Daily Archive : Saturday September 6, 2014

News

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    Playing an accountant in this 2008 First Folio Theatre production of “Unnecessary Farce” at Mayslake Peabody Estate in Oak Brook, actress Molly Glynn received glowing reviews. The 46-year-old Chicago actress was killed by a tree uprooted during Friday’s violent storm.

    Falling tree in Northfield kills Chicago actress

    A veteran actress in TV shows and stage productions across the area, Molly Glynn died Saturday after being struck by a tree uprooted during Friday’s violent storms. “I couldn’t save her. I couldn’t save her. She’s gone,” read a Saturday morning Facebook post by her husband and fellow actor Joe Foust.

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    The Palatine Rural Fire Protection District will again ask voters for permission for a property tax increase intended to generate an additional $200,000 per year. Officials say the extra funds are necessary to stop the district from operating in the red.

    Taxes, home rule, size of government on ballot for suburban Cook Co. voters

    Residents of Northwest suburban Cook County will have several opportunities on the Nov. 4 ballot to weigh in directly on the operations of their local governments. Ballot questions run the gamut from financial to administrative, including a tax hike for fire services, giving a local municipality greater authority and reducing the size of a couple of government boards.

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    ComEd crews work on repairing damage along Monroe Street as storm damage cleanup continues Saturday in Elgin.

    ComEd: On track to restore power by Sunday night

    While around 31,500, most in the Northwest and North suburbs, remained without electrical power Saturday night in the wake of Friday’s violent storms, ComEd officials said repair crews were making progress and that almost all service is expected to be restored by Sunday night.

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    Former Chicago Bull Charles Oakley gives some dribbling tips during a clinic in the gym at West Chicago’s new ARC Center grand opening Saturday. Construction on the city’s first recreation center began in August 2013.

    New rec center takes West Chicago to ‘new level’

    West Chicago Park District held a grand opening ceremony Saturday for its first indoor recreation center. Called the ARC Center (for Athletics, Recreation and Community), city leaders said the 70,000-square-foot, $15.5 million facility in Reed-Keppler Park is the big step for the city. "The ARC center today is a big part of the next step and next level for West Chicago and the park district,"...

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    Former Gurnee Mayor Richard Welton hugs family friend George Anne Depke after she spoke during Saturday’s groundbreaking ceremony for the Richard A. Welton Village Plaza in Gurnee.

    Gurnee breaks ground on plaza honoring former mayor

    Instrumental in the development of Gurnee, former Mayor Richard Welton took part in many groundbreaking ceremonies during his long political career. On Saturday, he was the honored guest as the village broke ground on the Richard A. Welton Village Plaza. “The legacy of Dick Welton is on every street, every sidewalk, running through every mile of water main, and on the faces of children...

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    Linda Borton and Ed Sobon both of Arlington Heights take part in the first Tour d’Arlington sponsored by the Arlington Heights Rotary on Saturday.

    First Rotary Tour d’Arlington held Saturday

    on Crawford, heading up this year’s first Rotary Tour d’Arlington, said he was a “little disapointed with the turnout” of less than 50 people. Their mission statement for the day was to End Polio Now, a longtime Rotary crusade that is nearing success. Taking the blame was Mother Nature, with Friday night’s storm and downed trees putting a damper on the event.

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    Joan Rivers

    Notable deaths last week

    This week’s notable deaths include a Brooklyn-born comic whose catchphrase “Can we talk?” led to humorous, offensive insults directed at celebrities, including herself; the last surviving son of Ponzi schemer Bernard Madoff; and a beloved Chicago radio and TV personality.

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    Crane Road in St. Charles was named after Herbert Crane, an heir to the Crane Plumbing Co. of Chicago. He owned property on the west side of Route 31 and south of what is now Crane Road.

    Heun: Plenty of history in Tri-Cities street names

    What's in a name? Plenty of history, that's what, says Dave Heun, who takes a look at some of the more well-known street names in St. Charles.

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    U.S. Capitol in Washington. Congress returns to work this week with a relatively short and simple agenda, vote to keep the government operating in the short term, then return home to campaign.

    Congress returns to address spending, then it’s back to campaigns

    Committee hearings and briefings from administration officials will be part of the September agenda, starting Tuesday when President Obama plans to welcome the four bipartisan congressional leaders to the Oval Office for a meeting. During the week of Sept. 15, Secretary of State John Kerry is set to testify before Congress about the Islamic threat.

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    Cars sit on a street that collapsed after heavy rain Thursday in the Gulf port city of Veracruz, Mexico.

    Hurricane drenches Mexico, prompting evacuations

    High surf and waves broke a contention wall and flooded the fishing village of Puerto de San Carlos. Some 1,250 houses were damaged and some of the 2,500 people affected were evacuated to a shelter.

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    A family of a missing Lebanese soldier who was kidnapped by Islamic State militants, sits on the ground as they block a street Thursday during a demonstration to demand action to secure the captives’ release, in front the Lebanese government building, in downtown Beirut, Lebanon.

    Islamic State beheads 2nd captive Lebanese soldier

    The captured soldiers and police are from Lebanon’s many religious sects: the first soldier beheaded by the group, Ali Sayid, was a Sunni Muslim. The militants are also holding Christian soldiers and other Sunni Muslims.

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    Jacob Chrzastowski, 7, of Round Lake climbs to the top of the climbing wall, hosted by the Boy Scouts, during the Round Lake Home Town Festival Saturday.

    Home Town fest returns to Round Lake

    A car show, beer tent and food vendors, a craft show and bingo were all part of the village of Round Lake’s annual Home Town Festival on Saturday.

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    Sylvia Tutaj, left, and Christine Nazarowski, both 13, let the wind flow through their hair as they zip around on a ride at the Rolling Meadows Rotary Carnival at the Meadow Marketplace Shopping Center on Saturday afternoon.

    Rolling Meadows Rotary Carnival continues through Sunday

    The Rolling Meadows Rotary Carnival continued Saturday at the Meadow Marketplace Shopping Center, 2801-2915 Kirchoff Road. The carnival also will operate 1 to 10 p.m. Sunday.

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    Country music superstar Garth Brooks, in his black hat, and his old college buddy, University of Kansas head basketball coach Bill Self, share a moment with a young camper Saturday at the ProCamps baskebaball camp at Elk Grove High School.

    ‘It takes a team,’ Garth Brooks tells kids at Elk Grove High School

    Whether it's on a basketball court, in a concert venue or in life, you can't find success without good teammates, country music star Garth Brooks told kids Saturday at a basketball camp in Elk Grove Village. “Love one another. Have fun. Play your sport,” Brooks said.

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    Deer cross the Golden Gate bridge, in San Francisco, Friday.

    Deer tie up traffic on Golden Gate bridge

    Authorities say a pair of deer on the Golden Gate bridge snarled traffic in and out of San Francisco during the evening commute.

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    A satellite tagged Kemp’s ridley sea turtle named Hugo is released, near Gulfport, Miss., into the Gulf of Mexico for the purpose of having its migration through the gulf tracked.

