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Daily Archive : Wednesday September 7, 2011

News

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    Jim Schultz Jr., right, owner of Franks for the Memories in Mundelein, poses with Sonya Thomas, winner of the National Buffalo Wing Festival's wing eating contest. Thomas, better known as “The Black Widow”, ate 183 wings in 12 minutes.

    Mundelein eatery wins at national wing festival

    Mundelein's Franks for the Memories restaurant claimed two prizes at this past weekend's National Buffalo Wing Festival. The popular eatery, which introduced Buffalo-style chicken wings to Lake County in the mid-1980s, won the Chairman's Award for Festival Spirit and placed third for its recipe in the traditional medium sauce competition.

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    Hot romance flickers out with no real explanation

    They hit it off right away and spent a month -- plus holidays -- together. Then, just like that, she says she's going back to her ex. What happened?

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    Wheeling liquor store to open by Thanksgiving

    A new packaged wine, spirits and liquor store -- that specializes in Eastern European products not found in many area stores -- will be open in Wheeling by Thanksgiving. The Wheeling village board gave final approval to the business on Tuesday.

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    Several law enforcement agencies will participate in the 7th Annual Law Enforcement Exhibition Friday and Saturday, Sept. 10 and 11, at Westfield Hawthorn Mall in Vernon Hills.

    Vernon Hills police to host law enforcement exhibition

    A special commemoration of Sept. 11 is part of the 7th Annual Law Enforcement Exhibition Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 10 and 11, at Westfield Hawthorn Mall. The event is hosted by the Vernon Hills Police Department and features several local police agencies, specialized equipment and demonstrations.

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    More than 150 native plants, like these wild geraniums, can be found at the Openlands Northshore Preserve in Highland Park.

    Openlands Lakeshore Preserve offers wealth of plant diversity

    The grand opening of Openlands Lakeshore Preserve, a one-of-a-kind natural area on the former Fort Sheridan military base in Highland Park, is planned for 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10. Situated on 77 acres the Preserve features lush ravines, towering bluffs, and more than a mile of Lake Michigan shoreline.

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    Suburban men charged with Medicare fraud

    Federal authorities announced indictments against four Chicago- area defendants on charges they committed Medicare fraud. Indicted as part of the nationwide crackdown were Dr. John Natale, a vascular surgeon from South Barrington who had privileges at Northwest Community Hospital, and Jay Canastra, a director of admissions for a Lincolnshire nursing home.

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    A car crashed into the outdoor dinning area of the Rock Bottom restaurant in Warrenville Wednesday afternoon. Five people were injured, two of them seriously, during the lunchtime crash.

    Driver plows through Warrenville restaurant patio, 5 hurt

    Five people were injured, two of them seriously, when a vehicle drove through a Warrenville restaurant's patio during lunchtime Wednesday, police said. The driver of a 2011 Buick LaCrosse drove through a wrought-iron gate at the Rock Bottom Brewery restaurant and through the outdoor seating area before smashing into the side of the building at 12:24 p.m., police said.

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    Mom scared, frustrated trying to protect teen from stalker

    The start of school just meant the beginning of a stalking nightmare for a Lake County family. During the summer, the girl had a small circle of friends and a new development in her life — her first boyfriend. Realizing this relationship wasn't a good thing for her daughter, the mom stepped in and ended it. Now, the family is trying to protect their daughter from a stalker.

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    Joshua Rich

    Cops: Waukegan art teacher viewed child pornography at school

    A Waukegan middle school art teacher has been charged after members of the school's IT department discovered he was using a classroom computer to access child pornography websites, police said.

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    Republican presidential candidates, from left, former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, Rep. Michele Bachmann, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, Texas Gov. Rick Perry, Rep. Ron Paul, businessman Herman Cain and former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman stand together before a Republican presidential candidate debate at the Reagan Library Wednesday.

    Romney, Perry spar on jobs in presidential debate

    Appearing together for the first time on a debate stage, the two leading contenders for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination squared off Wednesday over the question most likely to shape the race: Which one is better equipped to restart the country's economy?

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    Elgin Fire Department Lt. Dan Rink points out an area at the rear of the Dino's Grocery store where roofing work caused a fire Wednesday afternoon. The fire forced the closure of Summit Street in Elgin between Dundee Avenue and Liberty Street.

    Fire at Elgin grocery store means food must go

    An Elgin grocery store will have to restock a large portion of its goods after a Wednesday afternoon fire filled the store with smoke and cut off electricity to refrigeration units. Initial reports estimate the damage to Dino's Foods, 465 Summit St., at $400,000, said Elgin Fire Department Batallion Chief Terry Bruce. “It's going to be quite a bit of cleanup,” he said.

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    Cleveland-based Heinen's Fine Foods confirmed Wednesday it plans to open a new store in Barrington, marking the 82-year-old company's first venture outside Ohio. The chain, which currently operates 17 stores, will open at the former Staples site in Barrington next summer.

    Ohio grocery chain to open first store in suburbs

    Heinen's Fine Foods, an 82-year-old family-owned grocery store chain, will make its first expansion out of greater Cleveland, locating at a recently closed Staples store in Barrington. Jeff Heinen, a member of his family's third generation to run Heinen's Fine Foods in Ohio, said the first Illinois store is planned to open next summer at 500 N. Hough St., Suite 150, in Barrington.

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    Paul Hamm in 2004.

    Olympic champ Paul Hamm accused of assault in Ohio

    Olympic gymnastics champion Paul Hamm has been accused of hitting and kicking an Ohio taxi driver, damaging a cab window and refusing to pay a $23 fare.

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    Retired Air Force Maj. Gen. James Miller was scheduled to attend a meeting early on the morning of Sept. 11 in the Pentagon. He was on the opposite side of the facility and unharmed when American Airlines Flight 77 crashed into the building.

    Aurora students get Sept. 11 lesson from retired Air Force officer

    Retired Air Force Maj. Gen. James Miller never thought his life could be changed so drastically by a meeting that never happened. On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, Miller woke up in his Washington, D.C., hotel room and prepared his notes for a 9 a.m. session he was to have with then-Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld at the Pentagon. But 9 a.m. came and went without any sign of Rumsfeld.

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    Bartlett board talks Metra coffee, video gambling

    The Bartlett village board talked Tuesday night about a new coffee vendor at the village's Metra stop and revisions to zoing ordinances that would affect people who work at home. It also asked for more information from staff about video gambling.

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    Quinn aides considered cutting parole officers, tax collectors

    Gov. Pat Quinn’s administration says it considered deep cuts to parole officers and tax collectors while looking for ways to balance the Illinois budget. Programs moving people with disabilities and mental illness into community care were also considered for cuts. But Quinn aide Kelly Kraft said Wednesday those ideas have been discarded.

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    Angie Williams

    Wheaton North grad devotes life to volunteering across U.S.

    Winfield resident and 2006 Wheaton North graduate Angie Williams returns this week to AmeriCorps — a domestic version of the Peace Corps — in a leadership role because that’s just what she does. “It becomes a lifestyle,” she says. “You eat, you work, you sleep and you volunteer. It’s something you have to do. Just like you work out to strengthen your heart, you volunteer to strengthen your heart.”

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    Ron Sandack

    Sandack will run for Illinois House seat in 2012

    State Sen. Ron Sandack will take a pass on a race for the state Senate and make a bid for the Illinois House in 2012, he announced Wednesday.

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    Michael Sexton

    Hoffman Estates family continues pediatric cancer fight

    Eighteen years after they lost their son to pediatric cancer, Jim and Dorie Sexton have still just begun to fight. Their enemy: neuroblastoma, the cancer that took their son, Michael. In his honor, the fundraising organization they formed the year after he died will host a race Saturday at Busse Woods in Elk Grove Village.

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    Mary Lou Reynolds and her brother, Bob Link, in front of their old home.

    Schaumburg loses connection to original Volkening Farm

    Her father was Adolph Link, of Adolph Link School fame. But Mary Lou Reynolds, who died Aug. 22, was also one of the last living connections to the Volkening Hertage Farm in Schaumburg when it was still a working farm. And she liked nothing beter than to describe for visitors what life on that farm was like, say friends at the Spring Valley Nature Center.

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    Police reports

    Carlos Guzman, 23, of the 0-99 block of Longwood Place in Elgin, appeared in bond court Tuesday on a felony charge of failure to stop and a misdemeanor charge of driving while license suspended, according to court documents. Elgin police arrested Guzman Monday for failing to stop his vehicle in the 2100 block of Royal Boulevard in Elgin, an accident that caused someone personal injury, reports...

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    Chicago’s new policy for nonunion city employees gives women four to six weeks of paid leave after they give birth.

    Chicago implements uniform maternity leave

    Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s administration announced Wednesday it was instituting a uniform maternity leave policy for nonunion employees. The new policy gives women four to six weeks of paid leave after they give birth. Adoptive parents are entitled to two weeks. Partners and spouses can get a week off.

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    Glendale Heights cops probe attempted child abduction

    Glendale Heights police are trying to find a man suspected of an attempted child abduction near Reskin Park. Authorities said a passenger in a gold-colored, four-door vehicle in “beater condition” tried to lure a 12-year-old into the car around 7 p.m. Sunday at the park’s north end near Fullerton Avenue.

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    Palatine paying to spruce up downtown buildings

    The village of Palatine is launching an incentive program aimed at improving and updating building exteriors in the downtown area. Business owners could get as much as $50,000 from the village through the matching grant program.

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    Former Buffalo Grove manager Brimm joins water commission

    The Cook County Board on Wednesday appointed former Buffalo Grove Village Manager William Brimm to the Northwest Water Commission. Based in Des Plaines, the commission provides water to Arlington Heights, Buffalo Grove, Palatine and Wheeling.

