Breaking News Bar
updated: 7/5/2011 2:01 PM

Don't harsh your homemade mallow

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • You can call these swirly confections from Gesine Bullock-Prado's "Sugar Baby" by their French name, "guimauve," but your kids will still call them "marshmallows." And really delicious ones at that.

      You can call these swirly confections from Gesine Bullock-Prado's "Sugar Baby" by their French name, "guimauve," but your kids will still call them "marshmallows." And really delicious ones at that.
    Courtesy of Stewart, Tabori & Chang

 
By Marialisa Calta
Newspaper Enterprise Association

Making your own marshmallows is one of those show-offy, culinary stunts that you should consider doing ... just because you CAN. And because homemade marshmallows taste way better -- fluffier, airier, less gummy -- than the packaged kind. And because you can dazzle everyone you know by presenting them with their French name, "guimauve" (ghee-MOHV).

Gesine Bullock-Prado, the smart and spunky author of "Sugar Baby" (2011 Stewart, Tabori & Chang), prefers to eat her "guimauve" straight: "No roasting, no melting, no chocolate dipping." She also prefers piping them into a kind of fluffy rosette that is unrecognizable to those of us raised with the cylindrical confections found in pillowy plastic bags in the supermarket. And she prefers a renegade recipe that includes egg whites, which she says enhances flavor. If egg whites make you squeamish, leave them out.

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

Bullock-Prado also includes directions (too long for this space) to flavor the marshmallows with chocolate, espresso, peanut butter, raspberry and maple. These confections, she says, "won't harsh your mellow."

Marshmallows are only one of many sweet treats in Bullock-Prado's book, which she describes not as a baking book, and not as a candy book, but as a book about "cooking sugar." It includes some baked goods (tortes, cakes, pies, her signature French macaroons), some candies (caramels, taffy, brittles, lollipops) and some confections that can only be classified as "other." Cotton candy, for example. And flavored syrups. And "guimauve."

Note: if you combine a toasted "guimauve" with chocolate and graham crackers, you have a "smor-ay." That's French for s'more.

• Marialisa Calta is the author of "Barbarians at the Plate: Taming and Feeding the American Family" (Perigee, 2005). More at marialisacalta.com.

Share this page
    help here