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Daily Archive : Monday August 18, 2014

News

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    Kenneth Arndt, left, and Tony Sanders are the interim leadership team at Elgin School District U-46 in the wake of the departure of Superintendent Jose Torres. Arndt was appointed interim superintendent, and Sanders was appointed the CEO handling day-to-day operations.

    New CEO, superintendent, teacher deals in U-46

    The Elgin Area School District U-46 school board Monday night appointed Kenneth Arndt as interim superintendent and Tony Sanders as chief executive officer for the school year that started Monday. Arndt will be paid $650 per day for a maximum of 100 days between Sept. 15 and June 30, per the contract. Sanders will be paid $210,000 for this school year.

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    Animals to visit library

    A fruit bat, a sloth and other unusual animals will visit the Vernon Area Public Library on Sept. 29 as part of a program for kids and adults.

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    Forensic pathologist Shawn Parcells speaks during a news conference to share preliminary results of a second autopsy done on Michael Brown on Monday in St. Louis County, Mo. The independent autopsy shows 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot at least six times, and Parcells, who assisted former New York City chief medical examiner Dr. Michael Baden during the autopsy, said a graze wound on Brown's right arm could have occurred in several ways.

    Pathologist: Brown may have had his hands raised

    An unarmed 18-year-old whose fatal shooting by police has sparked a week of protests in suburban St. Louis suffered a bullet wound to his right arm that may indicate his hands were up or his back was turned, a pathologist hired by his family said Monday. But the pathologist said the team that examined Michael Brown can't be sure yet exactly how the wounds were inflicted, citing the need for more...

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    Former Gov. Rod Blagojevich sought a $100,000 campaign donation from racetrack executive John Johnston before he signed an extension of a state gambling law in 2008. Johnston never paid the $100,000 and has denied agreeing to pay it.

    Blagojevich, state corruption feature in ruling

    A U.S. appeals court took on the issue of Illinois corruption under now-imprisoned former Gov. Rod Blagojevich as it revived a lawsuit alleging that racetrack owners bribed the Democrat to get him to push through legislation that cost casinos $90 million.

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    Student volunteer Russell Danielson monitors for potential severe weather while working at the National Weather Service station in Romeoville.

    Romeoville weather service installs new system

    Up until recently, six short-lived EF1 tornadoes spawned by two storms that tore through northern Illinois on June 30 might have been all but invisible to the National Weather Service. The closest, which touched down briefly between Plainfield and Romeoville, was “embedded” in the storm front, said Matt Friedlein, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service's Romeoville office.

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    Jill Beebe

    Woman gets 20 days for driving school bus while intoxicated

    A former school bus driver pleaded guilty Monday to felony drunken driving for transporting West Chicago elementary students while she was intoxicated. Jill Beebe, 43, of the 600 block of Sunbury Road in South Elgin, was sentenced to 20 days in jail and two years of probation. She began serving her sentence immediately.

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    Plans for a seven-story apartment tower in downtown Arlington Heights was approved by the village board on Monday. The proposal earned the recommendation of the village’s plan commission last week, but with numerous conditions covering everything from the number of “affordable” units to the type of storefront glass and construction schedule.

    Arlington Heights approves downtown apartment tower

    The Arlington Heights village board on Monday approved a new seven-story apartment building in the heart of downtown with at least 15 percent of its units to be reserved for those who qualify under affordable housing guidelines.

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    Tony Sanders

    Sanders confirmed as U-46 CEO

    After seven years serving as second in command, Tony Sanders says he is ready to take the helm at Elgin Area School District U-46. “I’m excited about it,” said Sanders, chief of staff for outgoing Superintendent José Torres. “This is the district that I put my own kids into.”

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    Stacey Gonzales, director of instructional technology for Indian Prairie Unit District 204, tells school board members Monday that the district is looking to move beyond its Bring Your Own Technology program by increasing the number of laptops available for classroom use. The district bought more than 3,000 new laptops this year and replaced 1,700 old ones.

    Laptops increase classroom tech in Dist. 204

    As Indian Prairie Unit District 204 moves into the fourth year of its Bring Your Own Technology program often called BYOT, administrators are challenging educators to go “beyond BYOT.” “This year we’re looking to go beyond BYOT into the deep instructional practices that will set our teachers ahead in terms of using technology to improve instruction,” said Stacey...

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    A Des Plaines alderman has proposed taking away Mayor Matt Bogusz’s power to appoint a city hearing officer.

    Des Plaines alderman wants to shift one of mayor’s powers to council

    A Des Plaines alderman has proposed stripping the mayor of the power to appoint a city hearing officer, hired to handle local ordinance violations. But Alderman Jim Brookman, chairman of the city council’s legal and licensing committee, said Monday he’s doing more research on the issue and decided to delay discussion of a proposed ordinance that would enable the eight-member council...

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    The Jones Law Office Building, located at 302 Cedar Ave. in St. Charles, will move for the second time in its existence this week. Work crews will life the entire structure off its concrete foundation and move it to a new location in Langum Park.

    St. Charles to move holding cell for Civil War deserters

    St. Charles makes plans to move the historic Jones Law Office building from Cedar Avenue to Langum Park. The building, which served as a holding cell for deserting soldiers during the Civil War, has to be relocated after the city sold the property where it's currently housed.

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    Batavia 1st Ward Alderman Garran Sparks, who is also known for his lavish display of Christmas lights, announced Monday he is resigning because he is moving to North Aurora.

    Batavia alderman Sparks resigns

    Batavia 1st Ward Alderman Garran Sparks resigned his seat Monday because he is moving to North Aurora. “It is kind of with great sadness I announce there will be no more Bluestem Christmas Walk,” is how he announced his resignation at the city council meeting.

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    Don Pardo, who famously introduced the cast of “Saturday Night Live” each week, has died at age 96.

    Don Pardo, the voice of ‘SNL,’ dies at 96

    NEW YORK — Don Pardo, the durable television and radio announcer whose booming baritone became as much a part of the cultural landscape as the shows and products he touted, died Monday. He was 96.

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    Father of abducted Amish girls feels sorry for suspects

    OSWEGATCHIE, N.Y. — The father of two Amish girls abducted last week said he feels sorry for the man and the woman authorities say kidnapped and sexually abused them before letting them go.

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    David Gravel, vice president of Organic Soils, Inc., was on hand Monday as the Carol Stream village board authorized a lease agreement so the company can establish and operate a landscape waste transfer facility in the village.

    Carol Stream board approves lease for waste transfer facility

    If all goes well, a landscape waste transfer facility will soon be a new neighbor in Carol Stream. The Carol Stream village board voted Monday to authorize a lease agreement with Organic Soils, Inc. so the company can construct and operate a landscape waste transfer facility in the village. The facility will be located on property at the northeast corner of the intersection of Kuhn Road and...

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    Pietro Scalera has been picked to become Bloomingdale’s next village administrator. The 42-year-old Bloomingdale resident is expected to start his new job in October.

    Bloomingdale hires one of its own as village administrator

    The village manager of Riverside has been named Bloomingdale’s next village administrator. Village board members agreed on Monday night to appoint Pietro Scalera to Bloomingdale’s top administrative post.

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    Data breach might affect Vista patients

    Community Health Systems recently suffered a data breach that could affect patients at Vista medical centers in Waukegan, according to the Better Business Bureau.

