Football 2

Daily Archive : Tuesday August 19, 2014

News

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    The sun sets at the Roosevelt University Albert A. Robin Campus in Schaumburg on Tuesday. The Chicago-based school announced it is scaling back its suburban operations.

    Roosevelt University leaving most of Schaumburg campus

    Roosevelt University will eliminate many of the programs at its Schaumburg campus, relocate numerous faculty and try to rent its facilities there as part of a wider effort to focus resources on the school’s main Chicago campus, according to university President Chuck Middleton. “I’m shocked,” Village Manager Brian Townsend said. “They haven’t given us any...

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    Joanna Sojka was sworn in as Des Plaines' 7th Ward alderman in May 2013 by Appellate Court Judge Aurelia Pucinski.

    Des Plaines alderman dies of stroke at 29

    Colleagues are remembering Des Plaines Alderman Joanna Sojka as a rising, young leader committed to problem solving and helping others. The 29-year-old freshman alderman, elected in April 2013 for the city's 7th Ward, died late Monday from an apparent stroke. “She was a beautiful, young, single woman. She could have chosen to live anywhere in the world, but she chose Des Plaines,”...

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    Players from Naperville North and Wheaton Warrenville South high schools clash in a 2011 match.

    Concussion classes now required for high school coaches

    As football season gets underway, high school sports coaches in Illinois soon will have to take classes on how to best reduce concussions among young athletes under a new law signed by Gov. Pat Quinn today. The effort comes from state Rep. Carol Sente, a Vernon Hills Democrat, who first proposed last year limiting tackling in youth and high school football practices.

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    Vacant land in a Bartlett business industrial park has attracted four businesses that want to grow medical marijuana there.

    Medical pot growers competing for Bartlett site

    Four potential medical marijuana growers are clamoring to set up shop on a piece of vacant land in a Bartlett industrial park. The hopefuls have pitched informal design plans to the village, but the state gets the final say on whether one can open in Bartlett.

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    In an effort to foster some good will Missouri State Higway Patrol trooper D. Reuter chats with protester Robert Clark on Tuesday in Ferguson, Mo. The city of Ferguson says it is working hard to better connect with the community and learn from the “discord and heartbreak” that followed the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown by a police officer.

    Ferguson pledges outreach efforts after shooting

    Ferguson city leaders urged people to stay home after dark Tuesday to “allow peace to settle in” and pledged to try to improve the police force in the St. Louis suburb where the fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown has sparked nightly clashes between protesters and police.

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    The former Applebee’s restaurant at 781 E. Dundee Road in Palatine will be demolished to make way for a new building that will house a Chipotle Mexican Grill, a Jersey Mike’s Subs, a Starbucks with a drive-through lane and other businesses.

    Chipotle, Starbucks moving to former Palatine Applebee’s site

    A plan to bring a Chipotle Mexican Grill, Jersey Mike’s Subs and a Starbucks to the site of a closed Applebee’s on Dundee Road was approved this week by the Palatine village council. In addition to the restaurants and coffee shop, the new retail complex at 781 E. Dundee Road will include an AT&T store, a Menchie’s Frozen Yogurt and a medical office called Family and Immediate...

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    Roosevelt in Northwest suburbs for nearly 40 years

    The story of Roosevelt University began in Chicago at the end of World War II, but it wasn’t long before the school reached out and found a home in the suburbs. Roosevelt reached the Northwest suburbs in 1976, and 10 years later began occupying a wing of the former Forest View High School in Arlington Heights in 1986.

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    A 12-year-old girl died after being pulled Monday afternoon from a pool at the Tanglewood Apartments in Arlington Heights.

    12-year-old girl who drowned in Arlington Heights pool identified

    A 12-year-old Chicago girl pulled from a pool in an Arlington Heights apartment complex Monday afternoon was pronounced dead Tuesday, police said. Although police continue to investigate, no foul play is suspected and the pool where the drowning took place meets all applicable safety standards, said Arlington Heights police Capt. Mike Hernandez. “It’s a tragic accident,” he...

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    Fire breaks out in Northrop Grumman electrical vault room

    A reported fire and explosion late Tuesday afternoon casued an estimated $200,000 in damage at Northrop Grumman in Rolling Meadows. The fire was contained to an electrical vault room on the first floor of the building on 600 Hicks Road in Rolling Meadows, according to Rolling Meadows Fire Department Battalion Chief Jeff Moxley.

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    U-46 criticized for paying parents $1,000 in minority leadership program

    A program that helps develop parent leaders from within the Latino and black communities of Elgin Area School District U-46 has come under fire from some district taxpayers. Dozens of U-46 parents and taxpayers primarily from Bartlett and Wayne packed Monday night’s school board meeting complaining about being overtaxed and about the district’s Hispanic and African American parent...

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    A school bus navigates a flooded road north of Phoenix Tuesday. It was not known if there were children aboard the bus at the time. The area was flooded after several inches of rain pummeled the state.

    Floods force dramatic rescues in Phoenix area

    Heavy monsoon season rains that swept across Arizona on Tuesday led to dramatic rescues, road closures and flight delays as a series of fast-moving storms pummeled the state. A helicopter crew rescued two women and three dogs from a home surrounded by swift-moving waters in a town about 30 miles north of Phoenix, while elsewhere a small trailer park was evacuated, a school was flooded and...

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    An air tanker drops fire retardent on a fire which was burning on a ridge northeast of Oakhurst, Calif., Monday. One of several wildfires burning across California prompted the evacuation of hundreds of people in a central California foothill community near Yosemite National Park, authorities said.

    Fire near Yosemite that 1,000 fled doesn’t grow

    A wildfire that forced about 1,000 people from their homes in the foothills near Yosemite National Park held steady Tuesday as humidity and calmer winds aided the fight against the second blaze around the park in recent weeks.

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    The executive director of the DuPage Forest Preserve District, Arnie Biondo, is taking early retirement just seven months after beginning work with the district.

    Ex-DuPage forest boss first to take early retirement plan he implemented

    The DuPage County Forest Preserve District ended its 7-month relationship with Executive Director Arnie Biondo, who will be replaced by a DuPage courts administrator. Biondo exits with more than two years left on his contract, and will take advantage of an early retirement plan he implemented.

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    Wasim Ahmad, left, and his wife, Lakshmi Ramsoondar-Ahmad, pose with their newborn son in Merrick, N.Y. Two days after his son was born, Ahmad bought the website domain with his son’s name. “I’m going to make it a private website with a password so family can log in” to see updates, he says. “When he gets old enough, I’ll probably give him the keys.”

    No photos: Parents opt to keep babies off Facebook

    At a time when just about everyone and their mother — father, grandmother and aunt — is intent on publicizing the newest generation’s early years on social media sites, an increasing number of parents are bucking the trend by consciously keeping their children’s photos, names and entire identities off the Internet.

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    Edwin Paniagua

    Paniagua guilty of 2010 Mount Prospect murder

    A Cook County jury deliberated for about an hour before convicting Edwin Paniagua of murdering Jean Louis Wattecamps of Mount Prospect. “I think the jury saw things as they were,” Wattecamps’ sister, Marie Schutt, said after hearing the verdict Tuesday. “It’s still a sad day for all of us.”

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    Denise Hoppe

    Ex-Arlington Hts. PTA president charged with theft

    A former president of the South Middle School PTA in Arlington Heights is charged with stealing money from the group she was responsible for managing, officials said. Denise Hoppe, 48, faces felony charges of theft and forgery.

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    Jeweler hopes to set wedding vow record in Schaumburg

    Wyatt Austin Jewelers is organizing an attempt to break The Guinness World Record for the largest wedding vow renewal ceremony in one location during the evening of Friday, Aug. 22 at the Renaissance Schaumburg Convention Center Hotel. The record to beat is 1,087 couples.

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    Schaumburg Township tax appeals due Sept. 19

    Schaumburg Township Assessor John Lawson announced Tuesday that the Cook County assessor will accept property assessment appeals through Sept. 19. Appeals may be done at the Schaumburg Township Assessor’s office during normal business hours or online at cookcountyassessor.com.

