Breaking News Bar
posted: 3/17/2013 12:01 AM

5 ways to shake winter off your car

hello
Success - Article sent! close
 
Associated Press

DETROIT -- Winter can do a number on your car.

Slush, salt and cold temperatures take a toll on everything from the tires to the wiper blades. So, as spring approaches, it's a good idea to give your car a thorough once-over to undo winter's damage.

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

It won't cost a lot. You can do the work yourself or visit a car wash and a garage. Goodyear, Firestone and other car care centers will rotate your tires, change your oil and fluids and inspect your vehicle for winter damage for $35 or less.

Here are five things you can do to shake off winter and get your car in shape for spring:

1. Wash the underbody

Wintertime driving will coat the bottom of your car with salt, sand and other grime that can cause corrosion. Corrosion can lead to rust problems, which can make your car much harder to resell or even dangerous to drive.

Spend a few extra dollars for the undercarriage power wash at the local car wash or spray the car's bottom with your own hose. If possible, use a car jack to raise the vehicle for a more thorough cleaning, advises Bill Kropelnicki, president and owner of Rambling River Repair in Farmington, Minn. There's no need to use soap or any other cleaner.

While you're at it, open the hood and wipe down the engine with a soft mitt and soapy water. And remove all the leaves and debris that can find their way into the car, says Cliff Weathers, deputy autos editor for Consumer Reports. And remove any crusty white residue off the battery with a toothbrush, baking soda and water. The residue -- caused by corrosion -- can eventually prevent your car from starting. The cleaning also helps prepare the battery for the stress of warmer temperatures.

2. Scrub inside and out

Salt and sand can damage the car's paint. Give your car a thorough cleaning and wax it with a paste or liquid wax, Weathers said. He cautions that sprays don't clean as well.

Scrub the bottoms of doors, which can get coated with grime, Kropelnicki says. He also urges car owners to clean the window channels, Also apply a silicone spray, which repels dirt and lubricates the surfaces so the windows will operate smoothly, he says.

Use a steam cleaner -- you can rent one for $20 at Home Depot -- or apply a rug-cleaning spray to remove all the salt from the car's inside. Salt can break down some fabrics and cause rips or tears when feet grind against them.

And don't forget to take bags of salt and ice scrapers out of the trunk.

3. Replace wiper blades

Wiper blades get a workout during the winter months. Weathers advises changing them each spring and fall. Amazon.com's best-selling Bosch wiper blades go for $25 a pair.

4. Check tires

Some garages recommend a wheel alignment -- which can cost around $80 -- or a tire rotation as part of your spring maintenance. Weathers doesn't think it's necessary as long as you're following the car's regular maintenance schedule and doing normal winter driving.

Check your tire pressure. Cold weather can cause tires to be underinflated and the onset of warm weather can overinflate them. Also, visually inspect your tires to make sure they're wearing evenly and have plenty of tread for the rainy spring weather ahead.

Driving on properly inflated tires can save you money. It can cost anywhere from $50 to $250 to replace a blown tire, depending on the kind of tire you need.

5. Check your fluids

Winter weather can deplete some fluids -- especially windshield wiper fluid -- more quickly, so top them off yourself if they're too low. A service station will also do the job for $25 or so. You should change your oil around every 5,000 miles regardless of season, Weathers says. Brake and transmission fluids should be checked as well.

Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.
    help here