Breaking News Bar
updated: 5/21/2014 5:48 PM

Attorney: Red-light cameras "nakedly" unconstitutional

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • The Illinois Supreme Court took arguments over whether red light cameras are unconstitutional.

       The Illinois Supreme Court took arguments over whether red light cameras are unconstitutional.
    Joe Lewnard | Staff Photographer

  • Red-light cameras are limited to counties with the most traffic.

       Red-light cameras are limited to counties with the most traffic.
    Bob Chwedyk | Staff Photographer

 
 

SPRINGFIELD -- Attorneys for drivers who got red-light tickets in Chicago told the Illinois Supreme Court today the state law that allows for the traffic cameras in the suburbs is unconstitutional.

In oral arguments, attorney Michael Reagan called the law "nakedly local" and unfair because it doesn't apply statewide. He argued downstate has drivers who run red lights and cities that are bigger than most suburbs, so lawmakers shouldn't have singled out counties in the Chicago and St. Louis areas to allow the cameras.

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

"It destroys uniform enforcement," Reagan said.

But so far lower courts have sided with the city of Chicago, whose own red-light camera ordinance is the subject of the case.

Kerrie Maloney Laytin, an attorney for the city, told the justices it was rational for lawmakers to limit the cameras to counties with the most traffic.

She argued suburban and city police don't have enough resources to monitor red-light offenders and cameras help with that effort.

"There are too many for law enforcement to address," she said.

The court likely won't make a decision for months and possibly could decide the case without addressing the statewide law that allows for cameras in the suburbs.

Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.
    help here