Breaking News Bar
updated: 11/4/2011 11:29 AM

Arlington Heights neighborhood wants trees saved

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • A notice posted by the Village of Arlington Heights explains how trees marked with a green dot will be cut down because of infestation by emerald ash borer. These two trees are in the Cedar Glen neighborhood.

       A notice posted by the Village of Arlington Heights explains how trees marked with a green dot will be cut down because of infestation by emerald ash borer. These two trees are in the Cedar Glen neighborhood.
    Bob Chwedyk | Staff Photographer

  • A posted notice by the Village of Arlington Heights, on a tree outside Cedar Glen Condominiums, explains that trees marked with a green dot in will be cut down because of infestation by the emerald ash borer.

       A posted notice by the Village of Arlington Heights, on a tree outside Cedar Glen Condominiums, explains that trees marked with a green dot in will be cut down because of infestation by the emerald ash borer.
    Bob Chwedyk | Staff Photographer

  • Trees along South Embers Lane are marked with a green dot, indicating that they will be cut down because of emerald ash borer.

       Trees along South Embers Lane are marked with a green dot, indicating that they will be cut down because of emerald ash borer.
    Bob Chwedyk | Staff Photographer

  • A tree outside of Cedar Glen Condominiums is marked with a green dot indicating that it will be cut down because of emerald ash borer.

       A tree outside of Cedar Glen Condominiums is marked with a green dot indicating that it will be cut down because of emerald ash borer.
    Bob Chwedyk | Staff Photographer

 

Some residents of Arlington Heights' Cedar Glen neighborhood are encouraging village leaders to seek an alternative to cutting down 177 ash trees infested by the emerald ash borer.

Homeowners in the southeast side neighborhood are planning to appear before the Arlington Heights Village Board on Monday, Nov. 7, to make their case for treatment of the trees instead of their removal.

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

Emerald ash borers have infested parkway ash trees in the neighborhood north of Algonquin Road and east of Arlington Heights Road so severely that they must be removed, according to a report last month from the village's Public Works Department.

But Patti Mora, one of the organizers urging her neighbors to attend next week's board meeting, said she wants to be sure that all the trees are beyond treatment before they are cut down.

"One man on the street had a big old tree removed, and if his ash tree is taken down, too, the house will look like it dropped out of the sky," said Mora. "A lot of the people moved here because of the trees."

The village board voted funds to remove the trees, but has not yet committed to paying for replacing them, fearful of what the ultimate bill could be villagewide. Of the 36,000 parkway trees in Arlington Heights, 13,000 are ashes, the public works department said.

The village currently removes about 175 ash trees a year -- about 1,200 since 2006 -- for various reasons at a cost of $325,000.

Removing all the parkway ash trees in the village would cost $6.4 million. Replacing them would cost another $5.1 million.

Treating all the ash trees by injection would cost $1.6 million, according to the public works report, and that would have to be repeated every two or three years.

Saving ash trees has become an emotional topic in mature suburbs like Arlington Heights. A group of residents in one Mount Prospect neighborhood has pooled resources to treat parkway ash trees rather than see them removed, and a similar resident-driven effort is under way in Bartlett.

Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.