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Article posted: 7/15/2013 5:11 AM

Hospitals turn to therapy to curb staff burnout

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Nurse Kate Martin takes a moment out of her schedule to do some breathing and stretching exercises inside the Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center in Washington, D.C.

The Washington Post photo

Nurses receive some stretching exercises from Daniel Burkholder, right, inside the Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. Medical institutions are implementing programs to help both patients and staffers learn to cope with stress and promote staff morale.

The Washington Post photo

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Finding ways to help nurses relax, reflect, refocus or re-energize is critical in helping them to prevent or overcome burnout, according to researchers and nurse managers. "Nurses are particularly at risk for becoming overwhelmed and depleted," says Cynda Hylton Rushton, a professor in the School of Nursing at Johns Hopkins University. They "provide direct, 24/7 care, and they often must confront the limits of what medicine can do for people. Nurses can begin to feel helpless or have a sense that they are not actually helping. They can begin to question what they are doing and how they are benefiting others."
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    • Nurse Kate Martin takes a moment out of her schedule to do some breathing and stretching exercises inside the Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center in Washington, D.C.
    •  Nurses receive some stretching exercises from Daniel Burkholder, right, inside the Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. Medical institutions are implementing programs to help both patients and staffers learn to cope with stress and promote staff morale.
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