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updated: 8/20/2012 11:46 PM

Antioch not yet ready to allow — or ban — video gambling

Trustees haven't approved it, but they haven't banned it either

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Antioch remains undecided about whether to join several other suburbs in allowing video gambling at bars, restaurants, truck stops and other eligible places in the village.

Village trustees Monday night voted 6-0 against an ordinance paving the way for the devices.

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But the village also doesn't have an ordinance prohibiting video gaming. Village Attorney Robert Long said that means video gambling could pop up unless officials pass a local law banning it.

Records show parent companies of Limerick Lounge, The Lodge of Antioch and Fox's Lounge already have license applications pending before the Illinois Gaming Board.

Officials plan to address the issue again. Trustee Mary Dominiak suggested the ordinance require businesses to train employees on how to spot problem gamblers.

Round Lake Heights, Wauconda, Lakemoor, Fox Lake, Prospect Heights, Round Lake, Elk Grove Village, Huntley and Winfield are among the suburbs to approve ordinances for video gambling.

Video gambling was approved by the state in 2009 as a way to help raise $31 billion for capital improvements. No more than five machines may be placed in licensed truck stops, restaurants with liquor licenses, bars, clubs or halls of veterans and fraternal organizations.

Under the state's video gambling act, towns can receive 5 percent of net income from the terminals after winnings are paid to the players. The state will collect 25 percent, with business owners and machine operators taking an even split of the remainder.

"My instinct is there is not going to be a lot of revenue generated out of this thing," Trustee Deniss Crosby said.

Elected officials in about 150 communities and six counties statewide have voted to prohibit video gaming within their borders.

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