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    Calling for a sharp separation between the nation’s armed forces and local police, President Barack Obama on Monday urged a re-examination of programs that have equipped civilian law enforcement departments with military gear from the Pentagon.

    Obama: Time to review local police militarization

    Calling for a sharp separation between the nation’s armed forces and local police, President Barack Obama on Monday urged a re-examination of programs that have equipped civilian law enforcement departments with military gear from the Pentagon. The transfers have come under public scrutiny after the forceful police response to racially charged unrest in Ferguson, Missouri.

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    Police: Drunk Aurora man drove onto Batavia playground

    An Aurora man faces multiple alcohol-related charges after driving his vehicle onto a Batavia playground shortly after school dismissal Monday, police said.

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    Man found dead on CTA tracks was electrocuted

    A 23-year-old man found on the CTA tracks in Rosemont early Sunday morning died accidentally of electrocution, the cook county medical examiner’s office said.

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    The third edition of Elgin’s iFest, or International Festival, is Saturday on the newly reopened Riverside Drive promenade along the banks of the Fox River. The festival will feature music and entertainment, ethnic cuisine, hands-on activities, a world market, and cultural arts and crafts.

    Elgin’s third iFest to showcase new Riverside Drive on Saturday

    The third annual Elgin iFest (International Fest) comes to the Riverside Drive promenade Saturday. Plenty of fun, food and entertainment, plus learn about the different ethnicities in the city.

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    Edwin Paniagua

    Prosecutors play murder suspect’s statements to police

    Prosecutors on Monday played several video recordings in which defendant Edwin Paniagua describes to police the final harrowing moments in the life of Mount Prospect resident Jean Louis Wattecamps.

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    Palestinians inspect the rubble of the house of Hussam Qawasmeh, one of three Palestinians identified by Israel as suspects in the killing of three Israeli teenagers, after it was demolished by the Israeli army in the West Bank city of Hebron on Monday.

    Egypt: No deal yet on Gaza cease-fire, more talks

    Egypt late Monday announced a 24-hour extension in talks between Israel and the Hamas militant group aimed at salvaging a long-term arrangement that would allow reconstruction of the Gaza Strip following a monthlong war that killed more than 2,000 people. The announcement came just minutes before a temporary truce was set to expire at midnight, averting a resumption of the fighting that has...

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    Julie Hamos, director of the Illinois Department of Healthcare and Family Services, said her department is taking steps “to reduce the amounts of overdraws and underdraws of federal Medicaid funds.”

    Audit shows Illinois overdrew millions in federal Medicaid money

    Illinois used faulty methods for withdrawing federal Medicaid money, resulting in “a perpetual ‘treadmill effect”’ of regular overdraws of dollars that the state later had trouble repaying, federal auditors said in a report released Monday.

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    Attorney general wants lawsuit against treasurer’s office dropped

    Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan wants portions of a lawsuit filed against Treasurer Dan Rutherford’s office dropped, and a court to sanction the former staff lawyer who filed it.

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    Chicago Housing Authority adjusts voucher program

    Chicago Housing Authority officials say the agency will lower the limit on exception payments for housing vouchers in a program that has allowed some of the city’s poorest residents to live in high-priced apartments.

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    Iraq Shiite fighters make their way to the front line to fight militants from the extremist Islamic State group in Jurf al-Sakhar, 43 miles south of Baghdad, Monday. Fighters of the voluntary armed group formed after the radical Shiite cleric Muqtatda al-Sadr called to protect holy shrines against possible attacks by Sunni militants.

    Obama: Iraq forces retake dam from militants

    Iraqi and Kurdish forces recaptured Iraq’s largest dam from Islamic militants Monday following dozens of U.S. airstrikes, President Barack Obama said, in the first major defeat for the extremists since they swept across the country this summer. Militants from the Islamic State group had seized the Mosul Dam on Aug. 7, giving them access and control of enormous power and water reserves and...

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    Vernon Hills police looking for man who may have tried to lure boys into car

    Vernon Hills police said they are investigating whether a man tried to lure two boys into a car. The 10-year-old boys were riding bicycles on the sidewalk near Lexington Drive and Elm Tree Lane about 6:15 p.m. Friday when a man driving an older model station wagon or Saturn pulled up and said “I need directions, get in the car,” department spokesman Kim Christenson said Monday.

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    Jim Ross, manager, Division of Air Pollution Control at State of Illinois, testifies during an Illinois Commerce Commission hearing Monday in Springfield.

    State hearing focuses on cutting greenhouse gases

    Illinois regulators on Monday began formal hearings on how the state should meet tougher federal limits on pollutants blamed for global warming, saying they will consult with environmentalists and industry and will consider working other states on regional solutions.

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    Dist. 62 launches teacher development program

    Des Plaines Elementary District 62 will host a community event Tuesday to kick off the district’s new professional development program, D62 Teacher Leadership Corps. Officials say the program will train teachers about how to integrate educational technologies and digital media into classroom instruction.

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    New Illinois laws target senior care complaints

    Gov. Pat Quinn has signed two pieces of legislation giving seniors and the disabled greater access to people who can address complaints about their care or their living conditions.

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    Home rule question put on the ballot by Barrington board

    Barrington voters will be asked in November whether their village should become a home-rule community, a move supported by an independent committee of residents impaneled to explore the issue. Village trustees pledged not to raise taxes if home rule is granted.

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    A new two-tenant building to include a Panera Bread store with a drive-through will replace the former Tilted Kilt restaurant at 447 Nl. Milwaukee Ave., in Vernon Hills. The 20-year-old building will be demolished.

    Panera, mattress store to replace Tilted Kilt in Vernon Hills

    The former Tilted Kilt restaurant in Vernon Hills will be demolished and replaced with a two-tenant building to include a Panera Bread with a drive through. The 20-year old freestanding building for years was occuped by Max and Erma's restaurant.

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    Raymond Nemecek, Jr.

    Streamwood man, 63, accused of kissing 16-year-old girl

    A 63-year-old Streamwood man is charged with misdemeanor battery on allegations he kissed a 16-year-old girl on the lips on more than one occasion during the past month. Raymond Nemecek Jr., of the 200 block of Willow Road, is free on $150 bond, according to Hoffman Estates police.

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    Man charged with Plainfield bank robbery

    Kenneth M. Matlock, whose last known address was in Woodridge, was charged with one count of felony bank robbery Monday. He was arrested shortly after the BMO Harris branch robbery Friday.

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    Warden named for Thomson prison

    A man with nearly 25 years of experience in the federal prison system has been named warden of the Thomson Correctional Center. Federal officials announced the appointment of Donald Hudson on Monday.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Michael G. Russo, 56, of Crystal Lake was charged with theft early Monday after he walked out of a bar without paying a $12 tab and leaving behind a debit card that was declined, according to a police report says.

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    New playground equipment will be installed at Stone Fence Farm Park in Vernon Hills.

    Playground improvements slated for two Vernon Hills parks

    The Vernon Hills Park District will host meetings Saturday for residents at Stone Fence Farm and Augusta parks to present various options for playground replacement.

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    Lake safety on agenda

    The Wauconda village board’s police committee will meet Wednesday to discuss safety on Bangs Lake, towing regulations and other issues.