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    Batavia customers file suit against electricity provider

    Batavia resident and businessman Joe Marconi hopes the class-action lawsuit he filed Tuesday will get Batavia out from under a $240 million investment in the Prairie State Energy Campus coal mine and plant, by forcing officials to reveal confidential documents and discussions from when the deal was being made.

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    Texas Gov. Rick Perry talks to the media and supporters after he was booked Tuesday in Austin. He was indicted last week on charges of coercion and official oppression for publicly promising to veto $7.5 million for the state public integrity unit run.

    Perry booked on abuse of power charges

    Texas Gov. Rick Perry was defiant Tuesday as he was booked on abuse of power charges, telling dozens of cheering supporters outside an Austin courthouse that he would “fight this injustice with every fiber of my being.” The Republican, who is mulling a second presidential run in 2016, was indicted after carrying out a threat to veto funding for state public corruption prosecutors.

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    Long-standing D303 mold lawsuit could be over

    A lawsuit that dates back to a mold outbreak at St. Charles East High School 12 years ago may finally be over. St. Charles Unit District 303 school board members recently approved a $660,000 settlement with one of the insurance companies that paid out insurance claims to the district. The company has long believed it overpaid the district. The $660,000 represents the original amount that was in...

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    Lockmaster John Palmieri walks across the dam at the William G. Stratton Lock & Dam near McHenry in 2012.

    Stratton Lock and Dam getting $16 million renovation

    The Stratton Lock and Dam in McHenry will receive a $16.7 million facelift that should significantly cut the time boaters wait to travel between the upper Fox River and Chain O’ Lakes and the lower Fox River in Algonquin. However, officials said, the new gates will not help alleviate flooding on the recreational waterway, as nearby residents had hoped.

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    Route 53 ends at Lake-Cook Road but a tollway advisory group is studying how to pay to extend it north to Route 120.

    Tollway explores how to pay for Route 53 extension

    Are more tolls coming on the north end of the Tri-State? Increasing rates at the Waukegan toll and charging at the Wisconsin border and Route 132 are among ideas being tossed around by a Lake County advisoryo group.

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    Health workers with buckets, as part of their Ebola virus prevention protective gear, at an Ebola treatment center in the city of Monrovia, Liberia, Monday.

    Liberia: 3 receiving untested Ebola drug improving

    Three Liberian health workers receiving an experimental drug for Ebola are showing signs of recovery, officials said Tuesday, though medical experts caution it is not certain if the drug is effective. The World Health Organization said that the death toll for West Africa’s Ebola outbreak has climbed past 1,200 but that there are tentative signs that progress is being made in containing the...

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    Local citizens line up to collect water on a street in Donetsk, Ukraine, Monday.

    Ukrainian forces press attacks on rebel-held areas

    Government troops pressed attacks Tuesday in the two largest cities held by pro-Russian rebels in eastern Ukraine, while Kiev also pursued diplomatic efforts to resolve the conflict that has killed more than 2,000 and displaced another 300,000. Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko prepared to host German Chancellor Angela Merkel this weekend before heading to a meeting next week with Russian...

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    Carol Stream crafting crime-free housing ordinance

    Carol Stream is working to develop a crime-free housing ordinance for rental properties. Under the village’s draft of a residential rental licensing and crime-free housing ordinance, anyone who rents or leases a residential property would need to get a residential rental license. Some properties, such as motels or retirement homes, would be exempt.

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    Smoke rises after an Israeli strike hit Gaza City in the northern Gaza Strip, Tuesday, The Israeli military said it carried out a series of airstrikes Tuesday across the Gaza Strip in response to renewed rocket fire, a burst of violence that broke a temporary cease-fire.

    Egyptian cease-fire efforts collapse

    Egyptian attempts to broker an end to a monthlong war between Israel and Hamas collapsed in heavy fighting Tuesday, with Palestinian militants firing dozens of rockets and Israel responding with airstrikes across the Gaza Strip. At least three Palestinians were killed.

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    John Lapinski

    DuPage courts expert Lapinski to lead forest preserve

    John J. Lapinski, 53, trial court administrator for DuPage County’s chief judge, signed a three-year contract worth $160,000 annually to lead the county forest preserve district. His background “doesn’t necessarily scream natural resources but he is a great administrator in an area where there aren’t a whole lot of great administrators,” Commissioner Joe Cantore...

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    Buffalo Grove Stampede set for Aug. 31

    The Buffalo Grove Park District’s Friends of the Parks Foundation will be hosting its annual 5K and 10K race, the Buffalo Grove Stampede, on Sunday, Aug. 31. The race begins at 7:30 a.m. at Mike Rylko Community Park, near the Spray ‘N Play entrance, located at 951 McHenry Road.

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    Batavia: Still ‘no’ to video gambling

    The video gambling ban will stay in place in Batavia after aldermen voted 8-6 not to overturn the existing ban.

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    Antioch man accused of two murders awaits psych eval results

    The defense attorney for a 55-year-old Antioch man accused of killing his wife and mother said he awaiting the results of a psychological evaluation before being able to go to trial.

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    Island Lake commission meets:

    Island Lake’s new planning and zoning commission will meet Thursday. The members will be sworn in and then hear from village attorney David McArdle about their duties.

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    Gurnee police special campaign:

    Gurnee police have launched a special enforcement campaign focusing on vehicle occupant protection and impaired driving that’ll run through Sept. 1.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Saray V. Novoa-Vargas, 28, of South Elgin, was arrested at about 1 a.m. Friday in the 1000 block of South Randall Road, Elgin, and charged with fleeing/attempting to elude a police officer, driving under the influence and driving without a valid driver’s license, according to a police report. Novoa-Vargas didn’t immediately pull over when a police officer pulled up alongside her,...

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Andre M. Maisonet. 24, of Sugar Grove, was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia, leaving the scene of an accident and failure to reduce speed after crash at 12:23 p.m. Saturday at Healy and Bliss roads near Sugar Grove, according to a sheriff’s report.

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    A Metra train travels west along Big Timber Road Tuesday as repair work on the railroad track spur at 1600 Big Timber Road continues. Big Timber Road is closed from Todd Farm Drive to McLean Boulevard through at least Friday.

    Big Timber Road closed west of McLean Blvd. in Elgin

    To accommodate repair work on the railroad track spur at 1600 Big Timber Road, Big Timber Road in Elgin is closed this week from Todd Farm Drive to McLean Boulevard.

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    Cliff McIlvaine, who was sued by the city of St. Charles in an effort to get him to finish a project that he first pulled a permit for in 1975, stands in May 2013 on a landing between his original home to the left and new, super-insulated addition on the right, which he hopes to turn into a museum for his and his father’s inventions, along with city memorabilia.

    Kane judge could decide McIlvaine case in October

    A judge on Oct. 14 will hear arguments on whether fines should be reinstated against an embattled St. Charles homeowner for violating an agreement to clean up his property. Cliff McIlvaine, who was first issued a building permit in 1975 for an addiiton to his home, also has sued the city seeking more than $30,000 in damages from when the city installed a conventional asphalt roof instead of...

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    Pleviak Elementary School Principal Nick Heckel, left, directs children on the first day of classes for Round Lake Area Unit District 116’s new kindergarten at the building in Lake Villa.

    Lake Villa school starts school year as home for kindergarten program in new district

    Just as it has since 1910, the school at Grand Avenue and Route 83 in Lake Villa teemed with students and teachers Tuesday. Joseph J. Pleviak Elementary School has received new life as the home of Round Lake Area Unit District 116's kindergarten program. Lake Villa Elementary District 41 left the school after the 2013-14 academic season. “This is a fun place to be,” District 116...

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    Illinois’ high school coaches and athletic directors will be required to take an online concussion training course under a plan Gov. Pat Quinn signed into law Tuesday.

    Law aims to prevent student athlete concussions

    High school coaches and athletic directors now must take a concussion training course under a law signed by Gov. Pat Quinn. The law requires the Illinois High School Association to develop an online certification program. Quinn says the idea is to reduce and prevent concussions among athletes. The Chicago Democrat signed the measure Tuesday at a school on Chicago’s South Side. The law...

