Breaking News Bar
updated: 3/6/2014 2:53 PM

'In Fear' packs some thrills, but lacks direction

hello
Success - Article sent! close
 
 

The gimmick in Jeremy Lovering's atmospheric thriller "In Fear" stems from the director's idea to never tell his stars what will happen next, so that when something shocking occurs, cameras will capture true, visceral reactions.

In theory, this sounds intriguing. Except the actors' "real" reactions can't hold a torch to the fake ones cast members create, augment and flavor as needed in other thrillers.

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

Lovering casts Alice Englert and Iain De Caestecker as Lucy and Tom, a young Brit couple on their way to a music concert when they decide to stop at a rural hotel.

One they can never find, it seems. They keep driving and driving through narrow country roads and always winding up at the same foreboding gate with a "Keep Out" sign prominently posted.

"We're in a maze!" Lucy realizes.

Speaking of things that amaze, the best element in "In Fear" is the tech. Excellent sound editing (great wind, terrific car door closings!) and David Katznelson's camerawork give the movie a high-end flair.

But that doesn't compensate for Lovering's lacking direction. Instead of maintaining suspense by keeping the couple's point-of-view, he allows us to see scenes through the eyes of an unseen stalker, diluting the raw power of this rural thriller.

We never know Lucy and Tom enough to care about their survival, so when a bleeding stranger ("Downton Abbey" regular Allen Leech) jumps into the car and begs the couple to drive away fast, "In Fear" trades in its well-earned scare capital for thrills so cheap, they might have been made in China.

"In Fear" opens exclusively at the Buffalo Grove Theater. Rated R for language and violence. 85 minutes. ★ ★

Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.
    help here