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    Suburban emergency dispatch center adds text-to-911 capability

    Beginning Monday, AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon customers living in or traveling through the Northwest Central Dispatch System service area may be able to use their mobile phones to send a text message to 911 for emergency help. It is the first 911 communications center in Illinois to accept text 911 messages, which officials say is especially important for residents with speech or hearing...

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    Twilight Shuffle set in Libertyville

    The seventh annual MainStreet Libertyville Twilight Shuffle 5K run is set for 6 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 31.

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    Library opens indoor book drop earlier during construction

    The west entrance of the Schaumburg Township District Library at 130 S. Roselle Road in Schaumburg will be open at 6 a.m. on weekdays during parking lot construction for early access to the indoor book drops. Parking lot construction began Aug. 12 and is expected to last about three weeks.

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    Glen Ellyn’s Jazz in the Park series continues

    For those looking to close out summer with a little jazz, Lake Ellyn Park will be an ideal venue. The Glen Ellyn Jazz Ensemble will perform a free concert from 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesday in the park at 645 Lenox Road.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    A Browning 12-gauge Citori XT shotgun, valued at $2,650, was reported stolen at 1:05 p.m. Aug. 9 from the St. Charles Sportsman’s Club, 44W471 Keslinger Road near Elburn, according to a sheriff’s report.

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    Police: Man attempted to abduct Palatine girls

    Palatine police are searching for a man who they say attempted to abduct two girls shortly after 9 p.m. Sunday in the 500 block of West Helen Road. The girls managed to escape and yell for help, causing the man to flee.

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    Evaluation ordered for Wheaton teen in harassment case

    One of two former Wheaton middle school students facing criminal charges in connection with the electronic posting of inappropriate images involving students and staff members has been ordered to undergo a psychosexual evaluation. Officials said Monday the evaluation will help determine the likelihood of the 14-year-old boy engaging in future sexual misconduct and to determine the future of the...

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    Roosevelt University President Charles Middleton, left, and Harper College President Ken Ender sign an agreement Monday creating a program that allows Harper students in good academic standing a place in Roosevelt’s College of Pharmacy at its Schaumburg campus.

    Harper, Roosevelt strike deal to cultivate pharmacy students

    An agreement signed Monday between Roosevelt University and Harper College creates a program grooming new Harper students for a spot in Roosevelt’s College of Pharmacy within two years. Elgin Community College recently reached a similar agreement with Roosevelt and Oakton Community College will soon do the same.

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    Historical Libertyville photos on display

    The last “Made in Libertyville” historical photo exhibit of the season will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 20 and 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 21 at St. Lawrence Church, 125 West Church St., Libertyville.

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    Outdoor water use ban imposed in Lincolnshire

    An outdoor watering ban in Lincolnshire was announced Monday, effective immediately.

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    After the Alexian Brothers Women and Children’s Hospital opened last year, a team of Claire’s associates worked to fill more than 500 goody bags, and then delivered them to the hospital for young girls and teens.

    Claire’s delivers bags full of goodies to hospital

    A community partnership between two Hoffman Estates companies took place last week, but in the eyes of one 8-year-old girl, it all came down to this: color and fashion. A new interactive sculpture was recently installed in the lobby Alexian Brothers Women and Children’s Hospital, a gift from Claire's. And continuing the partnership, Claire's associates fill and donate goodie bags for young...

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    Thomas A. Weber Sr.

    District 118 board to honor former member Thomas A. Weber Sr.

    The Wauconda Unit District 118 school board will posthumously honor former member Thomas A. Weber Sr. this week. Weber, 65, of Wauconda, suffered a fatal stroke in May.

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    A child born in 2013 will cost a middle-income American family an average of $245,340 until he or she reaches the age of 18.

    USDA: Cost to raise child up slightly to $245,340

    A child born in 2013 will cost a middle-income American family an average of $245,340 until he or she reaches the age of 18, with families living in the Northeast taking on a greater burden, according to a report out Monday. And that doesn't include college — or expenses if a child lives at home after age 17.

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    Authorities: Lisle man had 40 illegal firearms

    A Lisle man was one of two people arrested on federal firearms charges stemming from a multijurisdictional investigation. Walter "Charlie" Freeman, 35, whose last known address was in Lisle, is scheduled to be arraigned Wednesday, along with Timothy Vana, 53, of Forest Park. Both men have previous felony convictions and face up to 10 years in prison if convicted of illegally possessing and...

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    A Border Patrol agent sits on the levee in Mission, Texas. The presence of armed militia members working on their own in a region known for human smuggling, drug smuggling and illegal immigration has added one more variable to an already complex and tense situation.

    Militias complicate situation on Texas border

    The presence of armed militia members working on their own in a region known for human smuggling, drug smuggling and illegal immigration has added one more variable to an already complex and tense situation.

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    This October 2013 photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows a burned Yellow-rumped Warbler that was found at the Ivanpah solar plant in the California Mojave Desert. Workers at a state-of-the-art new solar plant have a word for the birds that fly over the plant’s five-mile field of mirrors, “streamers,” for the puff of smoke as the birds ignite in mid-air and fall singed to the ground.

    Emerging solar plants scorch birds in mid-air

    Workers at a state-of-the-art solar plant in the Mojave Desert have a name for birds that fly through the plant’s concentrated sun rays — “streamers,” for the smoke plume that comes from birds that ignite in midair. Federal wildlife investigators who visited the BrightSource Energy plant last year and watched as birds burned and fell, reporting an average of one...

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    Sean Hargadon, squatting, takes part in a workshop about Hamlet held at the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust in Stratford-upon-Avon. Hargadon said, “We all broke up into groups and had to illustrate certain themes from the play in a physical way, like taking a photograph. This workshop was led by Mary Johnson, a 20-year Royal Shakespeare Company associate in education.”

    Learning and teaching Shakespearean-style acting

    Sean Hargadon, founder and director of Elgin-based Janus Theater Company, has always stressed the importance of education and development. Now, Hargadon said, he plans to bring forth a new method for aspiring actors to learn the works of William Shakespeare. Hargadon recently returned from Stratford-upon-Avon, Shakespeare's birthplace, where he spent a week in an intensive workshop learning Royal...

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    Michael L. Taylor

    $1.5 million bail for Elgin man charged in string of robberies

    A judge set bail at $1.5 million for an Elgin man arrested and charged with robberies at Aldi and Family Dollar in June and August. Michael L. Taylor, 52, was on parole after being released from prison in January after serving half of a 10-year sentence for a 2009 aggravated robbery in downstate Sangamon County. He also has served time in prison for seven previous felony convictions ranging from...

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    Wisconsin human waste spill causes traffic delays

    The Wisconsin Department of Transportation says human waste has spilled on a highway in Racine County. The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports the spill caused traffic delays Sunday afternoon for about three hours on Interstate 94 eastbound. The department says a “liquid non-hazardous substance” spilled across all lanes.

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    Rick Perry, governor of Texas, talks with attendees before speaking at the Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco.

    Perry rejecting indictment says charges driven by politics

    Texas Governor Rick Perry said an indictment against him stemming from a budget veto was a politically motivated “farce of a prosecution” and vowed to fight it. “We don’t settle political differences with indictments in this country,” Perry said yesterday in a televised press briefing in Austin, the capital. “This indictment amounts to nothing more than...

