Breaking News Bar
updated: 5/3/2018 11:29 PM

Arlington Heights community shows its commitment to arts at annual show

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • Westgate Elementary School second grade student Harper Giersch has her picture taken by her mom, Lindsay Giersch, next to her pencil drawing on display at the 26th annual Arlington Heights Elementary District 25 Student Art Show Thursday at the Arlington Heights Memorial Library.

      Westgate Elementary School second grade student Harper Giersch has her picture taken by her mom, Lindsay Giersch, next to her pencil drawing on display at the 26th annual Arlington Heights Elementary District 25 Student Art Show Thursday at the Arlington Heights Memorial Library.
    Paul Valade | Staff Photographer

  • A monochromatic self-portrait by Dryden Elementary fourth grade student Ella Benassi, upper left, is one of hundreds of District 25 art pieces now on display at the Arlington Heights Memorial Library. An opening night reception for the 26th annual district Student Art Show was held Thursday night.

      A monochromatic self-portrait by Dryden Elementary fourth grade student Ella Benassi, upper left, is one of hundreds of District 25 art pieces now on display at the Arlington Heights Memorial Library. An opening night reception for the 26th annual district Student Art Show was held Thursday night.
    Paul Valade | Staff Photographer

  • Paul Valade/pvalade@dailyherald.comSaxophone player Andrew Kuehl and the rest of the South Middle School Jazz Ensemble played Thursday night for the opening reception of the 26th annual Arlington Heights Elementary District 25 Student Art Show at the Arlington Heights Memorial Library. More than 400 students' artwork -- ranging from illustrations to 3D art -- from nine schools will be on display in the library during the month of May.

    Paul Valade/pvalade@dailyherald.comSaxophone player Andrew Kuehl and the rest of the South Middle School Jazz Ensemble played Thursday night for the opening reception of the 26th annual Arlington Heights Elementary District 25 Student Art Show at the Arlington Heights Memorial Library. More than 400 students' artwork -- ranging from illustrations to 3D art -- from nine schools will be on display in the library during the month of May.

  • Paul Valade/pvalade@dailyherald.comAn opening night reception for the 26th annual Arlington Heights Elementary District 25 Student Art Show was held Thursday at the Arlington Heights Memorial Library. More than 400 students' artwork -- ranging from illustrations to 3D art -- from nine schools will be on display in the library during the month of May.

    Paul Valade/pvalade@dailyherald.comAn opening night reception for the 26th annual Arlington Heights Elementary District 25 Student Art Show was held Thursday at the Arlington Heights Memorial Library. More than 400 students' artwork -- ranging from illustrations to 3D art -- from nine schools will be on display in the library during the month of May.

 
By Eileen O. Daday
Daily Herald Correspondant

The Arlington Heights Memorial Library was anything but a quiet place on Thursday night.

More than 800 people poured into the library for a student art show -- nearly 100 more than last year -- produced by art teachers within the nine schools in Arlington Heights Elementary District 25.

Add in the jazz ensemble from South Middle School, who performed during the opening reception, and it was a happening place.

"The library is the center of the community," said Mike Driskell, interim executive director. "This is a great place for the community to gather and celebrate art education."

This is the 26th year library officials hosted the District 25 art show.

Library officials said it is the longest running community partnership in the library, and it continues to build each year.

Nearly 400 students saw their works showcased Thursday, and the art show will remain on display throughout May in the library. Their media included collages, sketches, sculpture, papier-mache and textile art, as well as digital designs and collaborative works.

Each student received a certificate for their outstanding work from the library, and many posed with their award in front of their piece. One of those was 7-year old Harper Giersch, a second grader at Westgate Elementary School, who stood next to her pencil drawing of Celeste, the title character in the book, "A Nest for Celeste."

"I was excited that my art work was selected," Harper said. "I love to draw. Sometimes when I finish my homework, I just start drawing."

Another young artist, fifth grader Campbell Hoffman, said his art teacher at Olive Mary Stitt School allowed students to create any image they wanted. He chose his favorite animals -- sharks and dogs -- and combined them with his favorite food, pizza, in a whimsical pastel drawing.

"It's awesome that this many people get to see my art work," Campbell said.

"It's actually my second award. One of my drawings was exhibited by the park district. It makes me feel like maybe some day I could be an artist."

Those who attended included library and school board members as well as village officials -- but they blended in with the hundreds of families who took in the wide variety of work, as well as the jazz entertainment and free cupcakes.

One of the officials on hand was District 25 Superintendent Lori Bein, who said the district is committed to art education as part of a well-rounded education.

"Art is as important as any other subject our kids study," Bein said. "It teaches creativity, perspective, planning and replanning, the ability to start something and then start again. It's life skills and working together.

"We think it's as important as any core subject," Bein said, "and will never be cut."

Article Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.