Daily Archive : Sunday August 13, 2017

News

Sports

Business

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    John Wills, a founding partner of WBK Engineering in St. Charles and Aurora. , said the firm recently accepted a 51 percent investment from a Native American group in Michigan.

    Kukec People: Founder sees good fit by merging with Native American group
    John Wills, co-founder of WBK Engineering LCC in St. Charles and Aurora, talks about his company merge with Mno-Bmadsen, a Native American investment group for the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians in Dowagiac, Michigan.

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    A rendering shows the proposed Fuller’s Car Wash at 2765 Algonquin Road in Rolling Meadows. It will include a 5,000-square-foot building on the 1.4-acre site.

    Car wash at Ritzy’s site in Rolling Meadows approved

    Plans for a Fuller’s Car Wash at the former Ritzy’s restaurant site in Rolling Meadows earned final approval this week from the city council.

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    Rob Goldiez, co-founder of Hirebotics, configures a robot at Tenere Inc. in Dresser, Wisconsin.

    Factories in search of reliable workers turn to robots

    In factory after American factory, the surrender of the industrial age to the age of automation continues at a record pace. But at one factory in Wisconsin, the robots were coming in not to replace humans, and not just as a way to modernize, but also because reliable humans had become so hard to find.

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    Amanda Farris and Andy Salmons of Corbin, Kentucky, are talking about marriage and the idea of signing a prenuptial agreement to separate her savings from his business.

    Why millennials are more likely to have a prenup than their parents

    As more millennials put off marriage until later in life than previous generations, they are more likely to have careers, businesses and property. And that, financial advisers say, has made them more protective of what they have built. As a result, the prenuptial agreement is starting to lose its taboo.

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    Lynnette Faje, a former employee of NRG Energy, near the NRG Energy, Inc. Will County Generating Station in Romeoville, Illinois, on July 26.

    America’s other coal job, ignored by politicians, is dying fast

    A couple months ago, Donald Trump was cheering a new coal mine in Pennsylvania that will put 70 people to work — good news for a president whose pledge to revive the industry helped get him elected. But a bigger group of coal workers has already suffered sweeping job cuts, and it’s bracing for more. Coal-fired power plants employ more people than mines, and they’re shutting down all over the country.

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    Perhaps the most despised bank fee among consumers is the overdraft fee, an ugly $30 (or so) insult to your wallet. A new report from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau shows just how much of a bite overdraft fees can take out of some consumers, and provides new prototype disclosure forms it hopes banks and credit unions will adopt.

    Who gets hit hardest by bank overdraft fees?

    Perhaps the most despised bank fee among consumers is the overdraft fee, an ugly $30 (or so) insult to your wallet. A new report from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau shows just how much of a bite overdraft fees can take out of some consumers, and provides new prototype disclosure forms it hopes banks and credit unions will adopt.

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    The town of Matewan, W.Va., is seen at sunrise. The state of West Virginia is ground zero for one of the worst drug crises in our nation’s history. In 2015, 725 people died of overdoses in the state, the highest per capita rate in the country. Johnsie Gooslin and his family live in Matewan, which is located in Mingo County.

    Can marijuana rescue coal country?

    According to one group, marijuana has been West Virginia’s most valuable cash crop for the past 20 years. Lately, however, marijuana has been overshadowed by opioids, which are devastating parts of coal country. While there are no easy answers to the opioid crisis, a growing body of research suggests that legalizing marijuana could help.

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    When Chase released its Sapphire Reserve card last year with a signup bonus of 100,000 points, it was such a hit with consumers that the bank temporarily ran out of metal to make the cards. That popularity came with a short-term cost, however: JPMorgan Chase Chief Executive Officer Jamie Dimon said the cards’ perks ended up cutting the bank’s fourth-quarter profit by up to $300 million.

    Why credit card rewards are getting harder to earn

    Banks are making it harder to qualify for the lucrative signup bonuses that come with their premium credit cards by increasing the minimum spending requirement. Spending a couple thousand dollars a month on a card is no problem for the affluent, globe-trotting customers who are the traditional audience for premium cards. But it’s a much heavier lift for the younger customers who have recently been flocking to the cards.

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    Consultant scores with different approach, MBA outreach
    Ninety percent of a struggling business’ issues are embedded in the system, a consultant tells Small Business Columnist Jim Kendall.

Life & Entertainment

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    Lulu Wilson stars in "Annabelle: Creation."

    'Annabelle' scares up $35M, jolting sleepy box office

    The "Conjuring" spinoff "Annabelle: Creation" scared up an estimated $35 million in North American theaters over the weekend, making it easily the top film and giving the lagging August box office a shot in the arm.

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    The Chicago Botanic Garden holds a Kite Festival Sunday, Aug. 13.

    Sunday picks: Let 'em soar at Kite Festival

    Let's go fly a kite at the Chicago Botanic Garden's Kite Festival Sunday. More on this and other fun events.

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    This New York living room designed by Drake/Anderson, where large scale art plays a starring role in the décor scheme. “An interior never looks finished without art,” says Caleb Anderson. “Its use in a room adds dynamism more than any other element. Artwork establishes mood, defines personality, and impacts emotion.”

    Home decorators embrace big, bold wall art

    Not long ago, the only homes in which you’d see big, bold art hanging on the walls tended to be those of serious collectors. For everyone else, filling up a blank space meant going with something attractively innocuous that didn’t jangle with the sofa color.

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    Thinkstock photo

    Not reaching your wellness goals? Take a look at your nighttime routine

    We all think our day starts when we wake up. But what if the day really starts the evening before? A good nighttime routine could be the key to attaining your fitness goals.