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    Marilyn Jean Hartman

    Woman who sneaked on plane gets early jail release

    A stowaway who was recently ordered to spend 117 days in jail for violating probation by returning to Los Angeles International Airport served a fraction of her sentence when she was released Saturday because of overcrowding. Marilyn Jean Hartman, 62, was released from the Century Regional Detention Facility in Lynwood, California, shortly after 6 p.m., according to jail records.

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    An Amish family rides along Route 812 in Heuvelton, N.Y., near the command center at the Heuvelton Volunteer Fire Department The investigation continues into the abduction and return of two young Amish sisters who were selling vegetables at their family’s roadside stand in Oswegatchie, N.Y. Stephen Howells II, 39, and Nicole Vaisey, 25, both of Hermon, were each charged with two counts of first-degree kidnapping .

    Prosecutor: Couple sexually abused 2 Amish sisters

    The northern New York couple charged in the kidnapping of two young Amish sisters were prowling for easy targets and sexually abused the girls before letting them go, authorities say. The couple were arrested and arraigned Friday on charges of kidnapping with the intent to physically or sexually abuse the 7-year-old and 12-year-old sisters.

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    Elderly man unharmed after crashing car into pool

    An 85-year-old man was unharmed Saturday after he crashed his car into a backyard pool, authorities said. Officers responded around 11:45 a.m. to a report in Altadena of a car crashing into a pool in the 2700 block of Scripps Place, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department told KNBC-TV.

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    Russia aid trucks reach Ukraine’s border before truce talks

    The first sixteen trucks of a convoy Russia says is carrying humanitarian supplies reached the border with Ukraine today as the two countries’ top diplomats prepared to discuss a possible cease-fire and a way to let the aid cross the frontier.Ukrainian Foreign Minister Pavlo Klimkin and his Russian counterpart Sergei Lavrov will hold talks with Germany and France in Berlin to ease tensions...

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    Associated Press Gov. Rick Perry makes a statement in Austin, Texas Saturday concerning the indictment on charges of coercion of a public servant and abuse of his official capacity.

    Official: No arrest warrant to be issued for Perry

    A warrant won’t be issued for the arrest of Gov. Rick Perry following his indictment on two felony charges of abuse of power. Linda Estrada, a grand Jury clerk in Travis County, said Monday that the judge overseeing the case decided against issuing an arrest warrant.

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    Students at Lions Park Elementary School and elsewhere in Mount Prospect won’t notice many changes to the schools when they return to classes on Wednesday, but school leaders say there will be plenty of changes in how they learn. Officials in school districts 26 and 57 say they will continue this year to implement Common Core learning standards and have launched new programs to improve learning.

    Mount Prospect elementary districts start year with new programs

    School opens this week in Mount Prospect's two elementary districts. Leaders of River Trails District 26 and Mount Prospect Elementary District 57 say that the ongoing transition to the Common Core will be a big part of the new year's educational approach.

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    This is the architect's vision for the three-story expansion planned for Mundelein High School in 2015. The $23.6 million expansion will provide additional classroom and lab space for science and mathematics courses.

    Mundelein High superintendent touts STEM expansion

    Mundelein High School officials aren't just talking about the importance of science, technology, engineering and math education for today's youth. They're putting their money where their mouths are by planning a $23.6 million expansion dedicated to so-called STEM instruction. “It puts Mundelein up at the front of the pack,” said Superintendent Kevin Myers, who joined the district this...

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    A preservation group is asking the DuPage County Forest Preserve District to fix the roof at the McKee House in Churchill Woods Forest Preserve near Glen Ellyn.

    Historic McKee House near Glen Ellyn needs new roof, supporters say

    With restoration efforts expected to take years, supporters say the McKee House needs a new roof soon to prevent further damage to the landmark structure at Churchill Woods Forest Preserve near Glen Ellyn. One forest preseve commissioner says he plans to ask that the district spend $60,000 for the roof repairs.

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    Police: Woman found dead on highway in Rockford

    Winnebago County officials say a Rochelle woman has been found dead on a highway after being hit by a semitrailer. The Rockford Register Star reports the 29-year-old pedestrian was pronounced dead Sunday after emergency medical personnel arrived at the scene

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    $1 million bond set for 2 men in Chicago crash

    A Cook County judge has ordered two men held on $1 million bond each in connection to a police chase that ended in a fatal crash. The Chicago Sun-Times reports 18-year-old Gabriel Johnson had his bond set Sunday on charges of reckless homicide, aggravated DUI and unlawful possession of a handgun.

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    Members of the AeroShell Aerobatic Team perform at the Chicago Air and Water Show Saturday. Officials canceled the show Sunday because of poor visibility.

    Poor visibility shuts down Chicago air show

    Officials canceled the Chicago Air and Water Show Sunday because of poor visibility. The Chicago Sun-Times reports the show was delayed three hours before getting underway at 1:30 p.m. Low clouds along Lake Michigan did not lift, however.

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    Police say bones found in Indiana lake could be old

    Authorities say possible human skeletal remains found over the weekend in a northeastern Indiana lake could be old. Indiana Conservation Officers say a resident reported seeing the bones in SteubenCounty’s Hamilton Lake and that divers found more remains during an extensive underwater search on Sunday.

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    Former Wisconsin officer to enter plea in suitcase slaying

    A former police officer accused of killing two women and hiding their remains in a pair of suitcases is due back in a Kenosha County courtroom. Steven Zelich is expected to enter a plea Monday to charges of first-degree homicide and hiding a corpse in the death of Jenny Gamez, of Cottage Grove, Oregon.

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    Illinois officials assess centuries-old elm tree
    Western Illinois officials say a centuries-old tree might not been infected with Dutch elm disease based on preliminary tests. The Quincy Herald-Whig reports one of Quincy’s few American elm trees that survived a 1970s blight might now be in shock after two summers of drought and a particularly harsh winter.

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    Gov. Pat Quinn congratulates Shaelye Varner, center, on her Grand Champion Steer during the Governor’s Sale of Champions at the Illinois State FairAttendance at this year’s Illinois State Fair is down about 9 percent from last year during a week of frequent rain.

    Illinois fair attendance down 9 percent with rain

    Attendance at this year’s Illinois State Fair is down about 9 percent from last year during a week of frequent rain.Fair manager Amy Bliefnick tells the Springfield Journal-Register it drew roughly 773,000 visitors through Saturday. That’s down from 854,000 at the same point last year. Sunday admissions numbers weren’t yet available Sunday evening, which was the last fair...

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    Dense fog advisory issued for DuPage, Kane and McHenry counties

    The National Weather Service has issued a dense fog advisory for DuPage, Kane and McHenry counties until 9 a.m., according to a weather service alert.

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    Leslie Moore of Baytown, Texas, a Navy seaman from 1991 to 1995, was forced out of the military under “don't ask, don't tell” after an investigation into a homosexual relationship. This portrait is part of a series by Vincent Cianni showcased in an Elgin Community College exhibit.

    ECC photo exhibit examines the personal costs of war

    As a gay man, Vincent Cianni said the movement toward equal rights for gays in the military was near and dear to his heart. Cianni, a New York-based documentary photographer, wanted to capture the struggles of gay members of the military to fit in. His portraits and interviews of gay, current and former, military personnel are featured in a book and a new exhibit that opened Friday at Elgin...

