internet got its start in the 1960s, when a team of computing pioneers at the Pentagon’s Advanced Research Projects Agency designed and deployed ARPANET, the first computer network that used “packet switching” — a communications system that splits up data and sends it across multiple paths toward its destination, which is the basic design of today’s Internet. Suddenly, though, the government’s role in the Internet’s creation is being cast into doubt.

    Did the government really invent the Internet?

    Everyone in the tech world knows that the Internet got its start in the 1960s, when a team of computing pioneers at the Pentagon's Advanced Research Projects Agency designed and deployed ARPANET, the first computer network that used "packet switching" — a communications system that splits up data and sends it across multiple paths toward its destination, which is the basic design of today's Internet. Suddenly, though, the government's role in the Internet's creation is being cast into doubt.

  •  
    Twitter seems to clearly intend to move in the direction of becoming an advertising business.

    Analysis: Twitter, ads clash

    Twitter seems to clearly intend to move in the direction of becoming an advertising business.

  •  
    The historic Catlow theater in Barrington is seeking patrons’ help to raise the $100,000 it needs for a now-or-never conversion from film to digital projection.

    Catlow owner seeks online help to save theater

    Tim O'Connor, owner of the Catlow Theater, took the advice of some of his patrons and launched an online campaign on Kickstarter.com this week to raise the $100,000 the theater needs to switch from film to digital. "The deadline is looming over all the exhibitors that haven't converted yet," O'Connor said Friday. "Whenever it is, we've basically been told, go digital or go dark. Either switch over to digital or go out of business."

  •  
    A customer looks at the new OS X Mountain Lion operating system at an Apple store in Palo Alto, Calif. Apple Inc. released its new operating system for Mac computers on Wednesday, with features borrowed from mobile devices and a tighter integration with online file storage.

    Mac’s Mountain Lion well worth $20 upgrade

    Mobile devices are already responsible for the bulk of Apple's sales and profits. Now, Apple is making the new Mac system even more like the iOS software that powers its iPhones and iPads. It's also casually dropping the "Mac" name from the Mac OS X operating software, though computers will still be called Macs, not "Super-sized iPads." The new system, formally OS X 10.8 and dubbed Mountain Lion, went on sale Wednesday as a $19.99 download from Apple's App Store.

  •  
    Marissa Mayer, who was named Yahoo Inc.’s CEO on July 16, accepts her award at Glamour magazine’s 2009 Women of the Year awards at Carnegie Hall in New York. Yahoo is giving Mayer a compensation package worth more than $59 million over the next several years.

    Yahoo CEO Mayer’s pay package worth more than $59M

    Yahoo is giving its new chief executive Marissa Mayer a compensation package worth more than $59 million over the next several years. Yahoo Inc. said in a regulatory filing Mayer will receive an annual salary of $1 million. She's also eligible for a $2 million bonus, and $12 million in restricted stock and stock options that will vest over several years.

  •  
    The New York Times dropped its downloadable application for BlackBerry users, dealing a setback to Research In Motion Ltd. as it races to introduce a new version of the mobile device early next year.

    New York Times scraps newspaper app for BlackBerry phones

    The New York Times dropped its downloadable application for BlackBerry users, dealing a setback to Research In Motion Ltd. as it races to introduce a new version of the mobile device early next year.BlackBerry users can still access the newspaper through the mobile website, which will become the focus of its electronic- publishing efforts, New York Times Co. said in a message on its site. Users of Apple Inc.’s iPhone and devices built on Google Inc.’s Android software can still get their New York Times news through dedicated apps.RIM is fighting to stay relevant to U.S. consumers after sales in the country fell 47 percent last year. The company’s share of the U.S. smartphone market shrank to 12 percent in the first quarter, from 16 percent in the previous three months, according to research firm ComScore Inc. Google’s Android accounted for 51 percent, while Apple had 31 percent.Google said in November it would stop supporting its Gmail application for BlackBerry devices.RIM dropped 1.7 percent to $6.81 at the close today in New York. The stock has lost 95 percent of its value since reaching a closing high in 2008 of $147.55.RIM offers its users more than 2,100 news and information apps to BlackBerry users and RIM’s base of BlackBerry software suppliers grew 157 percent last year, Marty Mallick, vice president of global alliance and business development, said in an e-mailed statement.“Applications and content are strategic areas in which RIM continues to invest as we work to build the future of the BlackBerry platform.”