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    Timothy Schneider

    Cook County halts federal immigration holds

    Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart can ignore requests from the federal government to hold suspected illegal immigrants for an additional 48 hours in jail after they’ve either completed their sentence or bailed out ahead of trial. The county board voted 10-5 to allow Dart’s office to halt the practice of employing such holds on behalf of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Office.

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    Toni Preckwinkle

    Contracts will get less scrutiny by Cook County Board

    The Cook County Board will have less oversight of county purchases under changes to the county's purchasing policies. But officials like Board President Toni Preckwinkle believe the changes will streamline contract processes and save tax dollars.

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    Rescuers work at the crash site of a Russian Yak-42 jet near the city of Yaroslavl, on the Volga River about 150 miles northeast of Moscow, Russia. The Yak-42 jet was carrying the Lokomotiv ice hockey team. At least 43 are dead, with 2 others critically injured.

    Two ex-Blackhawks aboard crashed jet

    A Russian jet carrying a top ice hockey team crashed Wednesday while taking off in western Russia, killing at least 43 people and leaving two others critically injured. Two former Blackhawks players, Igor Korolev and Alexander Karpovtsev, died in the crash.

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    Deerfield, ComEd settle:

    The village of Deerfield and Commonwealth Edison Co. announced they have reached a settlement of the lawsuit filed by Deerfield in 2008 concerning the electric service provided to the village.

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    Sept. 11 fundraiser:

    The Warren Youth Football program will host a fundraiser during games this weekend to honor police, fire and EMT personnel for the Sept. 11 anniversary.

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    Blood donation drives:

    To honor the victims of 9/11 on its 10th anniversary, the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community USA has launched “Muslims for Life”, a nationwide campaign to collect 10,000 units of blood in September, 2011.

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    Rachel Salstone, 18, of Northbrook along with other Oakton Community College students tie yellow ribbons on a giant American flag that will be displayed at the Des Plaines college in remembrance of the roughly 3,000 victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks.

    Oakton Community College marks 10th anniversary of 9/11

    Dozens of Oakton Community College students, faculty and staff members gathered Wednesday to remember the victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks during a somber wreath-laying ceremony Wednesday marking the upcoming 10th anniversary. A four-member U.S. Marine Corps color guard presented the United States and Marine Corps flags.

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    Bridgette Buckner

    10 years for Bartlett woman who lied about deaths

    Bridgette Buckner was nowhere to be found at the DuPage County courthouse Wednesday, but that didn’t stop a judge from sentencing her to a decade behind bars. Buckner, 50, received consecutive five-year terms for defrauding a former employer with bogus insurance claims in which she falsely reported the deaths of a young daughter and her supposed FBI agent husband.

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    Randy Ramey

    Ramey: ‘I’ve gotten an outpouring of support’

    DuPage County GOP Chairman and state Rep. Randy Ramey says he doesn’t expect his recent DUI charge to affect his duties with either job. Ramey hasn’t yet announced his election plans for 2012, but he said he could pass on a re-election for the Illinois House and take a shot at the state Senate.

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    Melissa Calusinski faces murder charges in the death of 16-month-old Benjamin Kingan at a Lincolnshire day care center.

    Expert: Day care death suspect has “risk factors” for false confession

    A college professor and leading researcher in the field of false confessions testified Wednesday he saw indications the woman charged with killing a toddler at a Lincolnshire day care center may have admitted doing something she did not.

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    Chelsea Lloyd

    U-46 teacher with gift for reaching students dies

    A 29-year-old physical education teacher from Elgin Area School District U-46 died Tuesday night. Chelsea Lloyd was the junior varsity boys soccer coach at Streamwood High School and a PE teacher at Teft Middle School.

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    Fugitive Jose Camacho, profiled in this FBI wanted poster, has been captured in Mexico and now faces extradition back to Illinois, where he faces first-degree murder charge. Camacho is accused of killing a 28-year-old Hanover Park man found dead in a Schaumburg pond on May 25, 2001.

    Suspect in 2001 Schaumburg murder captured

    A fugitive wanted in the 2001 murder of a 28-year-old Hanover Park man found dead in a Schaumburg pond has been arrested in Mexico. Authorities are now working to extradite 43-year-old Jose Camacho, wanted for the murder of Flavio Venancio. Schaumburg investigators believe Camacho killed the victim in an alcohol-fueled argument, police said.

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    Longtime Cook County Board Commissioner Bobbie Steele received a nearly $150,000 pension in 2010 because her pension is based on her brief stint as board president in 2006 instead of the $85,000 salary she received as a commissioner.

    Cook County pensions sweeter than most

    If you work for Cook County government, you can retire after 33 years with a pension starting at 80 percent of your final salary. It's one of the quickest and highest-paying retirement packages in the state. “As a broad spectrum I would say the pension systems throughout Illinois are bankrupting the state,” said Timothy Schneider, a Republican Cook County commissioner from Bartlett.

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    Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy student council President Aadi Tolappa, President Max McGee and Aurora Mayor Tom Weisner unveil a road sign honoring IMSA during the school’s 25th birthday ceremony Wednesday.

    IMSA celebrates 25th anniversary in Aurora

    Illinois Math and Science Academy in Aurora celebrated 25 years as a school Wednesday, and officials said it's come a long way from its uncertain days in 1986, when students didn't even know if their classrooms would have books or desks.“We did not know what the future would hold for us,” said Michael Hancock, an English teacher at the school who was a student in 1986. “There was a lot of risk,...

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    Yancarlo Garcia

    Chicago man charged with murder of homeless Elgin man

    A 26-year-old Chicago man was charged Wednesday with first-degree murder in the death of a homeless man who was hit with a fire extinguisher thrown from atop an Elgin parking deck in August, according to police. Yancarlo Garcia is charged with throwing a fire extinguisher at Richard Gibbons, 61, who was sleeping below the deck, police said.

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    The Illinois tollway is considering managed lanes on I-90.

    Would you pay more for I-90 express lane?

    Tollway drivers using I-90 could pay extra for a fast lane in the future on top of increased rates that go into effect Jan. 1. The new revenues from the express lanes could help pay for bus rapid transit or commuter trains along the I-90 corridor, which would ultimately reduce congestion, officials predict.

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    Diane Eldrup

    Prosecutor: Muddy Paws owner lied about dogs

    Diane Eldrup told a Lake County animal control officer there were no dogs at the Muddy Paws Dog Rescue shelter a month before dozens of dead animals were found there, a prosecutor said Wednesday. Eldrup, 48, is on trial in Lake County Circuit Court for animal torture and aggravated cruelty to animals for allegedly allowing 30 dogs, three birds and an opossum to starve to death while in her care.

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    Pabst threatened earlier this year to pull Old Style from Wrigley Field.

    Fans will continue to cheer Cubs, drink Old Style

    Old Style-maker Pabst Brewing Co. and the Chicago Cubs announced Wednesday that the brew that has been available to fans since 1950 will be peddled at the Wrigley Field through 2013.

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    Bridgette Buckner

    10 years for Bartlett woman who lied about deaths

    Bridgette Buckner was nowhere to be found at the DuPage County courthouse Wednesday, but that didn’t stop a judge from sentencing her to a decade behind bars. Buckner, 50, received consecutive five-year terms for defrauding a former employer with bogus insurance claims in which she falsely reported the deaths of a young daughter and her supposed FBI agent husband.

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    Batavia 4th Ward Alderman James Volk voted against the Moose annexation agreement Monday night.

    Batavia approves Moose annexation parameters

    Batavia and Moose International have come to terms on an agreement that will guide annexation of 470 acres of the nonprofit group's land to the city. The pact paves the way for commercial development along Randall Road from Main Street to Mooseheart Road.

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    The Daily Chronicle reports 22,990 students were counted at NIU this fall. That’s compared with 23,850 students during the same time last year.

    Enrollment falls at NIU

    Statistics show enrollment is down by 860 students at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb.

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    Tri-Cities police reports

    Items valued at $10,174 were stolen out of a building in the 400 block of South Batavia Avenue, it was reported at 3:10 p.m. Tuesday, according to a police report. The items were not listed in the report.

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    Route 83 repaving closes lanes through Halloween

    Get ready for some Route 83 pain this week as IDOT crews begin a repaving job.

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    Eric Holzer

    Off-duty Carpentersville cop recognized for quick action

    The Carpentersville village board recognized Police Officer Eric Holzer at its meeting Tuesday for his actions helping to restrain the man who threw a molotov cocktail into a crowd of customers at Joseph Caputo and Sons Fresh Market in Algonquin. Holzer was off duty Aug. 21 but sprang to action when he heard the man had tried to hurt people inside.

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    Zion’s temporary stadium is the source of controversy with the Lake County Fielders independent baseball league team.

    Zion to Fielders: Pay up or get sued

    Zion is giving the Lake County Fielders a last chance to pay $340,000 in back rent and other fees associated with the city’s temporary stadium before pursuing a lawsuit against the independent league baseball team, officials said. But in response a day after the Zion city council’s action, the Fielders threatened to sue over breach of contract and causing millions of dollars in losses.

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    Schaumburg Whole Foods offering garden grants

    Whole Foods Market in Schaumburg is encouraging area parents, teachers and volunteers to apply for $1,000 to $2,000 grants to help support new or existing school gardens. A drive is also under way encouraging shoppers to donate to the program.

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    Demonstrators scuffle with Italian Carabinieri, paramilitary policemen, in front of the Senate during a protest against government austerity measures in Rome Wednesday. Wall Street’s worries over the European debt crisis ebbed Wednesday.

