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updated: 4/27/2013 11:03 PM

Sox in a world of hurt

Floyd now latest concern as injury bug continues to strike White Sox

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  • Alejandro De Arza strikes out with the bases loaded while Tampa Bay Rays' pitcher Jake McGee walks to the dugout to end the seventh inning Saturday night at U.S. Cellular Field.

      Alejandro De Arza strikes out with the bases loaded while Tampa Bay Rays' pitcher Jake McGee walks to the dugout to end the seventh inning Saturday night at U.S. Cellular Field.
    Associated Press

  • Adam Dunn shakes hands with third base coach Joe McEwing after hitting a solo home run in the fourth inning Saturday at U.S. Cellular Field.

      Adam Dunn shakes hands with third base coach Joe McEwing after hitting a solo home run in the fourth inning Saturday at U.S. Cellular Field.
    Associated Press

 
 

It's starting to look like the White Sox' extended run of good karma with injuries is coming to a screeching halt.

With five players already on the disabled list heading into Saturday night's game against Tampa Bay, including left fielder Dayan Viciedo (oblique), second baseman Gordon Beckham (fractured wrist) and starting pitcher John Danks (shoulder), the Sox could ill afford to lose any more players to ill health.

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But as infielder Jeff Keppinger was sitting out his second straight game with back spasms, starter Gavin Floyd had to exit with two outs in the third inning with a flexor muscle strain in his right elbow.

After the Sox fell to the Rays 10-4 at U.S. Cellular Field, manager Robin Ventura said Floyd is likely to land on the DL, with Hector Santiago taking his spot in the rotation.

Ventura also said right-hander Deunte Heath is coming back up from Class AAA Charlotte to take Santiago's spot in the bullpen.

"The hits keep coming," Ventura said.

From 2002-12, White Sox players spent the least amount of time on the DL in the major leagues.

Credit crack trainer Herm Schneider, who is in his 35th season on the South Side, his assistant, Brian Ball, and director of conditioning Allen Thomas.

The Sox' staff is adept at curing all of the aches and pains that come with baseball's marathon season, but right now the injuries are coming fast and furious.

Floyd was not in the White Sox' clubhouse after the game, but there is some growing concern about his future.

Floyd throws one of the nastiest curveballs in baseball, and the pitch taxes the elbow. Last year, Floyd was on the DL two different times with elbow problems.

Santiago relieved Floyd on Saturday and allowed 4 runs on 10 hits in 3 innings. He threw 86 pitches and is in line to start Friday at Kansas City.

"I don't know what they told Gavin, but you hope he's healthy and it's nothing major and he can come back soon," Santiago said. "I think I will be filling in for the next couple of starts. I'm good. I feel fine."

Too bad the White Sox can't say the same thing about their decimated roster.

"You just keep going," Ventura said. "The games are on the schedule. You just find another guy and you keep it going. It's disappointing that guys you think you're going to have at a certain time are not going to be there, but you keep going."

The Sox weren't able to get much going against Rays starter Matt Moore (5-0), who allowed 1 run on 3 hits in 6 innings. The left-hander recorded the first six outs on strikeouts and exited with a 1.13 ERA.

"As far tonight, the story's the Moore kid," Ventura said. "He's good. He was cruising for most of the game.

"Nothing looks the same as far as watching him. He changes eye levels, in and out, back and forth. He really has kind of everything. You're not sitting on one speed or looking for one spot. He can move it around."

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