  •  
    U.S. Cellular says it earned $460,000 from releasing cell phone data to law enforcement authorities. AT&T took in $8.2 million. Verizon and T-Mobile refused to release hard numbers.

    Cell companies get millions for giving cops data

    The nation's wireless carriers earn a surprising amount of money sharing their customers' private data with police and the FBI. U.S. Cellular says it earned $460,000, and AT&T took in $8.2 million. Verizon and T-Mobile refused to release hard numbers.

  •  
    Commenting on or uploading a video will now prompt users to display their full name on YouTube, going as far as to link to a Google+ profile, assuming they have one.

    YouTube wants commenters to use real names

    YouTube has been long held as one of the Internet's worst commenter cesspools. In an attempt to clean up its notorious comments section, YouTube is encouraging users to give up the tool that most enables online abuse — their anonymity. Commenting on or uploading a video will now prompt users to display their full name on YouTube, going as far as to link to a Google+ profile.

  •  
    New surveillance laws being proposed in countries from the United States to Australia would force makers of online chat software to build in backdoors for wiretapping. For years, the popular video chat service Skype has resisted taking part in online surveillance — but that may have changed. And if it has, Skype’s not telling.

    Skype quiet on whether if can eavesdrop on your conversations

    New surveillance laws being proposed in countries from the United States to Australia would force makers of online chat software to build in backdoors for wiretapping. For years, the popular video chat service Skype has resisted taking part in online surveillance — but that may have changed. And if it has, Skype’s not telling.Historically, Skype has been a major barrier to law enforcement agencies. Using strong encryption and complex peer-to-peer network connections, Skype was considered by most to be virtually impossible to intercept. Police forces in Germany complained in 2007 that they couldn’t spy on Skype calls and even hired a company to develop covert Trojans to record suspects’ chats. At around the same time, Skype happily went on record saying that it could not conduct wiretaps because of its “peer-to-peer architecture and encryption techniques.”Recently, however, hackers alleged that Skype made a change to its architecture this spring that could possibly make it easier to enable “lawful interception” of calls. Skype rejected the charge in a comment issued to the website Extremetech, saying the restructure was an upgrade and had nothing to do with surveillance. But when I repeatedly questioned the company last week whether it could currently facilitate wiretap requests, a clear answer was not forthcoming. Citing “company policy,” Skype PR man Chaim Haas wouldn’t confirm or deny, telling me only that the chat service “co-operates with law enforcement agencies as much as is legally and technically possible.”So what has changed? In May 2011, Microsoft bought over Skype for $8.5 billion. One month later, in June, Microsoft was granted a patent for “legal intercept” technology designed to be used with VOIP services like Skype to “silently copy communication transmitted via the communication session.” Whether this technology was subsequently integrated into the Skype architecture, it’s impossible to say for sure. Perhaps Skype’s reason for refusing to answer the interception question is because Microsoft has instituted a stricter media strategy than back in 2008. Either way, looking at Skype’s privacy policy today, it’s clear the company is certainly in a position to hand over at least some user communications to authorities if requested.Under Section 3 of the privacy policy, it is stated that Skype or its partners “may provide personal data, communications content and/or traffic data to an appropriate judicial, law enforcement or government authority lawfully requesting such information.” It also notes that instant messages sent over Skype will be stored for a maximum 30 days “unless otherwise permitted or required by law.”It is perhaps unsurprising that, with 663 million registered users reported last year, Skype has come under pressure to enable interception of calls.The overarching concern, though, is not the interception requests per se_it’s that Skype isn’t being candid about the status of its relationship with law enforcement.The company could learn a great deal from Google’s transparency reports, detailing requests it receives from authorities on a semi-annual basis. Without openness Skype will lose trust, and without trust it will lose users. Some are already migrating elsewhere, turning to alternatives like Jitsi, which enables end-to-end encryption and a level of security that can no longer be taken for granted with Skype.Ÿ Ryan Gallagher is a London-based journalist who reports regularly on surveillance technology.

