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Daily Archive : Tuesday August 26, 2014

News

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    Almost 60,000 people attended this summer’s five-show concert series in Elk Grove Village. Next year, officials won’t allow people to use tarps, blankets or tables to reserve spots.

    Elk Grove banning blankets at summer concerts

    Don’t expect to plop down tarps, blankets or tables next year to reserve your spot for one of Elk Grove Village’s popular summer concerts. “We had one tarp that was 10 feet by 20 feet,” Mayor Craig Johnson said. “It’s taking up too much space.”

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Several steel chain saws, valued at $3,500, were stolen between 5 p.m. Aug. 20 and 2:10 p.m. Aug. 21 from a trailer near Old Kirk and Reed roads near Geneva, according to a sheriff’s report.

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    Libertyville resident Gerry Verbeten implores Libertyville-Vernon Hills Area High School District 128 officials to cut spending during Monday’s board meeting.

    Dist. 128 board adopts $84.5 million budget after residents complain

    After spending weeks whittling down planned expenses, the Libertyville-Vernon Hills Area High School District 128 board has approved an $84.5 million annual budget. The budget cuts totaled about $1.5 million and were made in a variety of categories, including supplies, staffing and maintenance.

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    Pat Quinn

    Quinn vetoes 70 mph speed limit on tollways in suburbs

    Gov. Pat Quinn Tuesday put the brakes on legislation that would have raised speed limits on suburban tollways to 70 mph. The governor last year signed a law to raise speed limits on downstate interstates, but urban areas were excluded. “(T)he convenience of increased speeds for drivers on Illinois tollways does not outweigh the safety risks to children, families, and our dedicated public...

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    Metra train strikes, kills man in Des Plaines

    A man in his 40s died after he was hit by an outbound Metra train on the Union Pacific/Northwest Line late Tuesday afternoon in Des Plaines. The man was pronounced dead at the scene at 5:37 p.m., according to the Cook County medical examiner’s office.

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    Fire in Naperville leaves home uninhabitable

    A Tuesday bedroom fire in a Naperville house has left the building uninhabitable until repairs are made, officials said.

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    Trial starts for Naperville agency CEO

    The trial began Tuesday for the founder and former CEO of a Naperville adoption agency accused of embezzling more than $200,000.

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    John Euwema

    Western Springs man sentenced for stalking DuPage County judge

    A Western Springs man was sentenced to six years in prison Tuesday after he pleaded guilty to stalking a DuPage County judge.Through his plea, John Euwema, 58, of 3902 Central Ave. admitted to anonymously sending a package to the home of Judge Kathryn Creswell in July 2013 while facing a felony driving charge in her courtroom.

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    American woman is being held hostage in Syria

    The Islamic State militant group is holding hostage a young American woman who was doing humanitarian aid work in Syria, a family representative said Tuesday. The 26-year-old woman is the third American known to have been kidnapped by the militant group. The Islamic State group recently threatened to kill American hostages to avenge the crushing airstrikes in Iraq against militants advancing on...

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    Algonquin man arrested on heroin-related charges

    An Algonquin man has been arrested after law enforcement officials found heroin in a vehicle.Brandon P. Trina, 20, was charged with unlawful possession of heroin, hypodermic syringes and paraphernalia and unlawful delivery of heroin, according to a McHenry County Sheriff’s Office news release.

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    D. “Dewey” Pierotti

    Pierotti: I was surprised DuPage forest exec director was let go

    DuPage County Forest Preserve commission President D. "Dewey" Pierotti says he wasn't involved the decisions to part ways with Executive Director Arnie Biondo and hire someone to replace him. “I didn’t know a thing until they gave me that (letter),” Pierotti said Tuesday. “This was a decision made by the board. I was surprised that he was let go.”

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    Supporters of gay marriage in Wisconsin and Indiana attend a rally at the federal plaza Monday, Aug. 25, 2014, in Chicago. The Chicago-based 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals will hear arguments Tuesday on gay marriage fights from Indiana and Wisconsin, setting the stage for one ruling. Each case deals with whether statewide gay marriage bans violate the Constitution.

    Judges chide state lawyers over gay marriage bans

    Federal appeals judges bristled on Tuesday at arguments defending gay marriage bans in Indiana and Wisconsin, with one Republican appointee comparing them to now-defunct laws that once outlawed weddings between blacks and whites.

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    The Department of Veterans Affairs says investigators have found no proof that delays in care caused any deaths at a VA hospital in Phoenix, seen here, deflating an explosive allegation that helped expose a troubled health care system in which veterans waited months for appointments while employees falsified records to cover up the delays.

    Report: Shoddy care by VA didn’t cause deaths

    Government investigators found no proof that delays in care caused veterans to die at a Phoenix VA hospital, but they found widespread problems that the Veterans Affairs Department is promising to fix. Investigators uncovered large-scale improprieties in the way VA hospitals and clinics across the nation have been scheduling veterans for appointments, according to a report released Tuesday by the...

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    A Palestinian boy sits next to the destroyed 15-story Basha Tower following early morning Israeli airstrikes in Gaza City, Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014.

    Gaza truce open-ended, but puts off tough issues

    Israel and Gaza’s ruling Hamas agreed Tuesday to an open-ended cease-fire after seven weeks of fighting — an uneasy deal that halts the deadliest war the sides have fought in years, with more than 2,200 killed, but puts off the most difficult issues. In the end, both sides settled for an ambiguous interim agreement in exchange for a period of calm.

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    Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, shakes hands with Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko, right, as Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbayev, center, looks on. Leaders of Russia, Belarus, two other former Soviet republics as well as top EU officials are meeting in Minsk, Belarus, for a highly anticipated summit to discuss the crisis in Ukraine which has left more than 2,000 dead and displaced over 300,000 people.

    No sign of quick end to Ukraine conflict

    Ukraine’s president said Wednesday that Vladimir Putin accepts the principles of a peace plan for Ukraine but the Russian leader insisted that only Kiev can reach a cease-fire deal with the pro-Moscow separatists. Following meetings between Putin and Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko that included a one-on-one session that stretched into the night, there was no indication of a quick end...

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    Syrian Foreign Minister Walid al-Moallem speaks during a press conference, giving the first public comments by a senior Assad official on the threat posed by the Islamic State group, in Damascus, Syria, Monday. Al-Moallem warned the U.S. not to conduct airstrikes inside Syria against the Islamic State group without Damascus’ consent.

    Possible airstrikes in Syria raise more questions

    The intelligence gathered by U.S. military surveillance flights over Syria could support a broad bombing campaign against the Islamic State militant group, but current and former U.S. officials differ on whether air power would significantly degrade what some have called a “terrorist army.”

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    Ishmael Beah, an author, activist and former child soldier, will speak Thursday at Glenbard West High School.

    Former child soldier to speak at Glenbard West

    Parents and students will get the chance to hear from author and former child soldier Ishmael Beah on Thursday as part of the District 87 Glenbard Parent Series: Navigating Healthy Families program. Beah, the author of “A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier” and “Radiance of Tomorrow: A Novel,” is originally from Sierra Leone and was a child soldier during his...

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    Burning Man participants, seen at this week’s event in the Black Rock Desert of Gerlach, Nev., have a distinctive look.

    Soggy start: Burning Man crews stuck at Wal-Mart

    Ah, Burning Man, the annual weeklong rave that draws thousands of free-thinkers to a remote spot in the Nevada desert. It’s a festival so remote and bizarre that the only limit to free expression is imagination ... and that dust that always gets into the electronics. Except when it rains. That’s when the “Burners” end up in the parking lot of the Reno Wal-Mart.

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    Garang Deng

    Prosecutors: Deng should stand trial for 2005 murder

    Prosecutors want Garang Deng to either head to trial or enter a new guilty plea in the 2005 murder of Marilyn Bethell. Deng, whose 35-year sentence was vacated by an appellate court last year, wants his case sent back to juvenile court. A judge will sort it out in October. Deng, now 22, was 14 when prosecutors say he killed Bathell.

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    Peter Roskam

    Roskam talks tax reform, health care, immigration in St. Charles

    Congressman Peter Roskam shared his views on tax reform, the president's health care law and immigration reform with an audience of local businesses leaders in St. Charles Tuesday.

