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updated: 6/27/2011 1:54 PM

Crowds gather to hear Blago verdict at 2 p.m.

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  • Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich and his wife, Patti, leavetheir home for the courthouse.

      Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich and his wife, Patti, leavetheir home for the courthouse.
    Associated Press

  • Rod Blagojevich heading for the courthouse to hear the verdicts.

      Rod Blagojevich heading for the courthouse to hear the verdicts.
    ABC7 Chicago

  • Rod Blagojevich arrives outside the Dirksen Federal building on his way to hear the verdicts.

      Rod Blagojevich arrives outside the Dirksen Federal building on his way to hear the verdicts.
    ABC7 Chicago

  • Blagojevich inside the courthouse on his way to hear the verdicts.

      Blagojevich inside the courthouse on his way to hear the verdicts.
    ABC 7 Chicago

 
Daily Herald reports

The Rod Blagojevich jury is hung on two of the 20 counts against him. The verdicts on the 18 counts are supposed to be read around 2 p.m. today.

Dozens of people already are lining the streets outside the federal courthouse waiting for the arrival of the ousted Illinois governor, who's left his home on Chicago's North Side en route to the court.

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Outside the Dirksen Federal Courthouse in downtown Chicago, a horde of media has been joined by dozens of Illinoisans many with their cell-phone cameras at the ready. Blagojevich and his wife Patti arrive shortly before 1:30 p.m.

Jurors deliberating in the corruption retrial of Rod Blagojevich told a judge Monday they have reached a verdict on 18 of the 20 counts against the ousted Illinois governor, and attorneys in the case agreed that the verdicts should be read.

Judge James Zagel said that will happen Monday afternoon. The jury had returned to the federal courthouse Monday morning after nine days of deliberations. They had been talking through the evidence over a three-week period.

Blagojevich, 54, faces allegations that he sought to sell or trade an appointment to President Barack Obama's vacated U.S. Senate seat in exchange for a high-paying job, and schemed to shake down executives for campaign donations. He took the stand at the retrial and denied all the charges.

Prosecutors, defense attorneys and dozens of reporters filed into the courtroom Monday after the court announced it had received word of a note from jurors.

"The jury has come to a decision on 18 of the 20 counts," Zagel said, clutching the note and reading it aloud. Jurors added they were deadlocked on two counts and "were confident" they couldn't agree on those charges "even with further deliberations."

The note didn't say which charges they agreed on or disagreed on.

Asked how he should respond, both prosecutors and the defense indicated to Zagel that the jury had deliberated long enough and should be asked to deliver the verdicts.

It was only the third note from jurors in their deliberations. The two other gave no hint about how deliberations were proceeding.

Jurors at Blagojevich's first trial last year came back deadlocked after deliberating for 14 days. They agreed on just one of 24 counts, convicting Blagojevich of lying to the FBI. He faces up to five years on that conviction.

If found guilty on all the counts this time, he faces up to 350 years in prison -- though guidelines would dictate he get far less.

Blagojevich was arrested in December 2008, after the FBI had wiretapped hundreds of his telephone calls at work and home. The Illinois Legislature impeached him a month later.

Both trials hinged on whether the former governor's bold ramblings to aides and others on the telephone was just talk, as he insisted, or part of "a political crime spree," in the words of U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald.

Before a national audience, the Blagojevich saga exacerbated Illinois' reputation for graft. A conviction would mean Blagojevich is the second Illinois governor in a row facing a prison sentence for corruption. His predecessor, former Gov. George Ryan, is serving a 6 year sentence.

The case also became a media spectacle, as the indicted governor and his wife, Patti, appeared on TV reality shows, and as the loquacious Blagojevich made theatrical appearances daily outside the courthouse during the first trial to profess his innocence and hug his remaining fans.

In a case full of high-level name dropping, defense attorneys in the retrial pulled into court Chicago's new Mayor Rahm Emanuel and U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. Emanuel's appearance on the witness stand, the most anticipated by a Chicago mayor in a federal courtroom in decades, was over in just five minutes. Jackson was done in about half an hour.

Overall, though, the retrial had far less of the circus-like atmosphere that accompanied the initial trial. Blagojevich himself also was more subdued this time.

Other major differences were in the prosecution's dramatically streamlined case, and the fact that the defense put on a case after not doing so the first time around.

Prosecutors dropped racketeering counts against the ex-governor and dismissed all charges against his then co-defendant brother, Robert Blagojevich. They presented just three weeks of evidence -- half the time taken at the first trial. They called fewer witnesses, asked fewer questions and played shorter excerpts of FBI wiretaps that underpin most of the charges.

There was also a new variable at the retrial: The testimony from Blagojevich himself. At the first trial, the defense rested without calling any witnesses and Blagojevich didn't testify despite vowing that he would.

Retrial jurors saw a deferential Blagojevich look them in the eyes and deny every allegation, telling them his talk on the recordings was mere brainstorming. This time, jurors must decide if they believe him.

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