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updated: 1/16/2014 4:30 PM

Digital media lab set to open at Naperville library

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A digital media lab the Naperville Public Library is creating for 95th Street Library patrons is set to open next month.

The lab will allow library users to print 3-D models of architectural designs, edit movies and photos, and compose basic songs, among other creative, computer-based tasks.

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Julie Rothenfluh, the library's executive director, said the digital media lab plans to host an open house sometime in February so people can get expert assistance and firsthand experience with programs such as iMovie, GarageBand, Adobe InDesign and Adobe Photoshop as well as a new 3-D printer.

The library will show examples of projects that can be made with the 3-D printer and play examples of soundtracks that can be created with the new audio technology available on 12 iMac computers. The library spent about $25,000 on technology for the lab.

The lab will play into plans the library is developing to launch more concentrated services for entrepreneurs through an initiative called BiblioTek Centers for Innovation and Development. BiblioTek could have a presence at the 95th Street and Nichols libraries as soon as this spring.

Also in the digital realm, Rothenfluh told library board members Wednesday night about a new service available on the library's website called Zinio that lets cardholders download hundreds of magazines to their computers or e-readers for free. Magazine downloads come in full-color and do not expire, so the files will not vanish from a reader's device.

The digital magazine service is allowing the library to decrease the number of back issues it has on hand, creating more floor space for technology and work stations, Rothenfluh said.

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