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    All People’s Interfaith Food Pantry volunteer Lili Balasa of Elgin, left, hands fresh produce to Shelley Hernandez of Elgin. Balasa has been a volunteer there for two years.

    Twice as many need food from Elgin pantry

    All People’s Interfaith Food Pantry manager Joan Wesner says people should see the need among those who come to the pantry. “It is unbelievable what people go through to try to make ends meet.” In response to a steady increase in demand, the pantry — which fed more than 13,000 people last year — began allowing families to get food once a month, rather than six...

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    The home grandstand in the stadium at Batavia High School would be replaced with a larger one, under plans the school district is considering for spending $15 million on capital projects, if voters approve.

    Batavia school board refining needs for referendum money

    If the Batavia school district gets the OK to borrow $15 million, what projects would it spend the money on first? School board members are refining that list.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Jocelyn Villalobos, 21, of Elgin, was charged Monday with trespass to a residence and two counts of disorderly conduct, court records show.

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    Joanna Sojka

    Services set for 29-year-old Des Plaines alderman who died of stroke

    Funeral services have been set for 29-year-old Des Plaines Alderman Joanna Sojka, who died Aug. 18 of an apparent stroke. A visitation is scheduled for 5 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 3, at St. Hubert Parish, 729 Grand Canyon St. in Hoffman Estates. It is followed by a Mass at 6 p.m. A public moment of silence will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 2, at the beginning of the city council meeting. The...

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Michael C. Stewart, who police said is homeless, was charged with felony theft from the Batavia Public Library, at 3:41 p.m. Monday at the library, according to a police report.

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    Anderson Animal Shelter Executive Director Beth Drake works Tuesday on setting up a temporary location at 122 W. Wilson St. in Batavia. The South Elgin shelter is moving to temporary headquarters while its current location is refurbished. Drake expects to be back in South Elgin no later than the end of October.

    Anderson Animal Shelter temporarlily moves to Batavia

    Anderson Animal Shelter in South Elgin moves to temporary headquarters on West Wilson Street in Batavia for the next couple months. Part of the project includes new cages to replace the current ones, some of which are 40 years old. “We know how to house these animals better now, so we need to do that,” Executive Director Beth Drake said.

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    DuPage forest preserve rangers trying to unionize

    A majority of DuPage Forest Preserve District rangers want to unionize, but first they’ll have to overcome a challenge by their employer. Representatives for the 22 rangers and senior rangers recently filed a petition with the Illinois Labor Relations Board to form a collective bargaining unit through the Metropolitan Alliance of Police.

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    The Downtown Wheaton Association has requested $41,000 in city funding for fiscal 2014-15 to make up for a revenue shortfall.

    Wheaton considers giving $41,000 to downtown organization

    The Downtown Wheaton Association may receive supplemental funding from the city’s general fund this year after experiencing a shortfall in revenue. During a planning session Monday, most city council members said they would grant the association’s request for $41,000. But not all agreed. “I know it’s tough, it’s a challenge, but you’ve got to live within...

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    A federal U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity study shows a major increase — more than 70 percent — in the number of pregnancy discrimination claims from 1992 to 2011.

    Quinn signs pregnancy anti-discrimination measure

    New guidelines aimed at preventing workplace discrimination against pregnant women were signed into law by Gov. Pat Quinn this week, a move backers say extends protections already in place for other workers.

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    Quinn says agencies must follow hiring rules

    Gov. Pat Quinn deflected blame for state hiring problems Tuesday, saying agencies must follow anti-patronage hiring rules — even when the candidates are those the governor’s office favors.

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    Quinn liaison to IDOT resigns

    One of Gov. Pat Quinn’s deputy chiefs of staff — whose responsibilities included the troubled Illinois Department of Transportation — is leaving the job.

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    Chicago’s Trey Hondras scores ahead of the throw to South Korea catcher Sang Hoon Han in the sixth inning of the Little League World Series championship Sunday in South Williamsport, Pa. South Korea won 8-4.

    Jackie Robinson West game draws ratings record

    Chicago’s Jackie Robinson West All Stars broke a television rating record on Sunday for Little League World Series games viewed in the Chicago market.

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    Adlai Stevenson II

    Lincoln library plans Stevenson family exhibit

    Officials at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum are planning an exhibit featuring former Gov. Adlai Stevenson II and his family’s political dynasty.

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    EPA says oil spill migrated to canal

    The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency is seeking enforcement action against a Cicero company after an oil spill reached a nearby canal. The EPA said Tuesday that it’s asked Attorney General Lisa Madigan’s office to obtain an order requiring Olympic Oil Ltd., to stop the spill and clean up contaminated soil and water.

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    New China exhibit to open at Field Museum

    The Field Museum is announcing plans to open a new permanent exhibition on China. Museum officials say the Cyrus Tang Hall of China exhibition will cover thousands of years of China’s history, from the Paleolithic era to the present.

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    Gunman in car wounds 4 people

    A gunman firing from a car has shot and wounded four people standing outside a strip mall Monday night on the South Side.

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    Murder suspect arrested in Lake in the Hills

    A federal parolee suspected in a stabbing death earlier this month in west-central Illinois has been arrested in Lake in the Hills.

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    This land is at the center of a dispute between Grayslake and Mundelein. Mundelein officials may sue to prevent a truck terminal from being built there.

    Mundelein could sue over Grayslake annexation, trucking plan

    Mundelein officials may go to court to stop a truck terminal from being built on newly annexed land in neighboring Grayslake. Mundelein’s village board on Monday authorized its attorneys to file a lawsuit against Grayslake and Saia Inc., the Georgia trucking firm behind the plan.

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    Jasica named associate judge

    Daniel L. Jasica has been chosen as the next associate judge of the 19th juidicial circuit, officials announed Tuesday.

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    Tip-a-Cop events in Lake County:

    Lake County Sheriff’s corrections officers, deputies, explorers and reserve deputies will host and assist food servers on Wednesday, Aug. 27, from 4 to 8 p.m., to help raise money for Special Olympics Illinois. The Tip-A-Cop fundraiser will be at the California Pizza Kitchen Restaurant, 20502 N. Rand Road, Deer Park.

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    Suicide prevention luncheon:

    The Lake County Suicide Prevention Task Force will hold a special luncheon open to the public from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 8 as part of Suicide Prevention Week.

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    Labor Day blood drive:

    The Mundelein Fire Department will host the “Everyday Heroes Labor Day Blood Drive” on Tuesday, Sept. 2, from noon to 7 p.m. at Mundelein Fire Station #1, 1000 N. Midlothian Road, Mundelein.

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    Chris Harper’s colleagues at the Daily Herald knew her as the “church lady” for her work with suburban churches and religious institutions seeking to advertise with the newspaper. Harper died Aug. 20 after a long illness. She was 61.

    “Church lady” earned clients’, colleagues’ respect

    Around the advertising department of the Daily Herald, colleagues referred to Chris Harper as the “church lady,” since she was the go-to person for churches and religious institutions wishing to place ads in the Easter and Christmas worship sections. “Chris really earned the respect of her clients,” said Scott Ray, director of Niche Publications. Harper passed away...

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    Bob Chwedyk/bchwedyk@dailyherald.com ¬ Yomara Ibarra, right, of BalloonsbyTommy.com, parades along the route with balloons at the annual Schaumburg Septemberfest parade.

    What Septemberfest has in store for you

    The area’s largest Labor Day festival returns to Schaumburg this year, with its blockbuster list of entertainment options and family-friendly atmosphere.

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    Oak Brook names new village manager

    A veteran administrator, Riccardo “Rick” Ginex, is in line to become Oak Brook’s next village manager, officials said Tuesday. Village President Gopal Lalmalani will recommend the village board approve Ginex’s appointment when it meets Sept. 9.

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    Mardi Gras is celebrated in Crested Butte, Colo., Feb. 24, 2009. Some people in normally laid back Crested Butte, are not up for a secretive Bud Lite plan to paint their mountain town blue and turn it into a fantasy city for an ad campaign.

