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updated: 8/1/2014 6:13 PM

Plans under way to bring back American sick with Ebola

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  • Plans are under way to bring back one of the two American aid workers sick with Ebola in Africa. A small private jet based in Atlanta has been outfitted with a special, portable tent designed for transporting patients with highly infectious diseases.

      Plans are under way to bring back one of the two American aid workers sick with Ebola in Africa. A small private jet based in Atlanta has been outfitted with a special, portable tent designed for transporting patients with highly infectious diseases.
    Associated Press/CDC

  • Dr. Kent Brantly is one of two American aid workers that have tested positive for the Ebola virus while working to combat an outbreak of the deadly disease at a hospital in Liberia. Plans are under way to bring back one of the two American aid workers, but the plane can only carry one patient. Officials have not said who is to be picked up.

      Dr. Kent Brantly is one of two American aid workers that have tested positive for the Ebola virus while working to combat an outbreak of the deadly disease at a hospital in Liberia. Plans are under way to bring back one of the two American aid workers, but the plane can only carry one patient. Officials have not said who is to be picked up.
    Associated Press

 
By MIKE STOBBE
AP Medical Writer

NEW YORK -- Plans are under way to bring back one of the two American aid workers sick with Ebola in Africa.

A small private jet based in Atlanta has been dispatched to Liberia where the two sick Americans work for missionary groups. Officials say the jet is outfitted with a special, portable tent designed for transporting patients with highly infectious diseases.

The two Americans are Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol. The plane can only carry one patient and officials have not said who is to be picked up.

Atlanta's Emory University Hospital says it expects one of the patients to be transferred there "within the next several days." The hospital has a special isolation unit.

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more than 700 people.

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