    Hooked sea turtles heading back to the Gulf

    Melissa Cook, a NOAA Fisheries marine biologist and Mississippi’s stranding coordinator, said baby and juvenile Kemp’s-ridleys naturally spend their time in inshore waters. “I think they would be in this area anyway. There just happen to be fishing piers so there is basically free food,” she said. “Although it comes at a price.”

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    A man walks past Picasso’s “Le Tricorne,” a 19-foot by 20-foot stage curtain, hangs in the lobby of the Seagram building, in a passageway connecting the two dining rooms of New York’s Four Seasons restaurant.

    Four Season’s big Picasso going to museum

    As the curtain falls on the long residency of “Le Tricorne”, art students have come to sketch and visitors to snap pictures. Reservations have risen for the 1919 painting’s final days at the Four Seasons.

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    Rendi Murphree, an epidemiologist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention who will soon be leaving for Monrovia, Liberia, packs Friday for her trip at her home in Nashville, Tenn.

    Zeal, devotion compels volunteers to Ebola crisis

    Hospital volunteer Nancy Writebol and Dr. Kent Brantly were already in Liberia when the outbreak began, and decided to stay at the charity-run ELWA hospital in Monrovia to help. Richard Sacra, a 15-year ELWA veteran, immediately volunteered to leave his family in suburban Boston and return to the hospital when Writebol and Brantly got sick.

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    President Barack Obama, accompanied by Vice President Joe Biden, pauses while making an announcement about immigration reform in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington.

    White House: Obama to delay immigration action

    In a Rose Garden speech on June 30, Obama said he had directed Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson and Attorney General Eric Holder to give him recommendations for executive action by the end of summer. Obama also pledged to “adopt those recommendations without further delay.”

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    Gravedigger hurt while falling into newly dug hole

    A New York City gravedigger has been injured while falling backward into a freshly dug plot.

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    300 homes evacuated near Yosemite

    An evacuation order for 300 homes near Yosemite National Park remained in effect Saturday as firefighters battled a wildfire scorching about 300 acres in Central California.

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    Police: Prisoner slips off handcuffs, crashes cruiser

    State police say 24-year-old Chad Nadeau was en route to the Hartford Correctional Center on Friday night on domestic violence charges.Police say Nadeau was in the passenger seat when he freed his hands and assaulted the trooper, causing the cruiser to swerve and eventually crash into the median on Interstate 91.

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    Sophie Twichell, executive director of the Brushwood Center at Ryerson Woods, shows off a panel on a new walking and reading trail Friday at Ryerson Woods Forest Preserve near Riverwoods. The panels are taken from the children’s book “Miss Maple’s Seeds.”

    Lake County forest preserve trails have some tales to tell

    A new educational program officially opened Friday at the Brushwood Center at Ryerson Woods in Riverwoods. Trail Tales/Caminando con Cuentos, is a walking and reading experience featuring seven large illustrated panels with book exerpts. The program also is available at the Greenbelt Cultural Center.

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    Syrian opposition group fighters from the Islamic State group parade in Raqqa, Syria. The U.S. and its allies are trying to hammer out a coalition to push back the Islamic State group in Iraq. But any serious attempt to destroy the militants or even seriously degrade their capabilities means targeting their infrastructure in Syria. That, however, is far more complicated. If it launches airstrikes against the group in Syria, the U.S. runs the risk of unintentionally strengthening the hand of President Bashar Assad, whose removal the West has actively sought the past three years. Uprooting the Islamic State, which has seized swathes of territory in both Syria and Iraq, would potentially open the way for the Syrian army to fill the vacuum.

    AP Analysis: U.S. wary over hitting Syrian militants

    The U.S. and its allies are trying to hammer out a coalition to push back the Islamic State group in Iraq. But any serious attempt to destroy the militants or even seriously degrade their capabilities means targeting their infrastructure in Syria. That, however, is far more complicated.

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    A destroyed kindergarten building is seen Saturday in the village of Kominternove, Ukraine. After four months of war, eastern Ukraine begins the first full day of an uncertain cease-fire. The truce agreement calls for an exchange of prisoners and establishment of humanitarian corridors, but how quickly those actions will begin is unclear.

    Ukraine cease-fire appears to hold

    After more than four months of bloodshed, a cease-fire in Ukraine’s rebellious east largely held back fighting Saturday, but appeared fragile as both sides of the conflict claimed the others had violated the agreement.

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    Texas Democratic gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis reveals in a new campaign memoir called “Forgetting to be Afraid” that she terminated two pregnancies for medical reasons in the 1990s, including one where the fetus had developed a severe brain abnormality.

    In memoir, Texas’ Wendy Davis reveals abortion

    Texas Democratic gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis, who became a national political sensation by filibustering her state’s tough new restrictions on abortion, discloses in her upcoming memoir that she had an abortion in the 1990s after discovering that the fetus had a severe brain abnormality.

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    An Pakistani army helicopter hovers to rescue trapped people Friday from a flooded area on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan. Heavy monsoon rains killed dozens of people across Pakistan as flash flood inundated villages, prompting authorities to send troops to evacuate residents and assist in the emergency, officials said.

    Monsoon rains kill 110 in Pakistan, 108 in India

    Heavy monsoon rains and flash floods have killed 110 people in Pakistan and 108 people in India, officials said Saturday, as forecasters warned of more rain in the coming days and troops raced to evacuate people from deluged areas.

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    French ex-hostage identifies captor in Syria

    A French journalist held hostage for months by extremists in Syria says one of his captors was a Frenchman suspected of killing four people at the Brussels Jewish Museum earlier this year. French magazine Le Point on Saturday quoted its reporter Nicolas Henin as saying he was tortured by Mehdi Nemmouche, a Frenchman who had spent time with extremists in Syria.

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    Larry Glazer gestures toward a building to be demolished on Alexander Street in Rochester, N.Y. Glazer and wife, Jane, were aboard their small plane, which took off from the Greater Rochester International Airport, as it flew 1,700 miles down the East Coast on Friday before finally crashing off the coast of Jamaica.

    Mystery shrouds U.S. couple’s crash off Jamaica

    A search-and-rescue operation resumed at first light Saturday off Jamaica’s northeast coast as crews hope to solve the mystery of a private plane carrying a prominent upstate New York couple who were taken on a ghostly 1,700-mile journey after the pilot was apparently incapacitated at the controls.

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    President Barack Obama speaks Thursday with British Prime Minister David Cameron as NATO leaders meet regarding Afghanistan at the NATO summit at Celtic Manor in Newport, Wale From left are, Secretary of State John Kerry, the president, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and NATO Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen.

    For Obama, a glimpse of good old days in Europe

    On the continent that cheered his ascent to the White House, President Barack Obama was enthusiastically welcomed in Estonia by Baltic leaders who see American military power as the best safeguard of their own security. And at the NATO summit in Wales, Obama gathered numerous statements of support for his call to confront Islamic State militants in the Middle East.

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    While Harbour Contractors Inc. has declined to pursue revitalizing a section of downtown Lake Zurich, two other developers are showing interest, according to Village Manager Jason Slowinski.