  •  
    When Texas sent Amazon.com Inc. a $269 million sales-tax bill in 2010, the world’s biggest online retailer shrugged. As lawmakers forced the issue last year, the company closed a warehouse near Dallas, cutting 119 jobs. Until April, Texas stood with 39 other states that don’t get sales and use levies from Amazon for purchases made by their residents. By one estimate, that will mean more than $11 billion in potential revenue from Web merchants lost this year.

    Amazon cutting good deals on sales tax with states

    When Texas sent Amazon a $269 million sales-tax bill in 2010, the world's biggest online retailer shrugged. Until April, Texas stood with 39 other states that don't get sales and use levies from Amazon for purchases made by their residents. By one estimate, that will mean more than $11 billion in potential revenue from Web merchants lost this year. "Online is the fastest growth segment of the retail economy," an expert said, adding that the lost revenue has "exasperated" governors.

  •  
    Tesla workers cheer on the first Tesla Model S cars sold during a rally at the Tesla factory in Fremont, Calif., on June 22. The San Jose Mercury News’ Troy Wolverton began his Model S review thusly: “I am now a member of a select club: I’m one of the very few who has driven Tesla’s new all-electric Model S luxury sedan.”

    Move over Prius, it’s Tesla time

    Gliding up Manhattan's West Side Highway in a Tesla Model S, I change lanes and see the traffic before me part as though for Moses. I stab the gas pedal — er, accelerator — and none of the usual things happen — no noise, no downshift. The car, though, snaps forward like a rubber band, pinning the back of my head to the leather headrest as the scenery blurs by. I prefer not to think of myself as the sort of person who would harbor feelings of superiority on the basis of a material possession. But it is extremely hard, as drivers in their BMWs and Lexuses crane for a glimpse of my ninja-quiet ride, to keep from thinking one thing: suckers.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    During mating season, a moss needs a little help from its friends — and it uses smell to recruit them. A new study has found that mosses, which were long thought to require only water or wind to reproduce, release an aroma that entices tiny animals such as mites and little bugs called springtails to help fertilize the plants. The discovery challenges current ideas about plant evolution, but experts say it raises more questions than it answers.

    Moss sex driven by scent

    During mating season, a moss needs a little help from its friends — and it uses smell to recruit them. A new study has found that mosses, which were long thought to require only water or wind to reproduce, release an aroma that entices tiny animals such as mites and little bugs called springtails to help fertilize the plants. The discovery challenges current ideas about plant evolution, but experts say it raises more questions than it answers.

  •  
    Lewis Black will bring his trademark frustration and high blood pressure style to the Richard Rodgers Theater from Oct. 9-14.

    Lewis Black to rant on politics on Broadway

    Lewis Black is bringing his anger back to Broadway — just in time for the election. Talent agent Jackie Knobbe said Thursday the comedian will bring his trademark frustration and high blood pressure style to the Richard Rodgers Theatre from Oct. 9-14. The show, currently on tour, is called "Running on Empty." Tickets go on sale Aug. 6.

  •  
    Kate Hudson works closely with Ann Taylor team on set while shooting Ann Taylor’s Fall 2012 ad campaign in Pasadena, California.

    Kate Hudson has a full fashion life, including PJs

    Kate Hudson is the first celebrity signed to Ann Taylor for three consecutive seasons, but there have been many other stars, including Demi Moore, Heidi Klum and Katie Holmes. Hudson says she can't worry too much about those who came before her — or will come after her. "When you're in this business as actresses and models, you know everyone is replaceable. Enjoy it while it's happening. Take each day as it's presented to you."