    Crested Butte to be Bud Light’s ‘Whatever’ town

    Some people in normally laid back Crested Butte are not up for “Whatever” — a secretive Bud Light plan to paint their mountain town blue and turn it into a fantasy town for an online and television ad campaign.

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    Driver charged in hit-and-run crash that injured two men

    A Tennesse motorist has been charged with misdemeanor DUI and failing to report an injury accident after authorities say he struck two men riding the same motorcycle about 2:20 a.m. Aug. 23. Jason Gaston, 35, was ordered held on $100,000 bond Tuesday.

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    Schaumburg Septemberfest
    Thousands of Schaumburg residents and people from surrounding communities will visit the village’s municipal grounds Labor Day weekend for the 44th annual Septemberfest celebration. Admission is free and parking is available at remote lots with free shuttle service.WhenSaturday, Aug. 30, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.Sunday, Aug. 31. 9 a.m. to 10 p.m.

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    Des Plaines hires economic development coordinator

    Des Plaines has hired an economic development coordinator to assist the city’s efforts in bringing businesses to town. Lauren Pruss, who has been an economic development professional and planner for 16 years, will begin her new role in Des Plaines Sept. 8.

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    Palatine Children’s Chorus to host welcome nights

    The Palatine Children’s Chorus will host two free fall welcome nights for families with children who want to learn more about or are considering enrolling in the singing groups. The welcome nights will be at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 28, and 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 2, at the Palatine Park District Community Center.

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    An Elk Grove Village gateway sign on Ridge Avenue north of Devon Avenue is one of six that will be replaced next year with a new LED-illuminated sign.

    New LED-illuminated gateway signs coming to Elk Grove Village

    New LED-illuminated gateway signs welcoming drivers to Elk Grove Village will be installed at the edges of town next year, officials said. Elk Grove Village-based Rebechini Studios is being paid $39,636 to construct six new signs, which will replace existing wood and brick facade signs.

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    Fourth-grader Chase Hampton gets a high-five from English teacher Carmen Bustamante as he walks through a welcome tunnel of parents and teachers on the first day of school Tuesday at Anne Fox Elementary in Hanover Park.

    District 54 reopens 27 schools, prepares for 28th

    Schaumburg Township Elementary District 54 welcomed back students to 27 of its schools Tuesday — with the ribbon-cutting for its 28th coming Thursday. That’s when the district’s special-needs and at-risk 3- to 5-year-old and their families will get their first looks at the new Early Learning Center next to the district’s administration building in Schaumburg.

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    A group called Conserve Itasca Open Space wants to see the Itasca Country Club protected from development.

    Itasca residents lobbying to preserve country club site

    Fearing the Itasca Country Club property could be developed, a group of residents is trying to get the village and DuPage County Forest Preserve District involved in an effort to protect the site. “Aside from losing this 125-acre natural habitat along with its recreational amenities,” one resident wrote, “we are extremely concerned about the enormous impact any development will...

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    Salveo Health & Wellness, Ltd. would like to open a marijuana dispensary at 1330 Crispin Drive, unit 215, in the Fox Bluff Corporate Center.

    Elgin marijuana dispensary opening might be delayed

    A petition to open a marijuana dispensary in Elgin might get sent back to the city's planning and zoning commission, and the applicant says he might abandon the process if that happens. Elgin Corporation Counsel Bill Cogley recommended the city council direct the commission to continue a public hearing held Aug. 4, to ensure the principles of due process are met, Elgin Assistant City Manager Rick...

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    Flooding, like that shown here from 2010, has been a regular problem at Palatine Hills Golf Course. Heavy rains Saturday forced the course to close several holes over the weekend.

    Palatine Hills golf course experiences more flooding

    Flooding that forced Palatine Hills Golf Course to close several holes over the weekend served as a reminder that plans to address the course's ongoing water problems have not yet been implemented fully. Parts of four holes at the Palatine Park District's 18-hole course were underwater at the opening of business Sunday as a result of Saturday's heavy rains.

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    A carnival along Jackson Avenue will be one of the first elements of the Last Fling in Naperville to open when the festival begins at 5 p.m. Friday.

    Naperville’s Last Fling celebrates end of summer

    It’s crunch time for a club of young professionals dedicated to giving back to Naperville charities, which means it’s soon to be fun time for anyone who makes the Last Fling an end-of-summer tradition. “We’ve spent months thinking about what worked well, what traditions do we keep alive or what new traditions do we create,” Last Fling Coordinator Chad Pedigo said.

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    Students arrive Tuesday for the first day of classes at Metea Valley High School.

    New year brings new leaders in Dist. 204

    A new school year started Tuesday for students, educators and administrators in Indian Prairie Unit District 204, many of whom, such as new Superintendent Karen Sullivan, found themselves in new roles. “My goal for the district this year is to really get out in the community and introduce myself and to really listen to what the community has to say,” Sullivan said.

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    Officials: Egypt, UAE behind airstrikes in Libya

    Egypt and the United Arab Emirates secretly carried out airstrikes against Islamist militias inside Libya, U.S. officials said Tuesday, decrying the intervention as an escalation of the North African country’s already debilitating turmoil. They said the United States had no prior notification of the attacks.

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    Family members touch the copper top of the vault containing the casket of Michael Brown during his funeral on Monday, Aug. 25, 2014, in Normandy, Mo. Hundreds of people gathered to say goodbye to Brown, who was shot and killed by a Ferguson, Mo., police officer on Aug. 9.

    Can Ferguson change the ‘ritual’ of black deaths?

    The choir sang, the preachers shouted and the casket stayed closed. The body was taken to the cemetery, and Michael Brown was laid to rest. Thus went the most recent enactment of “the ritual” — the script of death, outrage, spin and mourning that America follows when an unarmed black male is killed by police. Will the ritual ever change, and is it even possible that Ferguson...

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    Storm clouds roll in over Allegheny Park near Grayslake Tuesday morning. High winds, rain and lightning quickly followed.

    Severe thunderstorm warning for Cook, Lake counties expires

    A severe thunderstorm warning issued for northwestern Cook and Lake counties was allowed to expire at 10:45 a.m., according the National Weather Service. The line of storms that prompted the warning weakened and no longer posed a serious threat, the weather service said.

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    Some of the hundreds of earthquake damaged wine barrels at the Kieu Hoang Winery, Monday, Aug. 25, 2014, in Napa, Calif.

    Napa earthquake hastens calls for warning system

    The earthquake that jolted California’s wine capital may have caused at least $1 billion in property damage, but it also added impetus to the state’s effort to develop an early warning system that might offer a few precious seconds for residents to duck under desks, trains to slow down and utility lines to be powered down before the seismic waves reach them.

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    Train hits, kills woman walking dog in Wisconsin

    Authorities in northwestern Wisconsin are investigating the death of a woman who was hit by a train. WDIO-TV reports it happened in the Douglas County community of Solon Springs Monday evening. The Douglas County Sheriff’s Office says the 59-year-old woman was walking her dog and had just left a grocery store.

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    Chicago police issue alert for kidnapping suspect

    The Chicago Police Department has issued a community alert after an 11-year-old girl who escaped a kidnapping attempt reported seeing another girl inside a van driven by the assailant.

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    Central Illinois mayor resigns after charges

    The mayor of Kincaid in central Illinois has resigned after he was charged for allegedly violating an order of protection and possessing drugs.The (Springfield) State Journal-Register reports the Kincaid Village Board unanimously voted Monday to accept the resignation of Douglas A. Thomas. It will pay him about $1,200 for leaving before his term ends.

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    Former Springfield teacher convicted of sex abuse

    A former Springfield teacher has been convicted of sexually abusing a young boy more than a decade ago. The (Springfield) State Journal-Register reports that 59-year-old Steven Battles was sentenced to seven years in prison in Sangamon Circuit Court Monday.

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    Amy Sandler, right, and Niki Quasney, who’s terminally ill with advanced ovarian cancer, in Munster, Ind. Quasney receives treatment at hospitals in Illinois because she and Sandler, who wed last year in Massachusetts, fear that a private hospital near their Indiana home might not allow them to be together because of the state’s marriage ban if Quasney suffered a medical emergency.