    Developer passes on waterfront property in downtown Lake Zurich

    While one company has decided against pursuing development on prime waterfront land in downtown Lake Zurich, two others are showing interest, according to the top village hall employee. Village Manager Jason Slowinski provided elected officials with an update this week regarding the roughly 2-acre site that cost taxpayers $3.6 million as part of a long-stalled effort to revitalize downtown.

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    Jeff Linton of Chicago gets a high-five from Robin Carlson of Berwyn after he sank a putt during a scramble fundraising round Friday at the 14th annual Midwestern Amputee Golf Association tournament at Pheasant Run in St. Charles. Linton lost his legs in an accident in college and later picked up golf.

    Midwest group hosts golf tournament in St. Charles

    The Midwestern Amputee Golf Association hosts its 14th annual golf tournament this weekend at Pheasant Run in St. Charles, and began the festivities with a scramble Friday.

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    South Elgin High School seniors, from left, Cosette Teschke, Alex Sandoval, Valentino Wilson and Jeff Schooler produced a seven-minute film about 2-year-old Matthew Erickson of Huntley, who was born with brain cancer.

    4 suburban students’ film on toddler with cancer headed to NYC

    Four South Elgin High School seniors are finalists in the All American High School Film Festival in New York City next month. The students produced a seven-minute film, “All About M.E.,” about Matthew Erickson, a 2-year-old boy who was born with brain cancer. “(The film) was a huge deal and it was really cool, but we didn’t expect anything out of this project when we...

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    Bob Dold, left, and Brad Schneider are candidates in the 10th Congressional District.

    Candidates for Congress will meet on TV next month

    Republican Bob Dold of Kenilworth and Democratic U.S. Rep. Brad Schneider of Deerfield will appear for a joint interview on WTTW’s “Chicago Tonight” Oct. 22. And Democratic U.S. Rep. Bill Foster of Naperville will appear Oct. 23 with Republican challenger Darlene Senger of Naperville.

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    Mosquito spraying resumes Monday in Elk Grove

    Spraying to combat an increase in mosquito activity is expected to resume in Elk Grove Village beginning Monday, village officials said.

Sports

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    Former Cubs pitcher Carlos Zambrano visited his old team on Friday at Wrigley Field. Zambrano also was in town to take part in a charity softball game in Schaumburg on Saturday.

    Miles: An unconventional convention idea for Cubs

    With the Cubs convention lacking in interest in recent years, Daily Herald Cubs writer Bruce Miles has some unconventional ideas to spice it up. How about inviting Carlos Zambrano, Sammy Sosa and Lou Piniella and letting the good times roll?

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    Chicago White Sox’ Paul Konerko watches video highlights before he was presented a large bottle of wine by Minnesota Twins’ Joe Mauer and Glen Perkins before Wednesday’s game.

    Spiegel: Konerko and Jeter on the goodbye tour

    The long goodbyes for Paul Konerko have already begun, and Matt Spiegel hopes the White Sox icon will get to play on Sept. 27 when the team honors him with a special ceremony.

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    Quarterback Jay Cutler has reached the age where he's looking forward to bring everything together with the Bears' high-powered offense.

    Cutler's 'journey' has him poised to lead Bears

    Bears quarterback Jay Cutler has reached the age where he appreciates his situation, being surrounded by an abundance of talent, with the opportunity to bring it all together into a potent offense capable of outperforming last year's high-scoring unit and carrying the entire team.

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    The Cubs may be starting to feel the effects of not having Starlin Castro and Anthony Rizzo in their lineup. They were pretty punchless Saturday in falling twice to the Pittsburgh Pirates on a gorgeous day and evening at Wrigley Field. Here Chris Valuka reacts to striking out

    Cubs' offense struggles in double loss

    The Cubs look like they're missing big guns Anthony Rizzo and Starlin Castro from their lineup. They dropped a pair of games Saturday, losing Friday's suspened game 5-3 in 11 innings and getting shutout 5-0 in the second game. Manager Rick Renteria also said he's not worried about rookie Javier Baez and his strikeouts.

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    Girls volleyball: Saturday’s results
    Here are high school girls volleyball results from Saturday, Sept. 6.

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    Girls tennis: Saturday’s results
    Here are high school girls tennis results from Saturday, Sept. 6.

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    Girls swimming: Saturday’s results
    Here are high school girls swimming results from Saturday, Sept. 6.

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    Girls golf: Saturday’s results
    Results of girls golf meets from Saturday, Sept. 6.

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    Girls cross country: Saturday’s results
    Here are high school girls cross country results from Saturday, Sept. 6.

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    Boys soccer: Saturday’s results
    Here are high school boys soccer results from Saturday, Sept. 6.

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    Boys golf: Saturday’s results
    Results of boys golf meets from Saturday, Sept. 6.

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    Boys cross country: Saturday’s results
    Here are high school boys cross country results from Saturday, Sept. 6.

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    Boomers advance behind Webster

    The Schaumburg Boomers, behind the pitching of Seth Webster, defeated the visiting Lake Erie Crushers 1-0 on Saturday night in the Frontier League wild-card game.

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    Cougars take Game 1 of playoffs 5-2

    Mark Zagunis and the Cougars are a win away from the Midwest League championship after a 5-2 victory over the Cedar Rapids Kernels on Saturday night at Veterans Memorial Stadium. The Cougars piled on 4 runs in the final three innings for the Game 1 victory of the Western division championship.

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    Virginia Tech stuns No. 8 OSU, 35-21

    Michael Brewer passed for two touchdowns and Virginia Tech’s defense stood tough at the end and the Hokies stunned No. 8 Ohio State 35-21 on Saturday night. Keyshoen Jarrett had two interceptions and Donovan Riley returned another 63 yards for a TD in the final minute before a record crowd of 107,517 at enlarged Ohio Stadium.

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    Parting shot: Notre Dame pounds Michigan, 31-0

    Everett Golson and Notre Dame said so long to Michigan with a devastating parting shot. When it was over, the Fighting Irish celebrated their most-lopsided victory in the history of series — and the only thing playing in the stadium was the alma mater and the fight song by the band.

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    Chicago White Sox third baseman Conor Gillaspie throws to first on a ground ball by Cleveland Indians’ Jose Ramirez in the fifth inning of a baseball game Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014, in Cleveland. Ramirez was called safe which was upheld on replay review.

    White Sox come up short in 3-1 loss

    Jose Quintana maintained his dominance at Progressive Field on Saturday night, but had nothing to show for it. Quintana gave up one run in six innings, but Jose Ramirez’s RBI triple in the seventh off Zach Putnam (4-3) put the Indians up for good, as Cleveland won 3-1 for Chicago’s 13th loss in 17 games.

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    O’Connell, Stevenson prevail at H-F

    Stevenson defensive end Patrick O’Connell helped pace the defense with 5 tackles for loss including a pair of fourth quarter sacks, and senior quarterback Willie Bourbon scored four consecutive touchdowns, three of which came in the fourth quarter to help Stevenson (2-0) rally for a 33-24 win over the Vikings.

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    Naperville Central’s fortunes turn in second half

    You have to wonder what Naperville Central coach Troy Adams said during halftime of the Best of the West championship.

