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Article updated: 5/6/2013 10:56 AM

Limo's legacy stretches over the decades

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1967 Lincoln Continental "Baby Limo"

Courtesy of Prestige MotorCar Photography

George Lehmann, left, and Robert Peterson at the White House. While commonly known as the Nixon limousine, this Lehmann-Peterson Lincoln Continental was actually accepted by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1968.

Courtesy of Peterson family

While most Lehmann-Peterson limousines are stretched 34 inches, this "Baby Limo" is one of just six made that were merely eight inches longer than a standard Lincoln Continental.

This particular limousine was ordered by the late John G. Searle, CEO of Skokie-headquartered Searle Pharmaceutical, as a 65th birthday present to himself after growing tired of driving in Chicago traffic.

While a variety of luxuries came standard, buyers could purchase upgrades to their limousine interiors. Searle's Lincoln came with work stations.

After Searle's ownership, the limousine went to an East Coast collector before more recently coming back to an Illinois enthusiast last year.

About this Article

For those looking to travel in pure class during the 1960s, few luxury offerings were as tantalizing as a Lincoln Continental limousine assembled by Chicago's Lehmann-Peterson Coachbuilders. Two young car enthusiasts, Robert Peterson and George Lehmann, started the company in 1963 and established a headquarters on Harlem Avenue.
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    • 1967 Lincoln Continental “Baby Limo”
    •  George Lehmann, left, and Robert Peterson at the White House. While commonly known as the Nixon limousine, this Lehmann-Peterson Lincoln Continental was actually accepted by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1968.
    • While most Lehmann-Peterson limousines are stretched 34 inches, this “Baby Limo” is one of just six made that were merely eight inches longer than a standard Lincoln Continental.
    • This particular limousine was ordered by the late John G. Searle, CEO of Skokie-headquartered Searle Pharmaceutical, as a 65th birthday present to himself after growing tired of driving in Chicago traffic.
    • While a variety of luxuries came standard, buyers could purchase upgrades to their limousine interiors. Searle’s Lincoln came with work stations.
    • After Searle’s ownership, the limousine went to an East Coast collector before more recently coming back to an Illinois enthusiast last year.
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