    Indiana, Wisconsin couples in gay marriage case

    The Chicago-based 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals will hear arguments Tuesday on gay marriage fights from Indiana and Wisconsin, setting the stage for one ruling. Each case deals with whether statewide gay marriage bans are constitutional. For the couples challenging the bans, the fight is about fairness and the right to be treated like other couples.

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    Obama addresses vets in trip laden with politics

    Associated PressWASHINGTON (AP) — Three months after a veterans’ health care scandal rocked his administration, President Barack Obama is taking executive action to improve the mental well-being of veterans. The president was to announce his initiatives during an appearance before the American Legion National Convention that is fraught with midterm politics.

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    Brett Roeper asks a question Wednesday, Aug. 20, in Chicago during the last of three town hall meetings that gave patients, caregivers and aspiring business owners a chance to inquire about the application process for Illinois' medical marijuana program. Roeper wanted to know about whether dispensaries will be able to open medical marijuana packaging to let customers see and smell the product. A standing-room-only crowd of more than 500 attended the meeting.

    Illinois seeks medical marijuana board nominees

    The new medical marijuana program in Illinois is looking for health professionals and patients to serve on an advisory board. The 15-member board will make recommendations about which medical conditions can be added to the list of those approved for medical marijuana use in the state. Board members will be appointed by the governor. There is no compensation other than expenses.

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    Illinois mayor survives West Nile, urges caution

    A suburban Chicago mayor who survived West Nile virus is lending his voice to the prevention campaign. Evergreen Park Mayor James Sexton is walking and talking again, but he still has limited movement in his neck two years after contracting the virus from an infected mosquito.

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    Chicago Jackie Robinson West T-Shirts selling well

    Chicago’s Jackie Robinson West All Stars are not only good at baseball, but also in the T-shirt market.

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    Wisconsin’s Alpine Valley Music Theatre for sale

    The Wisconsin music venue tucked away in the rolling hills of Walworth County that has hosted such musical greats as the Rolling Stones, Pearl Jam and the Grateful Dead is for sale. Alpine Valley Music Theatre is also the place where guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughan and four others were killed in a helicopter crash following a performance on Aug. 27, 1990.

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    Danville leery of gambling cafes

    Video gambling has been a boon to social groups such as the American Legion in the eastern Illinois city of Danville. But some city leaders are less eager to allow commercially oriented gambling cafes. Danville Mayor Scott Eisenhauer says he worries gambling cafes that some other cities allow would hurt groups such as the Knights of Columbus and the Elks.

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    Elk Grove Village is considering a ban on electronic cigarettes in indoor public places.

    Elk Grove Village considers banning electronic cigarette indoors at public places

    Elk Grove Village may join a growing list of suburban communities to ban the indoor use of electronic cigarettes at public places. Officials say they are concerned about the potential health risks of secondhand vapors. “We’re going to err on the side of safety,” Mayor Craig Johnson said.

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    Gail Mancuso accepts the award for outstanding directing for a comedy series for her work on “Modern Family” at the 66th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards in Los Angeles.

    Dawn Patrol: Suburbanite wins Emmy; grandson charged in murder

    Suburban native wins Emmy for ‘Modern Family.’ Grandson charged in slaying of 85-year-old East Dundee woman. Arlington Heights picks developer for Golf Road site. Lake Zurich District 95 puts new heat policy into effect on first day. Elgin man exposes himself outside school, police say. Two Elgin High students charged with bringing pellet gun to school.

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    The Courthouse Square development in downtown Wheaton will move forward after final approval by the city council Monday.

    Wheaton Courthouse Square development work could start in 2015

    After many years of planning and dispute, Wheaton's Courthouse Square development is back on track. The Wheaton City Council approved two ordinances Monday, both with a 6-1 vote, that amended the original Courthouse Square development agreement for a fifth time, and granted the developer a special use permit to construct two luxury apartment buildings near Willow Avenue and Naperville Road.

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    Congressman Randy Hultgren, right, hosted a discussion with local parents, educators and school board members Monday night to see what assistance he can offer in addressing any pitfalls with Illinois’ adoption of Common Core standards.

    Hultgren hears about Common Core pitfalls during roundtable

    Congressman Randy Hultgren still has concerns about Common Core standards coming to Illinois. But having accepted Illinois' embrace of Common Core, he hosted a discussion Monday night about how to avoid major problems with the implementation.

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    Ken Sorrick has been hired as the interim superintendent of Kaneland Community Unit School District 302.

    Kaneland picks ex-Palos Hills chief as interim superintendent

    The Kaneland school board turned to a retired Palos Hills District 117 superintendent, Ken Orrick, to fill in as interim chief, and to lead it in a search for a new superintendent. “Not having somebody experienced to make those decisions at that time may impact the district,” board member Tony Valente said.

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    Senior Michael Scardino, 17, sits in on one of Tom Bredemeier’s computer science classes at Barrington High School. Barrington is one of several suburban high schools to change its schedule to allow first-semester finals before winter break instead of after.

    Suburban schools moving finals to before holiday break

    Instead of making study guides and cramming for finals, Lily Moradi will spend winter break this year relaxing and enjoying time with her friends and family. Moradi, a senior at Barrington High School, is just one of thousands of students in the suburbs benefiting from a growing trend of school districts changing their schedules to place first-semester exams before, rather than after, winter...

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    Northwest suburbs in 60 seconds
    Cook digest for Aug. 26

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    Ferguson police shooting grand jury judge refuses age disclosure

    The judge presiding over the Missouri grand jury that will decide whether to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of Michael Brown refused a media request to disclose the age and residence of its members.

Sports

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    Quarterback Max Tucker is back to lead Westminster Christian in its second season of varsity football.

    Westminster Christian excited for second season

    It’s one thing to be new to varsity football. It’s another thing to be new to varsity football and have an extremely young team, which was the doubly difficult challenge Westminster Christian faced during its inaugural varsity season in 2013. The Warriors took their lumps against some of the Northeastern Athletic Conference’s top teams during the season’s first half before finding their legs late in the campaign. A memorable 33-28 home win in Week 8 over Christian Liberty broke the ice. They finished the year on a winning streak, courtesy of a 40-6 victory at North Shore Country Day in Winnetka.

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    Jordan Lynch will get to see plenty of playing time in the Bears' preseason finale Thursday night at Cleveland.

    Bears' Lynch out to make most of final opportunity

    On Thursday night in Cleveland against the Browns, former NIU quarterback and Hesiman Trophy finalist Jordan Lynch gets his final preseason opportunity to prove to Bears coaches that he belongs on the 53-man roster -- which will be decided by Saturday afternoon -- or at least on the practice squad.

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    Chicago Cubs starting pitcher Travis Wood throws against the Cincinnati Reds in the first inning of a baseball game, Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)

    Cubs' Wood gets first win since June

    Travis Wood pitched six innings of two-hit ball against his former team for his first win in two months, leading the Cubs to a 3-0 victory over Johnny Cueto and the Cincinnati Reds on Tuesday night.Arismendy Alcantara hit a two-run shot and Anthony Rizzo connected for his 30th homer for the Cubs, who have won four in a row for the first time since June 30-July 4.

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    Chicago Sky's Elena Delle Donne (11), left, and guard Allie Quigley (14) celebrate after defeating the Atlanta Dream 81-80 in Game 3 of the WNBA basketball Eastern Conference semifinals, Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

    Whoa! Sky upset No. 1 seed Dream with 20-point rally

    Despite trailing by 17 early in the fourth quarter, the Chicago Sky weren't ready to give up on their season. Instead, they kept their focus and pulled off the biggest fourth-quarter comeback in WNBA playoff history. Elena Delle Donne scored 17 of her 34 points in the final period, including the winning jumper with 8.4 seconds left, as the Sky rallied from 20 points down to beat the Atlanta Dream 81-80 on Tuesday night and advance to the Eastern Conference finals. "I just know that when we were in huddles and I was talking to the team, everyone had that look in their eye like we were not done yet — we were not ready to go home," Delle Donne said.