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    Dawn Patrol: Aurora police seek leads in fatal shooting; bat attack

    Aurora police seek leads in fatal weekend shooting; no term limits in Arlington Heights’ near future; Round Lake Park gang unit charges teen with marijuana possession; bat attack reported at Palatine theater; White Sox hang on to beat Jays; Castro’s homer in 9th lifts Cubs over Mets; Bears running on empty so far

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    Naperville man found dead in the Black Hills

    Authorities say a 23-year-old Naperville man who was reported missing in early August was found dead in the Black Hills National Forest. Lt. Steve McMillin of the Custer County Sheriff’s Office says the body of Jordan Baznik was found around 5:30 p.m. Friday less than a mile north of the Iron Creek trailhead.

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    Daisy, left, and Brenda Martinez recently underwent kidney transplant surgery so that Brenda could give one of her kidneys to Daisy, who was diagnosed with end-stage renal disease in 2012. The sisters work together at the Culver’s restaurant in Carol Stream.

    Carol Stream Culver’s owner, workers bound by transplants

    Carol Stream restaurant owner Amy Adams has a special appreciation for organ donors and recipients -- because of the many who were helped when her 10-year-old son died after a 1998 accident. Now Adams is holding a fundraiser for two sisters who work for her, after one donated a kidney to the other.

  •  
    A cyclist on Ridge Road passes a yard sign Aug. 9 as he approaches Spring Creek Road in Barrington Hills.

    10 stories you may have missed this weekend
    What you may have missed this weekend: Bicyclist, Barrington Hills residents feuding over sharing road in suburb; Aurora man dies, girlfriend hurt in shooting; Iraqi refugees seeking safety in the suburbs; Elgin police to host fundraiser for former sergeant who suffered stroke; Jewel-Osco had a customer data breach; Glen Ellyn voters to decide on $3 million development project; Grant High School...

  •  
    Tina Francis, a registered nurse and shift supervisor at Alexian Brothers Medical Center in Elk Grove Village, demonstrates protective garments that are used in the emergency room if infectious diseases are suspected. The garments would be a key element in keeping an Ebola patient from spreading the disease.

    Suburban charities, hospitals keep watchful eye on Ebola

    People across the suburbs are keeping a close eye on the Ebola outbreak, from those who have close ties to west Africa to local hospital workers who so far are considering the outbreak half a world away as an exercise in preparedness. “As with any infectious disease, it's just a plane ride away,” said Georgene Fabsits, the EMS/emergency preparedness coordinator at Alexian Brothers...

  •  
    Mike Malone of Overpasses for America sets up to protest against President Barack Obama on the Great Western Trail foot bridge over I-355.

    Pyke: Highway bridge protests exercise free speech, but irk drivers

    Fuming in gridlock caused by protestors atop a bridge over the tollway? It's perfectly legal, police say. And it's constitutional, says Fred Schneider whose political protest signs have irked more than a few motorists. "If you give a thumbs up, we give one. If you give us a finger, we wave to you," he said.

  •  

    Disabilities in kids rise; not physical problems

    Disabilities among U.S. children have increased slightly, with a bigger rise in mental and developmental problems in those from wealthier families, a 10-year analysis found. Disadvantaged kids still bear a disproportionate burden. The increases may partly reflect more awareness and recognition that conditions, including autism, require a specific diagnosis to receive special services, the...

  •  
    Riders twist through the air on the Freak Out at the 18th annual South Elgin Riverfest Express Thursday at Panton Mill Park on the Fox River.

    Images: The Week in Pictures
    This edition of The Week in Pictures feature photos of horses who kiss, cardboard boats that float, and cars that fly in the air.

Sports

  •  

    Girls golf: Tuesday’s results
    Results of girls golf meets from Tuesday, Aug. 19.

  •  
    Bringing in wide receiver Santonio Holmes was a risky decision for the Bears.

    Imrem: Bears show much trust in adding Holmes

    Welcoming Santonio Holmes into the Bears' family indicates that head coach Marc Trestman and general manager Phil Emery have confidence in the team's culture and infrastructure.

  •  
    White Sox starting pitcher Chris Sale sits in the dugout after his night was over. Sale worked 6 innings, allowing 3 runs, and suffered the loss to fall to 10-3.

    Orioles soar past Sale, White Sox

    Chris Sale was off a bit Monday night, and the bullpen was way off again. Add it up, and the White Sox were left with an 8-2 loss to the first-place Orioles.

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    Cougars win 2-1 in 10 innings

    The Kane County Cougars used a leadoff walk in the bottom of the 10th inning for a 2-1 victory Monday night in front of 7,561 at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark.

  •  

    Boys golf: Monday’s results
    Results of boys golf meets from Monday, Aug. 18.

  •  

    Girls golf: Monday’s results
    Results of girls golf meets from Monday, Aug. 18.

  •  
    Bears offensive tackle Jordan Mills has been out with a foot injury since Aug. 6.

    Bears’ Mills hopes to be back next week

    The health of the Bears' offensive line remains iffy, with no definitive return date for right tackle Jordan Mills, who started 16 games as a rookie in 2013, and top backups Eben Britton and Brian de la Puente.

  •  
    St. Charles North’s Jake Muehlschlegel tees off Monday. The North Stars and Saints teamed up to defeat Batavia and Geneva.

    St. Charles schools open with a bang

    The McChesney Cup has been a historically competitive start to the high school athletic year. But Monday at Geneva Country Club, the boys golf teams from St. Charles were on a different level than their counterparts from Batavia and Geneva.

  •  
    Venus Taylor

    Judson names Venus Taylor new softball coach

    Judson University was no stranger to Venus Taylor, who was an assistant coach with the Chicago Bandits when the Bandits played at the Elgin college. So when Becky Pearl left the Judson softball job after 10 years to become the head coach at Lewis University, Taylor immediately had an interest in the job. On Monday, Eagles’ athletic director Joel Cotton named the well-known former pro player as Judson’s new coach. Taylor started her new job right away and had a hard time containing her excitement for the challenge ahead of her.

  •  

    White Sox catcher Nieto escapes serious injury

    Toronto's Jose Reyes stepped on the back of Adrian Nieto's left ankle during a play at the plate Sunday. Nieto, the White Sox' backup catcher, is almost amazed he wasn't seriously injured.

  •  

    Currie replaces Paradise at alma mater Marmion

    As a student at St. Rita of Cascia School in Aurora, each fall for four years Joe Currie rode his bicycle to Marmion where he was a team manager for the football team. He’ll now be driving the bus for the Cadets varsity basketball team, figuratively if not literally as well.

  •  

    Impressive debut for Buffalo Grove

    For the first time since he took over the program eight years ago, Buffalo Grove girls golf coach Matt Meyer’s watched his Bison win a championship just one day into the season. The Bison captured Monday’s annual Early Bird Invite hosted by Conant at the Fox Run Golf Course in Elk Grove by 6 strokes over Class AA defending state champ Prospect 339-345. “We have a lot of new faces in the program,” said Myers, whose team graduated four of its top six players. “But a lot of the new ones stepped up.”