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    Mark Rising, a school board member in Indian Prairie Unit District 204, talks about the effect of canceling elementary classes for “heat days” on state funding the district receives. The district lost $750,000 from calling three “heat days” the past two years.

    Indian Prairie board members factoring heat into budget

    Indian Prairie Unit District 204 school board members have their eyes on the weather forecast as they prepare to approve their next budget because three "heat days" called for schools without air conditioning during the past two years caused the district to lose $750,000 in state aid. "If that happens again, we just continue to lose money," school board President Lori Price said.

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    This Aug. 8, 2014 booking photo released by the Somerset County Sheriff’s Department shows Robert Burt, of Pittsfield, Maine, as he reported to serve jail time in Madison, Maine, for a June arrest for operating under the influence while driving. Burt arrived wearing a T-shirt bearing his mug shot that was made at the time of the June arrest.

    Man shows up for jail in T-shirt with mug shot

    A man reporting to jail in Maine put some thought into his attire: He wore an orange T-shirt with his mug shot printed on it. Robert Edward Burt, of Pittsfield, was arrested on a charge of operating under the influence in June and bailed out. He was later sentenced to 48 hours in jail.

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    Residents in the Chicago area average 6 hours and 50 minutes of sleep a night, quite a bit less than residents in Melbourne, Australia, which average 7 hours and 5 minutes.

    Where does Chicago rank in sleep deprived cities?

    Feeling tired this week? It might be more than your imagination. Chicago residents get an average of 6 hours and 50 minutes of sleep at night, that's about 2,737 hours less of sleep over a lifetime than Orlando, the city in the U.S. that gets the most sleep.

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    Man accused of tweeting threat to Wisconsin governor’s son

    A Milwaukee man accused of sending dozens of threatening and obscene tweets to Gov. Scott Walker’s adult son told investigators he was angry at Walker and that his son was just an “innocent bystander,” an investigator alleges in a criminal complaint. Robert C. Peffer, 31, is due in court Monday for a pre-trial conference. He was charged last month with four misdemeanor counts...

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    Rauner urges quick decision on term limits measure

    Advocates for term limits in Illinois say the state Supreme Court likely will decide whether the issue can appear on the November ballot, no matter how an appeals court rules.Republican gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner is urging the high court to take up the issue “immediately” once the lower court issues a ruling.

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    Heather Mack, stands at the police district headquarters after she was brought in for questioning in relation to the death of her mother, in Bali, Indonesia.

    Daughter of slain Oak Park woman slain had troubled past

    Police reports point to a troubled relationship between an Oak Park woman and the daughter accused in her killing on the Indonesian resort island of Bali. Oak Park police were called 86 times in 10 years to the house where the two once lived.

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    Self-serve beer proposed for Wisconsin park

    Self-serve beer could be on its way to Miller Park. Milwaukee Sportservice has filed an application with the city to install two beer vending machines at the Milwaukee Brewers ballpark.

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    Two dads and two young boys fishing in Naperville’s May Watts Park sparked all sorts of fond memories for our Stephanie Penick.

    A day of fishing rekindles childhood memories

    When our Stephanie Penick came upon two dads and two young boys fishing in a Naperville park, it sparked all sorts of childhood memories -- some of which might surprise you.

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    At the 12th annual Naperville Wine Festival Friday and Saturday, Aug. 22 and 23, 59 wineries will offer samples of roughly 350 wines.

    ‘Do a lap’ to enjoy Naperville wine fest, organizers say

    The setup of the 12th annual Naperville Wine Festival is like a racetrack: The best way to experience it is to take a lap. “The process is you go and look and feel and go through the wine guide and see who you want to see,” festival organizer Scott Janess with inPlay Events said.

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    The southwest corner of the Barrington White House, seen here Monday, has undergone great change during the first month of the project to renovate the 116-year-old building.

    Barrington White House renovation well underway

    Work crews are not even one month into the $6.1 million Barrington White House renovation project, but the 116-year-old building has already undergone dramatic changes. Much of the southwest portion of the building, at 145 W. Main St., has been removed; the front porch is unrecognizable, apart from some of the masonry that is still standing; and the grounds and trees around the building have been...

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    Iceland prepares for volcanic eruption as tremors persist

    Iceland’s Civil Protection Agency has registered hundreds of earthquakes since midnight yesterday at the site of one of its biggest volcanoes as the island braces itself for a possible eruption.

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    Grayslake’s hot-air balloon festival, Color Aloft, returns Saturday, Aug. 23, at Central Park.

    Color Aloft hot-air balloon festival returns for second year in Grayslake

    Grayslake's Central Park will be the venue for the village's second balloon hot-air festival. Color Aloft is set for Saturday, Aug. 23.

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    Veteran rock climber killed in fall in Yosemite

    Authorities say a veteran rock climber died in a fall while climbing alone in Yosemite National Park — just hours after proposing to his girlfriend during an earlier climb.

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    Police: Woman left baby in car while shopping

    Officials say a Florida mother faces child neglect charges after leaving her 1-year-old daughter in the car while she shopped in grocery and liquor stores. Police were called Sunday afternoon by someone who saw the child alone inside the vehicle, which was parked at a shopping plaza in Leesburg.

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    Oregon woman accused of setting husband on fire

    An Oregon woman accused of setting her husband on fire because of an argument over weed killer is jailed on an attempted murder charge. KPTV reports an officer on patrol Friday evening saw the woman and man outside their Mount Angel home and initially thought there had been an accident with a barbecue. The man, 43-year-old Timothy Bork, was flown to Legacy Emanuel Medical Center in Portland...

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    Hackers steal encrypted passwords of meetme social network users

    Hackers gained access to some names, e-mails and encrypted passwords of users of MeetMe Inc.’s social network, the company said.The attack occurred between Aug. 5-7, said Aaron Curtiss, a hired spokesman for the company based in New Hope, Pennsylvania. There was no indication any accounts were accessed or financial information was compromised, he said.

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    Hoosier Lottery operator just misses profit goal

    The Hoosier Lottery director says she’s pleased with the performance of the lottery’s private management company even though it fell slightly short of the profit goal during its first year.

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    Batavia named in suit over electricity plant deal

    Batavia is being sued as a respondent in discovery over its involvement in the Prairie State Energy Campus, by a longtime resident, business owner and land owner.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Burglars stole two pairs of sunglasses, a headset, cellphone car charger, and AUX cable between 6 p.m. Aug. 12 and 5:30 a.m. Aug. 13 out of an unlocked 2010 Ford Focus on the 1400 block of East Northwest Highway in Arlington Heights. Value was estimated at $480.

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    Erin Corwin, left, with her husband, Jonathan Wayne Corwin, a corporal in the U.S. Marine Corps. Erin Corwin disappeared after leaving her home on the Twentynine Palms Marine Corps base June 28, 2014.

    Marine’s wife found dead in California mine shaft

    Deep in a mine shaft in the California desert, the body of a pregnant wife of a U.S. Marine was discovered after a search of nearly two months. Far off in Alaska, a man alleged to have been her lover was arrested on suspicion of homicide. Authorities on Monday outlined the discovery of 19-year-old Erin Corwin and the arrest of 24-year-old Christopher Brandon Lee, who until recently was also a...

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    5,000-8,000 gallons of fuel oil spills into Ohio River

    An estimated 5,000 to 8,000 gallons of fuel oil spilled into the Ohio River, closing about a 15-mile section of the waterway southeast of Cincinnati. A Coast Guard spokeswoman says that the section of river was closed to river traffic Tuesday to enable cleanup and response.

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    Syria's chemical weapons destroyed

    The organization charged with overseeing the destruction of Syria’s chemical weapons program says the most crucial part of its operation has been completed.

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    Iraq Shiite fighters make their way to the front line to fight militants from the extremist Islamic State group in Jurf al-Sakhar, 43 miles (70 kilometers) south of Baghdad, Iraq, Monday, Aug 18, 2014. Fighters of the voluntary armed group formed after the radical Shiite cleric Muqtatda al-Sadr called to protect holy shrines against possible attacks by Sunni militants.