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    Girls tennis: Tuesday’s results
    Here are high school girls tennis results from Tuesday, August 26.

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    Girls volleyball: Tuesday’s results
    Here are high school girls volleyball results from Tuesday, August 26.

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    Boys soccer: Tuesday’s results
    Here are high school boys soccer results from Tuesday, August 26.

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    Girls golf: Tuesday’s results
    Results of girls golf meets from Tuesday, August 26.

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    Boys golf: Tuesday’s results
    Results of boys golf meets from Tuesday, August 26.

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    Chicago White Sox left fielder Dayan Viciedo chases down a double by Cleveland Indians' Carlos Santana during the first inning of a baseball game in Chicago, Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)

    Sox losing streak hits 7

    The White Sox lost another game Tuesday night, this one an 8-6 decision in 10 innings to the Indians. Before the game, Sox general manager Rick Hahn said more changes are in store prior to the 2015 season.

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    White Sox trio offers hope for future

    The White Sox lost another game Tuesday night, 8-6 to the Indians in 10 innings at U.S. Cellular Field, but they did have Adam Eaton, Jose Abreu and Avisail Garcia back on the field for the first time since early April.

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    Girls volleyball / Lake County roundup

    Girls volleyballLakes d. Zion-Benton: Megan Behrendt tallied 10 kills, 18 digs and 2 aces, as the Eagles improved to 2-0 by rallying to defeat Zion-Benton 25-27, 25-15, 25-11.McKenna Lahr added 9 kills and 15 digs for Lakes. Maddie Demo dished out 22 assists for the Eagles, who also got contributions from Izzy Huntington (4 kills) and Lisa Buehler (17 digs, 2 aces).

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    Girls golf / Lake County roundup

    Girls golfLibertyville d. Lake Zurich: At Willow Glen, Simone Mikaelian fired a 39, and the Wildcats (163) defeated the Bears (215) in North Suburban Conference action.Libertyville (3-0, 2-0) also counted Megan Sturonas’ 40, Riley Burnetti’s 42 and Jessica Lovinger’s 42.Lake Zurich got a 42 from Aine Mattera.

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    Boys golf / Lake County roundup

    Boys golfLake Forest d. Mundelein: At Lake Bluff, the host Scouts had a 152 to edge the Mustangs (158).Jeff Lee’s 37 paced Mundelein in the North Suburban Lake opener. Lake Forest’s Sean Casey earned medalist honors with a 36.CL Central d. Grayslake North: At Renwood, the host Knights shot a 177 in losing their dual-meet opener to Crystal Lake Central (171).Kyle Baker and Alex Wrobel each carded a 41 to lead Grayslake North. The Tigers’ Michael Tobin was medalist with a 40.

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    Round Lake gets rolling

    Alejandro Sotelo scored twice and notched 3 assists, and Freddie Ramirez added a pair of goals and an assist, as Round Lake’s boys soccer team opened its season with a 7-3 win over Carmel Catholic in the Lake Forest North Shore Shootout on Tuesday.

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    McAvoy, Elk Grove making a name for themselves

    When you first try to pronounce O’Rayn McAvoy’s first name, you might not get it right. But the Elk Grove senior sure got things right in her first match as a full-time member of the varsity volleyball team. She went 6-of-7 in both attacking and serving with 3 kills and an ace as the Grenadiers won their season opener 25-22, 25-17 over visiting Maine West on Tuesday night.

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    Cubs prospect Jorge Soler connects fires the ball to second as the Class A Peoria Chiefs took on the Beliot Snappers Monday night in Beliot, Wisconsin. Soler signed a 9-year, $30 million contract this summer.

    Cubs prospect Soler to join team Wednesday

    The Cubs continue to press the accelerator down on their grand plan. The latest example came late Monday when they got set to call up outfielder Jorge Soler from Class AAA Iowa. The 22-year-old Soler is expected to make his major-league debut in Wednesday night’s game against the Reds in Cincinnati.

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    New Geneva girls volleyball coach Annie Seitelman had a lot to smile about in the Vikings’ 25-18, 25-21 win over Rosary Tuesday.

    Geneva tops Rosary in season opener

    Coming off a history-making season, Geneva’s girls volleyball team looks poised to make even more. The Vikings got their 2014 campaign season started on the right foot Tuesday night in front of their home fans and new coach Annie Seitelman, defeating Rosary 25-18, 25-21.

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    Boys soccer: Fox Valley roundup Tuesday, August 26

    Boys soccer: Fox Valley roundup Tuesday, August 26

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    Mundelein’s Trina Neukam, middle, spikes one past Wauconda’s Hayley Redmann, left, and Sara Sexton on Tuesday night at Mundelein.

    Sexton, Wauconda right on course

    For girls volleyball opening night at Mundelein, fans were treated to two close sets and then a one-sided set as Wauconda went home with a 25-20, 25-27, 25-17 victory.

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    Girls volleyball: Fox Valley roundup Tuesday, August 26

    Girls volleyball: Fox Valley roundup Tuesday, August 26

  •  

    St. Charles East makes early River statement

    St. Charles East used a time-honored recipe — home cooking — to jettison back-to-back uncharacteristically poor performances in 18-hole tournaments.

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    UEC’s evolution continues

    The Upstate Eight Conference contains some of the top football programs in the state. Enjoy it while it lasts.

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    Chris Cooney, left, of Prospect and Emin Ademi of Niles West make contact as they pursue the ball during Tuesday’s game in Mount Prospect.

    Late goal lifts Niles West at Prospect

    Anthony Morales popped up with a late game-winner to help visiting Niles West gain the upper hand in the 75th minute to spoil the boys soccer season opener for host Prospect, which dropped a 2-1 match Tuesday night at George Gattas Stadium.

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    South Elgin, St. Charles North battle to draw

    Maybe it’s too early to call the South Elgin boys soccer squad a team of destiny, but if you could say anything about the Storm’s debut Tuesday is that it at least knows how to channel its inner-Cristiano Ronaldo in the waning seconds. In an ending slightly similar to how the USA Men’s soccer team squandered the lead in the closing seconds of its World Cup match against Portugal this summer, St. Charles North watched its victory slip away when a throw-in by Storm forward Jose Gomez on the left sideline ricocheted off Juan Carlos Lujan’s shoulder in the box controversially with just 26 seconds to end an Upstate Eight crossover in a 1-1 tie.

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    Los Angeles Angels’ Gordon Beckham, right, blows a bubble after being called out on strikes from Oakland Athletics’ Jon Lester in the second inning of a baseball game Saturday, Aug. 23, 2014, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

    Why was Beckham a bust with White Sox?

    Expected to be a star player with the White Sox for a decade or more when he first arrived, Gordon Beckham quickly went bust and the second baseman was traded to the Angels last week. Beat writer Scot Gregor explains what went wrong.

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    Jacobs cruises past Bartlett in opener

    Yes, there were first-match jitters and plenty of unforced errors. But when the last volleyball was spiked Tuesday night, Jacobs’ effort was good enough to produce a 25-10, 25-11 season-opening nonconference win over Bartlett at the Eagles Nest in Algonquin.

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    Running back Ben Klett is one key returner from last year’s highly successful team at Lake Zurich.

    New cast as Lake Zurich gets busy

    Lake Zurich lost the bulk of its players from last year, but the Bears still have high hopes this fall.

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    Chris Conte, here trying to bring down Adrian Peterson last year, suffered a concussion against Seattle in the Bears’ last preseason game.

    Bears’ coaches have tough call to make on Conte

    Safety Chris Conte is expected to miss the preseason finale Thursday night because of a concussion, so coaches will have just a handful of snaps from one game to evaluate the fourth-year veteran, who is coming back from off-season shoulder surgery. Final cuts are due at 3 p.m. Saturday.

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    Notre Dame will count on freshmen on defense

    Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly expects some teeth-gnashing while watching the Fighting Irish defense this fall.The 17th-ranked Irish already were expected to be young on defense in the season opener against Rice on Saturday. That’s before learning they’d be without four players, three of them on defense, who are under investigation by the university to determine whether they received improper assistance from others on papers and homework.

