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posted: 8/22/2013 2:07 PM

Govt to sue Texas over voter ID law

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  • Attorney General Eric Holder said Thursday that the Justice Department will sue Texas over the state's voter ID law and will seek to intervene in a lawsuit over the state's redistricting laws.

      Attorney General Eric Holder said Thursday that the Justice Department will sue Texas over the state's voter ID law and will seek to intervene in a lawsuit over the state's redistricting laws.
    ASSOCIATED PRESS

 
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department said Thursday it will sue Texas over the state's voter ID law and will seek to intervene in a lawsuit over the state's redistricting laws.

Attorney General Eric Holder said the action marks another step in the effort to protect voting rights of all eligible Americans. He said the government will not allow a recent Supreme Court decision to be interpreted as open season for states to pursue measures that suppress voting rights.

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"This represents the department's latest action to protect voting rights, but it will not be our last," said the attorney general.

On June 25, the Supreme Court threw out the most powerful part of the Voting Rights Act, whose enactment in 1965 marked a major turning point in black Americans' struggle for equal rights and political power. The Justice Department's legal action in Texas is based on another provision in the law. Texas Gov. Rick Perry has called the Obama administration's actions an "end-run around the Supreme Court."

In the voter ID lawsuit, the U.S. government will contend that Texas adopted a voter identification law with the purpose of denying or restricting the right to vote on account of race, color or membership in a language minority group.

Intervening in the redistricting case would enable the federal government to seek a declaration that Texas's 2011 redistricting plans for the U.S. Congress and the Texas State House of Representatives were adopted in order to deny or restrict the right to vote on account of race, color, or membership in a language minority group.

A federal court in Washington, D.C., has previously held that Texas failed to meet its burden of proving that its 2011 redistricting plans and its 2011 voter identification law were not discriminatory.

The separate provision of the Voting Rights Act that Holder is invoking may be a difficult tool for the Obama administration to use. A handful of jurisdictions have been subjected to advance approval of election changes through the Civil Rights Act provision it is relying on, but a court first must find that a state or local government engaged in intentional discrimination under the Constitution's 14th or 15th amendments, or the jurisdiction has to admit to discrimination. Unlike other parts of the voting law, the discriminatory effect of an action is not enough to trigger the provision.

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