    Iraq military clashes with militants in Tikrit

    Skirmishes broke out Tuesday between Iraqi security forces and militants on the outskirts of Tikrit, a local official and a resident said, a day after the Iraqi and Kurdish troops backed by U.S. airstrikes dislodged Islamic militants from a strategic dam in the country’s north.

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    No injuries, one displaced in Waukegan high rise fire Monday night

    No injuries were reported in a fire on the eighth floor of a Waukegan high rise Monday, authorities said. The fire in the 200 block of Martin Luther King Drive was confined to the single apartment, authorities said. The fire remains under investigation.

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    Bloomingdale village board members have agreed to put three advisory questions on the Nov. 4 ballot related to the noise caused by airplanes taking off from and landing at O’Hare International Airport.

    Bloomingdale voters to weigh in on O’Hare noise

    Bloomingdale will be joining several other suburbs by asking voters for their opinions about airplane noise at O’Hare International Airport. The village board agreed on Monday night to put three advisory questions on the Nov. 4 ballot related to O’Hare noise. “This is an opportunity for our residents to weigh in on the issue,” Village President Franco Coladipietro...

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    “In too many communities around the country, a gulf of mistrust exists between local residents and law enforcement. In too many communities, too many young men of color are left behind and seen only as objects of fear,” President Barack Obama said at the White House, in his most expansive comments to date about the fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown just outside St. Louis.

    Obama struggles to find his role after Brown death

    When racial tensions erupted midway through his first presidential campaign, Barack Obama came to Philadelphia to decry the “racial stalemate we’ve been stuck in for years.” Over time, he said, such wounds, rooted in America’s painful history on race, can be healed. Six years later, the stalemate suddenly seems more entrenched than ever.

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    A man is detained after a standoff with police Monday, Aug. 18, 2014, during a protest for Michael Brown, who was killed by a police officer Aug. 9 in Ferguson, Mo. Brown’s shooting has sparked more than a week of protests, riots and looting in the St. Louis suburb.

    Police mistrust still prevalent years later

    Michael Brown’s death is the latest illustration of deep divisions between minorities and police that have simmered for generations. The depth of this distrust becomes obvious in polling. While the unrest was occurring in Missouri, almost two-thirds of blacks surveyed said police went too far in their response to the Ferguson protests, while one-third of whites agreed and nearly another...

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    Deadline looms for disabled deer hunt sign-up

    Wisconsin wildlife officials are reminding disabled deer hunters the deadline to sign up for the state's special disabled hunt is approaching.

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    Gov. Scott Walker

    Wisconsin ourt set to release John Doe documents
    A federal appeals court is poised to release nearly three dozen files in a lawsuit over an investigation into Gov. Scott Walker's 2012 recall campaign and a host of conservative groups.

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    Chicago Mayor Rahm Emmanuel

    Emanuel’s critics scurry to find 2015 challenger

    Rahm Emanuel swept into the Chicago mayor’s office with citywide support and a promise — some might say a threat — to tackle Chicago’s many problems. The former White House chief of staff has been true to his word. Along the way, he’s ticked off enough people to expect a serious challenge when he seeks a second term early next year.

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    Tollway kids ID and safety seat event planned

    The Illinois Tollway and District 15 of the Illinois State Police are planning a “Kids Identification and Safety Seat” event this week. The “KISS” event will be at the 127th Street Walgreens in Lemont. Authorities will conduct child safety-seat inspections and create children’s ID cards inside the store.

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    Illinois sees year’s 1st human case of West Nile
    Health officials in Illinois are reporting the state’s first human case of West Nile virus this year. A woman in her 70s got sick last month. Her case was reported to the state by the Chicago Department of Public Health, which made the announcement Monday.

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    Sangamon County panel OKs $2.6 million settlement

    A Sangamon County committee has approved a $2.6 million settlement offer to the family of a former clown charged with child sex crimes who died in jail in 2007.The State Journal-Register reports the county board’s civil liabilities committee signed off on Monday. The full county board next has to approve the settlement.

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    Illinois man gets 9 years in fatal drunken crash

    A Douglas County judge has sentenced a man to nine years in prison for killing another man while driving drunk. The (Champaign) News-Gazette reports 29-year-old Edgar Maza was sentenced Monday for aggravated DUI in the October death of 47-year-old motorcyclist Harold Adamson of Atwood. Maza pleaded guilty in July.

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    Indiana woman pleads guilty of trying to abduct baby

    A central Indiana woman has pleaded guilty to charges stemming from an attack during which police say she wrapped an electrical cord around a mother’s throat and demanding she hand over her 3-week-old daughter.Thirty-five-year-old Judith Ann Walker of Anderson told a Delaware County judge Monday that because of drug abuse she remembers little about the June 2013 attack at the...

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    Police: Wisconsin man bungee jumped off crane
    Sheboygan police say a 26-year-old man bungee jumped off a 140-foot crane and posted a video of the stunt online.Nick Propson of Maribel faces up to nine months in jail and a $10,000 fine if convicted of misdemeanor entry onto a construction site. Propson voluntarily reported to the police four days after the July jump at the Acuity Insurance site. A criminal complaint says he admitted he was the...

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    Grocery head tours Chicago neighborhood lacking store

    The head of a grocery chain toured Chicago’s South Shore community with an alderman in search of a store site. The South Side neighborhood was served by a Dominick’s grocery that was shuttered last year. The Chicago Sun-Times reports Alderman Leslie Hairston and Roundy’s CEO Bob Mariano toured the vacant store, which was rejected as a Mariano’s grocery site. However,...

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    Kirk pushing to reauthorize Export-Import Bank

    U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk continues to push for the reauthorization of the Export-Import Bank.The Illinois Republican on Monday hosted a business roundtable in Chicago for Export-Import Bank Chairman and President Fred Hochberg.

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    City of Urbana city council member Diane Marlin pets a goat at Prairie Fruits Farm in Urbana during a Tourism Road Show stop. This is the second year the farm has offered organized tours for groups of school children and adults.

    Visitor agency banks on agritourism

    Prairie Fruits Farm earned its reputation by producing goat’s-milk cheese and gelato. Now the farm just north of Champaign-Urbana is milking agritourism for extra business. This is the second year the farm has offered organized tours for groups of school children and adults. It’s also the second season that Prairie Fruits has worked with a pair of businesses — the KD Ranch...

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    Hank Salemi, park president of Six Flags Great America, and park employees took part in the Ice Bucket Challenge on Monday to benefit the fight against ALS.

    Ice Bucket Challenge heats up fundraising in the suburbs

    Margaret Rosano, a Northwest Community Hospital nurse, completed the Ice Bucket Challenge for her cousin, who was diagnosed at 33 with ALS, or Lou Gehrig's disease. She's one of many in the suburbs, including Des Plaines Mayor Matt Bogusz, who have helped created the big boost in fundraising for charities fighting ALS. "Let's make ALS history," Rosano said.

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    Dawn Patrol: U-46 deals official; DUI charges after vehicle on playground

    U-46 leadership, teacher deals approved. Aurora man faces alcohol-related charges after driving onto playground. Man found on CTA tracks was electrocuted. Data breach might affect Vista patients. Arlington Heights OKs downtown apartments. Prosecutors play murder suspect’s statements. 63-year-old Streamwood man accused with kissing 16-year-old. Bad night for Chris Sale.

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    The zucchini donated to the Northern Illinois Food Bank in this 2010 photograph apparently did find new homes. The food bank currently is accepting zucchini donations from this year’s bumper crop.

    Constable: Brace yourself for World War Zucchini!

    Every year as summer moves closer to fall, we suburbanites must steel ourselves for the onslaught of World War Z. Those who aren't vigilant end up with more zucchini than we know what to do with. And that number is one.

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    Hoffman Estates trustees Monday discussed the latest study on noise levels from auto racing events in the Sears Centre Arena’s parking lot.