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    U.S. beat Slovenia in basketball exhibition, Rose has 3 points

    Mike Krzyzewski’s big men had barely finished pushing around Slovenia when he was asked how they would match up with Spain’s imposing frontcourt.“I’m not going to compare. I haven’t seen Spain play,” Krzyzewski said. “If we play Spain, it’s a long way away. So I’m just concentrating on U.S. and trying to get better.”

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    Glenbard West’s Aidan Gould completes his route during football practice.

    Gold catching up to Silver in WSC

    When it comes to football in the West Suburban Conference, bragging rights have been pretty one-sided. Silver dominates Gold. While the Silver Division teams still hold a decisive edge, this may be the year the Gold starts catching up. Maybe.

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    Isaac Branch, here scoring against Hoffman Estates last season, is one of the Mid-Suburban League’s top return rushers and could help Wheeling challenge for the East Division title this fall.

    MSL East preview: High ceiling for Wheeling

    Rolling Meadows and Elk Grove have dominated the Mid-Suburban East over about the last 10 years. And the East ended in a three-way tie last year between Rolling Meadows, Elk Grove and Hersey. But a new contender could emerge this season from one of the most unlikely places. Wheeling, which has had just two winning seasons in the last 17 years, could be poised to clear the first hurdle in the resurgence of the program under coach Brent Pearlman.

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    Eugenie Bouchard, of Canada, returns a shot against Olga Govortsova, of Belarus, during the first round of the 2014 U.S. Open tennis tournament, Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014, in New York. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

    Bouchard on track again with victory at U.S. Open

    Back on the Grand Slam stage, Eugenie Bouchard returned to her winning ways.The seventh-seeded Bouchard routed Olga Govortsova 6-2, 6-1 on Tuesday in the first round of the U.S. Open. The last time she played at a major tournament, the 20-year-old made history: the first Canadian to reach a Grand Slam final.

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    FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2013, file photo, Northwestern head coach Pat Fitzgerald yells at his team during an NCAA college football game against Illinois in Champaign, Ill. The Wildcats are coming off a disappointing 5-7 season and already hit hard by injuries and a key defection ahead of the Saturday, Aug. 30, 2014, opener at home against Cal. On top of that, they spent the offseason at ground zero in the debate over whether college players should have the right to unionize. (AP Photo/Jeff Haynes, File)

    Union talk fades as Northwestern begins season

    Northwestern is coming off a disappointing 5-7 season and already hit hard by injuries and a key defection ahead of Saturday’s opener at home against Cal. On top of that, they spent the offseason at ground zero in the debate over whether college players should have the right to unionize.“It would be naive to think the guys have not been distracted at times. Will it be part of the narrative?”Fitzgerald asked, without waiting for an answer. “Yes, it will.”

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    Although Tampa Bay quarterback Josh McCown completed 13 of 16 passes in his third preseason game with the Bucs, he has 2 touchdown passes and 2 interceptions in his three starts.

    Is Cutler less effective than his backups?

    Mike North says it seems to him that the Chicago Bears backup quarterbacks do as well as the expensive starter, Jay Cutler. North is wondering just how well Cutler will do this year.

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    Warren maintains winning outlook with McNulty

    The last time that Bryan McNulty was coaching a game, he was busy winning a state title. McNulty led the Warren softball team to the Class 4A state championship in June. He’s hoping the lessons he learned on that ride will help in his new journey. In the midst of softball season, McNulty was named Warren’s football head coach, replacing longtime coach Dave Mohapp.

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    Numerous reasons for a confident Mundelein

    It’s Year 3 of George Kaider’s tenure at Mundelein, and he believes the third time will be the charm.

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    Wheeling, Evanston evenly matched once again

    Evanston and Wheeling could not possibly have outdone the epic battle these two teams had last November in a sectional final. The names had changed, and so, obviously, had the stakes in Monday’s boys soccer contest. But as season openers go, it was a most worthy beginning as both clubs played an entertaining 80 minutes which ended in a 0-0 draw on the turf in Wheeling.

Business

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    Comcast Corp. said it now expects its planned $45.2 billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable Inc. to be completed early next year.

    Comcast predicts Time Warner cable deal completion in early 2015

    Comcast Corp. said it now expects its planned $45.2 billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable Inc. to be completed early next year. The expected timing is due to Comcast's current expectations about regulatory approvals, the Philadelphia-based company said in a filing dated yesterday. Comcast previously said that the transaction may be completed by the end of 2014.

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    Cultivating industrial hemp is legal in 15 states, including Indiana.

    Quinn signs law allowing study of industrial hemp

    Universities and the Illinois Department of Agriculture now can study industrial hemp, which is in the same species as marijuana but has a negligible amount of marijuana’s active ingredient. Hemp can be used in the production of plastics, fuel, textiles and food.

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    Tired of that friend or relative who won’t stop posting or tweeting political opinions? Online loudmouths may be annoying, but a new survey suggests they are in the minority. In a report released Tuesday, the Pew Research Center found that most people who regularly use social media sites were actually less likely to share their opinions, even offline.

    Study: Social media users shy away from opinions

    People who use Facebook and Twitter are less likely than others to share their opinions on hot-button issues, even when they are offline, according to a surprising new survey by the Pew Research Center. The study, done in conjunction with Rutgers University in New Jersey, challenges the view of social media as a vehicle for debate by suggesting that sites like Facebook and Twitter might actually encourage self-censorship.

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    A Burger King sign and a Tim Hortons sign are displayed on St. Laurent Boulevard in Ottawa, Canada. Canada’s iconic coffee chain, Tim Hortons, and Miami-based Burger King say they will join forces but will operate as independent brands to form the world’s third-largest quick service restaurant company.

    Burger King plans expansion of Tim Hortons

    The fight for the coffee and breakfast crowd is heating up, both at home and abroad. Burger King said Tuesday it will buy Tim Hortons in an $11 billion deal that would create the world’s third largest fast-food chain. The company is hoping to turn the coffee-and-doughnut chain into a household name outside Canada, and give itself a stronger foothold in the booming morning business.

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    The Standard & Poor’s 500 index closed above 2,000 points for the first time Tuesday. Financial markets moved higher after some encouraging news, including a surge in consumer confidence. The Dow Jones industrial average is about 32 points below the record close it set on July 16, while the Nasdaq remains well below its dot-com era high of 5,048.62 set in March 2000.

    Another milestone: S&P 500 closes above 2,000

    It was a big round-number day for the stock market.News: The Standard & Poor’s 500 index closed a hair above 2,000 points Tuesday, 16 years after it finished above 1,000 for the first time. The move extended the stock index’s record-shattering run this year. The latest milestone comes as investors see new signs that the economy is strengthening, a driver of stronger company earnings.

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    Lower prices for corn and soybeans will drive the profits of U.S. farmers down to an estimated $113.2 billion in 2014, a decline of 14 percent from last year’s record, according to the Department of Agriculture.

    U.S. 2014 farm Income seenfFalling 14% from record 2013 levels

    Lower prices for corn and soybeans will drive the profits of U.S. farmers down to an estimated $113.2 billion in 2014, a decline of 14 percent from last year’s record, according to the Department of Agriculture. The forecast for this year’s income is up 18 percent from a February estimate as livestock revenues may reach an all-time high, the USDA said in a report on its website.

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    Business orders for long-lasting manufactured goods shot up by the largest amount on record in July. But most of the strength came from demand for commercial aircraft, which tends to fluctuate sharply from month to month. Outside of transportation, orders dipped.

    U.S. durable goods orders surge record 22.6 percent

    Business orders for long-lasting manufactured goods shot up by the largest amount on record in July. But most of the strength came from demand for commercial aircraft, which tends to fluctuate sharply from month to month. Outside of transportation, orders dipped. Despite the broader weakness in July, most analysts said factory output will likely support solid economic growth in the second half of this year as companies increase their orders for the equipment they need to meet rising demand.

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    Turner Broadcasting offering buyouts

    The corporate parent of CNN, TNT and TBS on Tuesday offered voluntary buyouts to 600 veteran employees, part of an overall cost-cutting effort at the Atlanta-based broadcasting company founded by Ted Turner.The offer went out to U.S.-based employees who are over 55 and have worked at the company for at least 10 years, excluding on-air talent and others with specific contracts. Some 9,000 of Turner’s 13,000 employees are based in the United States.