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    Westminster Christian tops Mooseheart

    So far in the early existence of its program Westminster Christian has been trying to compete almost solely with an advanced passing attack. The result has been only two wins, which both came last year. On Saturday, however, the Warriors took a big step in becoming a more complete team. Not only did they win 13-12 at Mooseheart, but they did so with a running game and defense.

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    Boylan edges LZ for Barrington title

    In every game this season, Lake Zurich’s boys soccer team has stayed close to the teams it has faced — though the outcomes don’t always show it. Lake Zurich had another hard-nosed effort Saturday night as it went after unbeaten Rockford Boylan on Saturday night. But the Bears lost a 1-0 decision to the Titans in the championship game of the Barrington Classic.

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    Ready for their first battle against each other are mom-and-daughter volleyball coaches Jeanette Pancratz of Schaumburg, left, and Drewann Pancratz of Conant, here wishing each other luck before their matchup Saturday in the Peggy Scholten Volleyball Classic at Fremd.

    A Scholten Classic, family style

    When retired Schaumburg athletic director John Selke hired Jeanette Pancratz as the Saxons volleyball coach in 1989, he could never have imagined what he was seeing Saturday morning. For that matter, neither could Jeanette’s husband Andy. But there they were, Selke and Andy Pancratz, watching Jeanette coaching the Saxons 25 years later against a Conant team coached by Drewann Pancratz. Yes, Drewann, the daughter of Jeanette and Andy. No one off hand can recall a mother and daughter facing one another as head coaches in a Mid-Suburban League sport. But it happened on Saturday in the Peggy Scholten Volleyball Classic. And it turned out to be a classic as the two teams battle to the wire before Conant pulled out a 16-25, 25-18, 27-25 victory for seventh place in the 16-team tournament.

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    Drew Hare, one of three Northern Illinois quarterbacks, played the entire second half Saturday against Northwestern. He completed 6 of 10 passes for 90 yards and a pair of touchdowns.

    Rozner: Young Huskies prevail in Battle of Illinois

    NIU might have found its new quarterback as the Huskies put together a strong second half to defeat Northwestern in Evanston.

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    Hinsdale Central wins at Batavia

    There is plenty of evidence to support Hinsdale Central being the two-time defending Class 3A boys golf state champions.

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    Samuel Asta of Montini scores while Jerod Robinson of East St. Louis chases during Saturday’s game in Lombard.

    Time is on Montini’s side

    Saturday against East St. Louis, wide receiver Leon Thornton III quickly displayed why he’s one of Montini’s team captains.

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    Boys soccer: Fox Valley roundup Saturday, Sept. 6

    Boys soccer: Fox Valley roundup Saturday, Sept. 6

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    Bears coach Marc Trestman, talking with receiver Brandon Marshall after a preseason touchdown, will have to rely on some sort of luck if the season is going to be a success. All NFL teams do.

    Imrem: Luck such a big factor in NFL

    Here's a prediction of the Bears' final regular-season record but, to be honest, going into the opener your guess is as good as anybody's.

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    Harvard’s Oscar Morales, left, tries to control the ball in front of Grayslake North’s Fernando Sanchez during the Grant Invitational in Fox Lake on Saturday.

    Cary-Grove edges Grant for tourney title

    Cary-Grove made it a three-game winning streak to net itself a Grant Invitational championship on Saturday morning as the Trojans topped host Grant 3-1 for the championship in Fox Lake on Saturday morning.

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    Bears running back Matt Forte is a workhorse who shows no signs of slowing down.

    Like it or not, Bears’ Forte needs a break

    Because Matt Forte has become such an effective all-around threat, it's difficult for coach Marc Trestman to ever take the two-time Pro Bowl running back out of the lineup. But the Bears' coach is also anxious to see what rookie Ka'Deem Carey can do as Forte's backup.

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    Well worth the drive for Carmel

    A mere couple of miles from the site of one of its most memorable drives in team history, Carmel Catholic returned to Chicago’s South Side for a football game Saturday. The Corsairs manufactured a vintage, clock-consuming sequence that conjured up memories of old, great Carmel teams. And when nose guard Mark Curran pounced on a fumble and recovered it late in the game to all but secure a 20-13 win over Phillips on the artificial turf at Mandrake Park, the Corsairs basked in the sun and rejoiced like they hadn’t in a long time.

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    No. 3 Oregon downs No. 7 Michigan State 46-27

    Marcus Mariota threw for 318 yards and three touchdowns, including a pair to speedy redshirt freshman Devon Allen, and the No. 3 Oregon Ducks’ blur offense prevailed over No. 7 Michigan State’s stout defense 46-27 on Saturday night.

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    Girls volleyball: Fox Valley roundup Saturday, Sept. 6

    Girls volleyball: Fox Valley roundup Saturday, Sept. 6

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    Benet Academy’s Brady McLaughlin finishes fourteenth with a time of 15:53.4, at the St. Charles East boys and girls cross country invite at LeRoy Oaks on Saturday in St. Charles.

    St. Charles East starts strong

    St. Charles East’s boys cross country team picked up right where it left off. Coming off their first conference championship since 2001, the Saints got their 2014 season started Saturday with an impressive second-place finish at their own 14-team St. Charles East Invitational at Leroy Oakes.

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    Pirates take a pair from Cubs

    The Pittsburgh Pirates picked up a pair of wins Saturday at Wrigley Field. They beat the Cubs 5-3 in 11 innings to finish Friday's suspended game. In the regularly scheduled contest, the Pirates took command early and never looked back, winning 5-0.

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    Glenbard West leaves room for improvement

    For all the sloppy play, Glenbard West’s football team still did what it usually does at home. The Hilltoppers dominated. Outgaining Morton by a near four-to-one margin in total yardage, Glenbard West easily rolled to a 42-0 West Suburban Conference crossover victory Saturday at Glen Ellyn’s Duchon Field.

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    Kristufek’s Arlington selections for Sept. 7

    Joe Kristufek's selections for Sept. 7 racing at Arlington International.

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    Jacobs’ Lauren VanVlierbergen placed first, with a time of 17:06.5, at the St. Charles East boys and girls cross country invite at LeRoy Oaks on Saturday in St. Charles.

    Jacobs' VanVlierbergen pushed but defends title at Leavey invite

    A little of the old and a little of the new turned St. Charles East’s Jeff Leavey invitational into must-see viewing Saturday morning at Leroy Oakes.

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    Hersey, Morton battle to scoreless draw

    Hersey gave state-ranked Morton all it could handle, as the Huskies fought and defended magnificently for nearly 80 minutes to keep the high-powered Mustangs scoreless in a draw Saturday morning in the final match of pool play for both clubs at the Red Devil Invite in Hinsdale.

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    Geneva wins own invite

    The wait is over. After putting an end to Joliet Catholic’s 8-year run as Geneva Invitational champions with a 3-game victory over the Angels in the semifinals, the Vikings’ volleyball team decided it was time to keep the title plaque close to home.

