Breaking News Bar
posted: 4/25/2013 10:12 PM

White Sox' Flowers out to stop basestealers

hello
Success - Article sent! close
 
 

This wasn't supposed to happen.

When Tyler Flowers replaced A.J. Pierzynski as the White Sox' No. 1 catcher this season, opposing basestealers that had been running wild and free for years were supposed to be stopped in their collective tracks.

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

So far this season they've continued to swipe bases at will.

Backing up Pierzynski in 2012, Flowers had a 30 percent (12-for-40) success rate throwing out basestealers. This year he's at 6.7 percent (1-for-15).

While he's not thrilled with the ratio, Flowers said there is more to the numbers.

"I can do a better job throwing, and can the pitchers do better holding runners on? Yeah, probably a little bit," Flowers said. "But at the same time, the baserunners are taking advantage of the situation.

"A lot of (steals) have been because our emphasis at that point of the game was getting the hitter out more so than keeping a guy close. The object of the game is to get the guys out and stop the guys from hitting."

In Wednesday's game against Cleveland, Sox relief pitcher Nate Jones was on the mound in the sixth inning, and he never checked the runner. That allowed Jason Kipnis to steal second and third base after getting "a Flintstones lead," as manager Robin Ventura put it.

"I'm going to do what I'm supposed to do, catch the ball, get rid of it as quickly as I can, as accurately as I can," Flowers said. "The rest of it's really out of my hands. I feel confident throwing. It's tough when you think you're better than what the numbers mean and all that kind of stuff.

"But it's a team game. It's not about my numbers. It's about us winning ballgames."

Getting anxious:

Gordon Beckham has been spending much of his time with veteran White Sox trainer Herm Schneider and his assistant, Brian Ball.

Like every other injured Sox player through the years, Beckham can't wait until his fractured hamate bone heals and he is back on the field -- with late May still the target date.

"Hermie's got me going," Beckham said. "I've done probably 1,600 leg exercises in the last four days. That's the way Herm likes it, to get you back quicker, so that's what I'm doing."

Injured April 9 while taking an awkward swing during a game at Washington, Beckham is hoping to have the cast and stitches from his left wrist removed Tuesday.

"After that, I'll be able to do a lot more things," Beckham said.

Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.