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updated: 2/10/2012 3:00 PM

See how Valentine's Day treats are created in Geneva

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  • Mireya Ojeda, left, puts the swirl on the top of some peanut butter diamonds at Graham's Fine Chocolates and Ice Cream in Geneva. The staff can tell what is in the candy by looking at the swirl, which is different for each type of candy.

       Mireya Ojeda, left, puts the swirl on the top of some peanut butter diamonds at Graham's Fine Chocolates and Ice Cream in Geneva. The staff can tell what is in the candy by looking at the swirl, which is different for each type of candy.
    Brian Hill | Staff Photographer

  • Pink chocolate is drizzled over what will be inside chocolate boxes at Graham's Fine Chocolates and Ice Cream in Geneva.

       Pink chocolate is drizzled over what will be inside chocolate boxes at Graham's Fine Chocolates and Ice Cream in Geneva.
    Brian Hill | Staff Photographer

  • Valentin Antinio, left, and Maria Nicacio spreads 25 pounds of English toffee on a special warming table. The toffee will cool and then be broken apart into the pieces that will be sold.

       Valentin Antinio, left, and Maria Nicacio spreads 25 pounds of English toffee on a special warming table. The toffee will cool and then be broken apart into the pieces that will be sold.
    Brian Hill | Staff Photographer

  • Morning barista Maddi Foote, who works at Graham's 318 Coffeehouse a few doors down from the main store, prepares some of the mixed boxes for Valentine's Day.

       Morning barista Maddi Foote, who works at Graham's 318 Coffeehouse a few doors down from the main store, prepares some of the mixed boxes for Valentine's Day.
    Brian Hill | Staff Photographer

  • Maddi Foote prepares a few of the mixed boxes for Valentine's Day.

       Maddi Foote prepares a few of the mixed boxes for Valentine's Day.
    Brian Hill | Staff Photographer

 
 

With more than 50 types of candies and truffles to choose from at Graham's Fine Chocolates and Ice Cream in Geneva, how can you make a bad choice?

With everything from different flavors of peanut brittle to the skalie, which is Graham's version of the turtle, there is sure to be something to please even the most die-hard sugar fanatic.

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Most everyone has a favorite candy, but Graham's owner Robert Untiedt can't be pinned down to one choice.

"It depends on the day," Untiedt said. "Everything we make is my favorite version of that candy."

Untiedt says he learned a lot while working with some of the best chocolatiers in the mid-west.

"In 1987 my dad passed and it pushed me. I looked and looked for a place to open my own store and God helped me find Geneva. It has been wonderful ever since. It's just in my blood," he said.

Jayni Wunderlich, Graham's premier graphic designer and pastry chef, says the local community is what make Graham's special. She enjoys hearing from customers who say they've been coming in for years.

The family-run business, which was started in 1987, has grown and now has three locations, with two on Third Street in Geneva and another on Front Street in Wheaton.

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