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    Cary-Grove a solid third at Jacobs

    Cary-Grove girls volleyball coach Patty Langanis realizes she has abundance of talent on her 2014 roster. But early in the season she knows it will take time for her team to mold into a solid squad. Avenging a loss earlier in the day, the Trojans defeated Hersey 25-18, 25-16 to capture third place in Saturday’s Jacobs Invitational at the Eagles Nest in Algonquin.

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    Addison Trail gets a kick out of Novy title

    Addison Trail rode the good fortune of shootout success to defeat Maine West 2-1 Saturday afternoon to capture the championship of its own Joe Novy Invite.

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    Palatine’s Brown back on track

    Palatine senior Graham Brown made a statement, and the boys cross country teams from Hinsdale Central and Neuqua Valley both looked impressive on Saturday at the Red Devil Invitational hosted by Hinsdale Central and Hinsdale South. Brown finished eighth in Class 3A last season and showed he will a force this season. The senior made his invite-winning move just before the 2-mile mark and never looked back, cruising through the finish in an impressive 14:55 at Katherine Legge Memorial Park in Hinsdale.

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    BC-FBC--Maryland-South Florida, 1st Ld-Writethru,416Brown throws for 2 TDs, Maryland rallies past USF

    TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — C.J. Brown threw for two touchdowns and Avery Thompson recovered a blocked punt in the end zone for a fourth-quarter TD that helped Maryland beat South Florida 24-17 on Saturday.Marcus Leak scored on receptions of 10 and 44 yards for the Terrapins (2-0), who overcame six turnovers, including a pair of interceptions that stopped promising drives.Thompson's TD put Maryland ahead for good with 12:25 remaining. Brad Craddock's 23-yard field goal made 24-17, and cornerback Alvin Hill's late interception helped the Terrapins put it away.USF (1-1) lost quarterback Mike White with an arm injury on the first play of the game. Backup Steven Bench scored on a 17-yard run and linebacker Auggie Sanchez scored on a 21-yard fumble return for the Bulls, who led 17-14 at halftime.Maryland's defense limited Marlon Mack, who began the day as the nation's leading rusher, to 73 yards on 22 carries.Mack ran for 275 yards and four TDs, helping USF overcome an early 11-point deficit to beat Western Carolina in the Bulls opener. The true freshman who scored on runs of 62, 60 and 56 yards in the opener found the going much tougher against a defensive front primed to slow down the 6-foot, 195-pound blend of power and speed.The USF running back had a couple of nice runs for 15 and 19 yards, but averaged just 3.3 yards per carry after gaining nearly 12 per attempt in his debut last week.Brown threw for 111 yards, no touchdowns and one interception in Maryland's season-opening rout of James Madison. He was much more effective Saturday, completing 17 of 28 passes for 201 yards. He also was intercepted on the Terps' opening series, the first of four first-half turnovers that threatened his team's chances of winning, and threw a third-quarter pick that stopped a drive deep in USF territory.USF lost White when he was hit after throwing 12 yards to Sean Price on the first play of the game. Bench started two games and appeared in seven overall a year ago, but didn't play nearly as well as he did Saturday in guiding the Bulls to his touchdown and a 35-yard field goal that put the Bulls up 17-14.Bench finished 14 of 36 for 162 yards. He was sacked twice and threw the late interception that helped Maryland stay in control in the closing minutes.Stefon Diggs had seven receptions for 50 yards for the Terrapins. Leak had three receptions for a team-leading 72 yards.

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    Iowa TD with minute to go beats Ball St. 17-13AP Photo IACN111, IACN110, IACN108, IACN107, IACN106, IACN105, IACN103, IACN102, IACN101, IACN104

    Associated PressIOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Iowa's Jake Duzey caught a go-ahead 12-yard touchdown pass from Jake Rudock with a minute left in a 17-13 win over Ball State on Saturday.Rudock threw for 322 yards and completed 9 of 11 passes on the Hawkeyes' two scoring drives in the final 6 minutes.Iowa (2-0) forced a fumble on Ball State's final possession to end the game.Ball State (1-1) turned two fumbles into 10 points, but the Cardinals couldn't get a stop late. The Hawkeyes racked up 455 yards and 27 first downs.Iowa broke through with a 12-yard touchdown pass from Rudock to Derek Willies with 3 minutes left to cap a 90-yard drive and cut Ball State's lead to 13-10.After the Hawkeyes forced a punt, Rudock marched Iowa downfield again and connected with his tight end Duzey for the game-winning score.Blake Dueitt returned a fumble 35 yards for Ball State's touchdown.

  •  

    Fremd powers past Prospect

    Fremd parlayed success on first down into a 47-3 romp over Prospect on Saturday afternoon in Mt. Prospect in a game rescheduled due to a power outage Friday night.

  •  

    Hinsdale Central's Haff fully impressive in Red Devil Invitational

    Last year everything was new for Hinsdale Central’s Alexa Haff, and as a freshman she still managed to finish second in Class 3A. This year the sophomore is coming back better than ever.

  •  
    Hampshire’s Charlie Piazza (2) battles Westminster Christian’s Noah Gannon for control during soccer action at Westminster Christian in Elgin Saturday.

    Hampshire picks up first win

    It has taken a few tries, but Hampshire’s boys soccer team finally came up with the winning formula against Westminster Christian on Saturday. Sophomores Charlie Piazza and Jose Cruz each scored goals and senior goalkeeper Andy Peterson recorded 6 saves as the Whip-Purs blanked the host Warriors 2-0 for their first victory of the season.

  •  
    Northern Illinois wide receiver Da’Ron Brown (4), top, catches a touchdown pass against Northwestern cornerback Matthew Harris (27) Saturday in Evanston. Northern won 23-15.

    NIU slips past Northwestern in 23-15 win

    Drew Hare passed for two touchdowns and ran for another to lead Northern Illinois to a 23-15 win over in-state rival Northwestern on Saturday. He got help from Da’Ron Brown, who hauled in the two TD passes and finished with six receptions for 128 yards. Hare, who didn’t play until the second half, completed six of 10 passes for 109 yards and had 11 rushes for 31 yards. Hare was the third quarterback to play for the Huskies.

  •  

    St. Francis retains familiar spot

    Starting this year, the Early Bird Girls Volleyball Invite was renamed the Peggy Scholten Volleyball Classic. But there was no change of the name of the winning team from a year ago or many years in the past. Wheaton St. Francis rallied from a first game setback to defeat St. Charles East 20-25, 25-12 25-22 in the championship match.

  •  

    Cobb carries Minnesota past Middle Tennessee 35-24

    David Cobb had 29 carries for two touchdowns and a career-high 220 yards, the most for the program in nine years, and Minnesota outlasted Middle Tennessee for a 35-24 victory on Saturday.

  •  

    No. 18 Wisconsin pulls away from W. Illinois 37-3

    With its running game stuffed, Wisconsin needed another way to get the offense rolling. Quarterback Tanner McEvoy took over using his arms and legs. McEvoy overcame a slow start to throw for three touchdowns and run for another, and the 18th-ranked Badgers pulled away from second-tier Western Illinois in the second half to win its home opener 37-3 Saturday.