  •  

    Swan’s summer study pays off in first meet

    Prospect senior TJ Swan played a ton of competitive golf over the summer, honing his skills. Swan estimates that he played in close to 15 tournaments during the break from school, but he knows that there’ll be a change in mindset now that his senior year of classes is about to begin Wednesday. “Things will be different, that’s for sure,” said Swan. “You’ve definitely got to concentrate on your schoolwork.” And in an impressive performance, the senior showed that all his summertime hard work on the course has paid off as he fired a 78 at Monday’s Rolling Green Invitational.

  •  
    Santonio Holmes

    Holmes plans to make Bears’ No. 3 WR job his

    The Bears are giving Santonio Holmes an opportunity to compete for their contested No. 3 wide receiver position, and it could be the final chance for the talented but troubled player who has worn out his welcome in two previous NFL stops.

  •  
    Cubs first baseman Anthony Rizzo hits a solo home run off New York Mets relief pitcher Buddy Carlyle Monday during the eighth inning at Citi Field in New York.

    Hendricks, Baez help Cubs beat Mets 4-1

    Kyle Hendricks and two relievers held New York to four or fewer hits for the fifth straight game, Anthony Rizzo and Javier Baez homered, and the Cubs rallied for a 4-1 victory over the Mets on Monday. Hendricks (5-1) gave up just three hits in seven innings, allowing only Lucas Duda’s home run in the fourth. The rookie right-hander won his fourth straight start — yielding four earned runs over 29 1-3 innings.

  •  
    Philadelphia’s Mo’ne Davis drives in a run with a single to right field off Pearland pitcher Clayton Broeder during the first inning Sunday at the Little League World Series tournament in South Williamsport, Pa. Davis will likely pitch on Wednesday against Las Vegas, the team that pounded Chicago 13-2.

    Philly pitcher, Chicago team talk of LLWS

    An African-American female pitcher from Philadelphia and a team from Chicago have created a buzz at the Little League World Series.

  •  

    Mike North video: Johnny Football on MNF
    Mike North thinks everyone will be watching tonight's preseason NFL game between the Cleveland Browns and the Washington Redskins to see how Johnny Manziel will play.

  •  

    Blackhawks bring back reserve goalie Leighton

    With an eye toward improving the play in Rockford, the Chicago Blackhawks have reunited with veteran goaltender Michael Leighton.

  •  
    United States' Anthony Davis dunks over Brazil's Nene Hilario during Saturday's exhibition game at the United Center. Davis finished with 20 points in the U.S. victory.

    Imrem: D-Rose, Anthony Davis & Jabari Parker. Why not?

    A Bulls fan's hoop dream might be that there is a hoop dream team out there waiting patiently to happen. How does a combination of Derrick Rose, Anthony Davis and Jabari Parker sound to you? A couple of the hang-ups are that Rose will have to do some serious recruiting, which he has been reluctant to do, and the basketball triplets can't come together for a while anyway because of contractual obligations under NBA rules.

Business

  •  
    Bryan Gerrish

    Griller Gerrish fires up ideas for 25th anniversary

    Bryan Gerrish of Arlington Heights has a yard full of Weber grills. During the summer, you may see about a dozen or so. His favorite is the Performer with both gas and charcoal. “I always have a number of grills in the yard. It's grill envy,” said Gerrish, 59. He also happens to be CEO of Weber Grill Restaurants, owned by the family behind Palatine-based Weber-Stephen Products, maker of the Weber grill. When not in his Rolling Meadows office, Gerrish has been firing up his grill a lot this summer, trying out different recipes as he and his colleagues enjoy tweaking the menu in the restaurants.

  •  
    Stocks climbed on Monday after a bidding contest erupted for discount retailer Family Dollar and as concerns eased about the situation in Ukraine.

    U.S. stocks gain; Dollar General jumps after bid

    Corporate deal news gave the US stock market a lift on Monday as a bidding contest erupted for a discount retailer. Stocks also climbed amid reports of diplomatic efforts to broker a cease-fire in the conflict in Ukraine.

  •  
    Staff members prepare dishes of slow-cooked beef served with gnocchi fashioned out of McDonald’s french fries and a fruit sauce from its smoothie mix during a dinner hosted by McDonald’s for reporters and bloggers in New York on Sept. 26, 2013, The evening was part of a stealth campaign McDonald’s is waging to shake its image for serving junk food.

    McDonald’s confronts its junk food image

    McDonald’s is trying to shake its reputation for serving cheap, unhealthy food. At a time when Americans are playing closer attention to what they eat, the company is trying to sway public opinion by first reaching out to the reporters, bloggers and other so-called “influencers” who write and speak about McDonald’s.

  •  

    Part-time workers a full-time headache on Yellen radar

    Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen has a stubborn warning light blinking on her labor market dashboard: A group of Americans larger than Washington state’s population can find only part-time work. As Yellen heads to this week’s Fed symposium in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, where the focus will be on the labor market, those 7.5 million part-time workers who want full-time jobs are inflating the broad measure of underemployment she watches to gauge job market health.

  •  
    Google Inc. and other critics of a European Union court ruling that created a right to be forgotten on the Internet are exaggerating it to undermine a reform of data-protection rules, the EU’s justice chief said.

    Google and right-to-be-forgotten critics distort ruling, EU says

    Google Inc. and other critics of a European Union court ruling that created a right to be forgotten on the Internet are exaggerating it to undermine a reform of data-protection rules, the EU’s justice chief said. Search engines such as Google “complain loudly” about the ruling and such critics are using “distorted notions of the right to be forgotten to discredit” a planned reform of EU data-protection rules that includes the right.

  •  

    Cisco’s 6,000 job cuts drown out EZchip profits

    EZchip Semiconductor Ltd. reported double-digit earnings and sales growth last week, beating analysts’ estimates for a second straight quarter. Stock investors barely seemed to notice.

  •  
    A man walks next to a McDonald’s restaurant at a shopping mall. Chicken and salads at convenience stores is typical of an increasing number of Filipinos, who say the outlets are cheaper and faster than McDonald’s.

    Faster food at Manila minimarts challenges McDonald’s

    At lunchtime in Manila, Isha Vida avoids fast-food restaurants and joins thousands of other workers and students buying ready-made meals at minimarts across the Philippine capital. The 29-year-old recruitment coordinator’s preference for the steaks, fried chicken and salads at convenience stores is typical of an increasing number of Filipinos, who say the outlets are cheaper and faster than McDonald’s

  •  

    Consumer sentiment in U.S. fell in August to nine-month low

    American consumer confidence unexpectedly declined in August to a nine-month low, repressed by gloomy wage perceptions. The Thomson Reuters/University of Michigan preliminary sentiment index dropped to 79.2, the lowest since November, from 81.8 in July, according to data issued today.

  •  
    Charis Hill, who has a rare form of arthritis that affects the spine, in Capitol Park in Sacramento, Calif. Hill has health insurance under one of the new plans offered through the health care law, could not afford the medication required for her condition because of the plan’s high copays.

    Patient advocates say insurers avoiding the sick

    Ending insurance discrimination against the sick was a central goal of the nation’s health care overhaul, but leading patient groups say that promise is being undermined by new barriers from insurers. The insurance industry responds that critics are confusing legitimate cost-control with bias. Some state regulators, however, say there’s reason to be concerned about policies that shift costs to patients and narrow their choices of hospitals and doctors.