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    Parents can coach their kids to help them navigate through the school year.

    Coaching your child to a successful school year

    Back to school means back to routine for everyone, and for parents that can be a real challenge for their children after a summer filled with sleeping in, later hours and nonstop fun. Local pediatrician Dr. Erik L. Johnson offers a few recommendations to help.

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    The cast of “Jersey Shore” is doing it all again for a special on the E! Network. “Reunion Road Trip: Return to the Jersey Shore” brings the gang back together for the first time in five years — Mike “The Situation” Sorrentino, Jenni “JWoww” Farley, Paul “Pauly D” Delvecchio, Deena Cortese, Vinny Guadagnino, Ronnie Ortiz-Magro, Sammi “Sweetheart” Giancola and Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi.

    ‘Jersey Shore’ gang reuniting for an E! special

    The cast of “Jersey Shore” is doing it all again for a special on the E! Network.

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    If you aren’t getting enough sleep, it might show in your waistline.

    Insufficient sleep may add more than an inch to your waist, study suggests

    A new study indicates that getting insufficient sleep may make you go up a clothing size.

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    A widower (Menashe Lustig) tries to take care of his son (Ruben Niborski) in Brooklyn's Hasidic community in “Menashe.”

    Yiddish film 'Menashe' offers poignant portrait of family

    In “Menashe,” filmmaker Joshua Z Weinstein turns his camera on the Orthodox Jewish community of Borough Park in Brooklyn, using nonactors to create a tender portrait of family.

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    All-white bathrooms can be updated easily with a dash of color, wallpaper, lighting and accessories.

    Small accents can makeover a dated bathroom

    How many times do you go into your bathroom and say to yourself, “this bathroom needs a makeover”? You may be afraid of the costs of doing a head-to-toe bathroom renovation, but there may be small improvements that can be done within a budget that will make every visit to the “throne” a little bit nicer.

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    Kitchen drawer function is essential. This example offers a way to divide and organize a shallow drawer.

    Small kitchens rely on innovative storage

    The American front porch is a slice of heaven. In a suburban neighborhood, there is an abundance of people walking their dog, but you must be outside in order to speak to them.

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    Why you should order spring bulbs in late summer
    Q. Someone said it was time to start thinking about spring and ordering bulbs. Isn’t it too early?

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    Campbell Soup Company won an award at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, France.

    Collectible is Mmm, Mmm, Good

    Q. I have had this porcelain Campbell soup bowl for many years. It is 4 inches in diameter and in mint condition. There is a gold seal on the label with the inscription “1900 Exposition Universelle Internationale.” I found no information about its history on the internet. Could you help me determine its value? I would like to sell it.

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    Best to keep up your utilities on, and record clear

    Q. My tenant is living in my rental house, has not paid rent or utilities and the lease states that the tenant is responsible for utilities. The utilities are in my name.

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    Brick paths can be installed in many different designs.

    Garden paths can be pretty and practical

    Whether you planned them or not, your garden has paths — a path to the vegetable garden to harvest veggies for dinner, a path to a favorite bench to enjoy a glass of lemonade on a sunny summer day, a path to the compost bin and a path to guide visitors to your front door.

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    Making lemonade out of surprise child from long-ago affair

    Q. My husband recently dropped a bomb on our lives. He was contacted by someone claiming to be his child. It turns out many years ago, when we were married a few years, he had a one-night stand. Never saw this person again and now, bingo!

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    Dried ink can be difficult to remove

    Q. My husband left a permanent ink pen stain in his shirt pocket and it went through the wash. What’s even worse is the ink found its way into the dryer where it really raised havoc. Is there a product I can use to try to remove all of the mess?

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    Showy gladiolus need to be cut when the lowest blossoms show color.

    Stagger planting of gladiolus to extend blooms

    The gladiolus produces a large, showy flower spike that lasts for several days, whether in the garden or in a vase. To get the most out of a bloom for decoration inside, cut when the lowest blossoms have begun to show color.

Discuss

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    For wisdom on North Korea, Trump should pay a visit to the White House library

    Columnist Michael Gerson: Donald Trump doesn’t spare much time for reading. “I never have,” he explains. “I’m always busy doing a lot.” But what he is now busy doing is managing a global crisis with nuclear dimensions and historical precedents.

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    Governor should block bill on sanctuary cities
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: The Illinois Trust Act – SB31 (making Illinois a sanctuary state) sponsored by John Cullerton has passed in the House and Senate, only awaiting Gov. Rauner’s signature by the end of this month.

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    An exercise in political imagination
    A Round Lake Beach letter to the editor: Imagine it is the summer of 2009. You voted for Barak Obama.

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    Redistribution is natural function of government
    A Palatine letter to the editor: Jake Griffin’s Aug. 9 piece outlining how much of the state’s income tax is collected from Greater Chicago is another example of misguided scorekeeping by politicians and reporters.

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    Man made his choice, dog had none
    A Glen Ellyn letter to the editor: In response to Steve Smith’s letter published on Aug. 5, I would like to point out a couple of things. First, the disabled man who drowned in Florida, taunted by teens whose behavior was disgraceful and they need to be punished.

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    Putting a stop to the shenanigans
    A McHenry County letter to the editor: McHenry County taxpayers pay higher property taxes than 99.99 percent of Americans, and that’s on top of a permanent income tax increase in a state with almost 7,000 local governments. People have had enough and are fleeing.

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    Today’s Opinion Page editorial cartoon
    Today’s Daily Herald Opinion page editorial cartoon

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