  •  
    Marin Cilic, of Croatia defeated Roger Federer of Switzerland during the semifinals of the 2014 U.S. Open tennis tournament Saturday in New York.

    Federer, Djokovic both lose in U.S. Open semifinals

    Roger Federer could not pull off another big escape at the U.S. Open, losing 6-3, 6-4, 6-4 in the semifinals Saturday against Croatia’s Marin Cilic. It was the second significant surprise of the day, coming after Novak Djokovic was beaten 6-4, 1-6, 7-6 (4), 6-3 by Japan’s Kei Nishikori, who became the first man from Asia to reach a Grand Slam singles final. Instead of the No. 1-seeded Djokovic against the No. 2-seeded Federer — who have combined to win 24 major championships — in Monday’s final, it will be No. 10 Nishikori against No. 14 Cilic, neither of whom has ever appeared in a Grand Slam title match.

  •  

    So much to catch up on from summer gone by

    It feels so good to be back here. We’re going to play a little thing called, stuff that happened this summer.

  •  

    Willowbrook keeps trophy at home

    Setter Kelsey Linnig has played plenty of varsity volleyball the last three seasons for Willowbrook, but there hasn’t been a whole lot of hardware added to the trophy case.

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    ACC’s Babler scores 4 TDs in win over Lisle

    Aurora Central Catholic scored early and held off a second-half Lisle surge to win 29-14 on Saturday in Lisle. Brandon Babler scored 4 touchdowns to lead the Chargers.

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    Nebraska quarterback Tommy Armstrong Jr., right, and offensive lineman Jake Cotton, center rear, celebrate with running back Ameer Abdullah, left, after Abdullah scored the winning touchdown against McNeese State in the second half of an NCAA college football game in Lincoln, Neb., Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014. Nebraska won 31-24. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

    Abdullah’s late TD averts diaster for Nebraska

    Desperation brought out the best in Ameer Abdullah.With No. 19 Nebraska and McNeese State of the second-tier FCS tied Saturday, Abdullah turned a short pass from Tommy Armstrong Jr. into a jaw-dropping 58-yard touchdown with 20 seconds left for a 31-24 victory.Abdullah broke five tackles on his way to the end zone on what may end up as the signature play of his career. As far as Abdullah was concerned, the game shouldn’t have come down to that against an opponent from a lower division.

  •  
    Cincinnati Bengals defensive tackle Devon Still on the sidelines during an NFL preseason football game against the New York Jets in Cincinnati.

    Making practice squad keeps insurance for player's daughter

    His daughter is on her fourth round of chemotherapy. Being on the practice squad also will give him more time to spend with her since he won’t be playing in games.Still benefited from the NFL’s changes in practice squad qualifications in August. The league expanded the squad from eight to 10 players for each team.

  •  
    Purdue coach Darrell Hazell stood there incredulously with what he had just witnessed. Too many penalties, too many turnovers, not enough execution. It was a recipe for disaster. Cooper Rush threw two touchdown passes, Thomas Rawls ran for two more TDs and Brandon Greer returned an interception 57 yards for a score as Central Michigan stunned the Boilermakers 38-17, their second win over a Big Ten opponent in three seasons.

    Central Michigan stuns Purdue 38-17

    Purdue coach Darrell Hazell stood there incredulously with what he had just witnessed.Too many penalties, too many turnovers, not enough execution. It was a recipe for disaster.Cooper Rush threw two touchdown passes, Thomas Rawls ran for two more TDs and Brandon Greer returned an interception 57 yards for a score as Central Michigan stunned the Boilermakers 38-17, their second win over a Big Ten opponent in three seasons.

  •  
    Illinois quarterback Wes Lunt (12) throws a pass Saturday during the first quarter of an NCAA college football game against the Western Kentucky.

    Illini come back to beat W. Kentucky, 42-34

    Illinois quarterback Wes Lunt threw for three touchdowns and Taylor Barton returned an interception for a late score to secure a comeback win over Western Kentucky Saturday, 42-34.

  •  
    Chicago Cubs relief pitcher Neil Ramirez delivers during the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Pittsburgh Pirates continued from Friday's rain delay in Chicago, Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)

    Pirates prevail over Cubs in extras

    By Bruce Miles


    There was no rain Saturday at Wrigley Field. Unlike Friday, only blue skies and sunshine abounded. The Cubs and Pirates treated fans to extra-inning baseball before the regularly scheduled game.The Pirates got 2 runs in the 11th inning to win 5-3.

Business

  •  
    Andrew Dunham and his 2-year old daughter Leonora walk near asparagus plants Thursday on his farm, in Grinnell, Iowa.

    Pesticide drift a persistent problem for organic farmers

    Pesticide drift is a serious concern for organic farmers and they’ve come up with several defenses, such as buffer strips. Twelve states are part of a registry of farms that tips off aerial and ground sprayers to areas they need to avoid. The aerial spraying industry and pesticide manufacturers, meanwhile, say they’ve made big strides in controlling drift through pilot education and new technologies.

  •  
    Chris Coronado, a field technician for Bakman Water Co., installs a water meter Thursday on a new home under construction in Fresno, Calif.

    Drought lingers, yet some homes lack water meters

    More than 235,000 homes and businesses in the state are not equipped with meters, according to the most recent figures for 2013 collected by the State Water Board. An Associated Press analysis found that Californians who live in 10 water districts with the highest number of unmetered homes or businesses all used more water each day than the state average.

  •  

    French president in trouble, in public and private

    Things can’t get much worse for French President Francois Hollande: The economy is lagging; his new government is already under fire; and his private life has just been exposed in a ravaging book by the former first lady

  •  
    Vice President Joe Biden greets patrons at the Old Ferry Landing restaurant Wednesday while making a stop for lunch in Portsmouth, N.H.

    Biden promotes economics for nation’s middle class

    Vice President Joe Biden says the August jobs report, which underwhelmed many economists, is another step forward in the nation’s economic recovery. The economy generated only 142,000 jobs, the fewest in eight months.

  •  
    Bob Rohrman is eyeing the former Arlington Toyota property for a used car dealership.

    Rohrman dealership could give Buffalo Grove shot in the arm

    Buffalo Grove’s once vibrant corridor of auto dealerships along Dundee Road may come roaring back with at least one Bob Rohrman dealership and possibly three. On Monday, the Buffalo Grove village board will consider a sales tax sharing agreement that would bring a Rohr-Max to the former Toyota dealership at 935 W. Dundee Road.

  •  
    Ecuador’s Central Bank is getting ready to use electronic currency in which consumers will initially be able to use it to make and receive payments using their cellphones. Ecuador is heralding its plans to create the world’s first government-issued digital currency, which some analysts believe could ultimately replace the country’s existing currency, the U.S. dollar, which the government cannot control.

    Ecuador heralds digital currency plans

    Ecuador is planning to create what it calls the world’s first digital currency issued by a central bank, which some analysts believe could be a first step toward abandoning the country’s existing currency, the U.S. dollar. The electronic money, which Central Bank officials say they expect will start circulating in December, does not have a name and officials would not disclose technical details, though they said it would not be a crypto-currency like Bitcoin.