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    Berkshire Hathaway Inc. will earn 9 percent on a $3 billion preferred equity stake that Warren Buffett’s firm will take to finance Burger King Worldwide Inc.’s takeover of Tim Hortons Inc.

    Berkshire to get 9% on Burger King preferreds

    Berkshire Hathaway Inc. will earn 9 percent on a $3 billion preferred equity stake that Warren Buffett’s firm will take to finance Burger King Worldwide Inc.’s takeover of Tim Hortons Inc. A term loan tied to the deal will probably pay the London interbank offered rate plus at least 300 basis points, Burger King Chief Executive Officer Daniel Schwartz said.

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    Shoppers exit a Hermes International SCA luxury goods store on Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills. Consumer confidence in the U.S. unexpectedly climbed in August to the highest level in almost seven years, reinforcing signs of a strengthening outlook for the second half of 2014.

    Consumer confidence in U.S. rises to almost seven-year high

    Consumer confidence in the U.S. unexpectedly climbed in August to the highest level in almost seven years, reinforcing signs of a strengthening outlook for the second half of 2014. The Conference Board’s sentiment gauge rose to 92.4, the highest since October 2007, from a revised 90.3 a month earlier, the New York-based private research group said today. The median forecast in a Bloomberg survey called for a decline to 89.

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    United Stationers makes industrial division executive appointments

    Office supplies manufacturer United Stationers Inc., based in Deerfield, announced Paul Barrett will serve as chief operating officer industrial effective immediately “Paul has been president of our janitorial and sanitation business, and recently president of national and strategic accounts. I

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    Z Captial nets winning bid on Miami Beach resort

    he private equity firm, Lake Forest-based Z Capital Partners was the winning bidder in the recent auction of the Carillon Hotel and Spa in Miami Beach, Florida. The spa was owned by FL 6801 Spirits LLC and its subsidiaries and is currently being operated and managed as Canyon Ranch Hotel & Spa in Miami Beach, a beachfront boutique hotel & luxury spa.

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    Emergency Nurses Association names deputy executive directors

    The Des Plaines-based Emergency Nurses Association today announced the appointment of two new deputy executive directors who will serve on the senior leadership team. Cynthia Meehan joins ENA in the new Deputy Executive Director, Member Relations role. Meehan brings a strong background in association leadership to ENA, focusing the majority of her career on membership and chapter relations.

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    The U.N. health agency recommended Tuesday that nations regulate electronic cigarettes and ban them from use indoors until the exhaled vapor is proven not to harm bystanders.

    UN health agency: E-cigarettes must be regulated

    The U.N. health agency recommended Tuesday that nations regulate electronic cigarettes and ban them from use indoors until the exhaled vapor is proven not to harm bystanders. In a report to its 194 member nations, the World Health Organization also called for a ban on sales to minors of the popular nicotine-vapor products, and to either forbid or keep to a minimum any advertising, promotion or sponsorship.

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    Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey speaking in New York. President Barack Obama’s military leadership made clear in recent days that the threat from the Islamic State militants, who murdered American journalist James Foley, cannot be fully eliminated without going after the group in Syria, as well as Iraq.

    Obama won’t seek Syria’s approval for any U.S. airstrikes

    The U.S. hasn’t decided whether to attack Islamic State targets inside Syria and won’t ask President Bashar al-Assad for permission if it does, a White House spokesman said.President Barack Obama, who this month ordered airstrikes against the Islamist militants in Iraq, hasn’t reached a conclusion about similar actions in Syria, White House press secretary Josh Earnest said yesterday. Earnest declined to say whether U.S. military leaders have given Obama specific options for such attacks.

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    Malaysian air crash investigators walk by wreckage at the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 near the village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine last July. Families of passengers who were on the Malaysia Airlines plane shot down over Ukraine are starting to sort through the long process of gaining compensation for their loss.

    Even if attacked, airline could be liable in crash

    Families of passengers who were on the Malaysia Airlines plane shot down over Ukraine are starting to sort through the long process of gaining compensation for their loss. Officials in the Netherlands, where the majority of Flight 17 victims lived, say that Malaysia Airlines has been making $50,000 payments to the families without admitting any wrongdoing in the crash.

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    Andrew Berlin, Chairman & Chief Executive Officer of the Berlin Packaging of Chicago.

    Private equity firm buys Berlin Packaging

    Private equity firm Oak Hill Capital Partners announced Monday that it will buy Berlin Packaging LLC, a supplier of packaging products, from from Investcorp SA for $1.43 billion.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Joan Huenecke of Palatine created barbecue sauce from peach tea and apricot spread. A peach tea vinaigrette dresses her radish salad. She serves it with corn dusted with parmesan cheese.

    Warm Harvest Salad with Peach Flavored Sweet Tea Vinaigrette Warm Harvest Salad with Peach Flavored Sweet Tea Vinaigrette
    Joan Huenecke makes a vinaigrette with Pur leaf peach tea for a kale and radish salad.

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    Comedian Mark Normand appears at Zanies at MB Financial Park in Rosemont.

    Weekend picks: Mark Normand brings comedy to Zanies

    Comedian Mark Normand takes a break from his TV stints on NBC's “Last Comic Standing” or Comedy Central's “@Midnight” to bring his standup to Zanies in Rosemont. If you grew up adoring Donny & Marie Osmond, now's your chance to fulfill a lifelong fantasy, catching a series of performances at the Paramount Theatre in Aurora. The Chicago Jazz Festival is jumping at the Chicago Cultural Center through Sunday. And Naperville's Last Fling says goodbye to summer, while Union Park's North Coast Music Festival keeps the music scene hot for one more weekend.

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    Steal Beam Theatre founder and artistic director Donna Steele stars in the thriller "Veronica's Room," part of the company's 14th season announced Tuesday.

    Steel Beam Theatre announces 2014-2015 season

    Steel Beam Theatre in St. Charles begins its season Sept. 12 with "Almost, Maine." Also on tap: "You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown," "Jacob Marley's Christmas Carol," "Veronica's Room" and more.

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    5 Seconds of Summer will perform with One Direction at Chicago's Soldier Field Friday and Saturday, Aug. 29 and 30.

    5 Seconds of Summer, One Direction to rock Soldier Field Aug. 29-30

    5 Seconds of Summer fit the boy band mold: a quartet of young men with a feverish female fan base. But the Australian pop-rock group identifies more with Pete Wentz than Harry Styles. Currently they're touring with megastars One Direction. The tour stops at Chicago's Soldier Field Friday and Saturday, Aug. 29-30.

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    Reader says mom should own up to lie to daughter

    Readers give advice while Carolyn Hax takes some time off.

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    ABC News makes changes at top broadcasts

    NEW YORK — ABC News is making leadership changes behind the scenes at its top two broadcasts.The network announced Tuesday that Tom Cibrowski, the top executive behind “Good Morning America” as it passed by NBC’s “Today” show in the ratings, will become a top deputy to news division President James Goldston. As senior vice president of news programs, news gathering and special events, he’ll report to Goldston and promote coordination at all of the network’s broadcasts.Michael Corn will replace Cibrowski as senior executive producer at “Good Morning America.” He’s been the top producer at Diane Sawyer’s “World News.”With David Muir to take over next week as the evening show’s anchor, Almin Karamehmedovic will become that show’s top producer.

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    Billy Crystal speaks during an In Memoriam tribute to Robin Williams at the 66th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards at the Nokia Theatre in L.A. on Monday.

    Billy Crystal remembers Robin Williams at the Emmys

    Billy Crystal, left speechless by Robin Williams’ death, paid tribute to his great friend and comedy brother at the Emmy Awards, movingly remembering him as “the greatest friend you could ever imagine.” Following the Emmys’ in memoriam segment Monday night, Crystal appeared on stage at Los Angeles’ Nokia Theatre to honor Williams, who was found dead in his Northern California home on Aug. 11. A luminous image of the late comedian hovered overhead. “He made us laugh, big time,” Crystal said.