    Stocks surge after Germany upholds bailout plan

    A broad rally broke a three-day losing streak in the stock market Wednesday as fears about Europe’s debt crisis ebbed. Stocks rose sharply after a German court backed the country’s role in bailing out other European nations.

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    Philippe Ayala

    Two charged in Naperville Tennis Club burglary

    Two men face felony burglary charges after Naperville police said they were apprehended Sunday while fleeing from the Naperville Tennis Club. Police said they recovered cash and other items they believe were taken in the heist.

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    Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is offering cash incentives to schools and for teachers who agree to work outside of the contract by voluntarily lengthening their day by January 2012.

    Emanuel plows ahead to make school day longer

    It’s taken Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel less than four months to advance an educational maneuver his predecessor attempted for years but could never pull off. He’s keeping the city’s students in school longer.

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    State Rep. Roger Eddy, a Hutsonville Republican, says that Illinois law gives regional school superintendents many responsibilities, such as background checks, building inspections and training bus drivers.

    Regional superintendents say their jobs are necessary

    The state’s 44 regional offices of education are charged with a wide range of responsibilities under Illinois law. Usually, the jobs are carried out with little fanfare or notice from the public. But Gov. Pat Quinn’s decision to veto money from the state budget to pay regional superintendent salaries and those of their assistants brought a new spotlight to the offices and what they do.

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    The Mundelein High Mustangs will play home games on artificial turf once officials choose a surface to install.

    MHS officials explain why next meeting is in Macomb

    Mundelein High School board members are hitting the road for their next meeting, convening 250 miles away in downstate Macomb on Saturday rather than the boardroom at the Hawley Street campus. The board is making the roughly four-hour trip to examine an artificial turf field at Western Illinois University. Members will gather in Mundelein at 6:30 a.m. and travel to Macomb in a school activity...

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    Emanuel: Chicago staffing company to hire 400

    Mayor Rahm Emanuel says a Chicago staffing company plans 400 new jobs over the next year. Emanuel announced Wednesday that SeatonCorp will hire programmers, recruiters and account managers.

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    Hundreds of emails between former Northwestern University professor David Protess and journalism students must be turned over to prosecutors, a judge has ruled.

    Prosecutors praise judge’s decision on NU emails

    Cook County prosecutors say it’s important that a judge has ordered hundreds of emails detailing efforts by students to free a man serving a life sentence to be turned over to prosecutors.

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    Fatal stabbing in Palatine ruled self-defense, no charges coming

    Police say the 29-year-old man who fatally stabbed Eduardo Guillen-Tellez late Monday in Palatine acted in self-defense and won't face criminal charges. Authorities say the stabbing occurred after a dispute over the sale of a broken television turned violent.

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    DuPage time-off plan comes with possible $1.6 million cost

    The DuPage County sherriff's office is expecting to take a one-financial hit from a plan intended to save the county millions of dollars in the future.

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    Send kids to school with the right attitude

    After shopping for new attire for the school year, don't forget to clothe your children in good behavior to lead as examples.

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    Timothy C. Echols

    Aurora man charged in 2005 gang murder

    Timothy Echols, a 21-year-old serving a 45-year sentence for gunning down an Illinois Youth Center guard on Halloween 2004 in Aurora, is charged as an adult with a 2005 murder and could face life in prison if convicted.

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    Itasca’s Oktoberfest blends German fun and food with chili kickoff party

    It’s an authentic German weekend wrapped up with a decidedly American finish. This year’s Itasca Oktoberfest takes place Friday and Saturday, Sept. 9 and 10, while events on Sunday, Sept. 11, pay homage to the start of this year’s NFL season, complete with a chili cook-off.

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    Meet the Candidates night in Palatine

    The Palatine-based Great Awakening is hosting a Meet the Candidate’s night Thursday, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., at he Palatine Public Library. Among the Republican candidates scheduled to appear are state Sen. Matt Murphy of Palatine; state senate hopeful Dr. Arie Friedman of Highland Park; state Rep. Tom Morrison of Palatine; and state Rep. David Harris of Arlington Heights.

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    New thrift store coming to Arlington Hts.

    A new thrift store is coming to Arlington Hts. — this one will raise money for homeless women and children. The HUG's shop (Humanity United Group) will open soon at 1820 S. Arlington Heights Road in the shopping center anchored by Jewel/Osco.

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    Everyone benefits when old, young come together

    Research shows that it's a win-win when seniors, young people socialize with each other. Seniors will be less depressed, more active and young people are nurtured and learn compassion.

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    Artist David Powers, left, sets up a gallery exhibit in the Haight warehouse downtown Elgin. Helping out is oil painter Peter Zalesky, who is also showing his own work at The Next Wave Art Salon, which runs from 6 to 10 p.m. today and Saturday, Sept. 9 and 10.

    More than 150 artists show their work in Elgin

    The Next Wave Art Salon, a forum for artists to show their work and get a chance to hook buyers, especially in the hard times of a recession, will he held from 6 to 10 p.m. today and Saturday, Sept. 9 and 10, in the Haight Warehouse, 166 Symphony Way, Elgin. “We’re just artists helping other artists here, no more, no less,” said Elgin artist David Powers, 62, who founded the forum.

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    Palatine Township launches discount prescription drug program

    Palatine Township is the latest township to launch a prescription drug discount program. The Coast2Coast Rx card will allow all residents, regardless of income, age or health status, to participate and receive pharmacy drugs and other services at a reduced cost.

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    Libertyville plan to replace ash borer-damaged parkway trees

    The village of Libertyville will help residents remove and replace parkway trees killed by the pesky emerald ash borer beetle that has wrecked havoc on ash trees throughout the Midwest since 2002. A village panel discussed the new program Tuesday, but officials said they are unsure if homeowners would be willing to fully pay for a replacement tree or opt to leave the spot barren.

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    McHenry County College commemorated the 10th anniversary of the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, with a ceremony at the Crystal Lake campus Wednesday. Some 2,996 flags were placed in the courtyard to honor every life lost that day.

    MCC places flags in honor of 9/11 victims

    MCC students, faculty members and school staffers were far outnumbered by the 2,996 American flags placed in the courtyard near the school's peace pole at the Crystal Lake campus, in honor of the victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in New York, Washington, D.C., and Pennsylvania. While students in attendance, who were likely 8 or 9 years old at the time, listened to speakers reference the...

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    West Nile cases down in DuPage County

    The first detections of the West Nile virus in DuPage County turned up recently in several traps laid out by the DuPage County Health Department. Officials say the erratic weather this year has actually held off the mosquito that carries the virus.

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    Highland Park plane crash victim hailed as hero

    A Highland Park man is dead after crashing a small plane into an open field while trying to make an emergency landing in Racine, WI., authorities said. Phillip Pines, 76, a retired executive of Great Dane Trailers, was flying in a single-engine, multipassenger aircraft to Waukegan Airport when he experienced fuel problems about 10 miles west of Milwaukee, authorities from the National...

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    People stand in line waiting to fill boxes with food at the Living Faith Assembly Church food pantry Wednesday in Las Vegas. There was hope on the jobs front Wednesday when it was reported companies in July advertised the most jobs in three years.

    Businesses post most job openings in 3 years

    Companies in July advertised the most jobs in three years, and layoffs declined a bit of hope for a weak economy. Still, many employers are in no rush to fill openings.

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    Gov. Rick Perry, seen above discussing the wildfires in his state on Monday, has had to divide his time lately between the raging fires and his own presidential campaign.

    Perry faces a leadership test in real time

    Call it a leadership test in real time. Gov. Rick Perry left the presidential campaign trail this week to dash back to Texas, where wildfires have devoured more than 1,000 homes in barely seven days.

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    ACLU to sue over welfare drug testing

    The American Civil Liberties Union is suing to block Florida’s new law requiring new welfare recipients to pass a drug test, filing the lawsuit on behalf of a Navy veteran who was denied assistance to help care for his 4-year-old son because he refused to take the test.

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    Naperville auctioning old radio system

    Residents can bid on Naperville's surplus radio equipment during an auction at 9 a.m. Sept. 16 at the Public Works Service Center, 180 Fort Hill Drive. Equipment available for auction includes items from a Motorola Trunked 800 MHz Radio system purchased by the city in 1989.

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    Metra wants your opinion on proposed changes to the Milwaukee West line and the Milwaukee North, which runs through downtown Libertyville.

    Will proposed Metra Milwaukee Line changes affect your ride?

    If you're a regular rider on Metra's Milwaukee North or Milwaukee West lines, the agency wants your opinion on proposed schedule tweaks. Chronic delays are causing Metra to consider revising train times on lines it controls. “We want to more accurately reflect the times trains actually depart,” Metra spokeswoman Judy Pardonnet said. In most cases, the changes represent one to four...

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    Naperville eases public intoxication laws

    Naperville drinkers can no longer be cited for being intoxicated in public but are prohibitied from drinking in public and carrying open containers in public

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    Jeffrey T. Burke

    Man pleads innocent to cemetery thefts in DuPage, Will

    A man from Hometown pleaded not guilty Wednesday to charges of stealing more than $100,000 in brass vases from cemetery markers in DuPage and Will counties. Prosecutors said Jeffrey T. Burke, 35, was indicted on one count of felony theft and two counts of felony cemetery vandalism. He faces up to 10 years in prison if convicted of the most serious charge, authorities said.

