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updated: 8/12/2011 3:47 PM

Elburn woman doesn't forget children with special needs

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  • Nicole Anderson, left, enjoys a dance with a volunteer at a dance Aug. 5 at the Blackberry Township Town Hall. It was organized by Chassidy Mangers of Elburn, for children with special needs.

      Nicole Anderson, left, enjoys a dance with a volunteer at a dance Aug. 5 at the Blackberry Township Town Hall. It was organized by Chassidy Mangers of Elburn, for children with special needs.
    courtesy of Chassidy Mangers

  • Volunteers Megan Richmond, standing left, Chassidy Mangers and Sean Stanton mix with guests at a dance Mangers arranged earlier this month at the Blackberry Township Town Hall. The dance was for children with special needs.

      Volunteers Megan Richmond, standing left, Chassidy Mangers and Sean Stanton mix with guests at a dance Mangers arranged earlier this month at the Blackberry Township Town Hall. The dance was for children with special needs.
    Photo courtesy of Chassidy Mangers

 
 

A lack of money almost killed her plans, but Chassidy Mangers persevered. And so the second dance for children with disabilities, and their siblings, was held Aug. 5 at Blackberry Township Town Hall.

Overall, 21 guests attended. They danced, did the limbo and enjoyed Subway sandwiches. The girls' hair, makeup and nails were done by volunteers, including Yvonne Bailey of Elburn. Guests received corsages or boutonnieres made by Mangers' aunt.

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Volunteers helped out, most from Kaneland High School, Mangers reported. Many had assisted with an adaptive physical education class there. Mangers' friends and relatives also helped. First Street Photos took formal pictures.

"It is so rewarding to see all of the guests enjoying a night of their own. I am very thankful that I had financial and volunteer support," said Mangers, who is from Elburn. Mangers, 20, is a junior at Augustana College in Rock Island, studying speech and language pathology.

The volunteers were McKinzie Mangers, Curtis Lubic, Sean Carter, Bev Rissman, Tracy Feece, Fred Dornback, Mary Dornback, Logan Markuson, Andie Strang, Kris Bowen, Natalie Swieca, Lindsey Baker, Abby Michels, J.C. Gillett, Liz Hylland, Ashley Vlach, Claire Hampton, Katy Dudzinski, Noel Mangers, Bill Mangers, Jenna Thorp and Patty Lubic. Mangers also thanks the Blackberry Township Youth Committee.

Political perspirations: It's not often I get to attend three political demonstrations in one week.

Especially not out here in the Tri-Cities and western Kane County area. People out here aren't typically on-the-street rabble-rousers.

So I have to give them some credit because in what was one of the hottest stretches of the year, they came out to get their points across to elected officials. And the protesters weren't all spring chickens, especially at a debt-ceiling rally at Congressman Randy Hultgren's office. (That crowd was particularly interested in preserving Medicare and Social Security benefits.)

The Sugar Grove Library protesters, meanwhile, were savvy users of social media to get people out on July 28 to picket the library, then attend a library board meeting, over the firing of its director.

And the folks in Batavia who are worried about development near Mill Creek were most civil and gracious: Their statement was the delivery of a bunch of flowers to the Batavia City Council. Even without benefit of a florist's touch, the vase full of wildflowers ended up looking stunningly gorgeous.

Catch those Bulldogs: I'm not much for themed public art displays. "Cows on Parade" was enough for me.

But "Bulldogs Unleashed," Batavia's effort this summer, seems to be a runaway success. Morning, noon and night I see people taking pictures of the statues, reading descriptions of them and playing a sort of "scavenger hunt" game with them. I've even spied a guy who, jogging by, patted the one outside of Foltos Tonsorial Parlor on the head, just like you would a real dog.

But they will soon be gone. The dogs will be auctioned off Sept. 10, to raise money for the Batavia library, parks and schools foundations.

So snap those pictures now, then visit bulldogsunleashed.org for auction details.

Leo Club helps out: The Elburn Leo Club sure knows how to make a difference. The club, sponsored by the Elburn Lions Club, is a group of boys and girls from 8 to 18 who like to help out in the community. They have hosted events such as Breakfast with Santa and a Wii tournament with the fundraising proceeds going to charity. Last December the Leos hosted a food drive and their collections benefited the Elburn Food Pantry. The Leos will be at it again this week during the three-day Elburn Days festival. The club will collect nonperishable food items, paper products and personal hygiene products at the Leo Club ice cream concession stand Friday through Sunday during the fest at Lions Park, 500 Filmore St. People who make a donation on Friday will be entered in a raffle, and prizes will be drawn throughout the weekend.

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