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updated: 4/22/2014 10:00 AM

Retired justice proposes changes to Constitution in new book

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  • In the aftermath of the Connecticut school shootings that left 20 first-graders and six educators dead, retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens began thinking about ways to prevent a repeat. The result is Stevens' new book in which he calls for no fewer than six changes to the Constitution, of which two are directly related to guns.

      In the aftermath of the Connecticut school shootings that left 20 first-graders and six educators dead, retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens began thinking about ways to prevent a repeat. The result is Stevens' new book in which he calls for no fewer than six changes to the Constitution, of which two are directly related to guns.
    Associated Press file photo, 2012

 
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -- Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens is calling for no fewer than six changes to the Constitution, two of which are directly related to guns.

Other changes outlined in a new book by Stevens would abolish the death penalty, make it easier to limit spending on elections and rein in partisan drawing of electoral districts.

His proposed amendments generally would overrule major Supreme Court decisions with which he disagrees, including ones on guns and campaign finance in which he dissented. It's his second book since retiring from the court at age 90.

The book, "Six Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution," is being published Tuesday by Little, Brown and Co., two days after Stevens' 94th birthday.

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