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updated: 8/30/2011 11:21 AM

Deal in Illinois disability lawsuit goes to judge

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  • Marca Bristo, CEO and President of Access Living, speaks during an interview about a settlement that has been reached in the last of a trio of class-action lawsuits involving the rights of disabled Illinois residents living in large institutions. The settlement paves the way for thousands of people to get help moving from Cook County nursing homes to houses and apartments. Bristo is accompanied by Lenil Colbert, a plaintiff in the lawsuit.

      Marca Bristo, CEO and President of Access Living, speaks during an interview about a settlement that has been reached in the last of a trio of class-action lawsuits involving the rights of disabled Illinois residents living in large institutions. The settlement paves the way for thousands of people to get help moving from Cook County nursing homes to houses and apartments. Bristo is accompanied by Lenil Colbert, a plaintiff in the lawsuit.
    Associated Press

  • A settlement has been reached in the last of a trio of class-action lawsuits involving the rights of disabled Illinois residents living in large institutions. The settlement paves the way for thousands of people to get help moving from Cook County nursing homes to houses and apartments. Since the case was filed, Lenil Colbert has moved out of the nursing home and now lives in his own apartment.

      A settlement has been reached in the last of a trio of class-action lawsuits involving the rights of disabled Illinois residents living in large institutions. The settlement paves the way for thousands of people to get help moving from Cook County nursing homes to houses and apartments. Since the case was filed, Lenil Colbert has moved out of the nursing home and now lives in his own apartment.
    Associated Press

 
By Associated Press

CHICAGO -- A settlement reached in a class-action lawsuit involving the rights of disabled Medicaid residents in nursing homes has been presented to a federal judge in Chicago.

The settlement ultimately could affect about 20,000 people with disabilities living in Cook County.

In the deal's first phase, the state would spend $10 million to help at least 1,100 of those residents move into houses or apartments. More people would be helped in the second phase.

The settlement requires that the new housing arrangements cost the state the same or less than if the disabled residents had remained in nursing homes.

The settlement states that Illinois could reap an average annual net savings per person of at least $2,320 by housing people in apartments with community services instead of nursing homes.

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