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updated: 10/25/2011 10:39 PM

Quade's Cubs future a pressing issue

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  • Cubs manager Mike Quade will get a face-to-face meeting with Theo Epstein before any decision is made.

      Cubs manager Mike Quade will get a face-to-face meeting with Theo Epstein before any decision is made.
    Associated Press

 
 

Theo Epstein is officially on the job as the Cubs' new president of baseball operations.

One of his first acts of business will be making a decision on manager Mike Quade, who has one year left on his contract.

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Quade, a Prospect High School graduate, is firmly on the hot seat after the Cubs finished 71-91 in his first full season in the dugout.

There has been talk about Ryne Sandberg replacing Quade, and Epstein talked about his close relationship with Terry Francona when the two worked together in Boston.

Epstein already has contacted Quade and said he will talk to him in person before making a final decision.

"We have plans to meet in person sometime over the next week," Epstein said. "Mike seems like a great guy, and he has developed a great reputation over many decades in this game.

"I look forward to sitting down with him in person as a first step, sharing with him my vision for the organization. I'd like to hear his vision for the organization."

Hoyer update:

In addition to making a decision on manager Mike Quade in the next week or so, Theo Epstein is expected to announce Jed Hoyer is leaving the San Diego Padres to become the Cubs' general manager.

Epstein and Hoyer worked together in Boston from 2002-09 before Hoyer left to become the Padres' GM.

Epstein still will be heavily involved in making roster moves, but he will be busy with other aspects of the Cubs' organization.

"We have a ton of work to do," Epstein said. "If we bring in someone as a general manager, it will be because there's someone who I think is one of the best and one of the brightest in the game and someone who can make a real impact on the Cubs."

Decade and done?

Theo Epstein explained his departure from the Red Sox in Tuesday's Boston Globe.

"Football legend Bill Walsh used to say that coaches and executives should seek change after 10 years with the same team," Epstein wrote. "The theory is that both the individual and the organization benefit from a change after so much time together.

"The executive gets rebirth and the energy that comes with a new challenge. The organization gets a fresh perspective, and the chance for true change that comes with new leadership. This idea resonated with me."

Computer geek?

A self-described baseball purist, Theo Epstein has nonetheless been knocked by many old-school types for placing so much emphasis on computer stats and other sabermetrics.

In Boston, Epstein created a computer program named "Carmine."

"You have to balance traditional scouting with objective analysis, and that's not just a line," Epstein said. "As far as the (Carmine) computer thing goes, way too much has been made of that. We developed in Boston a program that was simply an information-management system.

"Every team in baseball has an information-management system of some form or another. With the Cubs, we're in the process of sitting down and seeing what they have.

"Information is everything. In the draft, for example, information is the single most important currency."

Fair trade?

Now that he is in place as president of baseball operations, maybe Theo Epstein can decide what compensation to send the Red Sox. "The issue of compensation will be addressed in coming weeks, either by the clubs or by a third party," Epstein said.

Commissioner Bud Selig is the likely third party if compensation isn't agreed upon by Nov. 1.

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