  •  
    For the second year in a row, Netflix racked up nominations and buzz before the Emmy Awards but then went home nearly empty-handed.

    Netflix, again, can’t win any major Emmy awards

    For the second year in a row, Netflix racked up nominations and buzz before the Emmy Awards but then went home nearly empty-handed. While the online streaming behemoth got all the chatter leading up to the ceremony, thanks to the political thriller “House of Cards” and the first year of “Orange is the New Black” eligibility, Netflix was completely shut out of the big awards.

  •  

    Germans warm to crowdfunding as luxury resort attracts investors

    In Germany, crowdfunders seeking cash for business ventures raised a total of 8 million euros in the first half, 60 percent more than a year earlier, according to Frankfurt-based startup portal FuerGruender.de.

  •  

    Celebrity photo leaks raise concerns about security of the cloud

    The leaking of hundreds of private and intimate photographs of Hollywood celebrities cast new doubt on the security of popular online storage sites Monday as investigators probed for explanations of the high-profile breach. The breach — regarded as one of the most wide-ranging involving celebrities — has spurred concerns about the security of photographs, videos and documents that millions of Americans store in popular Internet “cloud” accounts.

  •  
    Google co-founder Sergey Brin gestures after riding in a driverless car with officials. The prospect of cars being controlled by online navigation systems is troubling to regulators and law enforcers.

    Driverless cars hijacked by hackers signal risk in Google push

    While the idea of robo-cars whisking us off to our destinations may sound like science fiction, the technology exists and is largely ready for the real world. What’s harder to determine is the risk associated with the emergence of these vehicles. If automakers effectively take the wheel, that puts them in the firing line for liability suits stemming from accidents. The vehicles would also be exposed to threats from hackers who could hijack cars and potentially control them remotely, turning them into mules for criminal purposes or even using them as weapons.

  •  
    The General Services Administration is experimenting with a network of sensors in its downtown Washington D.C. building, intending to cut energy use.

    ‘Smart Buildings’ strategy put to test at GSA

    For the past couple of years, GSA has been experimenting with a network of sensors in its building — a system technologists call the “Internet of Things” — intending to cut energy use and wasted resources. It aims to implement this network in other federal buildings across the country as part of a “Smart Buildings” policy — so far, it has done so with about 80 federal buildings covering a combined area of about 45 million square feet.

  •  
    Netflix is giving its Internet video subscribers a more discreet way to recommend movies and TV shows to their Facebook friends after realizing most people don’t want to share their viewing habits with large audiences. Until now, Netflix subscribers linking the service to their Facebook accounts automatically disclosed everything they were watching with a potentially wide-reaching range of people.

    Netflix unveils new way to share recommendations

    Until now, Netflix subscribers linking the service to their Facebook accounts automatically disclosed everything they were watching with a potentially wide-reaching range of people. The company believes the open-ended approach discouraged most Netflix subscribers from connecting their accounts with their Facebook profiles. The automatic disclosures will end Tuesday as Netflix Inc. embraces a new system that empowers subscribers to select which friends will receive their video recommendations.

  •  
    DJ Lee, Executive Vice President of Samsung, presents a Samsung Gear S smartwatch Wednesday during his keynote speech at an unpacked event of Samsung ahead of the consumer electronic fair IFA in Berlin.

    Review: Samsung phones impress, but new apps key

    After years of promoting its phones as “the next big thing,” Samsung is realizing that bigger isn’t necessarily better. Two new Galaxy Note smartphones from Samsung are about the same size as last year’s Note 3. What’s different: A side screen on one of them and sharper cameras on both. Samsung also unveiled new wearable devices, including a virtual-reality headset, as part of its holiday lineup. The devices won’t start selling until October or later, and prices for most haven’t been announced yet.

  •  
    Apple CEO Steve Jobs talks about iCloud at the Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco. The circulation of nude photographs stolen from celebrities’ online accounts has thrown a spotlight on the security of cloud computing, a system used by a growing number of Americans to store personal information over the Internet.

    How to protect your data in the cloud

    The theft of nude photographs from celebrities’ online accounts has thrown a spotlight on the security of cloud computing, a system used by a growing number of Americans to store personal information over the Internet. If celebrities’ photos aren’t safe, then whose are? Here are some key questions and answers about files that are stored remotely.

  •  
    The new iPhone will make mobile payment easier by including a near-field communication chip for the first time, according to a person familiar with the new phone. That advancement along with Touch ID, a fingerprint recognition reader that debuted on the most-recent iPhone, will enable consumers to securely pay for items in a store with the touch of a finger.

    Apple said to team up with Visa, MasterCard on iPhone wallet

    Apple plans to turn its next iPhone into a mobile wallet through a partnership with major payment networks, banks and retailers, according a person familiar with the situation. The agreement includes Visa, MasterCard and American Express and will be unveiled on Sept. 9 along with the next iPhone, said the person who asked not to be identified because the talks are private.

  •  
    Ryan Grepper invented the “Coolest,” which combines a cooler with a blender, USB charger for devices, music player and other features. Grepper’s Kickstarter project for the product generated more than $12 million in crowdfunding pledges, the most in Kickstarter’s five-year history.

    Kickstarter for “Coolest” shows growth of crowdfunding

    Ryan Grepper invented many a dud before he made more than $12 million on a souped-up cooler — a cooler that, on Friday evening, became the most successful project in crowdfunding giant Kickstarter’s five-year history. Grepper has earned nearly $13 million in donations from more than 61,000 people.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    The Gallery Leaning Desk, $499, draws eyes to the ceiling and makes a room appear taller.

    Minimalist desks simply get the job done

    Is the home office doomed? Laptops allow us to work almost anywhere, paper storage has gone digital, and for a growing number of apartment-dwellers, the notion of having the square-footage for a home office is a pipe dream.

  •  
    Kelly Anne Clark, from left, Bernie Yvon, Johanna McKenzie Miller and Alex Goodrich starred in Marriott Theatre’s “I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change,” a musical revue chronicling the stages of romance from dating to parenthood to divorce to death.

    Suburban musical theater favorite killed in Indiana crash

    Published reports indicate Bernie Yvon, an accomplished musical theater actor and near constant presence on the suburban theater scene, died Saturday in an accident en route to a rehearsal

  •  
    Director Andrej Koncalovskij shows his Silver Lion Saturday for best director for the movie The Postman’s White Nights during the awards ceremony of the 71th edition of the Venice Film Festival in Venice, Italy.

    Sweden’s Andersson wins Golden Lion at Venice fest

    The festival’s Silver Lion for best director went to Russia’s Andrei Konchalovksy for near-silent drama “The Postman’s White Nights.”

  •  
    Berghoff’s 29th annual Oktoberfest is a spirited outdoor celebration that will take place Wednesday through Friday, Sept. 10-12, in Chicago.

    On the road: Berghoff rolls out the barrel for Oktoberfest

    Berghoff rolls out their own private label beer and root beer in the heart of Chicago’s Loop during for the 29th annual Oktoberfest. The Intuit: Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art has a new collection of work, much from private collections. And multiday cruises are available on tall ships at Traverse City, Michigan.