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    Sally Gill and her daughter, Lori Smelser, had eight years with husband and father Ben Gill after he was diagnosed with ALS. Nearly a decade after his death, Sally Gill remains committed to fundraising to find a cure for the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

    Annual Walk4Life funds fight to cure ALS

    Sally Gill knows too well how amyotrophic lateral sclerosis sneaks in and steals life away. She spent eight years watching it imprison her husband, Ben, in a body that no longer responded no matter how much his still-alert mind willed his muscles to act — all the while knowing ALS has no cure.

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    Trial under way in Herrin apartment killing

    MARION, Ill. — Jury selection is under way in southern Illinois for one of four men accused in the shooting death of a man last year in Herrin.Twenty-one-year-old Travius Tucker of Fairview Heights is charged in Williamson County with first-degree murder in the death of Jamel Davis of Herrin.

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    Court denies LaGrone’s request for new trial

    SPRINGFIELD — An appeals court says a Clinton man convicted of murdering his girlfriend’s three children shouldn’t get a new trial.Maurice LaGrone Jr. is serving a life sentence.

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    Police: Woman turns self in, found with heroin

    EDWARDSVILLE, Ill. (AP) — A woman looking to resolve a warrant for her arrest landed in more legal trouble when authorities in southwestern Illinois say they found heroin in her purse at the jail.

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    Illinois woman charged in fork stabbing attack

    BLOOMINGTON — A Bloomington woman has been jailed after her boyfriend accused her of stabbing him with a fork and hitting him with a hatchet.McLean County prosecutors say police arrested 33-year-old Tonya Bean on Monday on preliminary charges of aggravated battery with a deadly weapon and domestic battery. She was jailed on $30,000 bond.

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    Tax increases on way in Warrenville

    A series of new local taxes and a tax increase are slated to take effect in 2012 and 2013 as part of a proposal approved this week by the Warrenville City Council.

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    Scott Jamieson examines the swamp white oak he planted last spring at Our Lady of the Wayside School in Arlington Heights. Behind him is a Chinquapin oak that he planted the spring of 2002. Both are in honor of victims of Sept. 11.

    Suburban man helps fill 9/11 memorial site with trees

    Arlington Heights resident Scott Jamieson is very proud of the 450 swamp white oak trees that bring life to the new Sept. 11 monument at ground zero in Manhattan. Jamieson, a vice president of Bartlett Tree Experts, which has raised the ground zero trees for five years. ”They bring life to the memorial where there was just death. They will comfort a lot of people,” he said.

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    The Carpentersville village board voted Tuesday to buy all trusteees iPads.

    Carpentersville to spend $4,200 on iPads for trustees

    Printed agenda packets for the Carpentersville village board are now a thing of the past. Trustees approved the purchase of iPads at the board meeting Tuesday to give board members the chance to electronically view agenda materials. The iPads would cost $530 each for a total cost of about $4,200, but officials say they'll save money by not printing paper.

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    Panera latest eatery to eye new Randhurst Village

    New tenants continue to set their sights on the resurgent Randhurst site in Mount Prospect. Panera Bread is one of the latest, having applied for approval to open a drive-through on the site, and village officials are happy with the progress.

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    Geneva church honors 9/11 with music

    Many events and church services Sunday will mark the 10th anniversary of the attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon, but the 9 and 10:45 a.m. services at the United Methodist Church of Geneva should catch the attention of your ears, columnist Dave Heun says.

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    Lake Zurick Fire Chief Terry Mastandrea saved to MUCHO

    Retired Lake Zurich fire chief takes over as trustee

    Former Lake Zurich fire chief Terry Mastandrea has been tapped to take over as trustee on the village board. Mastandrea, who retired from the Lake Zurich Fire Department a few months ago, was sworn in Tuesday to fill out the term of former Lake Zurich trustee Mark Ernst, who resigned at the end of July after accepting a job out of state.

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    Gumby calls it a robbery, clerk thinks it's a joke

    SAN DIEGO — San Diego police say surveillance tape shows a person dressed like Gumby telling a convenience store clerk he is being robbed, fumbling inside the costume as if to pull a gun, dropping 27 cents and leaving. Police say the attempted robbery took place Monday at a 7-Eleven in Rancho Penasquitos, Calif.

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    Volunteers sought for Naperville Riverwalk project

    Naperville residents can help install bricks along the downtown Riverwalk from 9 to 10 a.m. Sept. 15, officials said Wednesday.Volunteers have been helping place bricks all summer to replace the asphalt pathway along the Riverwalk west to the Jefferson Avenue bridge.

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    2nd woman dies from crash at covered Ohio sign

    CIRCLEVILLE, Ohio — A second woman who had been injured in a crash at an Ohio stop sign concealed with petroleum jelly and plastic wrap has died.

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    The foundation is all that remains of the New Antioch Church southwest of Linden, Texas, another victim of the wildfires that have raged across central Texas. The 100-plus year old community church was a landmark known for its interesting architecture.

    Crews make gains against raging blaze near Austin, Texas

    BASTROP, Texas — Firefighting crews started Wednesday to gain control of a wind-stoked blaze that has raged unchecked across parched central Texas for days, leaving a trail of charred properties in its wake and causing thousands of people to flee.

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    Suspect in W.Va. house rampage served robbery term

    MORGANTOWN, W.Va. — A 22-year-old man suspected of shooting five people to death in their rural West Virginia home and killing himself during a police chase had served 14 months for armed robbery at a state prison for young offenders, corrections officials said Wednesday.

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    BP clearing tar balls dumped on Ala. shore by Tropical Storm Lee
    AP Photo ALDM106, ALJR102, ALDM101Associated PressGULF SHORES, Ala. — BP workers are cleaning up tar balls tossed onto Alabama’s Gulf Coast beaches by heavy surf from tropical system Lee.Crews were on the beach at Gulf Shores on Wednesday using small fishing nets to scoop up sticky black globs off the sand.

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    NATO exercise set for Indiana military base

    NATO exercise set for Indiana military baseEDINBURGH, Ind. (AP) — Pilots and soldiers from 14 countries will be at central Indiana’s Camp Atterbury this month for a NATO training exercise on how to avoid opening fire on friendly forces.The exercises are scheduled to begin at the Indiana National Guard base starting Thursday and last through Sept. 25.

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    Purdue project gains approval despite objections

    WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — Plans for a new four-story engineering building at Purdue University are advancing despite the objections of some nearby residents.The West Lafayette City Council approved zoning changes Tuesday night to allow construction of the $38 million Wang Hall of Electrical and Computer Engineering on the northeastern edge of Purdue’s campus.

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    Man dies after Muncie police chase, shooting

    MUNCIE, Ind. — Authorities aren’t saying yet whether a man who died after crashing while he fled from Muncie police officers was wounded by gunfire from the officers.

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    Dawn Patrol: Quick hits as you head out the door

    Quick hits as you head out the door: Pilot killed overnight, Wheeling police warn students, nurse arrested in child's assault, trustees to get free iPads and sweet pension deals in Cook County,

Sports

  •  
    Geneva?s Kirby Einck strikes a backhand during her No. 1 singles match against Rosary?s Allison Stephans during Wednesday?s tennis action at Geneva.

    Geneva rolls by Rosary

    Though the girls tennis season is just a few weeks old, Rosary has probably seen all it wants of Geneva.The two teams met for the second time since the season began, and the Vikings turned in a repeat performance, beating the Royals at home, 6-1, after previously posting a 5-0 win in a weekend tournament.

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    Former Chicago Blackhawks defenseman Alexander Karpovtsev (25) was one of the top shot blockers in the NHL. He was killed Wednesday in a plane crash with members of the Lokomotiv Yaroslavl hockey team from the KHL.

    Crash hits home for hockey fans everywhere

    Jonathan Toews put it best Wednesday when informed by a reporter from the Hockey News of the plane crash in Russia that killed 43 people, including 36 members of the Lokomotiv Yaroslavl hockey team from the KHL. “This is the worst summer ever for hockey,” the Blackhawks captain said. Amen to that.

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    Ryne Sandberg as manager of the Iowa Cubs in the summer of 2010.

    Sandberg not focused on Cubs

    If you're wondering whether Ryne Sandberg is dreaming of a return to the Cubs, the reality is “I haven't thought about the Cubs at all,'' he said. “We're about to start a playoff series here and that's my focus.'' In his fifth year as a minor-league manager, Sandberg has followed up his PCL Manager of the Year season at Iowa in 2010 with a playoff season in Lehigh Valley.

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    Alex Rios breaks his bat over his leg after he was called out on strikes in the eighth inning of the White Sox' loss to Minnesota on Wednesday.

    Can White Sox' minor leaguers help next season?

    Kenny Williams has already taken out the pruning shears and trimmed $9 million off the payroll by trading Edwin Jackson and Mark Teahen. Assuming he returns as White Sox general manager, Williams is going to be doing even more salary chopping this winter. The Sox have to work young talent into the mix.

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    Carlos Pena launches a 3-run home run off Cincinnati Reds relief pitcher Bill Bray to score Starlin Castro and Aramis Ramirez during the eighth inning of the Cubs' win Wednesday.

    Can career minor-leaguer LaHair shed label with Cubs?

    One night after hitting a game-tying pinch homer, newcomer Bryan LaHair started in right field for the Cubs Wednesday. LaHair has been labeled as a career minor-leaguer, but he could change some minds with a big September. “It's fuel on the fire at the end of the day,” he said before Wednesday night's 6-3 victory over the Reds at Wrigley Field.

