Breaking News Bar
updated: 1/19/2012 2:41 PM

Arlington Hts. celebrates 125th anniversay with bells

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • Dawn Walter, left, a volunteer at the Arlington Heights Historical Museum, shows Village President Arlene Mulder her 1880s outfit.

       Dawn Walter, left, a volunteer at the Arlington Heights Historical Museum, shows Village President Arlene Mulder her 1880s outfit.
    JOE LEWNARD | Staff Photographer

  • The bell at Arlington Heights' First United Methodist Church is housed in the steeple.

       The bell at Arlington Heights' First United Methodist Church is housed in the steeple.
    George Leclaire | Staff Photographer

  • Arlington Heights Village Trustee Tom Glasgow talks with Sarah Jerome, superintendent of Arlington Heights Elementary District 25, at the Quasquicentennial reception Wednesday at Village Hall.

       Arlington Heights Village Trustee Tom Glasgow talks with Sarah Jerome, superintendent of Arlington Heights Elementary District 25, at the Quasquicentennial reception Wednesday at Village Hall.
    JOE LEWNARD | Staff Photographer

  • Bob Paddock, executive vice president of the Daily Herald, talks with Jim Perkins, president of the board of Northwest Suburban High School District 214, during the celebration of the 125th anniversary of Arlington Heights' incorporation.

       Bob Paddock, executive vice president of the Daily Herald, talks with Jim Perkins, president of the board of Northwest Suburban High School District 214, during the celebration of the 125th anniversary of Arlington Heights' incorporation.
    JOE LEWNARD | Staff Photographer

  • About 100 people attended a reception Wednesday marking the date of Arlington Heights' incorporation 125 years ago.

       About 100 people attended a reception Wednesday marking the date of Arlington Heights' incorporation 125 years ago.
    JOE LEWNARD | Staff Photographer

  • Arlington Heights Village President Arlene Mulder, left, greets William Maki, former village president and current presiding judge of the Third Municipal Court in Rolling Meadows. Maki purchased a banner to mark the Quasquicentennial, Mulder said.

       Arlington Heights Village President Arlene Mulder, left, greets William Maki, former village president and current presiding judge of the Third Municipal Court in Rolling Meadows. Maki purchased a banner to mark the Quasquicentennial, Mulder said.
    JOE LEWNARD | Staff Photographer

  • Bell ringers Daniel Merz, left, his son Eli, 5, and Jim Jirak, 87, ring the bell at First United Methodist Church at noon Wednesday to celebrate the 125th anniversary of Arlington Heights' incorporation. The bell was cast in 1895.

       Bell ringers Daniel Merz, left, his son Eli, 5, and Jim Jirak, 87, ring the bell at First United Methodist Church at noon Wednesday to celebrate the 125th anniversary of Arlington Heights' incorporation. The bell was cast in 1895.
    George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

  • Video: Arlington Heights Church Celebrates Village Milestone

 
 

Arlington Heights celebrated the 125th anniversary of its incorporation Wednesday with the ringing of church bells and a reception for village officials, members of the Quasquicentennial Committee and sponsors who have donated to support the yearlong celebration.

Thanks to the sponsors, including those who bought "trains" that will be decorated and spotted around the village and banners that are being hung, no funds are coming from taxpayers, Village President Arlene Mulder said.

An antiqued facsimile of the incorporation papers, complete with a small map showing the tiny village and signatures that include William Dunton, the village's founder, were displayed. Michael Mulholland, genealogist and local historian at the Arlington Heights Memorial Library, and Mike Driskell, the library's IT manager, traveled to the Cook County archives in Chicago and scanned the document for printing on paper that looks like parchment.

And residents attending the reception signed a "rededication" scroll that will join the incorporation papers on display at Village Hall.

"We are rededicating ourselves again to what this community is," said Lauree Harp, chairman of the anniversary committee. "We've gotten bigger; we've gotten newer, but we haven't really changed. We're still a community that cares about people, that cares about our library, that cares about our parks, that cares about our hospital."

The village had 1,200 "souls" in 1887, and the vote to incorporate was 126-34, Mulder said.

Harp said so far 30 trains have been sold, and they will go on display June 15 in a program similar to the 2000 Ponies on Parade. Half of the 75 custom banners have been hung, she said, and people can still purchase trains and banners.

Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.
    help here