    Resident: Racing at Sears Centre is too noisy

    A recent noise study objectively determined that one of the occasional auto racing events in the parking lot of Hoffman Estates’ Sears Centre Arena wasn’t dangerous to the hearing of anyone there or of neighbors living just across the Jane Addams Memorial Tollway. But how annoying the noise may be — and to how many — is the subjective question officials continue to weigh.

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    Lake Zurich Area Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Dale Perrin addresses the Lake Zurich village board about home rule Monday night.

    Lake Zurich board puts home rule on ballot

    Lake Zurich voters will decide whether village government should have more control over taxes and other issues through home-rule power. Village board members Monday night voted 5-1 to place a home-rule question on the Nov. 4 ballot. Lake Zurich voters overwhelmingly rejected home rule in 1998. If home rule is approved, an ordinance passed by the board states Lake Zurich would commit to limiting a...

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    Robin Williams found dead in his home

    Associated Press


    Robin Williams, the Academy Award winner and comic supernova whose explosions of pop culture riffs and impressions dazzled audiences for decades and made him a gleamy-eyed laureate for the Information Age, died Monday in an apparent suicide. He was 63.

Sports

  •  
    Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly talks to the media during media day for the NCAA college football team Tuesday Aug. 19, 2014, in South Bend, Ind.

    Imrem: College athletics keeps getting slimier

    Amid an alleged academic scandal involving football players, Notre Dame showcased its new football uniforms. Will someone please connect the dots here?

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    A member of the grounds crew works on the field after a heavy rain soaked Wrigley Field during the fifth inning. But the infield would never dry in time.

    After 4½-hour delay, Cubs declared the winner at 1:15 a.m.

    The Cubs have begun their run at being serious spoilers against teams from both the National and American Leagues. They took an early 2-0 lead against the San Francisco Giants Tuesday night before a brief but strong deluge hit Wrigley Field, causing a massive delay -- which finally ended with no further game play and a Cubs win at 1:16 a.m. And the Giants were not happy.

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    Prospect’s record-setting medley relay of, from left, Sam Gabriel, Nathanael Ginnodo, Michael Morikado and Carter Mau, has earned a spot on the Knights’ new swimming and diving record board inside the Jean Walker Field House.

    Prospect puts its swimming heritage on the record

    Prospect's swim teams have one less battle to fight. Though the school doesn't have its own pool, the swim team's top performances are now listed on new record boards inside the Jean Walker Field House.

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    Boys golf: Tuesday’s results
    Results of boys golf meets from Tuesday, Aug. 19.

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    Boomers rally, then fall short against CornBelters

    The Schaumburg Boomers fell behind early. rallied to tie, then dropped a 7-4 decision to the Normal CornBelters in Midwest League action Tuesday night.

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    The setting sun lights up storm clouds as they drift over Lake Michigan near U.S. Cellular Field during the third inning of a baseball game between the Chicago White Sox and the Baltimore Orioles, Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2014, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    Abreu ends power drought in Sox loss to Orioles

    Jose Abreu's first home run since July 29 was the lone highlight in the White Sox' 5-1 loss to the Orioles Tuesday night at U.S. Cellular Field.

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    Naperville North’s Griffin Brown putts during the Vern McGonagle Memorial High School Golf Championship at the Naperville Country Club.

    Singhsumalee, Brown each win Naperville championship

    Waubonsie Valley's Bing Singhsumalee won girls medalist honors at the McGonagle Naperville City Tournament on Tuesday, and Naperville North's Griffin Brown was the top boys finisher.

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    Cougars rally late, earn 9th straight victory

    The Kane County Cougars rallied with 2 runs in the bottom of the eighth inning en route to their ninth straight victory, a 4-3 win over the Burlington Bees in Midwest League action at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark in Geneva on Tuesday night,

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    The White Sox’s Jose Abreu hits a home run off Baltimore Orioles starting pitcher Chris Tillman during Tuesday’s game at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Abreu home run lone highlight in Sox loss to Orioles

    Jose Abreu hit his first home run since July 29 Tuesday and that was pretty much the story of the night for the White Sox, who lost to the Orioles 5-1 at U.S. Cellular Field.

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    Former Bears linebacker Tim Shaw says he has ALS

    Former NFL linebacker Tim Shaw has announced that he has ALS. In a 25-second video posted Tuesday on the Tennessee Titans’ web site, the 30-year-old Shaw reveals he was recently diagnosed with ALS and pours a bucket of ice water on his head as part of the Ice Bucket Challenge to raise money and awareness to battle the disease.

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    Jordan Danks spraying to all fields

    Jordan Danks has bounced between the majors and minors in each of the last three seasons. The outfielder is hoping a change in his approach to hitting helps him finally stick with the White Sox.

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    Chicago players Pierce Jones (23) and DJ Butler (1) celebrate a 6-1 win over Pearland in an elimination baseball game at the Little League World Series tournament in South Williamsport, Pa., Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2014. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

    Chicago Little League team tops Texas 6-1
    Joshua Houston struck out five in five innings, and Chicago’s Jackie Robinson West beat Pearland, Texas, 6-1, in an elimination game in the Little League World Series on Tuesday night.Chicago will face the loser of Wednesday’s game between Las Vegas and Philadelphia on Thursday night. Pearland has been eliminated.

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    Cubs’ Anthony Rizzo watches his two-run home run during the first inning of a baseball game against San Francisco Giants in Chicago, Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2014.

    Cubs’ Szczur thrilled to be with big club

    After a whirlwind weekend in New York, where he made his major-league debut, outfielder Matt Szczur settled in Tuesday at Wrigley Field. Szczur, a former college football player, says he's eager to show the Cubs his baseball skills.

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    Seattle Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman figures to make it tough on Jay Cutler and the Bears’ offense Friday in Seattle.

    LeGere: Playing Seahawks will test Bears’ offense

    The Bears' offense, which has some kinks to work out and questions to answer, will be tested in Friday night's third preseason game against the Seahawks in Seattles' noisy CenturyLink Field. Starters are expected to play at least until halftime.

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    Bears defensive coordinator Mel Tucker said last season, “We gave up over 1,400 yards in missed tackles alone. That’s been a big point of emphasis. Our tackling has been solid so far, but tackling is one of those things you can’t take for granted.”

    Tucker’s on mission to eliminate missed tackles

    Bears defensive coordinator Mel Tucker admits that missed tackles were one of the biggest problems for last year's crew, and correcting that that has been a daily focus in practice this year.

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    Ohio State quarterback Braxton Miller, among the top contenders for the Heisman Trophy, reportedly reinjured his throwing shoulder Monday during practice. The report about the two-time Big Ten offensive player of the year comes with just more than two weeks before the No. 5 Buckeyes open the season.

    Report: Buckeyes' Miller out for the season

    Ohio State star quarterback Braxton Miller will miss the 2014 season, dealing a severe blow to the fifth-ranked Buckeyes' national title hopes. Ohio State confirmed late Tuesday afternoon that Miller reinjured his throwing shoulder and will need surgery. The two-time Big Ten player of the year left practice in pain Monday after making a short throw.

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    Indiana’s Tevin Coleman (6) avoids a tackle by Michigan State’s Darian Hicks during the first quarter of an NCAA college football game, Saturday, Oct. 12, 2013, in East Lansing, Mich. Michigan State won 42-28. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

    Six star college players on struggling teams

    The next time you turn on the television and see a couple of sub-.500 teams slogging along, desperately hoping to just get bowl eligible, don’t turn it off. There is bound to be at least a few players out there worth watching. Here are six star players who will be trying to lead their struggling programs to the postseason.

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    Northern Illinois quarterback Jordan Lynch throws a pass against Utah State in Poinsettia Bowl in San Diego. ESPN and the MAC officially announced a 13-year media rights agreement.

    MAC Commissioner: ESPN deal brings stability

    Mid-American Conference Commissioner Jon Steinbrecher says the league’s new 13-year media rights agreement with ESPN provides long-term stability to the conference at uncertain time for college athletics. The MAC and ESPN officially announced the new deal, which runs through the 2026-27 season, on Tuesday. The contract reworks the final three years of the current eight-year deal that MAC has with the network, and adds 10 years.