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    Brisk and breezy host Seth Meyers, here with Amy Poehler, kept the 66th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards rolling on Monday.

    Seth Meyers kept Emmycast pleasant, brisk

    Cheery, brisk and efficient — the Emmycast seemed to fall in step with the style of host Seth Meyers. There were few if any surprises in Monday’s awards. (In this respect, the show often seemed a rerun from the past several years.) This, of course, wasn’t Meyers’ call. Nor did he deliver surprises of his own. That’s not his way. He’s a steady-freddy TV presence, reliably droll without rocking the rafters, and the Emmycast reflected that, too.

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    Wild Belle, an indie-pop band consisting of siblings Natalie and Elliot Bergman of Barrington, performs during the weekend-long North Coast Music Festival in Chicago.

    Music notes: Barrington's Wild Belle to play North Coast Music Fest

    Wild Belle, an indie-pop band with roots in Barrington, will perform this weekend as part of the North Coast Music Festival in Chicago. Next week, country-music superstar Garth Brooks and his wife, Trisha Yearwood, launch a massive new tour with a series of shows at the Allstate Arena in Rosemont.

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    Summery Quinoa Tabbouleh
    Fresh mint and parsley work together in a quinoa-version of tabbouleh.

  •  
    Visitors take pictures in front of a bust of President Franklin D. Roosevelt at Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, located on Roosevelt Island in New York City. The park, designed by renowned architect Louis I. Kahn, is considered an architectural masterpiece and offers scenic views of the city, including the Manhattan skyline.

    NYC islands: Governors by ferry, Roosevelt by tram

    New York is a city built on water. Four of its five boroughs — Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island — are located on islands, and the city’s rivers and bays are dotted with many more. Two of New York’s lesser-known islands make terrific destinations for a day trip, filled with history, green spaces and incredible views. And they’re easy and fun to get to: Visit Governors Island by ferry and Roosevelt Island by tram.

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    Fireworks erupt over the SLS Las Vegas during a grand opening celebration on the Las Vegas Strip Friday. The SLS is an all-encompassing resort and casino with more than 1,600 guest rooms and suites.

    Vegas’ storied Sahara casino reborn, transformed

    The Moroccan-themed Sahara casino that once hosted Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and the Beatles seemed a lost cause in 2011, when its owners declared the 59-year-old property unprofitable and shut it down with little more than a vague promise to return. The decision by owner SBE Group to cling to the shabby casino looks nothing short of prescient as the reincarnated Sahara opened this weekend as the vibrant SLS Las Vegas. As the casino reinvents itself, it’s ushering in a renaissance at the tired north end of the Las Vegas Strip, which for years had been home to empty lots, low-budget motels and half-built mega-resorts with their frozen construction cranes looming nearby.

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    “I Quit Sugar: Your Complete 8-week Detox Program and Cookbook” by Sarh Wilson (Clarkson Potter, 2014)

    Lean and lovin’ it: Learning to recognize, curb sugar addiction

    Eve O. Schaub's ode to sugar sounds dangerously close to an addiction, and perhaps there’s more truth in that than any of us would like. Don Mauer takes a look inside her book and the role of sugar in our diets.

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    Lesley Jacobs Solmonson and her husband, David Solmonson, wrote a book filled with cocktail recipes focusing on only the most essential ingredients for great drinking.

    Making the case for a simple well-stocked home bar

    Convinced there had to be a better way to stock a bar, Lesley Jacobs Solmonson and husband David Solmonson set out to cull the cocktail herd and hone in on only the most essential ingredients for great drinking. They settled on an even dozen, which gave birth first to the website 12bottlebar.com, and now a cookbook/shopping guide, “The 12 Bottle Bar.”

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    Crossword lover will find it easy to relate to author Alan Connor in his book, “The Crossword Century: 100 Years of Witty Wordplay, Ingenious Puzzles, and Linguistic Mischief.”

    Author’s ode to crosswords is right on the mark

    If you love solving crosswords, you know how it feels to be in the fraternity. There’s the rush of matching wits with a mysterious puzzle-maker. Alan Connor, a British quizmaster who writes a column on crosswords for the Guardian newspaper, is the author of “The Crossword Century: 100 Years of Witty Wordplay, Ingenious Puzzles, and Linguistic Mischief.” The book details the history and evolution of crosswords since the first one appeared in 1913. But what makes it such a fun read is Connor’s evident passion for all things crossword.

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    Lev Grossman gives meditations on loss, on growing up, the nature of friendship and people’s ceaseless, and often fruitless, desire to fix and control things in “The Magician’s Land.”

    ‘Magician’s Land’ closes a trilogy that matures

    Quentin Coldwater — a moody, man-child magician — is finally growing up. And just in time to save everything, mostly, that’s ever mattered to him. “The Magician’s Land” by Lev Grossman is the final book in the three-book “Magicians” trilogy, a genre-busting adult fantasy series. The books follow Quentin and an ever-growing cast of magicians through their school days, their angst, their magical quests. And to the outskirts of Newark Liberty International Airport. The final installment doesn’t disappoint, bringing Quentin’s saga to a satisfying, deeply felt conclusion.

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    James Conlon

    Conlon to step down as Ravinia music director next year

    Ravinia Festival's James Conlon will step down as music director after the 2015 season. He's held the job since 2005 and is known, among other things, for his leadership in reviving works by composers whose music the Nazi regime suppressed.

Discuss

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    Editorial: Keeping hunger in mind in the suburbs

    A Daily Herald editorial says that when suburbanites think of their neighbors, it's important to remember the many who do not know where their next meal is coming from.

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    Corporate tax returns should be public

    Columnist Catherine Rampell: Here’s a proposal to address the many questionable and incomprehensible corporate tax schemes: Require all publicly traded companies to make their tax returns public. Period.

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    If U.S. doesn’t lead war on terror, who will?

    Columnist Michael Gerson: The current Islamic State threat — a stated desire to repeat the Foley murder on a global scale — has grown in the fertile soil of American ambiguity.

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    Silence was better than words
    A Wheeling letter to the editor: Kudos to you for your Opinion page on Aug. 22. A picture is worth a thousand words. RIP, James Foley.

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    Accountability lacking on our leaders
    A Barrington Hills letter to the editor: Jake Griffin’s column on the state agency ignoring the law showcases one of the glaring flaws in Illinois government; i.e. no one is accountable for making sure things are done right and apparently no one is responsible for being sure the state follows the law.

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    Politicians not doing what’s best for businesses
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: Sen. Dick Durbin and the Obama administration are upset that companies are considering “inversions,” in which a company moves its headquarters overseas to reduce taxes. Sen. Durbin’s immediate response is to create a bill to punish those companies. So rather than look for the root of the problem, he looks to penalize,

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    Illinois cannot afford to lose residents
    A Barrington letter to the editor: Just read another study by the Illinois Policy Institute. Did you know that in 2012 Iowa’s median income surpassed Illinois’? Our income has collapsed by $12,000 in the last 15 years — ugh.

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    When will president work for us?
    A Northbrook letter to the editor: He still doesn’t get it. After six years in office, President Obama thinks everyone in government works for him. In a recent press conference the president was asked if he felt that his presence in Ferguson. Mo., would help provide a calming influence. In responding to the query, President Obama pronounced that “the Department of Justice works for me” and that he did not want to have his presence in Ferguson seen as “putting his thumb on the scale.”

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    Property tax hikes on everyone’s mind
    A South Elgin letter to the editor: Kudos to Linda Sobieski of Elburn and her letter, “Can’t Afford yet another tax increase.” This is a sentiment and a topic of conversation around Kane County and I’m sure other counties in Illinois.

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    Duckworth just another Democrat
    A Bensenville letter to the editor: Tammy Duckworth has gone from respected war hero to just another Democrat — using class warfare to get votes. I suppose the hundreds of businesses and thousands of people who leave Illinois every year are deserters, because they go where taxes are lower.

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    Tax on bike owners makes no sense
    A St. Charles letter to the editor: My fellow St. Charles resident Doug Eden in a letter to the editor suggested that bicyclists have some “skin in the game” — pay a tax to ride on the streets.

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