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Article updated: 2/11/2013 12:44 PM

Romania: Slaughterhouses did not commit fraud

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Findus Beef Lasagne photographed in a shop in Jarrow, England. Frozen-food company Findus recalled the beef lasagna meals earlier this week after French supplier Comigel raised concerns that the products didn't "conform to specification." The U.K. Food Standards Agency said the lasagnas were tested as part of an ongoing investigation into mislabeled meat.

Associated Press

Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) Owen Paterson, left, speaks to the media Saturday outside Defra Headquarters in London after an emergency meeting with the Food Standards Agency (FSA) and representatives of various leading retailers, as revelations about the widespread use of horseheat in supermarket beef products continues to hit consumer confidence. Concerns about the use of horse meat burst into the spotlight earlier this year, after it emerged that some beef products contained horse DNA, and now the whole industry faces pressure to test their products and reveal the findings.

Associated Press

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Two Romanian plants believed to be the source of horse meat mislabeled as beef in supermarkets across Europe declared it properly and any fraud was committed somewhere else down the line, officials said Monday. Romania is scrambling to contain the damage from the fast-growing horse meat scandal -- where the cheaper meat was substituted for beef in everything from burgers to frozen lasagna.
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    • Findus Beef Lasagne photographed in a shop in Jarrow, England. Frozen-food company Findus recalled the beef lasagna meals earlier this week after French supplier Comigel raised concerns that the products didn’t “conform to specification.” The U.K. Food Standards Agency said the lasagnas were tested as part of an ongoing investigation into mislabeled meat.
    • Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) Owen Paterson, left, speaks to the media Saturday outside Defra Headquarters in London after an emergency meeting with the Food Standards Agency (FSA) and representatives of various leading retailers, as revelations about the widespread use of horseheat in supermarket beef products continues to hit consumer confidence. Concerns about the use of horse meat burst into the spotlight earlier this year, after it emerged that some beef products contained horse DNA, and now the whole industry faces pressure to test their products and reveal the findings.
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