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    Washington linebacker Brian Orakpo (98) reacts after Cleveland quarterback Johnny Manziel was sacked during Monday’s preseason game in Landover, Md.

    Will Manziel’s gesture cost him the QB job?

    LANDOVER, Md. — If the Cleveland Browns pick a quarterback based solely on numbers, theres not much either Johnny Manziel or Brian Hoyer did to show he deserves the job. If the choice is based on maturity, the hotshot rookie’s obscene gesture lost him some ground to the nondescript sixth-year veteran. Manziel raised his middle finger toward the opponents’ bench as he returned to the huddle late in the third quarter of Monday night’s 24-23 loss to Washington. Truth be told, it was one of the few times a Browns QB actually found his intended target. “It does not sit well,” Cleveland coach Mike Pettine said. “It’s disappointing, because what we talk about is being poised and being focused. ... That’s a big part of all football players, especially the quarterback.” Manziel called the moment a “lapse of judgment” and suggested it was brought about by another game of unprintable verbal grief from another team’s players and fans. He was openly mocked by Brian Orakpo in the first quarter when the Washington linebacker raised both hands and performed the 2012 Heisman Trophy winner’s “money” gesture after a sack by Ryan Kerrigan. “I get words exchanged throughout the entirety of the game, every game, week after week, and I should’ve been smarter,” Manziel said. “It was a ‘Monday Night Football’ game, and cameras were probably solid on me, and I just need to be smarter about that.“It’s there, and it’s present every game, and I just need to let it slide off my back and go to the next play.” Meanwhile, Pettine needs to pick a starting quarterback. The performances were so unspectacular that the coach suggested he might audible from his previously stated plan of announcing his regular-season starter on Tuesday.“All the options are still on the table,” Pettine said.Hoyer started Monday night and completed 2 of 6 passes for 16 yards. His self-assessment: “It probably couldn’t have been any worse. It’s disappointing. It was embarrassing.”Manziel, the No. 22 pick in the NFL draft, was 7 for 16 for 65 yards and a touchdown. Of his series early in the game, he said: “I really tried to force everything and not let it fly like I should have. I need to get better at that and throw the dang ball.”Those stats, as mediocre as they are, were padded by series against Washington’s backups. In the first quarter — when Washington’s starters were in the game — Manziel was 2 for 7 for 29 yards, and Hoyer was 0 for 2.“They both missed some throws,” Pettine said.If there’s any hint as to which way Pettine is leaning, it’s worth noting that Hoyer started for the second consecutive game and played mostly with the first-team offense. Manziel was sent out with the reserves to play in the second half. Manziel took advantage by leading a 16-play, 68-yard drive capped by an 8-yard pass to Dion Lewis for Cleveland’s first touchdown.But the six points were overshadowed by the one finger.“A lot of people just scream out things that are very, very disrespectful,” Browns cornerback Joe Haden said. “He’s just got to zone it out.”

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    Former Minnesota Vikings punter Chris Kluwe, right, says he’s reached a settlement with the team to avert a threatened lawsuit over his release. Kluwe had accused the Vikings of cutting him over his activism on gay rights issues.

    Kluwe, Vikings reach settlement to avert lawsuit

    Former Minnesota Vikings punter Chris Kluwe said Tuesday that he reached a settlement with the team to avert a threatened lawsuit over his release, saying the club had agreed to donate to several groups that support gay rights. Kluwe had accused the Vikings of cutting him in 2013 over his outspoken support for gay marriage.

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    Pennsylvania’s Mo’ne Davis pitched a shutout last Friday for her team at the Little League World Series tournament in South Williamsport, Pa. Davis is expected to start Wednesday as the Taney team tries to reach the semifinals.

    In Philly, Little League star Mo’ne means money

    The baseball fans visiting Triple Play Sports in Philadelphia aren’t interested in the Phillies. They’re fanatical about Mo’ne. “The one thing they’re asking is: ‘How do I get a Mo’ne jersey?’” said Triple Play owner Dewey LaRosa, referring to Mo’ne Davis, who last week became the first girl to pitch a shutout in the 67-year history of the Little League World Series. “Everyone wants that.”

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    Atlanta Falcons returner Devin Hester (17) evades Houston's Josh Victorian (27) as he runs for a touchdown Saturday in Houston.

    For Bears fans, there’s plenty of uncertainty

    Mike North believes the Chicago Bears will miss returner Devin Hester. And with the uncertainty of the Bears defense and special teams, he wonders if the Bears offense will turn into the "Air Coryell" teams in San Diego in the 1970s.

Business

  •  
    Walmart Neighborhood Market employees Renee Nawrot, left, and Lauren Brutto get products on the shelves in preparation for the Des Plaines store’s grand opening today.

    Walmart Neighborhood Market opens Wednesday in Des Plaines

    The Walmart Neighborhood Market makes its first foray into the suburbs today with the grand opening of a 39,000-square-foot store at 727 W. Golf Road in Des Plaines. “A lot of folks don’t want to walk the 150,000- to 200,000-square-foot building and weed their way through the apparel and all the other stuff," said Jeremy Arndt, the Des Plaines store manager, explaining the concept behind the smaller, food-focused store.

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    McDonald’s plans to start selling its packaged coffee at supermarkets nationally by early next year, a move intended to help raise the profile of the coffee sold at its U.S. restaurants.

    McDonald’s to sell packaged coffee nationally

    Oak Brook-based McDonald’s plans to start selling its packaged coffee at supermarkets nationally by early next year, a move intended to help raise the profile of the coffee sold at its U.S. restaurants. The world’s biggest hamburger chain has made a deal with Northfield-based Kraft Foods to manufacture and distribute the bags of McCafe ground and whole bean coffee, as well as single-cup pods that can be used in at-home coffee machines.

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    The Canadian Transportation Safety Board released its report on the deadly Lac-Megantic train derailment in July 2013. The report cited 18 factors that contributed to the derailment, including the weak safety culture of the now defunct Montreal, Maine & Atlantic Railways company.

    Investigators release Quebec train disaster report

    The weak safety culture of a now-defunct railway company and poor government oversight were among the many factors that led to an oil train explosion that killed 47 people in Quebec last year, Canada’s Transportation Safety Board said in a new report released Tuesday. TSB chair Wendy Tadros said 18 factors played a role, including a rail company that cut corners and a Canadian regulator that didn’t do proper safety audits.

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    Abe Mashal of St. Charles, one of the plaintiffs in the Portland lawsuit, was unable to print his boarding pass before a flight out of Chicago four years ago. A counter representative told him he was on the no-fly list and would not be allowed to board.

    U.S. changing no-fly list rules

    The Obama administration is promising to change the way travelers can ask to be removed from its no-fly list of suspected terrorists banned from air travel. The decision comes after a federal judge’s ruling that there was no meaningful way to challenge the designation, a situation deemed unconstitutional. In response, the Justice Department said the U.S. will change the process during the next six months.

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    U.S. stocks gained Tuesday after investors got some encouraging news about home building, inflation and corporate earnings. Investors were encouraged by a bounce in home construction last month and news that consumer prices rose at the slowest pace in five months.

    Stocks rise as U.S. home construction rebounds

    A summer swoon for the stock market appears to be over for now. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index closed within six points of its all-time high Tuesday, less than two weeks after slumping on concerns about rising tensions in Iraq and Ukraine.

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    Elizabeth Arden sinks as sales of Justin Bieber fragrance drop

    Elizabeth Arden Inc. shares stink today, and scents associated with Justin Bieber and Taylor Swift are partly to blame.Shares of the manufacturer of fragrances and cosmetics dropped 24 percent to $14.95 at 1:54 p.m. in New York, the lowest since August 2010, after the company posted the worst quarterly loss since at least 1996 and said it will sell $50 million in stock.

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    Home construction rebounds in U.S. As inflation eases

    Home construction rebounded in July and the cost of living rose at a slower pace, showing a strengthening U.S. economy has yet to generate a sustained pickup in inflation.A 15.7 percent jump took housing starts to a 1.09 million annualized rate, the strongest since November, and halted a two- month slide, the Commerce Department said in Washington.