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    Wednesday’s girls volleyball scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Wednesday's girls volleyball matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Wednesday’s girls tennis scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Wednesday's girls tennis meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Wednesday’s girls swimming scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Wednesday's girls swimming meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Wednesday’s girls golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Wednesday's girls golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Wednesday’s girls cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Wednesday's girls cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Wednesday’s boys soccer scoreboard
    High school varsity results of Wednesday's boys soccer matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Wednesday’s boys golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Wednesday's boys golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Wednesday’s boys cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Wednesday's boys cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Libertyville tops Zion-Benton

    At Pine Meadow Golf Club, Alex Quenan fired a 37 and John Cordan and Andrew Ross shot matching 39s as host Libertyville topped Zion-Benton 158-166.

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    Boys soccer / Lake County roundup

    Mauricio Salgado got his first hat trick to lead Round Lake’s boys soccer team past visiting Grant 6-2 in a North Suburban Prairie Division match Wednesday.

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    It goes in for Flynn, Vernon Hills

    Vernon Hills senior Lydia Flynn carded an eagle and a birdie at Bittersweet Golf Club on Wednesday to help the Cougars to a 6-shot victory over host Warren in girls golf Wednesday.

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    Ali Morrison of Wauconda goes up for a block against Lakes’ Sarah Horner during Lakes at Wauconda volleyball.

    Watershed moment for Lakes at Wauconda

    Visiting Lakes outlasted Wauconda in three tense games, improving to 4-0 after beating one of the North Suburban Prairie Division's top girls volleyball teams Wednesday. The Eagles are off to the program's best start in seven years.

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    St. Francis wins in SCC Blue

    Michelle McLaughlin had 12 kills and Daiva Wise 8 as No. 4 St. Francis rallied for a big 20-25, 25-22, 25-21 win over Marian Central in Woodstock on Wednesday.

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    Pavich comes through for Benet

    Sophomore middle Brittany Pavich, playing in her first varsity match, had 4 kills and a block during a key third-set stretch as No. 2 Benet held off Neuqua 25-22, 23-5, 25-19 on Wednesday in Lisle.

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    Indianapolis Colts quarterback Peyton Manning will not play Sunday in the season opener at Houston, bringing an end to his streak of 227 consecutive starts, including the playoffs. The team said 38-year-old Kerry Collins will start against the Texans as Manning continues his long recovery from neck surgery in May.

    Manning won’t play vs Texans, streak ends

    Peyton Manning’s streak is over. The Colts quarterback will not play Sunday in the season opener at Houston, bringing an end to his streak of 227 consecutive starts, including the playoffs. The team said 38-year-old Kerry Collins will start against the Texans as Manning continues his long recovery from neck surgery in May.

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    Alex Rios breaks his bat over his leg after he was called out on strikes in the eighth inning Wednesday night in Minneapolis.

    White Sox unable to sweep Twins

    Danny Valencia's two-run single snapped Minnesota's 20-inning scoreless streak and rookie Chris Parmelee added a two-run double to help the Twins avoid a sweep with a 5-4 win over the Chicago White Sox on Wednesday night.

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    St. Charles North freshman Cory Wright earned an invitation to play for USA Baseball’s Great Lakes Regional 15-Under Team, this weekend in Cary, N.C.

    This frosh has Wright stuff

    There was no big blowout celebration when Cory Wright got the news. It was business as usual for the St. Charles North freshman, who on Aug. 21 received an invitation to represent the Great Lakes Regional 15-Under team, in USA Baseball’s National Team Identification Series.

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    Willowbrook’s Darius Zilius stops Addison Trail’s Anthony Catanese in a play on Willowbrook’s homecoming game on Saturday.

    Addison Trail shows resolve

    Experienced as Addison Trail’s football team is this season, even the Blazers grew up last Friday. On the opening drive of the game against Proviso West in Hillside, Anthony Catanese — Addison Trail’s top playmaker and last season’s offensive player of the year in the West Suburban Gold — was lost for the game after a hard hit caused a stinger.

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    Big hearts lead to big bucks for a good cause

    There's a lot on the line in Friday's football game at Montini. Hopefully plenty in the coffers as well.

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    Cougars win playoff opener 4-0

    Greg Billo and Nick Rogers combined on a 3-hit shutout Wednesday night to lead the Kane County Cougars over the Burlington Bees 4-0 at Elfstrom Stadium in the opener of the 2011 Midwest League playoffs.The best-of-three series now shifts to Iowa.Billo (1-0) tossed 7 innings to pick up the win, as he locked up with Blake Hassebrock (0-1) in a pitchers duel. Billo gave up 3 hits, walked one and fanned seven. He saw the minimum five times and went 1-2-3 four times.The game was scoreless through five innings when the Cougars managed an unearned run off Hassebrock.Jovan Pickett walked, took second on a passed ball, went to third on a sacrifice bunt by Angel Franco and scored on a sacrifice fly by Geulin Beltre.In the seventh the Cougars scored another unearned run, this time off Pedro Vidal. After Brian Fletcher led off with a single, Cheslor Cuthbert reached on a fielder’s choice while Fletcher was safe at second and took third on an error. Orlando Calixte followed with an RBI double to make it 3-0.In the eighth Fletcher’s sacrifice fly scored Beltre. The 4-0 score became the final after Rogers tossed a scoreless ninth to earn the save.

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    Caption

    This frosh has Wright stuff

    There was no big blowout celebration when Cory Wright got the news. It was business as usual for the St. Charles North freshman, who on Aug. 21 received an invitation to represent the Great Lakes Regional 15-Under team, in USA Baseball’s National Team Identification Series.

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    Carlos Pena steals third past the tag of Cincinnati Reds third baseman Juan Francisco as umpire Chris Conroy watches during the fifth inning Wednesday night.

    Pena lifts Cubs to 6-3 victory over Reds

    Carlos Pena hit a tiebreaking three-run homer in the eighth inning to send the Chicago Cubs to a 6-3 victory over the Cincinnati Reds on Wednesday night. Aramis Ramirez had a two-run double for Chicago, which took two of three against Cincinnati to earn a split of its six-game homestand. Starlin Castro and DJ LeMahieu each had two hits for the Cubs.

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    Bartlett’s Tyler Lake steps in front of South Elgin’s Spencer Scott during Wednesday’s game at Millennium Field in Streamwood.

    Bartlett, South Elgin play to scoreless tie

    When Bartlett boys soccer coach Ben Beary put out a call for a sweeper, it wasn’t surprising that Fabio Aiello answered. Usually a midfielder known for his ability to attack, Aiello made several key plays to prevent South Elgin from scoring. But with Aiello back on defense, the Hawks couldn’t manage to net a goal, tying the Storm 0-0 in the Upstate Eight Conference Valley Division opener for both teams Thursday night at Millennium Field in Streamwood.

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    Girls volleyball/Fox Valley roundup

    Sarah Norman had 11 kills and Katie Swanson added 10 Wednesday as the St. Edward girls volleyball team defeated Wheaton Academy 20-25, 25-18, 25-20 in Suburban Christian Conference Gold Division action in Elgin.Callie Johnson added 5 kills for the Green Wave (9-4, 2-0), while Rena Ranallo and Allison Kruk each had 9 digs and Katie Ayello 23 assists.U-High d. Elgin Academy: Claire Fluegel had 11 kills, 7 digs and 6 points and Bridgette Keslinke added 8 kills, 6 digs and 4 points but the Hilltoppers fell to U-High 25-19, 27-29, 25-20 in the Independent School League. Angie Martinez added 18 assists and 7 digs for Elgin Academy (2-3, 0-1).

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    White Sox scouting report

    Scouting report: White Sox vs. Indians

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    Warren fits in just fine on new turf

    Warren's boys soccer team got a winning result in its first test on the school's new field turf playing surface as the Blue Devils topped Mundelein 4-0 in North Suburban Lake play Wednesday.

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    Bears running back Matt Forte was all smiles on the sidelines during the Bears' playoff win against Seattle last season, but he's not happy now that talks over a contract extension have been put on hold.

    Stalled contract talks frustrate Bears' Forte

    Matt Forte doesn't sound like someone who's going to easily be able to put the disappointment of not getting a contract extension behind him. “I'm under contract,” he said. “I'm disappointed, kind of frustrated that it didn't get done. As a player, you're taught that this league is based off production, and you expect for a team to notice that and to get paid based off your production.

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    AP Illinois football rankings

    Here are the Associated Press Illinois football rankings for this week.

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    Luke Comerouski of Christian Liberty Academy, left, and Javier Fernandez of Northridge Prep make contact with one another during Wednesday’s game.

    Comerouski, Christian Liberty win again

    Luke Comerouski scored 3 goals, including the game-winner at 66 minutes, to lift Christian Liberty Academy past Northridge Prep 4-3 in boys soccer Wednesday.

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    Harrington helps lift DuPage past Harper

    Kierstyn Harrington scored twice in the second half as visiting College of DuPage defeated Harper 2-1 in a North Central Community College Conference opener Wednesday.

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    Undrafted rookie Dane Sanzenbacher made the roster as one of the Bears’ six wide receivers.

    Bears' wide receivers give Martz hope for increased scoring

    There’s nothing complicated about the Bears’ mission Sunday against the Atlanta Falcons, according to offensive coordinator Mike Martz.

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    A tennis patron falls asleep in the stands during a rain delay Wednesday at the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York.

