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posted: 7/17/2013 12:56 PM

Budweiser Clydesdales coming to Antioch

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Village of Antioch submission

The world-famous Budweiser Clydesdales, the symbol of quality and tradition for Anheuser-Busch since 1933, are scheduled to make several appearances in the Antioch area July 25, including quick ceremonial stops at the Limerick Lounge, Mexican Paradise, The Lodge, Piggly Wiggly, Wings Etc., with a final stop for a photo opportunities at Anastasia's.

The eight-horse hitch will be harnessed and hitched to the famous red beer wagon at the Piggly Wiggly from 4 to 5 p.m. They'll participate in the parade through the downtown Antioch that begins at 5 p.m. and should last approximately 40 minutes, with stops at the previously named locations.

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The Clydesdales' appearance in Antioch is one of hundreds made annually by the traveling hitches.

Canadians of Scottish descent brought the first Clydesdales to America in the mid-1800s. Today, the giant draft horses are used primarily for breeding and show.

Horses chosen for the Budweiser Clydesdale hitch must be at least 3 years of age, stand approximately 18 hands -- or 6 feet -- at the shoulder, weigh an average of 2,000 pounds, must be bay in color, have four white legs, and a blaze of white on the face and black mane and tail. A gentle temperament is very important, as hitch horses meet millions of people each year.

A single Clydesdale hitch horse will consume as much as 20 to 25 quarts of feed, 40 to 50 pounds of hay, and 30 gallons of water per day.

Each hitch travels with a Dalmatian. In the early days of brewing, Dalmatians were bred and trained to protect the horses and guard the wagon when the driver went inside to make deliveries.

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