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updated: 5/27/2013 9:23 PM

White Sox' Santiago quietly shows his kindness

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  • White Sox pitcher Hector Santiago has reached out to help a family affected by the tornado that hit Moore, Okla., last week.

      White Sox pitcher Hector Santiago has reached out to help a family affected by the tornado that hit Moore, Okla., last week.
    Associated Press

 
 

White Sox pitcher Hector Santiago throws a screwball, but that's not what makes him somewhat unique among his major-league peers.

With so many games and so much off-season training, most players simply don't have the time to respond to human tragedy.

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Santiago makes the time.

The Newark, N.J., native was in eighth grade when terrorists attacked the World Trade Center Towers in New York City on Sept. 11, 2001, and Santiago never forgot the terror and helpless feeling.

That's why he got in his car and drove up to Connecticut in January to speak to the children affected by the Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings.

Now, Santiago has turned his attention to the people affected by the deadly tornadoes in Moore, Okla.

"I always try to give a helping hand wherever I can," Santiago said before the Sox played the Cubs on Monday night at U.S. Cellular Field.

Santiago's agent, Brian McCafferty, got in touch with a church in Moore and connected with a family that lost their home in the tornado. Before Santiago offered financial assistance, the family's daughter was going to cancel her plans to go to college.

"I talked to her today and I asked her if there was anything she needed, anything I could do, something we could send," Santiago said. "The family had purchased all her stuff for school and lost it during the storm. I'm going to help her with that, get what she needs and ship it out to her."

Santiago is still a young player, and it's not like he's a multimillionaire. He's still willing to help others in need any way he can.

"I've always tried to give back as much as possible," Santiago said. "If something happened to me, I would appreciate it if somebody would try to help. Any little thing helps. This is nothing big, but maybe it will be one less thing she has to worry about."

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