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updated: 9/30/2017 12:25 PM

Death toll rises to 360 in Mexico earthquake

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  • In this Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017 photo, a framed image of Mexico's patron saint, the Virgin of Guadalupe, makes up part of a memorial for those who died when a five-story office and factory building was collapsed by a recent earthquake on 168 Bolivar Street, in the Obrera neighborhood of Mexico City. The rubble from the Sept. 19th earthquake has been cleared, only the concrete foundation with the building's footprint and memorial remain.

    In this Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017 photo, a framed image of Mexico's patron saint, the Virgin of Guadalupe, makes up part of a memorial for those who died when a five-story office and factory building was collapsed by a recent earthquake on 168 Bolivar Street, in the Obrera neighborhood of Mexico City. The rubble from the Sept. 19th earthquake has been cleared, only the concrete foundation with the building's footprint and memorial remain.
    Associated Press

  • A woman stands before the last remaining bit of wall at 168 Bolivar Street, the site of a collapsed five-story office and factory building felled by the recent earthquake, in Mexico City's Obrera neighborhood, Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. The glass-and-concrete building housed an assortment of Taiwanese toy and technology businesses, along with a clothing company run by an Argentine-born Jewish immigrant, and is where nearly all the foreigners killed in the quake died. The message on the wall reads in Spanish: "the life of one seamstress is worth all their machines."

    A woman stands before the last remaining bit of wall at 168 Bolivar Street, the site of a collapsed five-story office and factory building felled by the recent earthquake, in Mexico City's Obrera neighborhood, Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. The glass-and-concrete building housed an assortment of Taiwanese toy and technology businesses, along with a clothing company run by an Argentine-born Jewish immigrant, and is where nearly all the foreigners killed in the quake died. The message on the wall reads in Spanish: "the life of one seamstress is worth all their machines."
    Associated Press

  • A five-gallon bucket which volunteer rescuers had used to carefully remove rubble in the first days of the rescue attempts serves as a vase for a fresh spray of flowers at 168 Bolivar Street, a collapsed five-story office and factory building in the the Obrera neighborhood of Mexico City, Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. On sidewalks, median strips and amid the brick dust, mud and rubble of the 38 buildings that collapsed in Mexico's 7.1 earthquake, impromptu memorials to victims and rescuers have sprung up, as the capital begins to come to terms with its losses.

    A five-gallon bucket which volunteer rescuers had used to carefully remove rubble in the first days of the rescue attempts serves as a vase for a fresh spray of flowers at 168 Bolivar Street, a collapsed five-story office and factory building in the the Obrera neighborhood of Mexico City, Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. On sidewalks, median strips and amid the brick dust, mud and rubble of the 38 buildings that collapsed in Mexico's 7.1 earthquake, impromptu memorials to victims and rescuers have sprung up, as the capital begins to come to terms with its losses.
    Associated Press

 
 

MEXICO CITY -- The death toll from Mexico's magnitude 7.1 earthquake has risen by two and now stands at 360.

It includes 219 deaths in Mexico City, where 38 buildings collapsed during the temblor.

The rest of the casualties came in five states near the capital.

National Civil Defense chief Luis Felipe Puente reported the new toll Saturday on Twitter.

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