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posted: 7/25/2014 5:30 AM

Dutch Oven Multigrain Bread

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  • Artisanal quality bread is possible at home with a double Dutch oven.

      Artisanal quality bread is possible at home with a double Dutch oven.
    Associated Press

 

2¼ cups all-purpose flour, plus more as needed for sprinkling

2¼ cups lukewarm water (about 80 degrees)

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⅔ cup multigrain hot cereal (uncooked)

3 generous tablespoons honey

1 envelope (2¼ teaspoons) active dry yeast

½ cup stone-ground rye flour

2 teaspoons kosher salt

Line a medium bowl with a clean kitchen towel, then sprinkle it heavily with flour. Set aside.

In a large bowl, combine the warm water, cereal and honey. Let soak for at least 30 minutes and up to an hour. Sprinkle the package of yeast over the cereal, whisk gently, then let stand for 3 minutes.

Add the 2¼ cups flour, the rye flour and the salt. With a rubber spatula, mix together for 2 or 3 minutes by pulling the spatula through the dough and flipping. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let rise at room temperature (or in a warm place, about 75 degrees) until the dough has doubled in size, about 2 hours.

Remove the plastic wrap. Lightly sprinkle the top of the dough with all-purpose flour, then push the dough down and pick it back up at the sides. Knead a couple of times in the bowl, adding a little flour to make it less sticky. Flip the dough over so the seam of the dough is on the bottom, then cover with plastic wrap. Let rise for another 1 to 2 hours, or until doubled.

Knead again in the bowl and add a bit of flour if necessary. Transfer the dough to a floured work surface. Knead a couple of times and gently round the dough to tighten the loaf. Place the dough in the floured and towel-lined medium bowl with the seam side up. Cover the top of the loaf with the ends of the towel or with another clean towel. Let rise until the loaf feels springy, about 1½ to 2 hours.

At least 1 hour before baking, place a 5-quart cast-iron double Dutch oven on a rimmed baking sheet (to make it easier to transfer in and out of the oven). Place the cover, overturned, next to it. Place the entire thing in the oven and heat at 400 degrees.

When the dough is ready, carefully remove the baking sheet from the oven. Using the towel to transport it, invert the loaf of bread onto the overturned cover. Use a paring knife to quickly score the top with a 4-inch square about ¼ inch deep. Being very careful, overturn the pot onto the lid to cover the loaf.

Return the baking sheet to the oven. Bake, covered, for 30 minutes, then carefully remove the top and bake uncovered on the "lid" until the loaf is a deep golden brown, another 20 minutes. Transfer the loaf to a wire rack to cool for 1 hour before slicing.

Makes one 9-inch loaf (about 10 servings)

Cook's note: For this recipe you'll need a Dutch oven in which the lid is a skillet. The pan acts as a cover when overturned and set on top of the pot. Several different companies make this style cast-iron Dutch oven, sometimes called a double Dutch oven.

Nutrition values per serving: 190 calories, 1 g fat (0 saturated), 40 g carbohydrates, 3 g fiber, 9 g sugar, 6 g protein, 0 cholesterol, 430 mg sodium.

Recipe adapted from "Lodge Cast Iron Nation" (Oxmoor House, 2014)

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