  •  
    For hip rotation: On one knee and with your back foot out to the side a little, raise the club above your head and rotate toward your back leg, then tip away from your back leg. Hold for 30 seconds, repeat two to three times and repeat on the opposite side.

    Loosening up a Tin Man’s golf swing

    I aspire to become that near-mythical creature known as a “good golfer.” The main thing holding me back seems to be my own body. A good swing requires a fairly broad range of motion, and as it turns out, I don’t have that. I'm hoping to change that.

  •  
    Eating healthy while traveling can be a challenge.

    How to improve your diet while traveling

    Q. I’m trying to eat right and lose weight but I travel almost every week. Sometimes I’m in the car for several hours and other times I’m getting on a plane and flying across the country. How can I improve my diet when I’m away from home?

  •  

    Book notes: Joelle Charbonneau signs her book at Wauconda library
    "The Testing" author Joelle Charbonneau discusses and signs copies of her book at 3:15 p.m. Monday, Sept. 8, at the Wauconda Area Public Library, 801 N. Main St., Wauconda.

  •  
    “For Goodness Sex,” by Al Vernacchio, was released this month by HarperCollins. Vernacchio has been in the sex education field for more than 20 years, currently teaching 9th- and 12-graders in the Philadelphia suburb of Wynnewood. He’s seen the rise of the abstinence movement, the digital revolution and the impact on teens of parents who don’t know how to get the sex conversation started.

    Educator’s tips for parents on ‘the talk’

    One of the first things Al Vernacchio does in his high school Sexuality and Society class is stand at a podium in a sweater vest and tie surrounded by a wall packed with slogans: RESIST HOMOPHOBIA. FIGHT SEXISM. ENJOY LIFE. What he doesn’t do: pass around anatomy drawings or hand out safe sex pamphlets, though he makes those available near the door.

  •  
    Comedian Margaret Cho (“Drop Dead Diva”) performs at the North Shore Center for the Arts in Skokie at 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 6.

    Weekend picks: Laugh along with Margaret Cho at North Shore Center

    Comedian and actress Margaret Cho returns to her standup roots this Saturday at the North Shore Center for the Performing Arts in Skokie. Grammy Award-winning country mega star Garth Brooks is back in a big way with his World Tour with Trisha Yearwood at the Allstate Arena. Chicago native and comedian Denise Ramsden plays a series of standup performances at Zanies at Pheasant Run Resort in St. Charles.

  •  
    Olympic bobsledder Lolo Jones is one of 13 contestants on the new season of “Dancing With the Stars,” premiering Sept. 15, on ABC.

    Jones takes timeout from track, bobsled to tango

    Lolo Jones wrapped up her track season a little early so she could tango and two-step. She’s also putting her bobsled career on hold for a winter in order to jitterbug and jive. The Olympian is simply hearing the call of the music, even if she readily admits she has two left feet on the dance floor. Jones will join NASCAR driver Michael Waltrip, UFC legend Randy Couture and other famous personalities on the new season of “Dancing With the Stars,” which premieres Sept. 15 on ABC.

  •  
    Jack Reacher gets to explore Europe in Lee Child’s latest thriller, “Personal.”

    Jack Reacher returns in Lee Child’s ‘Personal’

    Jack Reacher reads an ad in a newspaper left on a bus and knows it was meant for him in “Personal,” Lee Child’s latest thriller to feature his larger-than-life hero. The ad specifies that he call a particular individual. Less than an hour after he contacts military man Rick Shoemaker, Reacher is on a flight to an unknown destination. Child is the best thriller writer in the business, and “Personal” is sure to be on the best-seller lists.

  •  
    Steve Rogers (Chris Evans), left, battles an assassin (Sebastian Stan) in “Captain America: The Winter Soldier.”

    DVD previews: ‘Captain America: The Winter Soldier’

    One of the great strengths of the “Avengers” mega-franchise has been its canny casting, and “The Winter Soldier” is no exception: Chris Evans once again brings a clean-cut, straight-shooting air of simplicity to Steve Rogers’ principled parago. Happily, directors Joe and Anthony Russo have decided to make this “Captain America” installment something of a two-hander between Steve and Natasha, who as portrayed by Scarlett Johansson continually threatens to steal the entire movie with her slinky martial arts moves and sultry, smoky-voiced one-liners. The film comes to DVD Sept. 9.

  •  

    CFPB is now a consumer complaint clearinghouse

    Financial services often don’t work well for consumers. The trial-and-error technique that consumers rely on in navigating many markets, such as food and clothing markets, does not work well when transactions are large and infrequent.

  •  
    Fashions from Peter Som’s Spring 2015 collection has the designer playing fast and loose with his take on green.

    Peter Som makes olive green fun for spring

    Peter Som, a favorite of first lady Michelle Obama, ramped up the fun Friday, with olive green in broad stripes and bold florals on his New York Fashion Week runway. Som transitioned from easy living dresses, flouncy short skirts and sturdy jackets and coats for day to a series of gold lame looks for evening, offering a youthful flourish with flowery appliques on numerous outfits.

  •  
    This khaki and black bedroom is an example of “masculine minimalism.” Though accessories are kept to a minimum, a “work-of-art” light fixture hangs overhead.

    No man cave for Mr. My Way

    Q. OK, maybe I should hire a professional (as my friends keep telling me), but I know the look I want for my own digs: sharp, clean, sophisticated — the way I think I dress — and fit for a 27-year-old guy. What I do need is some ideas about color and lamps, and things like that.

  •  

    Seller concessions are not uncommon

    Q. I sold my house by contributing $1,000 to the buyer’s down payment for a mortgage. All the details were taken care of at the closing. At the time, I was under stress from my wife’s death. But I have no regrets about the sale that was completed. Did they take advantage of me?

  •  

    Board within its rights to charge for copies of minutes

    Q. After years of providing our condominium homeowners with copies of approved meeting minutes, owners are now being advised that we must make an appointment and drive 20 miles to the property management office, pay an hourly sum to sit and watch someone make copies of the minutes, and pay ten cents a copy.

Discuss

  •  

    Saturday Soapbox: Ten suburban issues worth special reflection

    Ten special things to think about in the suburbs today -- including do-overs in DuPage County, win-win soccer deals in Long Grove, teaching charity in Arlington Heights, the press's pizza bias and more.

  •  

    Science argues against legalizing pot
    A Woodstock letter to the editor: The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, says that “regular cannabis use, which we consider once a week, is not safe and may result in addiction and neurocognitive damage, especially in youth.”

  •  

    Two reasons to vote Quinn out
    A Huntley letter to the editor: There is a long list of reasons for not re-electing Gov. Pat Quinn, but two come to the fore:

  •  

    Constant changes for project overruns
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: Claire Zinzer in her Sept. 1 coal plant letter bitterly questions the billion-dollar overrun on the coal plant that they are contracted with to buy their power. She rightly fears that her electric bill will be higher.One must ask another question. Why the billion dollar overrun?

  •  

    Lakefront is the question in Waukegan
    A Waukegan letter to the editor: People who ask “Where will we get our power?” if the coal-fired plant in Waukegan closes are not up to speed on the facts.

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