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    MB Financial completes Taylor Capital purchase, merges banks

    MB Financial Inc. completed its acquisition of Taylor Capital Group Inc., the holding company for Cole Taylor Bank, as is it expands operations in Chicago. MB Financial merged Cole Taylor into MB Financial Bank, the Chicago-based buyer said today in a statement.

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    Hitachi metals to pay $1.3 Billion for Wisconsin-based foundry

    Hitachi Metals Ltd., Japan’s biggest maker of magnets containing rare earths, will pay $1.3 billion for Wisconsin-based Waupaca Foundry Inc., gaining four foundries in the company’s home state and two others in the U.S The purchase will be financed with cash and debt, according to a statement today from Tokyo-based Hitachi Metals, a subsidiary of Hitachi Ltd.

  •  
    A shopper checks out with her lumber at a Home Depot in BostonHome Depot Inc., the largest U.S. home-improvement retailer, posted second-quarter profit that topped analysts’ estimates and raised its forecast for the year as sales of seasonal merchandise rebounded. The shares gained.

    Home Depot profit tops estimates as seasonal sales rebound

    Home Depot Inc., the largest U.S. home-improvement retailer, posted second-quarter profit that topped analysts’ estimates and raised its forecast for the year as sales of seasonal merchandise rebounded. The shares gained. Net income in the three months through Aug. 3 rose 14 percent to $2.05 billion, or $1.52 a share, from $1.8 billion, or $1.24, a year earlier, the Atlanta-based company said today in a statement. The average of 25 analysts’ estimates compiled by Bloomberg was $1.44. Chief Executive Officer Frank Blake has focused Home Depot on boosting sales from existing locations and investing in e-commerce, rather than opening new stores.

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    Brita recalling children’s water bottles

    Brita is recalling approximately 242,500 children’s water filter bottles due to a possible laceration hazard. The company said Tuesday that the lid of the hard-sided bottles can break into pieces with sharp points.Brita has received 35 reports of lids breaking or cracking. No injuries have been reported.

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    New York’s Metropolitan Opera reached tentative labor deals with two of its largest unions early Monday while negotiations continued with 10 more unions in hopes of averting a lockout.

    Metropolitan Opera reaches deals with 2 unions

    New York’s Metropolitan Opera reached tentative labor deals with two of its largest unions early Monday while negotiations continued with 10 more unions in hopes of averting a lockout. The federal Mediation and Conciliation Service announced the agreements with Local 802 of the musicians’ union and with the American Guild of Musical Artists, its orchestra and chorus.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Superhero fans dress up as Batman villains at a previous Wizard World Convention Comic Con at the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center in Rosemont. It returns from Thursday, Aug. 21, to Sunday, Aug. 24.

    Weekend picks: Celebrate your fandom at Wizard World

    Fans of all things fantasy and sci-fi won't want to miss the Wizard World Convention Comic Con 2014 starting Thursday in Rosemont. Meet and get autographs from actresses Patricia Rodriguez Vonne, Crystal McCahill and Rosario Dawson before screenings of “Frank Miller's Sin City: A Dame to Die For” at the Hollywood Palms Cinema in Naperville. And check out the Color Aloft Balloon Festival at Central Park in Grayslake. Comedian Chris DiStefano of MTV's “Guy Code” fame appears at Zanies locations in Chicago and Rosemont.

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    Double pork chops come smeared with chipotle butter and honey-marinated peaches at Milwalky Trace Restaurant in Libertyville.

    Libertyville's Milwalky Trace mixes rustic fare, modern touches

    Milwalky Trace is the first restaurant for chef Lee Kuebler, who trained at Chicago's Kendall College. Its name pays homage to the town's history, and its menu shies away from the modern appetizer-salad-entrée setup. Instead, Kuebler offers shared plates in small, medium and large sizes, plus a selection of desserts. “I'm really into food that you can sit down with a group of people and all share together and talk about it, have it be part of the experience,” Kuebler says.

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    Country superstar Garth Brooks has added an 11th show to his Garth Brooks World Tour with Trisha Yearwood, running Sept. 4-14 at the Allstate Arena in Rosemont.

    Garth Brooks adds 11th show at Allstate
    Country superstar Garth Brooks, who has already sold more than 170,000 tickets for 10 Allstate Arena shows next month, has added an 11th. Tickets for the newest show, at 10:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 5, go on sale to the public at 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 23.

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    Eddie Money will perform at the Genesee Theatre in Waukegan Friday.

    Music Notes: See Eddie Money Friday at Waukegan's Genesee

    Eddie Money brings his muscular pop-rock to the Genesee Theatre in Waukegan Friday, and the United Center hosts shows by two rock heavyweights, Tom Petty on Saturday and Arcade Fire on Tuesday and Wednesday.

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    Julien’s Auctions announced Tuesday that items from Madonna’s personal and professional life will be auctioned on Nov. 7-8, 2014. Pieces from Madonna’s “Material Girl,” “Music” and “American Pie” music videos will be offered during the Icons & Idols: Rock n’ Roll auction in Beverly Hills.

    Material Girl’s materials to be auctioned in Nov.

    Get ready to dance in Madonna’s old clothes. Julien’s Auctions announced Tuesday that items from the pop icon’s personal and professional life will be auctioned Nov. 7-8. Pieces from her “Material Girl,” “Music” and “American Pie” music videos will be offered during the Icons & Idols: Rock n’ Roll auction.

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    Various artists collaborated on “Nashville Outlaws: A Tribute to Motley Crue.”

    Country artists rock out for Motley Crue

    Country artists have long paid tribute to rock acts compatible with country music, from the Eagles to Buddy Holly to country-loving British acts the Beatles and Rolling Stones. But a heavy metal act like Motley Crue? For anyone listening to the arena-rock crunch in country music in recent years, country covering the Crue isn’t a surprise at all.

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    Commitment is key before moving in with boyfriend and son

    She is excited to move in with her boyfriend and his young son and asks for advice. Carolyn Hax says make sure there is a strong commitment before living together.

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    Jessie Mueller stars as Carole King in “Beautiful” on Broadway. The Tony Award-winning musical comes to Chicago next year.

    Carole King musical 'Beautiful' heading to Chicago

    The Tony-Award winning musical “Beautiful,” about the life of singer/songwriter Carole King, will make its Chicago debut late next year. “Beautiful” will play a 12-week engagement at Chicago's Oriental Theatre from Dec. 1, 2015, to Feb. 21, 2016.

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    Some of Amy Grant’s repertoire easily adapts to the remix concept of “In Motion — The Remixes.”

    Amy Grant shows another side with remixes

    Amy Grant never has shied away from experimentation and change. Having transformed herself from devout singer-songwriter to upbeat pop star more than 20 years ago, she now leaps from the reflective tone of recent work to the electronic dance music beat of “In Motion — The Remixes,” which gives a glow-stick tweak to her catalog of hits.

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    Motley Crue — Vince Neil, left, Nikki Sixx, Tommy Lee and Mick Mars — think country artists including Rascal Flatts, Florida Georgia Line and Brantley Gilbert, who performed on the 15-song album “A Tribute to Motley Crue,” have a lot more in common with hard rockers than some might think. The album was released Tuesday.

    Country Crue: Nashville embraces heavy metal

    Vince Neil and Nikki Sixx have spent so much time hanging out with country artists for a Motley Crue tribute album that they know how to write the classic country song. First, the subject of a country ballad isn’t that far from the life of a rock ’n’ roller. Instead of a clash of cultures on the 15-song album, “Nashville Outlaws: A Tribute to Motley Crue,” released Tuesday, Nashville’s country crooners welcomed the teased-hair, leather-clad metal band whose rock anthems helped define the ’80s.

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    Taylor Swift says she's releasing her first full-length pop album on Oct. 27. The 24-year-old revealed in a livestream via Yahoo! on Monday that “1989,” named after her birth year, is her “first documented official pop album.”

