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updated: 2/6/2014 7:00 AM

'Biggest Loser' winner faces criticism on social media

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  • Rachel Frederickson, left, David Brown, Bobby Saleem and host Alison Sweeney on the finale of "The Biggest Loser" in Los Angeles.

      Rachel Frederickson, left, David Brown, Bobby Saleem and host Alison Sweeney on the finale of "The Biggest Loser" in Los Angeles.
    Associated Press/NBC

  • This image released by NBC shows Rachel Frederickson, a contestant on "The Biggest Loser." Fredrickson lost nearly 60 percent of her body weight to win the latest season of ěThe Biggest Loserî and pocket $250,000. A day after her grand unveiling on NBC, she faced a firestorm of criticism in social media from people who said she went too far. (AP Photo/NBC, Paul Drinkwater)

      This image released by NBC shows Rachel Frederickson, a contestant on "The Biggest Loser." Fredrickson lost nearly 60 percent of her body weight to win the latest season of ěThe Biggest Loserî and pocket $250,000. A day after her grand unveiling on NBC, she faced a firestorm of criticism in social media from people who said she went too far. (AP Photo/NBC, Paul Drinkwater)

  • This image released by NBC shows contestant Rachel Frederickson from "The Biggest Loser." Fredrickson lost nearly 60 percent of her body weight to win the latest season of ěThe Biggest Loserî and pocket $250,000. A day after her grand unveiling on NBC, she faced a firestorm of criticism in social media from people who said she went too far. (AP Photo/NBC, Trae Patton)

      This image released by NBC shows contestant Rachel Frederickson from "The Biggest Loser." Fredrickson lost nearly 60 percent of her body weight to win the latest season of ěThe Biggest Loserî and pocket $250,000. A day after her grand unveiling on NBC, she faced a firestorm of criticism in social media from people who said she went too far. (AP Photo/NBC, Trae Patton)

 
Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS -- A day after Rachel Fredrickson won the latest season of "The Biggest Loser," after shedding nearly 60 percent of her body weight, attention wasn't focused on her $250,000 win -- but rather the criticism surrounding her loss.

Experts cautioned that regardless of her current weight, the criticism being levied on social media about her losing too much isn't helpful. A more constructive message is needed, they say, centering on overall healthy living and body image.

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The 5-foot-4, 24-year-old Frederickson dropped from 260 pounds to 105 under the show's rigorous exercise and diet regimen, and time spent on her own before the finale. She was a three-time state champion swimmer at Stillwater Area High School in Minnesota, then turned to sweets for solace after a failed romance with a foreign exchange student she followed to his native Germany.

Frederickson's newly thin frame lit up Twitter on Wednesday, with many viewers pointing to the surprised expressions on the faces of trainers Jillian Michaels and Bob Harper during the show's Tuesday night finale. Many tweeted that Fredrickson looked anorexic and unhealthy, while others congratulated her for dropping 155 pounds.

Frederickson's body mass index, a measure of height and weight, is below the normal range, said Jillian Lampert, senior director of the Emily Program, an eating disorder treatment program based in St. Paul, Minn. But she said the criticism directed against Frederickson isn't helpful.

"As a society we often criticize people for being at higher weights -- that's part of why we have the TV show 'The Biggest Loser' -- and then we feel free to criticize lower weight," Lampert said.

A more constructive message to send young people would center on well-rounded health and the importance of eating well, moving well and sleeping well, she said.

Joanne Ikeda, a dietitian and retired faculty member at the University of California at Berkeley's Department of Nutritional Sciences, added that focus needs to be on embracing body-size diversity.
"We are just obsessed with body size, women particularly. There's just tremendous body dissatisfaction," Ikeda said. "I'm sure even if she was the exact right size, someone wouldn't like the look of her fingers or the length of her hair. "

A listed phone number for Frederickson couldn't be found by The Associated Press late Wednesday. During an appearance on "Access Hollywood," Frederickson didn't directly respond to the criticism but said she intends to live a healthy lifestyle going forward.

"My journey was about finding that confident girl again. Little by little, challenge by challenge, that athlete came out. And it sparked inside me this feeling that I can do anything I can conceive. And I found that girl, and I'm just going to embrace her fully," she said.

In a statement released late Wednesday, NBC said it was committed to helping all of the show's past contestants live healthier lives..

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