Breaking News Bar
posted: 9/4/2012 8:35 AM

5 Democratic convention moments to remember

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • In this Aug. 12, 1980, file photo, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy responds to the applause at the presidential Democratic National Convention in New York City. One of the memorable moments from past conventions was when Kennedy's challenge to President Jimmy Carter fell short, he conceded with a defiant note: "The cause endures, the hope still lives and the dream shall never die."

      In this Aug. 12, 1980, file photo, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy responds to the applause at the presidential Democratic National Convention in New York City. One of the memorable moments from past conventions was when Kennedy's challenge to President Jimmy Carter fell short, he conceded with a defiant note: "The cause endures, the hope still lives and the dream shall never die."
    Associated Press

  • In this July 2, 1932, file photo, Gov. Franklin D. Roosevelt, Democratic nominee for President, thanks Louis Mc Howe, left, and James Farley, in Chicago, after delivering his acceptance speech before the democratic convention. One of the memorable moments from past conventions was Roosevelt inventing the tradition of the nominee coming to the convention to accept the nomination with a speech, instead of waiting for a formal ceremony weeks later.

      In this July 2, 1932, file photo, Gov. Franklin D. Roosevelt, Democratic nominee for President, thanks Louis Mc Howe, left, and James Farley, in Chicago, after delivering his acceptance speech before the democratic convention. One of the memorable moments from past conventions was Roosevelt inventing the tradition of the nominee coming to the convention to accept the nomination with a speech, instead of waiting for a formal ceremony weeks later.
    Associated Press

  • In this Aug. 28, 1964, file photo, Sen. Robert Kennedy stands before the delegates at the Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, N.J. One of the memorable moments from past conventions was delegates standing in tearful silence as Robert Kennedy quotes Shakespeare in tribute to his slain brother, President John F. Kennedy: "When he shall die, take him and cut him out into stars, and he shall make the face of heaven so fine that all the world will be in love with night and pay no worship to the garish sun."

      In this Aug. 28, 1964, file photo, Sen. Robert Kennedy stands before the delegates at the Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, N.J. One of the memorable moments from past conventions was delegates standing in tearful silence as Robert Kennedy quotes Shakespeare in tribute to his slain brother, President John F. Kennedy: "When he shall die, take him and cut him out into stars, and he shall make the face of heaven so fine that all the world will be in love with night and pay no worship to the garish sun."
    Associated Press

  • In this July 14, 1948, file photo, Mayor Hubert H. Humphrey of Minneapolis wears a Truman button as he addresses the Democratic National Convention at Philadelphia. One of the memorable moments from past conventions was Humphrey declaring it's time to "get out of the shadow of states' rights and walk forthrightly into the bright sunshine of human rights." When support for civil rights is added to the party platform, Mississippi's delegates and half of Alabama's walk out.

      In this July 14, 1948, file photo, Mayor Hubert H. Humphrey of Minneapolis wears a Truman button as he addresses the Democratic National Convention at Philadelphia. One of the memorable moments from past conventions was Humphrey declaring it's time to "get out of the shadow of states' rights and walk forthrightly into the bright sunshine of human rights." When support for civil rights is added to the party platform, Mississippi's delegates and half of Alabama's walk out.
    Associated Press

 
Associated Press

Democrats have little hope of matching the fervor and historical import of their 2008 convention, when they made Barack Obama the first black presidential nominee of a major political party. Will they find some way to make an enduring mark in 2012? Here are five memorable moments from their earlier gatherings:

1932: Amid the Great Depression, Franklin D. Roosevelt invents the tradition of the nominee coming to the convention to accept the nomination with a speech, instead of waiting for a formal ceremony weeks later. "I pledge myself to a New Deal for the American people," he says.

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

1948: Minneapolis Mayor Hubert Humphrey declares it's time to "get out of the shadow of states' rights and walk forthrightly into the bright sunshine of human rights." When support for civil rights is added to the party platform, Mississippi's delegates and half of Alabama's walk out.

1964: Delegates stand in tearful silence as Robert Kennedy quotes Shakespeare in tribute to his slain brother, President John F. Kennedy: "When he shall die, take him and cut him out into stars, and he shall make the face of heaven so fine that all the world will be in love with night and pay no worship to the garish sun."

1968: Vietnam War protesters are met with tear gas and billy clubs, leading a convention speaker to denounce "Gestapo tactics on the streets of Chicago." Inside the convention hall, anti-war delegates engage in shouting matches with supporters of Vice President Hubert Humphrey, who wins the nomination. His televised speech is intercut with scenes of the melee outside.

1980: When Ted Kennedy's challenge to President Jimmy Carter falls short, he concedes with a defiant note: "The cause endures, the hope still lives and the dream shall never die." In 2008, stricken by incurable brain cancer, Kennedy will echo these words as he passes the torch to Barack Obama: "The work begins anew, the hope rises again and the dream lives on."

------

Follow AP writer Connie Cass on Twitter at http://www.Twitter.com/ConnieCass

Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.
    help here