  •  

    EU pledges $168m to offset Russia sanctions cost
    The European Commission is pledging 125 million euros ($168 million) to assist fruit and vegetable producers hit by Russia’s ban on food imports from the 28-nation bloc.

  •  
    Dollar General Corp. said Monday that it would pay $78.50 per share in cash, 3 percent higher than Family Dollar Stores Inc.’s Friday closing price of $76.06. Dollar General put the deal’s value at $9.7 billion.

    Dollar General enters bidding for Family Dollar

    There’s now a bidding war for Family Dollar, with Dollar General offering about $8.95 billion for the discounter in an effort to trump Dollar Tree’s bid. Dollar General Corp. said Monday that it would pay $78.50 per share in cash, 3 percent higher than Family Dollar Stores Inc.’s Friday closing price of $76.06. Dollar General put the deal’s value at $9.7 billion.

  •  

    Structure helps draw potential franchise owners

    Franchises are more than burgers and subs. Small business columnist Jim Kendall looks at the topic.

  •  
    Bonnie Reidel is the owner of Fix This! Musical Instrument Repair Inc., a growing business in Palatine.

    Music repair, retail business grows in Palatine
    We talk with Bonnie Reidel, owner of Fix This! Musical Instrument Repair Inc. and DBA Horn Stash in Palatine.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Maine East High School graduate Michael S. Ojeda on the set of his horror tale “Savaged,” written in a motel room where a murder occurred.

    Horrors! Des Plaines native goes for filmmaking revenge

    Michael Ojeda found the perfect secluded motel he’d been looking for. He asked the clerk if he could stay in the corner room. “Oh, I should tell you that the room you want,” the clerk said, “someone was murdered in it last year.” “Perfect,” Ojeda said. “I’ll take it!” That’s how this Des Plaines native wrote the horror film “Savaged,” which is premiering at Bruce Campbell’s Horror Film Festival this week in Rosemont.

  •  
    The musical “On Your Feet!” — about the lives of Gloria Estefan, left, and Emilio Estefan — comes to Chicago in June 2015 for a pre-Broadway run.

    Estefan musical to debut in June in Chicago

    “On Your Feet,” a new musical based on the lives and music of Grammy-winner Gloria Estefan and her music producer husband, Emilio Estefan — will make its world premiere at Chicago’s Oriental Theatre on June 2, 2015, before heading to Broadway.

  •  
    Andrea Bocelli

    Bocelli coming to Rosemont for holiday concert

    Tickets are now on sale for a special holiday concert with famed Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli Dec. 13 at the Allstate Arena in Rosemont. Accompanying Bocelli are the Bella Musica Orchestra led by conductor Eugene Kohn with appearances by Heather Headley and Maria Aleida.

  •  
    Robin Williams, right, won the Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his role in “Good Will Hunting,” which also starred Matt Damon.

    Williams tribute in Naperville Monday to fund suicide prevention

    A movie tribute to the late actor/comedian Robin Williams will be presented at 6 p.m. Monday, Aug. 18, at the Hollywood Palms Cinema, 352 S. Route 59, Naperville, with 100 percent of the proceeds donated to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. The tribute includes showings of "Jumanji" and "Good Will Hunting," the film that won Williams an Oscar.

  •  
    Comedian Craig Ferguson is close to a deal to launch an early-evening talk show starting in fall 2015.

    Source: Craig Ferguson to launch new talk show

    Craig Ferguson is close to a deal to launch an early-evening talk show starting in fall 2015. The outgoing host of CBS’ “The Late Late Show” would introduce his half-hour syndicated series on stations in a slot just before prime time, according to a source with knowledge of the deal who spoke on the condition of anonymity because that person wasn’t authorized to comment publicly.

  •  
    Smokey Robinson pairs with artists young and old on “Smokey & Friends.”

    ‘Smokey & Friends’ duets nice, not vital

    Smokey Robinson doesn’t want to be a relic and that’s understandable. He deserves for people to know his role as a chief architect of the Motown Sound and bard of the American romantic songbook, while remaining a vital, inspiring voice today. Therein lay the catalyst and challenge of “Smokey & Friends,” which finds him pairing with artists young and old on classics he composed, performed or both. Some duets boost the mission while others backfire.

  •  
    Artists like Kris Kristofferson, Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, The Milk Carton Kids and others perform on “Look Again to the Wind: Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears Revisited.”

    Artists cover landmark Johnny Cash album

    Throughout his career, Johnny Cash sang about the downtrodden, giving a voice to the voiceless. But his 1964 concept album, “Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian,” started a new conversation about social awareness. Kris Kristofferson, Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, The Milk Carton Kids and others transform Cash’s political statement into a rootsy collection in the new album, “Look Again to the Wind: Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears Revisited.”

  •  
    The biggest change in the anchor job since Brian Williams took over NBC’s “Nightly News” 10 years ago has been the immediacy of the news and how it’s reported.

    NBC’s Brian Williams taking on new competition

    The television business can be humbling, even nearly 10 years after Brian Williams succeeded Brokaw as NBC “Nightly News” anchor. “When I started my competition was Dan (Rather) and Peter (Jennings),” Williams said. “That makes me feel old. That gets me on the treadmill every night after work. I am proud of what we’ve built here.” The biggest change in the job since Williams took over has been the immediacy of reporting the news and getting instant feedback on social media.

  •  
    “20/20” anchor Elizabeth Vargas said in an emailed statement Sunday that she checked into a recovery center to be treated for alcohol dependency this weekend while on vacation.

    ABC News reporter Elizabeth Vargas back in rehab

    ABC News reporter Elizabeth Vargas has returned to a recovery center to be treated for alcohol dependency, she and the network said Sunday. The “20/20” co-anchor said in an emailed statement that she checked into a treatment facility this weekend while on vacation. “As so many other recovering alcoholics know, overcoming the disease can be a long and incredibly difficult process,” Vargas said. “I feel I have let myself, my co-workers and most importantly my family down and for that I am ashamed and sorry.”

  •  
    This fall, the South Dakota State Historical Society Press plans to publish "Pioneer Girl: The Annotated Autobiography," which was the original version of the autobiography that Laura Ingalls Wilder likely wrote in the late 1920s.

    Wilder memoir to give gritty view of prairie life

    Laura Ingalls Wilder penned one of the most beloved children’s series of the 20th century, but her forthcoming autobiography will show devoted “Little House on the Prairie” fans a more realistic, grittier view of frontier living. “Pioneer Girl: The Annotated Autobiography” — Wilder’s unedited draft that was written for an adult audience and eventually served as the foundation for the popular series — is slated to be released by the South Dakota State Historical Society Press nationwide this fall.

  •  
    Mary Lynn Rajskub performs at Zanies in Rosemont Thursday and Friday, Aug. 21 and 22.

    Rajskub returns to comedy roots for Zanies shows in Rosemont

    While taking her dog's for a walk, "24" star Mary Lynn Rajskub ruminates on parenthood, creating an iconic television character and gets a little grossed out by the results of a Google search. Rajskub takes the stage at Zanies in Rosemont for three shows Thursday and Friday, Aug. 21-22.

  •  
    Fun activities, like giving your kids piggyback rides, can help burn calories when hanging out at the beach.