  •  
    This file combo made of book cover images provided by Vintage Books shows the “Fifty Shades of Grey” trilogy by best-selling author E L James. While it’s impossible to declare a ìFifty Shades of Greyî baby boomlet, some moms and moms-to-be attribute their pregnancies to sex inspired by the erotic trilogy that went mainstream early this year.

    Baby Ana or Grey? Moms-to-be credit ‘Fifty Shades’

    Will little Sophia and Jacob morph into baby Christian and Anastasia about nine months from now? While it's impossible to declare a "Fifty Shades of Grey" baby boomlet, some moms and moms-to-be attribute their pregnancies to sex inspired by the erotic trilogy that went mainstream early this year.

  •  
    Oxygen Media announced that 28-year-old Karolina Kurkova will be the third coach on the new reality competition for up-and-coming models, working alongside Naomi Campbell and Coco Rocha. Photographer Nigel Barker, the former judge from “America’s Next Top Model” will serve as host.

    Kurkova joining Campbell and Rocha on ‘The Face’

    Karolina Kurkova wants to be the mentor on TV's "The Face" that she didn't have 13 years ago when she started modeling. She will be the third coach on the new reality competition for up-and-coming models, working alongside Naomi Campbell and Coco Rocha, Oxygen Media announced. Photographer Nigel Barker, a former judge on "America's Next Top Model," will serve as host.

  •  
    A model wears swimwear from the Agua Bendita collection at the Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Swim 2013 show on Miami Beach, Fla. The latest swimwear fashion takes a nod to the past, from high waist briefs and the pinup girl look of the 1950s to the Studio 54 and Dolce Vita era of the 60s. Retro-inspired looks were seen throughout the Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Swim 2013 in Miami Beach, where more than two dozen designers showcased their latest swimwear collections.

    Latest swimwear fashion takes nod from the past

    The latest swimwear takes a nod from the past, from high waist briefs and the pinup girl look of the 1950s to the Studio 54 and Dolce Vita eras of the '60s and '70s.Retro-inspired looks were seen throughout the Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Swim 2013 in Miami Beach, where more than two dozen designers showcased their latest collections. The five-day event that ends Monday also cemented some new trends, including crochet, foliage prints, ruffles and fringe.

  •  
    Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart arrive at the UK film premiere of “Twilight Breaking Dawn Part 1” at Westfield Stratford in east London. On Wednesday, Kristen Stewart and director Rupert Sanders apologized publicly to their loved ones following reports of infidelity.

    So sorry: Kristen Stewart just the latest big apology

    Kristen Stewart issued a dramatic public apology for being unfaithful to her boyfriend, "Twilight" co-star Robert Pattinson, by having a fling — "this momentary indiscretion" — with her "Snow White and the Huntsman" director, Rupert Sanders. With her Wednesday statement, she joins a long list of high-profile people who have all felt the need to deliver a public mea culpa for mistakes.

  •  
    Fans fear the mass shooting at a midnight screening of “The Dark Knight Rises” in Aurora, Colo. on Friday, July 20, 2012, will forever be associated with the legend of Batman.

    Colorado massacre casts ugly scar on Batman mythology

    Bat-fan and comic-book historian Arlen Schumer is worried. He fears the mass shooting at a midnight screening of "The Dark Knight Rises" in Aurora, Colo., will forever be associated with the legend of Batman. "After mourning and feeling sympathy for the families, taking a step back as a Batman fan and historian, I'm concerned that this will taint what I consider to be an American treasure of not only popular culture but of mythology," he says.

  •  
    A fan of British singer songwriter Amy Winehouse lights a candle for her outside her house in London on the first anniversary of her death, Monday, July 23.

    A year later, Amy Winehouse family focuses on charity

    Singer Amy Winehouse's father says it's tough dealing with the loss of his daughter, but he's happy she is having a helpful impact on the world through the foundation named after her. "Even after a small space in time — we're talking a year since Amy passed away — we are beginning, well, Amy is beginning, to have a positive effect on a lot of disadvantaged young people's lives," Mitch Winehouse said in an interview Friday.