    U.S. Open has a start-and-stop day

    NEW YORK — Rafael Nadal, Andy Roddick and Andy Murray got in about 15 minutes of tennis Wednesday — barely enough to work up a sweat, but more than enough to get into a snit.Rain washed out the matches for the second straight day at the U.S. Open, creating a logjam in the schedule and a bigger mess in the locker room, where the big-name players questioned the wisdom of putting them out on courts that were still damp thanks to a fine mist that was falling in the morning.Shortly after they started, play was called, then late in the afternoon, the men were sent home.Much later, and right after Serena Williams warmed up for her match against Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, the U.S. Tennis Association finally scrubbed the women’s matches, too, calling everyone back for an 11 a.m. start Thursday, when the weather forecast is every bit as dodgy — an 80 percent chance of rain.“Right now, it’s our intention to finish the tournament on time,” said tournament director Jim Curley, while acknowledging all the things working against that possibility.If the weather cooperates, this will be a Grand Slam the likes of which very few of these players have seen. To win, a man on the bottom half of the draw — Nadal, Roddick or Murray, for example — would need to win four matches in four days. The men on the top of the draw — Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic among them — had their quarterfinal matches postponed and are in for a long haul, as well.But well before Nadal and Company pondered the weekend, they expressed their concerns about being put in harm’s way. When play was halted, they marched straight into the tournament referee’s office to discuss the situation.“If you know you’re going to go on court only for 10 minutes, you don’t have to lie to the fans at that point, and you don’t have to lie to the players, too,” said Nadal, the defending champion, who trailed unseeded Gilles Muller 3-0 when play was stopped. “The players knew when we (went) on court that it was still raining, so it was a very strange decision, and we were upset about that.”Curley, however, said player safety is the USTA’s top concern and that only one player — Roddick — made any mention to a chair umpire of the slick conditions when he walked on the court.“The players want to make sure they’re playing under safe conditions,” Curley said. “That’s the concern they’ve expressed. We share that concern. But at the end of the day, it’s the referee who makes the call on whether or not the court is fit for play.”With rain showers lingering over the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center for the rest of the day, this debate about safety, weather and scheduling — along with whether the USTA should build a covered stadium and whether the players should form a union — had to suffice for the day’s entertainment.Murray and Roddick also weighed in.“It didn’t really make a whole lot of sense in the end to go out for nine or 10 minutes when it’s still raining,” Murray said.Nadal conceded he let his reluctance get to him, which played into a pair of double-faults in his opening service game and his early 3-0 deficit.No. 4 Murray was trailing 2-1 to American Donald Young, but on serve. No. 21 Roddick got an early break and led No. 5 David Ferrer 3-1. Roddick said he did, in fact, speak to the chair umpire before play began.“I was just wondering if he saw the same mist in the air that I saw,” Roddick said. “The back was still a little wet. I understand everyone wants to see it on TV and certainly, at the end of the day, we’re a sport, but this whole thing is a business. Everyone here is kind of in the same boat, so they need a product on the court.”The match between No. 28 John Isner and No. 12 Gilles Simon was moved to Court 17 in an attempt to complete the fourth round as soon as possible. But the rain started before they hit a single ball.

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    The Southeastern Conference cleared the way for Texas A&M to join its ranks in an announcement Wednesday but with one snag. A Big 12 school has threatened to sue if the Aggies leave the fold.

    Texas A&M accuses Big 12 of backtracking

    Texas A&M sees no future in the Big 12. For now, the Aggies aren't going anywhere and the league is in turmoil. "We are being held hostage right now," Texas A&M President R. Bowen Loftin said. "Essentially, we're being told that you must stay here against your will and we think that really flies in the face of what makes us Americans for example and makes us free people."

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    Sky scouting report

    sky scout for thursday: sky at minnesota

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    Elgin Hall names 5 new inductees

    The Elgin Sports Hall of Fame Foundation board of directors today announced the five inductees who will take their place in the Hall of Fame on Sunday, Nov. 6 when the Hall of Fame Foundation holds its annual Induction Banquet at The Centre of Elgin.

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    David Reutimann (00) crosses the finish line to win the LIFELOCK.COM 400 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race at Chicagoland Speedway in Joliet last July.

    Speedway to kick off NASCAR Chase again in 2012

    For the second consecutive year, Chicagoland Speedway in Joliet will kick off the Chase for the NASCAR Sprint Cup during the 2012 season on Sept. 15 and 16, track officials announced Wednesday.

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    Former White Sox third baseman Joe Crede has agreed to take part in SoxFest 2012 next January. Tickets go on sale next week through whitesox.com.

    Joe Crede coming to SoxFest 2012

    Former White Sox third baseman Joe Crede will join other players and fans at SoxFest 2012 when the popular weekend fan fest returns next January.

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    Ohio State quarterback Braxton Miller talks to reporters during an NCAA college football photo day in Columbus, Ohio. In the darkest days of Ohio State’s seemingly endless NCAA investigation into players selling memorabilia, Buckeyes fans longed for a breath of fresh air, for some hope. They’ve gotten it in the form of a freshman class that has been the scourge of preseason camp, in a good way.

    Buckeyes’ pinch-hitters open with strong showings

    In its season opener, No. 15 Ohio State found itself relying heavily on several players who few might have expected to be such integral parts of the team just a short time ago — before more prominent players were suspended or quit the team.

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    Statements on SEC expansion

    Statement released Wednesday from Dr. Bernie Machen, chair of Southeastern Conference Presidents and Chancellors:`After receiving unanimous written assurance from the Big 12 on September 2 that the Southeastern Conference was free to accept Texas A&M to join as a new member, the presidents and chancellors of the SEC met last night with the intention of accepting the application of Texas A&M to be the newest member of the SEC. We were notified yesterday afternoon that at least one Big 12 institution had withdrawn its previous consent and was considering legal action. The SEC has stated that to consider an institution for membership, there must be no contractual hindrances to its departure. The SEC voted unanimously to accept Texas A&M University as a member upon receiving acceptable reconfirmation that the Big 12 and its members have reaffirmed the letter dated September 2, 2011.'———Copy of Sept. 2 letter from Big 12 Commissioner Dan Beebe to SEC Commissioner Mike Slive, released Wednesday by the SEC:`This is to confirm our discussion yesterday during which I informed you that the Big 12 Conference Board of Directors unanimously authorized me to convey to you and their colleagues in the Southeastern Conference that the Big 12 and its members will not take any legal action for any possible claims against the SEC or its members relating to the departure of Texas A&M University from the Big 12 and the admission of Texas A&M into the SEC; provided, however, that such act by the SEC to admit Texas A&M is publicly confirmed by 5:00 p.m. (CDT) on September 8, 2011.Such admission of Texas A&M will result in the withdrawal of Texas A&M from the Big 12 Conference effective June 30, 2012. We both agreed it is in the best interests of each of our conferences and our member institutions of higher education to waive any and all legal actions by either conference and its members resulting from admission of Texas A&M into the SEC, as long as such admission is confirmed publicly by September 8, 2011.If any of your presidents and chancellors have concerns about this commitment of the Big 12 Conference, they may contact me or Brady Deaton, Big 12 Board of Director chairman and chancellor of the University of Missouri, Columbia.'

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    Wilderness is truly a generational gift

    While he gets teased often about his exotic travels, Mike Jackson says he would truly love to have a little cabin on a river again, like his family did many years ago, just so to enjoy the remoteness.

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    Mark McNeil, center will play for the Blackhawks in the Toronto Maple Leafs Rookie Tournament this weekend in Canada. He was drafted in the first round by the Blackhawks on June 24.

    Blackhawks set roster for rookie tourney

    The Chicago Blackhawks will send a team to compete in the 2011 Toronto Maple Leafs Rookie Tournament, beginning on Saturday at General Motors Centre in Oshawa, Ontario.

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    White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf is responsible for everything, and that includes solving the dysfunctional relationship between his general manager and field manager.

    You can point finger at Reinsdorf

    The debate has been whether Ozzie Guillen or Kenny Williams is responsible for the White Sox' follies, on and off the field. The correst answer is behind Door 3: Jerry Reinsdorf.

Business

  •  
    A vendor sells an Old Style beer to a fan during a Cubs game at Wrigley Field. Pabst Brewing Company threatened earlier this year to pull Old Style from the ballpark, but on Wednesday the Cubs and Pabst announced a deal.

    Wrigley Field keeping Old Style beer

    Chicago’s iconic workingman’s brew will continue to have a place at Wrigley Field under a deal announced Wednesday.

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    Most China stocks rise

    Most China stocks rose on speculation the nation’s equities are undervalued relative to earnings and U.S. President Barack Obama’s expected jobs proposal may boost the world’s biggest economy.

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    China’s corn imports may grow

    China’s corn imports may jump to 5 million tons in 2011-2012.

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    House vote could move stalled trade agenda

    A House vote Wednesday to extend an expired trade program for the world’s poorer countries lays the groundwork for what could be more politically important consideration of three more free trade agreements.

  •  
    Carol Bartz

    Yahoo stock rises 5% after CEO fired
    Yahoo’s stock rose more than 5 percent on Wednesday after the company fired its CEO following more than 2½ years of financial lethargy. Tuesday’s ouster came as investors were convinced that Carol Bartz couldn’t steer the Internet company to a long-promised turnaround.

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    Report: 2,300 layoffs set at Illinois companies

    A new state report finds that nearly 2,300 workers at 11 Illinois companies will be laid off in the next few weeks, including about 630 at Chicago Restaurant Partners and nearly 200 at Lowe's Home Centers.

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    A worker walks inside an office of Beijing Goldlink Go-Abroad Consulting Co., an immigration consulting firm assisting Chinese to immigrate to Canada and the United States, in Beijing. Associated Press

    Top of Chinese wealthy’s wish list? To leave China

    Chinese millionaire Su builds skyscrapers in Beijing and is one of the people powering China’s economy on its path to becoming the world’s biggest. Yet the property developer shares something surprising with many newly rich in China: he’s looking forward to the day he can leave. Su’s reasons: He wants to protect his assets, he has to watch what he says in China and wants a second child.

