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Article posted: 3/30/2013 5:16 AM

Saplings from Anne Frank's tree take root in U.S.

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Mary Fortney, learning resource development manager at the Indianapolis Children's Museum, looks over chestnut saplings from the tree outside Anne Frank's hiding spot in Amsterdam being cared for in the museum's greenhouse in Indianapolis. Eleven saplings grown from seeds taken from the massive chestnut tree that stood outside the home in which Frank and her family hid are being distributed to museums, schools, parks and Holocaust remembrance centers through a project led by The Anne Frank Center USA.

Associated Press

Actress Julie Mauro discusses the hiding place of Anne Frank with students following a performance in the Anne Frank exhibition at the Indianapolis Children's Museum in Indianapolis.

Associated Press

Actress Julie Mauro portrays Miep Gies, one of Anne Frank's protectors and the woman who preserved her diary, during a performance in an Anne Frank exhibition at the Indianapolis Children's Museum in Indianapolis.

Associated Press

A replica of the Anne Frank Diary is displayed at the Indianapolis Children's Museum in Indianapolis.

Associated Press

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Saplings from the chestnut tree that stood as a symbol of hope for Anne Frank as she hid from the Nazis for two years in Amsterdam are being distributed to 11 locations in the United States as part of a project that aims to preserve her legacy and promote tolerance. The tree, one of the Jewish teenager's only connections to nature while she hid with her family in a Secret Annex in her father's company building, was diseased and rotted through the trunk when wind and heavy rain toppled it in August 2010. But saplings grown from its seeds will be planted starting in April, when the Children's Museum of Indianapolis will put the first one in the ground.
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    • Mary Fortney, learning resource development manager at the Indianapolis Children’s Museum, looks over chestnut saplings from the tree outside Anne Frank’s hiding spot in Amsterdam being cared for in the museum’s greenhouse in Indianapolis. Eleven saplings grown from seeds taken from the massive chestnut tree that stood outside the home in which Frank and her family hid are being distributed to museums, schools, parks and Holocaust remembrance centers through a project led by The Anne Frank Center USA.
    • Actress Julie Mauro discusses the hiding place of Anne Frank with students following a performance in the Anne Frank exhibition at the Indianapolis Children’s Museum in Indianapolis.
    • Actress Julie Mauro portrays Miep Gies, one of Anne Frank’s protectors and the woman who preserved her diary, during a performance in an Anne Frank exhibition at the Indianapolis Children’s Museum in Indianapolis.
    • A replica of the Anne Frank Diary is displayed at the Indianapolis Children’s Museum in Indianapolis.
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