  •  
    Heba Seraj, left, Shaimaa Hamid, center, and Shaimaa Abdelhamid, right, prepare to film a segment of a Ramadan program at the Maria Channel’s studio in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, July 23, 2012. The first Egyptian satellite channel operated by women wearing the niqab, or face veil, launched on the first day of the holy month of Ramadan. The station manager says he hopes the full face-veiled women will set an example for others†by showing a “new kind of woman” as a role model.

    Egypt TV channel caters to fully veiled women

    The only visible female face in the Cairo-based studio of a new Islamic TV channel for women is that of a puppet. The human stars are all veiled from head to toe, with only their eyes showing. Maria TV is run primarily by women who operate cameras, present shows and interview female guests ranging from doctors to students of Islamic theology. But they cannot show their faces during the broadcasts, and no men are allowed on air during the female programming, not even for phone-ins.

  •  
    A model wears swimwear from the collection of Aqua di Lara during Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Swim 2013 on July 21 in Miami Beach, Fla.

    Images: Swimwear fashion show
    The latest swimwear nods to the past, from high-waisted briefs and the pinup-girl look of the 1950s to the Studio 54 and Dolce Vita eras of the '60s and '70s.Retro-inspired looks were seen throughout Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Swim 2013 in Miami Beach, Fla., where more than two dozen designers showcased their latest collections. The five-day event that ends Monday also cemented some new trends, including crochet, foliage prints, ruffles and fringe.

  •  
    The first Chicago International Dragon Boat Festival takes place on Saturday, July 28, at Lake Arlington in Arlington Heights.

    Weekend picks: Dragon Boat Fest glides onto Lake Arlington

    Catch the spectacle that is dragon boat racing when Lake Arlington hosts the first Chicago International Dragon Boat Festival Saturday. Kids will have a blast dancing to the music of Laurie Berkner at a special children's concert at Ravinia. If you like fests, head to the Lake County Fair, North Shore Festival of Art, Wicker Park Fest or the Woodstock Mozart Festival.

  •  
    The Menil Collection holds nearly 16,000 art objects from ancient works to modern masterpieces.

    5 free things to do for Houston visitors

    Summer is nearly year round in southeast Texas, so it should be no surprise that the free stuff to see and do in the sprawling metropolitan area of the nation's fourth-biggest city focuses on the outdoors. But that doesn't mean you have to surrender to the area's infamous heat and humidity, particularly brutal in August, to enjoy attractions that will only cost the time and gasoline to get there.

  •  
    Eric Epstein, left, and Isabelle Davidowitz, of Braddock Heights, Md., ride past a cannon on a bike tour of Saratoga National Historical Park.

    Bike tours pedal through history of Saratoga Battlefield

    Ranger Megan Stevens sets a leisurely pace as she leads about a dozen bicyclists along the paved tour road at Saratoga National Historical Park, scene of one of history's most important battles. About midway up one of the steeper inclines, it becomes apparent why the Americans made sure they held the high ground when the redcoats finally showed up — on foot — in 1777.

  •  
    Pendant lights and wall sconces are popular lighting choices in remodeling projects.

    New fixtures make old lights obsolete

    Light-emitting diodes — LED lights — are taking the lighting world by storm and will soon largely replace all other forms of lighting, including incandescent, halogen and even fluorescent bulbs, said Benson Littman, co-owner of Littman Bros. in Schaumburg.

  •  
    This ranch home in Lake Zurich is near the 42-acre Forest Lake.

    Ranch in Lake Zurich

    Live a vacation lifestyle year-round within the Forest Lake community in Lake Zurich. This 1,200-square-foot, aluminum-sided ranch with three bedrooms is ideal for water sports enthusiasts.

  •  
    Daily Herald intern Max Filby prepares to test drive a BMW 328i with new Bridgestone Turanza Plus tires on a test track set up at Arlington Park in Arlington Heights.

