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updated: 8/7/2014 4:59 PM

Kane judge: Cameras allowed for Geneva doctor's rape case

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  • Mark G. Lewis

      Mark G. Lewis

 
 

A Kane County judge will allow cameras to record the case of a Geneva doctor accused of raping one of his patients in November 2012.

Judge John Barsanti will decide at hearing Aug. 28 what restrictions to impose on photographers covering the case of Mark G. Lewis, 55, formerly of St. Charles and now of the 200 block of Blackberry Drive, Geneva.

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"There's 14 paragraphs of restrictions. I haven't gone over all of those," Barsanti said during a brief hearing Thursday to consider the media request. "I can impose any kind of restrictions that I think are appropriate."

Since the Illinois Supreme Court in 2012 OK'd the use of cameras in courtrooms on a circuit-by-circuit basis, Kane County has adopted its own set of rules.

For example, jurors and sexual assault victims may not be photographed, and cameras are forbidden in some types of cases, such as child custody disputes.

Lewis was arrested in July on charges he sexually assaulted a female patient of his at his then St. Charles home in November 2012.

Also, his license was suspended last month, with the Illinois Department of Professional Regulation saying Lewis had sexual relations with patients and inappropriately prescribed controlled substances to "numerous individuals."

Lewis faces up to 30 years in prison if convicted of the most severe sex charges. He is free on bond.

Lewis' defense attorneys, Michael Krejci and Dean Kekos, objected to cameras in the courtroom, arguing in a motion filed Wednesday that cameras "would materially interfere with the right of the parties to a fair trial, and the fair and impartial administration of justice."

Assistant State's Attorney Greg Sams said the state did not object to cameras in the courtroom on this case.

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