  •  
    Stephen Botehlo, of Westwood, Mass., holds cellulose insulation in the attic of his home. Botehlo installed the cellulose insulation as an energy saving measure. Associated Press

    Shocker: Power demand from U.S. homes is falling

    American homes are more cluttered than ever with devices, and they all need power: Cellphones and iPads that have to be charged, DVRs that run all hours, TVs that light up in high definition. But over the next decade, experts expect residential power use to fall, reversing an upward trend that has been almost uninterrupted since Thomas Edison invented the modern light bulb.

  •  
    Steven R. Boal, CEO of Coupons.Com Inc. Todayís shoppers have traded in scissors for a mouse, because more coupons are now distributed through websites. Associated Press

    Coupons users trading the scissors for a mouse

    There may soon come a time when clipping coupons out of the Sunday circular is a distant memory. Although few would argue with shaving a bit off the price of groceries, the problem with coupons has always been the hassle. You have to happen to find a coupon for something you want and then clip and save it for the appropriate time.

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    Fewer Medicare Part D enrollees hit coverage gap

    Fewer Medicare prescription drug plan enrollees are falling into a coverage gap known as the doughnut hole in which they bear the full cost of their prescriptions, according to a study from the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation.A total of 19 percent of Medicare Part D beneficiaries who did not receive low-income subsidies hit that gap in 2009, the latest year for which figures are available. That compares to 26 percent in 2007. People who receive low-income subsidies do not have to make payments in the doughnut hole. Kaiser said the increased availability of cheaper generic drugs for some chronic conditions may be behind the drop in people hitting that coverage gap.About 29 million people are enrolled in Medicare prescription drug plans. Enrollees and their drug plans share costs up to a certain amount each year. Then enrollees pay the full cost for prescriptions before becoming eligible for catastrophic coverage, where the plan resumes paying and covers 95 percent of the bill.This year, for example, customers and their drug plans must spend $2,840 before they reach the coverage gap. Then beneficiaries pick up the next $3,608 before they become eligible for catastrophic coverage.Congress created this gap essentially to keep prescription drug spending within a budget and offer both upfront coverage and protection against big expenses.The health care overhaul aims to gradually fill the gap. This year, those who reach it will receive 50 percent discounts on brand-name drugs. Plans that offer Part D coverage also will pick up 7 percent of the cost for generics.Beneficiaries who hit the doughnut hole usually take medication for chronic conditions like cancer, diabetes or Alzheimer’s disease, and they frequently cut back on their prescriptions due to the financial crunch the gap causes, according to Kaiser.

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    Dollar slips as German court ruling supports euro

    NEW YORK — The dollar is slipping in morning trading after a German court ruling kept the country involved in the euro bloc’s rescue fund. Germany is Europe’s largest economy and a key part of the bailout program. The euro is rising to $1.4050 from $1.3991 late Tuesday. It had dropped more than 5 cents, about 3.5 percent, in the past two weeks, bottoming at a nearly two-month low of $1.3972 on Tuesday, as fears of a deepening debt crisis and slowing economy hurt European markets.The dollar is also slightly lower at 0.8602 Swiss franc from 0.8615, despite Switzerland’s efforts to weaken its currency.Elsewhere, the British pound rose to $1.5981 from $1.5936. The dollar fell to 77.33 Japanese yen from 77.67 yen.

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    Postal Service may get short-term financial help

    WASHINGTON — The White House may pull the Postal Service back from the brink of insolvency, at least for a few months.Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe reports the agency will be unable to make a required $5.5 billion payment to the Treasury at the end of September.But the Office of Personnel Management says the White House may delay the payment for 90 days as part of a larger economic package in the works.Postal spokeswoman Yvonne Yoerger said she had no details of the plan and that a long-term solution will still be needed.

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    Conrad Black

    Ex-Sun Times owner Black sues former ally Radler

    Conrad Black, the ex-Hollinger International Inc. chairman and chief executive officer, likened ex-ally F. David Radler to the biblical Cain in a lawsuit filed in Chicago as he reportedly entered a U.S. prison in Florida.

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    Mortgage applications decline for third week

    Mortgage applications in the U.S. fell for a third consecutive week as fewer Americans refinanced, while purchases stayed close to a 14-year low.

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    General Motors, Google, Nvidia, Yahoo!: U.S. Equity Preview

    Shares of the following companies may have unusual moves in U.S. trading. Stock symbols are in parentheses, and prices are as of 7:45 a.m. in New York.Altera Corp. (ALTR US): The maker of programmable semiconductors said sales in the third quarter may drop as much as 3 percent from the second quarter, lower than an earlier prediction of revenue growth of at least 2 percent.Darden Restaurants Inc. (DRI US): The operator of Red Lobster and Olive Garden restaurants posted first-quarter earnings from continuing operations of 78 cents a share, compared with the average analyst estimate of 87 cents.General Motors Co. (GM US) rose 1.9 percent to $21.84. The automaker expects to grow at double the market pace in India this year, helped by the diesel variant of the Beat model, Karl Slym, managing director of the local unit, said in an interview in New Delhi. Separately, the shares were added to Citigroup Inc.’s “Top Picks Live” list.Google Inc. (GOOG US) added 2.1 percent to $533. The company, which moved its Chinese search-engine service offshore last year to avoid the country’s online censorship rules, said China’s government renewed the company’s Internet license.National Retail Properties Inc. (NNN US) fell 2.5 percent to $25.93. The Orlando, Florida-based real estate investment trust announced it has started a public offering of 8 million shares.Nvidia Corp. (NVDA US) rallied 5.5 percent to $13.90. The maker of graphics chips said fiscal 2013 revenue may be as much as $5 billion, compared with the average analyst estimate of $4.47 billion in a Bloomberg survey.VeriFone Systems Inc. (PAY US) advanced 4.2 percent to $36.55. The electronic-payment technology provider reported adjusted third-quarter profit of 49 cents a share, topping the average analyst estimate by 5.8 percent.Yahoo! Inc. (YHOO US) jumped 6.1 percent to $13.70. The company ousted Chief Executive Officer Carol Bartz and announced a strategic review to help the most-visited U.S. Web portal revive growth and lure users who have defected to rivals in Web search and social networking.

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    Daimler bus unit sells fewer units, sees decline in sales

    Daimler AG’s bus division’s sales fell to 18,308 units in the first six months of this year compared with 19,226 in the year-ago period, the company said in an e-mailed statement today.The company said sales of the division fell to 2 billion euros from 2.22 billion euros in the year-ago period.

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    Consolidated media signs a$250 million of acquisition loans

    Consolidated Media Holdings Ltd. signed loan facilities worth A$250 million, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.One facility of A$100 million matures in 2014 while another of A$150 million matures in 2015, the data show. Proceeds will be used for acquisitions and Australia & New Zealand Banking Group Ltd. and BNP Paribas helped to organize the loans, the data show.

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    Australian economy grows 1.2 pct in June quarter

    CANBERRA, Australia — Australia has avoided recession with the economy growing by 1.2 percent in the three months through June after shrinking in the previous quarter due to natural disasters at home and overseas.Government data released Wednesday showed the economy expanded 1.4 percent in the year through June, rebounding from a 0.9 percent contraction in the March quarter. A recession is defined as two consecutive quarters of contraction.Storms and record flooding early this year destroyed crops worth billions of dollars on Australia's east coast and disrupted coal and iron ore exports. Earthquakes and a tsunami also devastated two key Australian trading partners, Japan and New Zealand.

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    Congress returns to fight over jobs, budget cuts

    WASHINGTON — Fights large and small await Congress as it gets back to business, with jobs and budget cuts topping a contentious agenda that also includes a lengthy roster of lower-profile but essential items.President Barack Obama is to unveil his jobs agenda in a nationally televised address Thursday night, but early glimpses of the package show it relies heavily on extending expiring programs like a payroll tax cut and unemployment benefits for the long-term jobless.Also this week, a bipartisan deficit-reduction panel will hold its first meeting amid mixed expectations that it can be successful in a highly partisan climate.In the short term, there’s a need for legislation required to simply keep the government running past Sept. 30, including a stopgap bill to avoid a government shutdown.

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    Oil industry: Boost in energy could create 1M jobs

    The oil industry says government policies to increase domestic energy production could create up to a million jobs over the next seven years.

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    Oil hovers above $86 as Obama speech awaited

    Oil prices hovered above $86 a barrel Wednesday in Asia amid hopes that President Barack Obama’s major policy speech later this week will provide a catalyst for stronger U.S. economic growth.

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    Toyota stops exporting Camry cars to North America

    Toyota says it’s no longer exporting Camry sedans from Japan to North America, where the best selling car is also manufactured — a decision that makes financial sense for the automaker as the yen soars against the dollar.

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    America’s sickly economy can be healed with jobs, jobs and more jobs. photos.com

    Getting back to even on jobs divides US leaders

    America’s sickly economy can be healed with jobs, jobs and more jobs. On that, everyone agrees. Figuring out how to produce them is what is stumping everyone.Other than letting time take its course,

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    Asian stocks up as gloom fades, bargains sought

    Asian stock markets rebounded Wednesday as traders looked past bleak U.S. jobs data and Europe’s debt crisis to scoop up bargains following a steep sell-off.

Life & Entertainment

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    During a recent taping of “The Chew,” Iron Chef Michael Symon, left, Carla Hall, Clinton Kelly and Daphne Oz react to audience applause during a rehearsal of the show in New York. ABC hopes these food and style stars help soap fans get over cancellation of their favorite stories.