    Squealing tires encouraged on Bridgestone test drive

    When Kenneth Hart got behind the wheel of a BMW, he tried to "push it to its limit." Hart, the manager of Wentworth Tire in Worth, was part of a group of store owners and managers invited to test drive Bridgestone's latest tires on a temporary course at Arlington Park in Arlington Heights.

  •  

    How to choose a reverse mortgage in an industry nearing a crossroads

    FHA-insured reverse mortgages, called Home Equity Conversion Mortgages (HECMs), can be a lifesaver for elderly homeowners short of income. While aftershocks from the financial crisis have caused the amounts that homeowners can draw under the program to be reduced, as discussed in my previous articles in this series, borrower s now have more options than they had before the crisis.

  •  

    Associations can set community standards for radon mitigation

    Q. A recent inspection of my first-floor unit indicates radon is entering through the concrete floor. Who is responsible for installing a radon mitigation system for my unit?

  •  
    Living room lounge: Flashy tile accents can glam up any space, like this recessed wall of shiny tiles that complement textured wallpaper in an ultramodern living room.

    Tile is breaking out of its pattern

    Tiles have long been happy in the background, dutifully covering surfaces in kitchens and bathrooms without causing too much excitement. But lately, they've started pushing their way out of the background and into the spotlight showing up all over the home in bold ways.

  •  

    Hire one broker for multiple houses

    Q. I'm getting ready to sell my father's house, and we want to sell our own home pretty soon also. Would you recommend using the same broker on both of them? Or should I sell one first and see how they do with it?

  •  

    Can you tell me anything about this oil painting?

    Any information you might have about a painting signed by S.F.M. Badger and dated 1893 would be greatly appreciated. The painting is an oil on canvas and 26 by 42 inches.A. Can you imagine naming your son "Solon Francis Montecello"?

  •  
    SH12G160HOMESTYLE July 23, 2012 -- A sofa needs to fit you, your home and your lifestyle. (SHNS photo courtesy Nell Hill's) (Newscom TagID: shnsphotos144154.jpg) [Photo via Newscom]

    Mistakes to avoid when choosing a sofa

    When you think about it, a lot of life happens on your sofa. This all-important piece of furniture needs to fit you, your home and your lifestyle. To ensure you get a sofa that's just right, avoid these five common mistakes.

  •  
    Tara and Chris discovered that turning their awkward space into a multipurpose space was a story with a not-so-happy ending.

    Repurpouse odd spaces for more functional uses

    Tara and Chris live in a gorgeous old storybook home with its crowning glory being a romantic turret that gives the house a royal air. But they quickly discovered that turning that awkward space into a multipurpose space was a story with a not-so-happy ending.

Discuss

  •  

    The Soapbox

    Daily Herald editors offer thoughts on a range of topics from the Olympics in London to movie theaters in Arlington Heights and Barrington.

  •  

    Emanuel needs to focus on city
    A Lake Zurich letter to the editor: I have continued to read the political maneuvering by the mayor of the city of Chicago, and what I clearly realize is that this proves the old axiom of "You can take the boy out of the country but you cannot take the country out of the boy."

  •  

    Legislation would improve hospice care
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: Rep. Peter Roskam and other members of Congress are supporting the HELP Act, proposed legislation that would maintain access to hospice care and promote better safeguards to ensure that only quality providers are eligible to deliver Medicare hospice services.

  •  

    Coolidge shares concerns about future
    A Palatine letter to the editor: I recently met Leslie Coolidge, candidate for Congress in the 6th District, and was impressed by her intelligence, her experience in business and her broad grasp of the issues facing the nation.

  •  
    Allison Kramer

    A wider spotlight for Asperger’s awareness
    A Carpentersville letter to the editor: My observation has been that those with Asperger's autism who have more intellectual impairment in great need of services or those who exhibit a savant capability get a lot of press while someone less affected intellectually and less savant-like in ability is only a news story if they plan on going to college.

«Jun

Jul 2012

Aug»
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31 1 2 3 4