    Don’t throw in the towel about exercising at the beach

    Exercise at the beach doesn’t have to be difficult, expensive or burdensome. You can maintain your fitness through some basic exercises or even through beach activities you may be planning anyway.

  •  
    Exposure to natural light in the office positively affects employees.

    Your health: Natural office light linked to better health
    Employees with more exposure to natural light at the office sleep longer, have higher quality sleep, are more physically active, and have a better quality of life, according to new research, reports PsychCentral. The study highlights the importance of natural light to employee health, according to researchers from Northwestern Medicine and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  •  
    Torrei Hart is among a group of exes having yet another moment in the spotlight, thanks to a new phenomenon in reality television shows: spinoffs based solely on the ex-wives and ex-girlfriends of famous folks. She and five other women will star on the new reality series, “Atlanta Exes,” that premieres Monday on VH1.

    ‘Atlanta Exes’ members create own lane to fame

    Torrei Hart’s career took a back seat for years to raise two children, allowing her then-husband Kevin Hart to pursue his comedy career. The two ultimately ended an eight-year marriage with divorce in 2011. Now, she hopes it’s her time to shine. “It’s my time to come up,” said Torrei Hart, who along with five other women will star on the new reality series, “Atlanta Exes,” which premieres Monday night on VH1.

  •  
    Leah Nickelsburg helps Luna burn calories on the agility course at Frolick Dogs. Industry observers think that the idea of dog gyms will be embraced in a country that spends more than $300 million a year on pet Halloween costumes.

    Dogs can get their work out in at state-of-the-art gym

    A dog's life used to be easier: Take a six-hour nap, terrify a squirrel, have a little can of something for dinner. But these days, a dog needs a day planner, what with the yappy hours, the dog-park play dates and now — yes, it's come to this — working out down at the dog gym.

  •  

    Plan ahead so arthritis pain doesn’t spoil your vacation

    Q: Can you give me advice for managing arthritis pain while traveling?

  •  
    Female athletes seem particularly susceptible to ACL injuries. Experts say some exercises such as plyometrics might reduce the chances of an injury.

    Escalating ACL injuries lead to call for screening and prevention programs

    Alarmed by the skyrocketing number of young athletes who get anterior cruciate ligament injuries, the Illinois Athletic Trainers Association and sports medicine physicians at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush are urging coaches and athletic directors to institute ACL injury screenings for all young athletes and prevention programs for those more vulnerable to ACL injuries.

  •  
    1965 Pontiac GTO

    Pontiac GTO has the power to unite

    The Pontiac brand has been defunct for a number of years now. However, the passion for Pontiac vehicles is as active as ever. Just ask Marvin and Kim Minarich of Morris, who first bonded over a 1965 GTO.

  •  
    Hollywood talent agent Sid Levin, center, listens as actress Stephanie Sanchez, who was an officer in the U.S. Navy serving with the Marines in Iraq and Afghanistan, talks about her experience in the Navy in Levin’s office in Los Angeles. Levin is the talent agent who represents the people who look like the rest of us.

    Agent gives Hollywood edgy look with ‘real’ people

    You couldn’t miss Hollywood talent agent Sid Levin’s office in the old days: It wasn’t much bigger than a closet and it was sometimes filled with burglars, bank robbers and gang members, all trying to break into the movies. These days you’ll find everyone from Gulf War veterans to a 15-time world arm-wrestling champion there, and they’re looking to be movie stars, too. Levin is the talent agent who represents the people who look like the rest of us.

  •  

    Her niece stole clothing and family wants to ignore it

    Her 13-year-old niece stayed with her family for three weeks this summer. Befoe she left, she stole clothing. Her sisters-in-law and mother-in-law told her she was mistaken and not to speak of it again. But then, the Facebook photos started rolling in. She regularly gets shared photos of the girl in her clothes.

Discuss

  •  

    Dist. 87 flap about taking responsibility
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: As a retired high school principal, I know from firsthand experience the difficulty developing and then administering an athletic/activity code that attempts to hold students involved in extracurricular activities accountable for their behavior.

  •  

    Immigration must be done properly
    A Palatine letter to the editor: After the Korean War, Ike sent 13 million illegal immigrants home. The troops came home and were in need of jobs.The Democratic Party wants to grant immunity to all illegal immigrants.

  •  

    President has a lot to put up with
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: What a lot of hogwash by the writer who recently claimed President Obama has caused the illegal immigration of children from the south. What would you do, sir, if you were the president dealing with a recalcitrant GOP that blocks everything you try to do?

  •  

    Gutierrez fails to serve Illinoisans
    A Palatine letter to the editor: I was of the impression that Congressman Luis Gutierrez was elected by citizens in the Illinois 4th Congressional District. I was unaware that he also represents El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala. I wonder if the people in the 4th District feel they are truly being represented by Mr. Gutierrez since he seems to spend the majority of his time running around the U.S. arguing for the rights of the millions who have broken U.S. law by coming here illegally.

  •  

    Financial clout shouldn’t win votes
    A Bartlett letter to the editor: While it is easy to criticize officials currently in office on all levels — county, state and federal — I believe if Bruce Rauner were truly honest and sincere in his quest to help the state of Illinois, instead of finding fault Rauner could use his personal wealth to take Illinois out of debt.

  •  

    Off-year election is political theater
    A Waukegan letter to the editor: 2014 has brought us an interesting spectacle called an off-year election.

  •  

    U.S. must fix, enforce immigration laws
    A Lake Bluff letter to the editor: As President Obama considers sidestepping Congress to loosen U.S. immigration policy by giving work permits to up to 5 million undocumented immigrants, a Reuters poll shows that 70 percent of Americans are deeply worried illegal immigration is threatening this nation’s culture and economy.

  •  

    Community-based hives would protect the honeybee
    A Mount Prospect letter to the editor: The constant articles about extinction of species, pollutants and climate change are unnerving. One noteworthy problem that can affect the world food supply is the plight of a tiny insect the size of a fingernail — the honey bee, which pollinates a high percentage of our food. The results of this pending extinction would be grim and serious. Pesticides are to blame and so I ask, why are such killers permitted?

  •  

    March to raise awareness of climate change
    A Palatine letter to the editor: Climate change is real, and it’s happening now. The good news is that solutions exist. But we must act decisively, and soon.

  •  

    Vegan diet will preserve our clean water
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: Animal agriculture dumps more pollution into our waterways than all other human activities combined. Principal pollutants are animal manure, fertilizers, as well as soil particles, organic debris, and pesticides from feed cropland. Manure and fertilizers promote growth of toxic algae that poison drinking water supplies. Organic matter feeds microorganisms that deplete oxygen and kill fish.

  •  

    American Legion baseball rules need overhaul
    Letter to the editor: Dennis Drolet, a American Legion baseball head coach, argues that until the eligibility rules for senior Legion baseball are changed, "American Legion Baseball will never again thrive, let alone survive."

  •  

    Bumps, ruts and potholes, oh my
    Letter to the editor: James Cole of Mount Prospect is begging someboyd to fix the bumps and ruts and potholes on Central Road from about Fernandez to the entrance to the Wellness Center of Northwest Community Hospital.

  •  

    Streamwood ‘harassing’ her over her yard
    Letter to the ediitor: A Streamwood writer compalins that a village code officer is harassing her over weeds in her yard, that she says are flowers.

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