    Can ‘The Chew’ win daytime viewers?

    ABC is banking on some of food and style TV’s biggest stars to help "All My Children" and "One Life to Life" fans get over the cancellation of the shows. The network’s counting on “The Chew" to fill the gap. What you’ll see is simple, fun tips for cheap and easy living.

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    Brad Pitt, left, and Jonah Hill star in “Moneyball.” Pitt will be on hand for the Toronto film festival premiere of the film.

    Toronto film festival mixes, stars, Oscar bait

    Stars such as George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Rachel Weisz, Michelle Williams, Glenn Close, Robert De Niro and Viggo Mortensen are on the guest list for the 11-day Toronto International Film Festival that opens Thursday with an unusually heavy emphasis on music and documentaries.

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    Rema Webb, Andrew Rannells and Josh Gad appear in the Broadway company of “The Book of Mormon.” The smash-hit musical is set to play a 12-week engagement at Chicago's Bank of America Theatre in December 2012.

    ‘Book of Mormon' coming to Chicago

    "The Book Mormon" is headed to Chicago for a 12-week engagement at the Bank of America Theatre starting in December 2012. The smash hit and multi-Tony Award-winning Broadway musical is by the creators of "South Park" and a composer of "Avenue Q."

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    Singer Neil Diamond has been chosen to receive the Kennedy Center Honors this year along with some of the biggest names from Broadway, jazz, classical music and Hollywood.

    Kennedy Center to honor Diamond, Streep

    Known for his songs that have become anthems at ballparks and bars, Neil Diamond was chosen Wednesday to receive the Kennedy Center Honors this year along with Broadway singer Barbara Cook, cellist Yo-Yo Ma, saxophonist Sonny Rollins and actress Meryl Streep for their contributions to American culture through the arts.

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    Make handy holiday mixes

    Tips for homemade taco seasoning, inexpensive wedding favors and dry goods storage at home in your own pantry.

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    Dining events: Bringing burgers to Vernon Hills

    Tom and Eddie's brings their gourmet burgers to Vernon Hills ... but save room for a milk shake. Also 3 Vines Cafe takes a taste of the Big Easy to Sleepy Hollow, and Mon Ami Gabi hosts a wine dinner.

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    At this year's MTV Video Music Awards, Lady Gaga stayed in drag as her alter-ego, whom she called Jo Calderone, throughout the show. The temporary gender switch marked yet another act in Gaga's strange pop odyssey.

    Ladies of pop winning with wacky, weird tactics

    What made the 2011 MTV Video Music Awards so noteworthy this year was that Lady Gaga, dressed as a man, wasn't the only oddity who graced the stage. In one corner there was Katy Perry, sporting pink hair and a giant yellow cube on her head. And then there was Nicki Minaj, who wore a rainbow-colored wig and a mini-tutu made out of cubic designs, with an attached string of stuffed toys. Crazy as it seems, these contemporary pop stars are finding success by defying the conventional definition of sexiness with oddball tactics and wacky outfits.

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    Sausage pizza at Alex's Washington Gardens in Highwood.

    Alex's Washington Gardens maintains tradition

    Alex's Washington Gardens has been a fixture in Highwood in some form since the Great Depression, when Angelina Scornavacco began selling food to railroad workers from the comfort of her yard-turned-beer-garden. Today it remains a go-to for pizza and homespun Italian meals.

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    Elizabeth Taylor's emerald and diamond necklace and pendant, attached at the bottom were a gift from actor Richard Burton. Christie's auction house is selling her complete jewelry collection in New York on Dec. 13-14.

    Elizabeth Taylor's jewels valued at $30 million

    Elizabeth Taylor dazzled the world with her luminous beauty, lavish lifestyle — and an unquenchable passion for diamonds and jewels that was fueled by the great loves of her life. Now one of the foremost jewelry collections in the world will be going up for auction in December.

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    Artist Ejay Weiss has created a series entitled “9/11 Elegies: 2001-2011.” Weiss witnessed the collapse of the World Trade towers on Sept. 11, 2001, from his apartment in Chelsea, just north of Lower Manhattan.

    Artists capture 9/11 in NYC exhibitions

    New York artists are showing their works in exhibitions commemorating the 10th anniversary of the terrorist attacks. At least two dozen other Sept. 11-related museum and gallery exhibitions also are being presented throughout the city.

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    Cook of the Week Challenge contestant Diane Hagopian

    First Cook of the Week Challenge recipes posted

    We are revealing recipes from contestant Diane Hagopian and Oscar Menoyo in the kungpao challenge and TerrieAnn Jones and Jamie Andrade in the root beer challenge. What ingredients do Ann Marie Norby and Michael Lalagos have to work with?

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    Members of the Elgin Choral Union rehearse for "A Concert of Remembrance" to be performed on Sunday, Sept. 11, at the Hemmens Cultural Center in Elgin.

    Best bets: Musical tributes to 9/11

    Several classical musical ensembles, including Fulcrum Point, the Chicago Philharmonic Chamber Players, the Elgin Choral Union and Elgin Symphony and more, will present special concerts Sunday to mark the 10-year anniversary of Sept. 11, 2001.

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    A few fresh blueberries are the only addition needed to this simple homemade granola.

    Wholesome homemade granola

    Granola began its history as a wholesome food, made by men with wholesome intentions. If they happened to find religion, make money, engage in lawsuits and develop various marketing ploys along the way, it only proves that granola is truly an American product.

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    Paul Bertolli, founder and curemaster of Fra’ Mani Handcrafted Salumi, saws up the carcass of a sow at his gourmet sausage factory in Berkeley, Calif. Bertolli served as head chef at Chez Panisse from 1982 to 1992.

    Chez Panisse at 40

    If the restaurant world had farm teams, Chez Panisse is where the talent scouts would hang out. The Berkeley restaurant, cofounded by food activist Alice Waters 40 years ago, is famous as a pioneer of serving fresh, local food in season. But in culinary circles it may be just as well known as the training ground for a number of leading lights of the food revolution.

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    Grilled polenta meets grilled marinated sirloin

    This highly flavorful steak is versatile enough to work for family-style dining, as well as a party-worthy appetizer. It all comes down to the polenta. The dish starts by marinating thinly sliced sirloin in a potent blend of olive oil, balsamic vinegar and garlic.

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    Start their engines — fuel with breakfast

    Goodbye lazy days of summer and welcome to the hectic busy mornings of the school year, where meals often become rushed while on the move.

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    Pick up your shoes and other fatherly advice: The tall and short of it
    How many conversations have you had in your family that start with, “I think Sarah has your (eyes, ears, forehead, whatever)”? We want our children to have some trait of ours as a way of passing on our legacy. We want it to be one of the positive ones, like intellectual curiosity, and not the negative ones, like fingernail-chewing.

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    A mom’s point of view: To push or not to push

    Is it OK to push your screaming scared child off the tower at the zip line attraction? Or is it better to give them a way out. The answer is not one size fits all.

Discuss

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    On an awful anniversary, necessary remembrance

    A Daily Herald editorial says we need to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist acts so we can examine where we have strayed from the ideals we suddenly appreciated and shared that day and rededicate ourselves to the tasks we’ve undertaken to protect them.

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    Some questions for GOP’s ‘decision time’

    Wednesday’s Republican “debate” in California will not resemble the 1858 Lincoln-Douglas debates. Still, today’s debates can illuminate. So, some questions.

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    The day of terror that never ends

    I went home on Sept. 11 with my shoes dusted with the detritus of the World Trade Center. I felt a hate that was entirely new to me. Soon after, the anthrax attacks began and I was ready for war -- against al-Qaeda and the Taliban, for sure, but against Saddam Hussein as well. I was wrong, and for that I blame myself, but I blame us all for going along with it.

  •  

    Let your vote speak for you
    I really believe that the majority of Americans are simply looking for leaders who will tell it like it is and do the very best they can to create tax policies and keep programs working that do the things that cannot be done locally.

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    Seek labels that say ‘Made in USA’
    Now, I know that it is not easy to find American-made goods. But I believe that we American citizens can become part of the solution. We do not need to depend on the government.

  •  

    Lights at Memorial Field a bad idea
    We believe that the potential harm to the quality of life in the community is not an acceptable trade-off for the small percentage of students able to use night lighting for extracurricular activities at Memorial Park practice field. Given the proximity to private homes, Lake Ellyn, commuter trains and the historic downtown, this type of intrusive lighting, noise and traffic congestion would have a negative impact on the community.

  •  

    Tired of all the partisan bickering
    Sick of all the blaming and criticizing and half truths? Sick of this: “I do not want to be a prop in that political theater of his,” says U.S. Rep. Joe Walsh concerning his intended boycott of President Obama’s speech this week.

  •  

    Democrats must accept blame for economy
    A Grayslake letter to the editor: Look in the mirror, Democrats, and come to the realization that what’s staring back at you is the same thing that has imperiled our nation and our state’s economic viability.

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    Snubbing president is a disgrace
    A Libertyville letter to the editor: Joe Walsh is a disgrace to the Congress of the United States. Who does he think he is to snub our president (yes, we have the same president)?

  •  

    Alternatives needed to tea party puppets
    Letter to the Editor: The one thing Bachmann, Perry, Romney and Palin have in common is being tea party puppets with no good plans of their own. Wanted — one old-fashioned, principled Republican.

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    Job 1: reduce federal spending
    Letter to the Editor: Whatever we do, we simply must walk the walk in reducing federal spending. Making this program a reality is so clearly the primary issue that I can’t think of a more direct way of stating it. Deciding how much will come in and determining how we will stay within that budget cost are what we have to do.

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