    Taylor Swift to release first pop album on Oct. 27

    Taylor Swift is saying goodbye to country music, for now: The singer says she's releasing her first full-length pop album on Oct. 27. The 24-year-old revealed in a livestream via Yahoo! on Monday that “1989,” named for her birth year, is her “first documented official pop album.” The first single is the upbeat jam “Shake It Off,” which she debuted during the livestream and was released Monday. She danced happily in a cropped white top and skirt with the audience as the song played. Swift called her upcoming fifth album a “rebirth.”

  •  
    MacKenzie LeBeau, 21, has been an intern this summer at Prairie Farm Corps at Prairie Crossing in Grayslake. She teaches teenagers how to use local ingredients in recipes.

    Cook of the Week: Intern relishes teaching kids farm-to-table cooking

    For the past three summers of MacKenzie LeBeau's college career, she's immersed herself in programs that explore healthier ways to feed America. This summer MacKenzie, a native of Vermont and a student at Syracuse University in New York, has worked as a crew leader for the Prairie Farm Corp, an educational program sponsored by the Liberty Prairie Foundation in Prairie Crossing. For the first time she found herself behind a kitchen counter, teaching teenagers how to cook and learning along the way herself.

  •  
    Motown legend Smokey Robinson's latest album, “Smokey & Friends,” comes out Tuesday. The collection of Robinson tunes pairs the Motown veteran with Elton John, Mary J. Blige, James Taylor, CeeLo Green, Miguel and Steven Tyler.

    Smokey Robinson, still writing, duets with friends

    After five decades in show business, the man who shaped Motown says he can't stop writing. But you won't hear any of that material on his latest album, “Smokey & Friends,” out Tuesday. His new tunes pair him with Elton John, Mary J. Blige, Steven Tyler and more. Robinson, who's tour stops at 8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 3, at the Genesee Theatre in Waukegan, talked recently about his duets collaborators and his love of being on the road.

  •  
    For a healthy, portable breakfast, try Broccoli Cheddar Muffins; they can crossover to lunch as well.

    Breakfast muffins get day off to a grade A start

    When fall rolls around and it’s back to school and work, wouldn’t you love to start your day with something tastier and more substantial than that all-too-typical bowl of cold cereal? It’s just so boring day after day. And that’s apart from the fact that most cereals fail to tide you over until lunchtime.

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    Chocolate Beet Cake
    Pureed beets add rich color and flavor to chocolate cake without adding any fat.

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    Zuquinoa Boats
    Stuffing zucchini with a quinoa mixture makes a filling meatless meal.

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    MacKenzie Le Beau, 21, an intern at Prairie Farm Corps at Prairie Crossing in Grayslake, teaches kids how to make seasonal meals, like this flat bread pizza that starts with garden-ripe tomatoes, peppers, onions, potatoes and basil-garlic pesto.

    Whole Wheat Flatbread Pizza
    MacKenzie Le Beau teaches kids how to make seasonal meals, like this flat bread pizza that starts with garden-ripe tomatoes, peppers, onions, potatoes and basil-garlic pesto.

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    Broccoli Cheddar Breakfast Muffins get the school day, or work day, off to a healthy start.

    Broccoli Cheddar Breakfast Muffins
    Broccoli Cheddar Breakfast Muffins start a busy day off on the right foot.

  •  
    The Davies family — Leah, left, Adam, Phil and Lauren — faced a crisis when Leah was a college sophomore and fell so ill from an out-of-control sinus infection she was hospitalized.

    Health care at college: Can your teen manage?

    Heading off to school is stressful for young people on a variety of fronts. Among the biggest challenges is managing their own health far from home. And it can be a trial for parents, too, in this era of helicopter parenting. The Davies family, of New York, knows this all too well when their daughter Leah was a college sophomore and fell so ill from an out-of-control sinus infection she was hospitalized.

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    Tomato Fest at Francesca’s at The Promenade runs through Aug. 31.

    Dining events: Tomatoes galore at Francesca’s in Bolingbrook

    Through the end of August, stop by Tomato Fest at Francesca’s at The Promenade in Bolingbrook, where all things tomato take center stage. Also, Weber Grill locations celebrate 25 years with a handful of themed specials.

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    Murali Coryell’s warm style of R&B soothes the soul on “Restless Mind.”

    Murali Coryell sings of love, lust on new album

    Love-life dysfunction is a recurring theme on “Restless Mind,” and luckily for us, Murali Coryell’s woes inspire warm, embracing R&B to soothe the soul music fans. He sings a lot about heartache, but as “Let’s Get It On” makes clear, Coryell has his act together.

  •  
    Lucky magazine style editor Laurel Pantin says trends for cooler weather include baby blue outerwear, shearling coats, oversized sweaters, plaids, black-and-white prints, straight trouser pants, hiking boots, blanket coats and Pendleton prints.

    Lucky mag fall tips: Santa Fe look, hiking boots

    It may feel like summer outside, but many stores are showing styles for cooler weather. Here are some tips and trends to help your wardrobe look “clean and fresh for fall,” according to Lucky magazine’s style editor, Laurel Pantin.

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    Doug J. Swanson meticulously crafts a fine biography of Benny Binion in “Blood Aces: The Wild Ride of Benny Binion, the Texas Gangster Who Created Vegas Poker.”

    Author tells story of wild ride of Benny Binion

    Benny Binion, native of tiny Pilot Grove, Texas, began his career as a crooked horse trader, graduated to bootlegging, took over the policy racket in Dallas, broke into the big time by opening the Horseshoe casino in Las Vegas, launched the World Series of Poker and turned the once back-alley game of Texas Hold’em into a worldwide spectator sport. Along the way, as author Doug J. Swanson tells it in this new biography, “Blood Aces,” Benny cavorted with gangsters; corrupted cops and U.S. senators; and ordered an untold number of murders.

  •  
    Tartan plates, such as these found at Pendleton-usa.com, take the Scottish décor trend to the table. The iconic pattern is showing up on furnishings and accessories for this fall as Scotland joins England as an inspiration for designers.

    Fall decor does a Scottish fling

    Where fashion goes, decor follows. And this fall, the fashionistas are inspired by Scotland.

Discuss

  •  
    Steve Lundy/slundy@dailyherald.com

    Editorial: Everyone has a stake in fighting truancy

    Parents, staff and the community must work together to ensure students are in school everyday and prepared to learn, a Daily Herald editorial says.

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    The more they learn about health care law, the less they like

    Columnist Byron York: Democrats have long believed Obamacare would become more popular once it was fully in place and Americans got a chance to see it up close. So why is Obamacare less popular now than a few months ago? Because it is fully in place and Americans have had a chance to see it up close.

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    ‘Only’ 6 years to let Bush off the hook
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: What right does Commander-in-Chief Obama have to insert pre-emptive airstrikes and send ground troops into Iraq? Has Iraq’s democratically-elected leader Malaki asked for U.S. military aid? No. The Iraq military is doing its own airstrikes?

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    Using position to point fingers
    A Carpentersville letter to the editor: I should have paid more attention to the endorsements of the Tribune and Daily Herald when each characterized the state senate career of Kane County Board Chairman Chris Lauzen as quixotic.

  •  

    Stop the exodus of jobs from Illinois
    A Mount Prospect letter to the editor: In the Daily Herald on Aug. 12 there were two articles about companies closing branches in Illinois. Intuit is closing its Arlington Heights facility, and Jelly Belly is moving production to Fairfield, Calif.

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    Vote out politicians who have no guts
    A Rolling Meadows letter to the editor: Durbin and the other politicians of this country, both state and federal, along with the media are playing us for dummies again. They make Walgreen out to be the bad guy to divert attention from the fact that they are too gutless to close the loopholes in the tax laws. Who were the people who wrote the laws to favor certain companies, and passed various corporate welfare laws in the first place? You’re right, the same politicians who will not stand up for simplifying and making our tax laws clearer and fairer for everyone.

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    Expect layoffs after Walgreen’s decision to stay
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: I agree totally with your conclusion, but not with other comments in your Aug. 8 editorial about Walgreen’s decision to stay in the U.S.

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